Colon Cancer News and Research RSS Feed - Colon Cancer News and Research

Every year, about one million new cases of colon cancer are diagnosed worldwide. About 150,000 new cases are detected each year in the United States. Over a lifetime, about 1 in 19 people develop colon cancer and nearly 50,000 people are expected to die from it in the U.S. this year. According to the American Cancer Society, colon cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related death in the U.S., accounting for about 10 percent of all cancer deaths.
Oral cavity bacterium linked to development and progression of esophageal cancer

Oral cavity bacterium linked to development and progression of esophageal cancer

A type of bacterium usually found in the human mouth, Fusobacterium nucleatum, has been found to be related to the prognosis of esophageal cancer in Japanese patients by researchers from Kumamoto University, Japan. [More]
Researchers discover biological pathway that plays vital role in tumor development

Researchers discover biological pathway that plays vital role in tumor development

An international team led by researchers from the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology's Rappaport Faculty of Medicine and the Technion Integrated Cancer Center has discovered a biological pathway that plays an important role in tumor development. [More]
Study shows involvement of lipid metabolism in tumour metastasis

Study shows involvement of lipid metabolism in tumour metastasis

A study headed by Salvador Aznar Benitah, ICREA researcher at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine, and published today in Nature identifies metastasis-initiating cells through a specific marker, namely the protein CD36. [More]
Study shows heart medications prevent cardiovascular damage during breast cancer treatment

Study shows heart medications prevent cardiovascular damage during breast cancer treatment

Heart medication taken in combination with chemotherapy reduces the risk of serious cardiovascular damage in patients with early-stage breast cancer, according to results from a new landmark clinical trial. [More]
Early life history and genetics may play crucial role in shaping gut microbiome

Early life history and genetics may play crucial role in shaping gut microbiome

Genetics and birthplace have a big effect on the make-up of the microbial community in the gut, according to research published Nov. 28. in the journal Nature Microbiology. [More]
Asian Americans at risk for type 2 diabetes less likely to undergo recommended screening, study finds

Asian Americans at risk for type 2 diabetes less likely to undergo recommended screening, study finds

Less than half of Asian Americans who ought to be screened for type 2 diabetes actually get tested, according to a study published Nov. 15, 2016, in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. [More]
Virginia Tech and CytImmune Sciences develop more effective and less toxic cancer treatment

Virginia Tech and CytImmune Sciences develop more effective and less toxic cancer treatment

Virginia Tech scientists have developed a new cancer drug that uses gold nanoparticles created by the biotech firm CytImmune Sciences to deliver paclitaxel — a commonly used chemotherapy drug directly to a tumor. [More]
Exposure to licorice compound disrupts steroid sex hormone production in ovary

Exposure to licorice compound disrupts steroid sex hormone production in ovary

A study of mouse reproductive tissues finds that exposure to isoliquiritigenin, a compound found in licorice, disrupts steroid sex hormone production in the ovary, researchers report. [More]
New research explains how tumors may impair ability of the liver to respond to caloric deprivation

New research explains how tumors may impair ability of the liver to respond to caloric deprivation

One of the worst cruelties of lethal cancer is the phenomenon called wasting, or in medical terms, cachexia (pronounced ka-CHEX-ia), in which a patient seems literally to diminish in bodily terms as the cancer ravages one or more internal organs. [More]
Scientists identify new way to block action of genetic mutations found in most cancers

Scientists identify new way to block action of genetic mutations found in most cancers

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have identified a new way to block the action of genetic mutations found in nearly 30 percent of all cancers. [More]
Researchers create new culture model of human intestine to study inflammatory bowel disease

Researchers create new culture model of human intestine to study inflammatory bowel disease

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a complex condition that requires a lifetime of care and increases a person's cancer risk. [More]
Penn study reveals new sights into how some intestinal cells can withstand chemotherapy and radiation

Penn study reveals new sights into how some intestinal cells can withstand chemotherapy and radiation

When treating cancer with chemotherapy and radiation, decisions about dose must walk a fine line between attacking cancerous cells and preserving healthy ones. [More]
WSU researchers identify potential new diagnostic tool for early detection of colorectal cancer

WSU researchers identify potential new diagnostic tool for early detection of colorectal cancer

Scientists at Washington State University and Johns Hopkins Medical School have discovered a fast, noninvasive method that could lead to the early diagnosis of colorectal cancer. [More]
Research finds rise in number of Americans who undergo procedures involving anesthesia outside of O.R.

Research finds rise in number of Americans who undergo procedures involving anesthesia outside of O.R.

More than one-third of Americans who undergo procedures involving anesthesia now have them outside of the operating room (O.R.), an increase of 27 percent in five years, according to an analysis of a large registry being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY 2016 annual meeting. [More]
Sanford opens new immunotherapy study on colorectal cancer

Sanford opens new immunotherapy study on colorectal cancer

Sanford Health has opened another clinical trial exploring the power of the body's immune system to fight cancer. [More]
Targeting TASINs can be viable approach for preventing colon cancer, research reveals

Targeting TASINs can be viable approach for preventing colon cancer, research reveals

A small molecule called TASIN-1 can selectively kill cells with a mutation that is considered to be a precursor to colon cancer, while sparing related normal cells, UT Southwestern Medical Center cancer biologists have demonstrated. [More]
Researchers find new path to stop metastatic growth of cancer

Researchers find new path to stop metastatic growth of cancer

Investigators from the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, and the Institute of Cancer Research, London, have discovered that some cancer cells can draw blood from existing mature blood vessels allowing them to continue to spread. [More]
BUSM scientists discover new strategy to treat colon cancers driven by mutant KRAS genes

BUSM scientists discover new strategy to treat colon cancers driven by mutant KRAS genes

Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine have discovered a possible strategy to treat colon cancers that are caused by the mutant KRAS gene, which is responsible for approximately half of all colon cancer cases. [More]
Red flag symptoms missed in bowel cancer emergency patients, study finds

Red flag symptoms missed in bowel cancer emergency patients, study finds

AROUND one in five bowel cancer patients diagnosed after an emergency presentation have displayed at least one cancer ‘alarm symptom’ in the year leading up to their diagnosis, according to a Cancer Research UK-funded study published in the British Journal of Cancer today (Wednesday). [More]
SRS reduces likelihood of local recurrence of brain metastases in cancer patients

SRS reduces likelihood of local recurrence of brain metastases in cancer patients

Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for cancer patients who receive the treatment for brain metastases decreases the likelihood of local recurrence but shows no positive difference in terms of overall survival (OS) or distant brain metastases (DBMs) rates, when compared to observation alone following surgical resection of brain metastases, according to research presented today at the 58th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology. [More]
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