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Every year, about one million new cases of colon cancer are diagnosed worldwide. About 150,000 new cases are detected each year in the United States. Over a lifetime, about 1 in 19 people develop colon cancer and nearly 50,000 people are expected to die from it in the U.S. this year. According to the American Cancer Society, colon cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related death in the U.S., accounting for about 10 percent of all cancer deaths.
Study finds striking gap in cancer survival between countries and regions

Study finds striking gap in cancer survival between countries and regions

The CONCORD-2 study, published in The Lancet, reports 5-year survival estimates for 25ยท7 million cancer patients diagnosed with one of 10 common cancers and 75 000 children diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia between 1995 and 2009, using individual patient data from 279 cancer registries in 67 countries. [More]
3SBio enters into exclusive license agreement with PharmAbcine for Tanibirumab

3SBio enters into exclusive license agreement with PharmAbcine for Tanibirumab

3SBio Inc., a leading China-based biotechnology company focused on researching, developing, manufacturing and marketing biopharmaceutical products, today announced it has entered into an exclusive license with PharmAbcine, Inc. for the development, manufacturing and marketing of Tanibirumab, an anti-VEGFR2/KDR antibody for cancer in the territory of Greater China (including Mainland China, Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) and several emerging countries, including Thailand, Brazil and Russia. [More]
UNC researchers develop new approach to block KRAS oncogene

UNC researchers develop new approach to block KRAS oncogene

Researchers from the UNC School of Medicine and colleagues at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have developed a new approach to block the KRAS oncogene, one of the most frequently mutated genes in human cancer. [More]
High-absorption BCM-95 Curcumin can reduce spread of cancer cells

High-absorption BCM-95 Curcumin can reduce spread of cancer cells

A recently published cellular study on colorectal cancer showed that high-absorption BCM-95 Curcumin is able to reduce the spread of cancer cells and potentially increase the effectiveness of chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced colon cancer. [More]
Should we be screening for colorectal cancer earlier?

Should we be screening for colorectal cancer earlier?

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer in men and women. Last year it was estimated that there had been around 143,000 new cases of CRC and 51,000 deaths due to CRC in the United States. The introduction of bowel screening for the over 50s has seen annual decreases in the overall incidence of CRC since 1998, giving cause for optimism. [More]
Health benefits of modified formulation of curcumin supplements

Health benefits of modified formulation of curcumin supplements

The health benefits of over-the-counter curcumin supplements might not get past your gut, but new research shows that a modified formulation of the spice releases its anti-inflammatory goodness throughout the body. [More]
Incidence of colon and rectal cancer expected to increase by 2030 among young patients

Incidence of colon and rectal cancer expected to increase by 2030 among young patients

In the next 15 years, more than one in 10 colon cancers and nearly one in four rectal cancers will be diagnosed in patients younger than the traditional screening age, according to researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. [More]
NSAIDs protect against colorectal cancer by inducing cell suicide pathways in intestinal stem cells

NSAIDs protect against colorectal cancer by inducing cell suicide pathways in intestinal stem cells

Aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) protect against the development of colorectal cancer by inducing cell suicide pathways in intestinal stem cells that carry a certain mutated and dysfunctional gene, according to a new study led by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute and the School of Medicine. [More]
Changes in cell metabolism slow growth of colorectal cancer

Changes in cell metabolism slow growth of colorectal cancer

Cancer is an unwanted experiment in progress. As the disease advances, tumor cells accumulate mutations, eventually arriving at ones that give them the insidious power to grow uncontrollably and spread. Distinguishing drivers of cancer from benign mutations open opportunities for developing targeted cancer therapies. [More]
EndoChoice study supports Fuse Full Spectrum Endoscopy System

EndoChoice study supports Fuse Full Spectrum Endoscopy System

EndoChoice announced the release of study data supporting the efficacy of the Fuse Full Spectrum Endoscopy System. These studies were presented simultaneously by leading gastroenterologists at the American College of Gastroenterology Annual Scientific Session in Philadelphia, PA, and the United European Gastroenterology Week in Vienna, Austria. [More]
RNF43 mutation may serve as biomarker that identifies colorectal, endometrial cancer patients

