Colon Cancer News and Research RSS Feed - Colon Cancer News and Research

Every year, about one million new cases of colon cancer are diagnosed worldwide. About 150,000 new cases are detected each year in the United States. Over a lifetime, about 1 in 19 people develop colon cancer and nearly 50,000 people are expected to die from it in the U.S. this year. According to the American Cancer Society, colon cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related death in the U.S., accounting for about 10 percent of all cancer deaths.
Experimental drug ozanimod moderately effective in treatment of ulcerative colitis

Experimental drug ozanimod moderately effective in treatment of ulcerative colitis

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have shown that ozanimod (RPC1063), a novel drug molecule, is moderately effective in the treatment of ulcerative colitis. Results of the Phase II clinical trial will appear in the May 5 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Certain sugars in the body play key role in colitis, colon cancer development

Certain sugars in the body play key role in colitis, colon cancer development

An Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation scientist has discovered that certain sugars produced by the body play an important role in the development of colitis and, ultimately, colon cancer. The new finding could potentially lead to therapies for ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease and colon cancer. [More]
Researchers develop computer model to reveal how antibiotic-resistant microbes develop and spread

Researchers develop computer model to reveal how antibiotic-resistant microbes develop and spread

Researchers from the Scientific Research Institute of Physical-Chemical Medicine, MIPT, the company M&S Decisions and the research department of Yandex have built a computer model of the interaction between different bacteria, and between bacteria and the gut wall. [More]
NEI-funded study analyzes outcomes of anti-VEGF therapy for AMD

NEI-funded study analyzes outcomes of anti-VEGF therapy for AMD

In a study of nearly 650 people with the eye disease age-related macular degeneration (AMD), half still had vision 20/40 or better, typically good enough to drive or to read standard print, after five years of treatment with anti-VEGF drugs that are injected into the eye. The authors of the study, funded by the National Eye Institute (NEI) at the National Institutes of Health, say those outcomes would have been unimaginable about 10 years ago, prior to the drugs' availability. [More]
Cholesterol-lowering drugs may not reduce colorectal cancer risk

Cholesterol-lowering drugs may not reduce colorectal cancer risk

Long-term use of the cholesterol-lowering drugs known as statins does not appear to decrease a patient's risk of colorectal cancer, suggests a new, large case-control study from Penn Medicine researchers published this week in PLOS Medicine. [More]
Low levels of vitamin D, methylation in black teens may increase cancer risk

Low levels of vitamin D, methylation in black teens may increase cancer risk

Low levels of vitamin D in black teens correlates with low activity of a major mechanism for controlling gene expression that may increase their risk of cancer and other disease, researchers report. [More]
New therapy strategy for liver disease shows initial measureable success with norUrso

New therapy strategy for liver disease shows initial measureable success with norUrso

The new therapy strategy for primary sclerosing cholangitis, a liver disease that at present still cannot be cured with medication, shows initial measureable success with the nor-ursodeoxycholic acid (norUrso). [More]
Flat adenomas may warrant keeping closer eye on patients at risk for colorectal cancer

Flat adenomas may warrant keeping closer eye on patients at risk for colorectal cancer

Being on the lookout for certain features of polyps may help physicians keep a closer eye on patients at risk for colorectal cancer. [More]
Moffitt study reports that liver metastases have different sensitivities to radiation therapy

Moffitt study reports that liver metastases have different sensitivities to radiation therapy

Radiation is a commonly used therapeutic option to treat liver metastases, with the majority of tumors maintained under control after one year. However, some patients do not respond as well to radiation treatment, and the factors that predict patient outcomes are unclear. Moffitt Cancer Center researchers report that liver metastases have different sensitivities to radiation therapy based on the location of the primary tumor. [More]
Umea University researchers find link between levels of DNA building blocks and colon cancer

Umea University researchers find link between levels of DNA building blocks and colon cancer