RNF43 mutation may serve as biomarker that identifies colorectal, endometrial cancer patients

Scientists say they have identified in about 20 percent of colorectal and endometrial cancers a genetic mutation that had been overlooked in recent large, comprehensive gene searches. With this discovery, the altered gene, called RNF43, now ranks as one of the most common mutations in the two cancer types. [More]
New oral biologic medication successfully treats precancerous intestinal inflammation

New oral biologic medication successfully treats precancerous intestinal inflammation

An oral biologic medication has successfully treated chronic, precancerous inflammation in the intestine, according to results of an animal study authored by an MD/PhD student in the University at Buffalo School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. [More]
Scientists combine new type of nanoparticle with photodynamic therapy to kill cancer cells

Scientists combine new type of nanoparticle with photodynamic therapy to kill cancer cells

An international group of scientists led by Gang Han, PhD, at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, has combined a new type of nanoparticle with an FDA-approved photodynamic therapy to effectively kill deep-set cancer cells in vivo with minimal damage to surrounding tissue and fewer side effects than chemotherapy. This promising new treatment strategy could expand the current use of photodynamic therapies to access deep-set cancer tumors. [More]
Hormone loss may cause colon cancer, say Thomas Jefferson University researchers

Hormone loss may cause colon cancer, say Thomas Jefferson University researchers

Some cancers, like breast and prostate cancer, are driven by hormones such as estrogen and testosterone, but to date, there are none that are driven by the lack of a hormone. New evidence suggests that human colon cells may become cancerous when they lose the ability to produce a hormone that helps the cells maintain normal biology. If verified by further studies, it suggests that treating patients at high risk for colon cancer by replacing the hormone guanylin could prevent the development of cancer. [More]
NCCN publishes 20th annual editions of NCCN Guidelines for Colon and Rectal Cancers

NCCN publishes 20th annual editions of NCCN Guidelines for Colon and Rectal Cancers

The National Comprehensive Cancer Network has published the 20th annual editions of the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Colon and Rectal Cancers, two of the eight original NCCN Guidelines published in November 1996. [More]
VolitionRx announces additional colorectal cancer data at International Conference of Anticancer Research

VolitionRx announces additional colorectal cancer data at International Conference of Anticancer Research

VolitionRx Limited, a life sciences company focused on developing blood-based diagnostic tests, today announced that further data analysis from its colorectal cancer study was presented today at the 9th International Conference of Anticancer Research, being held October 6-10, 2014 in Sithonia, Greece. [More]

Researchers generate fruit fly model, unveil key genetic factors behind human colon cancer

Researchers at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) have managed to generate a fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) model that reproduces human colon cancer. With two publications appearing in PLoS One and EMBO Reports, the IRB team also unveil the function of a key gene in the development of the disease. [More]
Magnesium essential to the activity of vitamin D

Magnesium essential to the activity of vitamin D

Extensive research has shown that vitamin D deficiencies play a major role in the development of dozens of diseases, including breast, prostate and colon cancer, as well as diabetes, heart disease, arthritis, osteoporosis, psoriasis and mental illness. [More]
Case Western Reserve researcher lands Director's New Innovator Awards from NIH

Case Western Reserve researcher lands Director's New Innovator Awards from NIH

For the second consecutive year, a Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine researcher has landed one of the year's much-coveted Director's New Innovator Awards from the National Institutes of Health. Principal investigator Rong Xu, PhD, assistant professor of medical informatics, will receive $2,377,000 for five years, starting immediately, to initiate computational analysis of thousands of drugs and their effects. [More]
Lung cancer can be detected much earlier using lab-on-a-chip technology

Lung cancer can be detected much earlier using lab-on-a-chip technology

Scientists have been laboring to detect cancer and a host of other diseases in people using promising new biomarkers called "exosomes." Indeed, Popular Science magazine named exosome-based cancer diagnostics one of the 20 breakthroughs that will shape the world this year. Exosomes could lead to less invasive, earlier detection of cancer, and sharply boost patients' odds of survival. [More]