When cells divide, the proper balance between the four DNA building blocks is required in order for the DNA to be copied without the introduction of potentially harmful mutations. Researchers at Umea University in Sweden have now shown a connection between levels of DNA building blocks - dNTPs - and colon cancer. This discovery has been published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. [More]
Surgeon to perform live-streamed Virtual Reality surgery on colon cancer patient using Mativision technology

Surgeon to perform live-streamed Virtual Reality surgery on colon cancer patient using Mativision technology

An operation on a patient with colon cancer at The Royal London Hospital will be the first in the world to be broadcast live through pioneering virtual reality (VR) technology. [More]
Researchers link higher levels of vitamin D to reduced cancer risk

Researchers link higher levels of vitamin D to reduced cancer risk

Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that higher levels of vitamin D - specifically serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D - are associated with a correspondingly reduced risk of cancer. The findings are published in the April 6, online issue of PLOS ONE. [More]
New CWRU study identifies three glycosyltransferases as major mutational targets in colorectal cancer

New CWRU study identifies three glycosyltransferases as major mutational targets in colorectal cancer

Little is known about the molecular basis of aberrant protein glycosylation, a complex enzymatic process that is a hallmark of many human cancers including colorectal cancers (CRC), and how it may contribute to tumor progression. In a new study published in Scientific Reports, an online journal of the Nature Publishing Group, scientists at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have successfully characterized the mutational landscapes of glycosylation-associated genes in colon cancer, identifying three glycosyltransferases as significant mutational targets in CRC. [More]
USC study finds coffee consumption decreases colorectal cancer risk

USC study finds coffee consumption decreases colorectal cancer risk

Whether you like your coffee black, decaf, half-caff or even instant, feel free to drink up. Researchers at the University of Southern California (USC) Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center of Keck Medicine of USC have found that coffee consumption decreases the risk of colorectal cancer. [More]
Study finds that married men over age 55 more likely to get colonoscopy

Study finds that married men over age 55 more likely to get colonoscopy

A national study involving 804 couples found that married men over age 55 were almost 20 percent more likely to have had a screening colonoscopy in the previous five years than men who were not married. Men married to women who are happier with the marital relationship were nearly 30 percent more likely. That rises to more than 40 percent if their wives were highly educated. [More]
Researchers develop metastasis-on-a-chip system to advance cancer investigation, drug discovery

Researchers develop metastasis-on-a-chip system to advance cancer investigation, drug discovery

Advances in personalized medicine allow doctors to select the most promising drugs for certain types of malignant tumors. [More]
Prognostic test could help lower cancer recurrence for colorectal patients

Prognostic test could help lower cancer recurrence for colorectal patients

Colorectal cancer, one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in the United States, is not a commonly discussed disease. Often symptomless in early stages, the cancer is more difficult to treat as it progresses, requiring chemotherapy in later stages. Researchers at the University of Notre Dame are working on a way to identify patients who would benefit from chemotherapy before the cancer progresses. [More]
Researchers uncover antitumoral nature of maslinic acid in colon cancer cells

Researchers uncover antitumoral nature of maslinic acid in colon cancer cells

Researchers from the University of Granada, in collaboration with the universities of Barcelona and Jaen, have brought to light the antitumoral nature of maslinic acid (a compound derived from olives) in Caco-2 p53-deficient colon adenocarcinoma cells in the short term. [More]
NLRX1 protein could be new biomarker for colorectal cancer, find UNC Lineberger researchers

NLRX1 protein could be new biomarker for colorectal cancer, find UNC Lineberger researchers

UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers have discovered that a deficiency in a key protein that regulates immune system warning signals could be a new biomarker for colorectal cancer, the second largest cancer killer in the United States. They believe the marker could be used to gauge response to a potential new treatment for the disease. [More]
High-fat diet may make intestinal stem cells to become cancerous

High-fat diet may make intestinal stem cells to become cancerous

Over the past decade, studies have found that obesity and eating a high-fat, high-calorie diet are significant risk factors for many types of cancer. Now, a new study from Whitehead Institute and MIT's Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research reveals how a high-fat diet makes the cells of the intestinal lining more likely to become cancerous. [More]
Advertisement