Colon Cancer News and Research RSS Feed - Colon Cancer News and Research

Every year, about one million new cases of colon cancer are diagnosed worldwide. About 150,000 new cases are detected each year in the United States. Over a lifetime, about 1 in 19 people develop colon cancer and nearly 50,000 people are expected to die from it in the U.S. this year. According to the American Cancer Society, colon cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related death in the U.S., accounting for about 10 percent of all cancer deaths.
NYU Langone reminds people about importance of screening and preventing colorectal cancer

NYU Langone reminds people about importance of screening and preventing colorectal cancer

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States. However, according to Mark Pochapin, MD, the Sholtz/Leeds professor of Gastroenterology and director of the Division of Gastroenterology at NYU Langone Medical Center : "With early screening and prevention, this is one cancer that is highly curable and often preventable." [More]
Loyola physician reveals top five health concerns for men, offers tips to prevent them

Loyola physician reveals top five health concerns for men, offers tips to prevent them

Men lead women in the likelihood to die from nearly all the most common causes of death. Still, men are less likely to go to the doctor than women and often try to ignore symptoms of health problems. [More]
New four-way collaboration aims to improve clinical decision-making in the treatment of colon cancer

New four-way collaboration aims to improve clinical decision-making in the treatment of colon cancer

EKF Diagnostics subsidiary, Selah Genomics, has announced a major, four-way collaboration with Greenville Health System (GHS, South Carolina), DecisionQ Corporation (Virginia), and BD (Becton Dickinson and Company, New Jersey). [More]
MD Anderson awarded more than $22 million in research grants from CPRIT

MD Anderson awarded more than $22 million in research grants from CPRIT

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center has received more than $22 million in research grants this week from the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas. Approximately half of the funds awarded for Individual Investigator Research Awards went to MD Anderson faculty as well as 40 percent of total IIRA awards that include those for children's and adolescent cancer and early detection and prevention. [More]
Evolution of two protein kinases may hold key to unlocking highly specific cancer drugs

Evolution of two protein kinases may hold key to unlocking highly specific cancer drugs

This is the story of Abl and Src -- two nearly identical protein kinases whose evolution may hold the key to unlocking new, highly specific cancer drugs. [More]
Study provides new insights into early events that shape cancer

Study provides new insights into early events that shape cancer

A study led by researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital suggests a new way to trace cancer back to its cell type of origin. By leveraging the epigenome maps produced by the Roadmap Epigenomics Program - a resource of data collected from over 100 cell types - the research team found that the unique genetic landscape of a particular tumor could be used to predict that tumor's cell type of origin. [More]
Oral pathogen protects different tumor cells from being killed by immune cells

Oral pathogen protects different tumor cells from being killed by immune cells

Bacteria that are commonly found in the mouth are often abundant in patients with colon cancer, but the potential role these microbes play in tumor development has not been clear. A study published by Cell Press February 18th in the journal Immunity reveals that the oral pathogen Fusobacterium nucleatum protects a variety of tumor cells from being killed by immune cells. [More]
Scientists potentially discover new therapeutic targets to halt progression of tumor cells

Scientists potentially discover new therapeutic targets to halt progression of tumor cells

Chronic inflammation is directly associated with several types of cancer, yet the reasons as to why this happens at a cellular level remain unclear. Now, an international team of scientists led by researchers at The Wistar Institute has identified a multistep process showing not only how these cancers develop but also potentially discovering new therapeutic targets that could halt the formation and progression of tumor cells. [More]
Combination therapies may overcome resistance to targeted cancer drugs

Combination therapies may overcome resistance to targeted cancer drugs

A protein called YAP, which drives the growth of organs during development and regulates their size in adulthood, plays a key role in the emergence of resistance to targeted cancer therapies, according to a new study led by UC San Francisco researchers. [More]
ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group opens clinical trial for women with newly diagnosed DCIS

ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group opens clinical trial for women with newly diagnosed DCIS

In direct response to recommendations made by a National Institutes of Health scientific consensus panel, the ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group announced today the opening of E4112, a clinical trial for women with newly diagnosed ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast who, together with their doctors, will use the results of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exam to determine whether to undergo a lumpectomy or a mastectomy. [More]
Study focuses on two natural approaches to preventing breast cancer

Study focuses on two natural approaches to preventing breast cancer

Preventing cancer requires intimate knowledge of how cancer starts, what causes it to grow and flourish, and how to stop it in its tracks. Sometimes this comes in the form of a vaccine (the HPV vaccine for cervical and head and neck cancers), a screening (a colonoscopy for colorectal cancer) or a blood test (the PSA level test for prostate cancer). [More]
Researchers are one step closer to devising an approach to identify pancreatic cancer earlier

Researchers are one step closer to devising an approach to identify pancreatic cancer earlier

Pancreatic cancer affects approximately 46,000 people each year in the United States and ranks fourth among the leading causes of cancer-related deaths. Only about 6 percent of individuals with pancreatic cancer will live five years after their diagnosis. [More]
Mathematical models of cancer behavior offer new insights on tumor growth

Mathematical models of cancer behavior offer new insights on tumor growth

Hassan Fathallah-Shaykh, M.D., Ph.D., believes that math can transform medicine, and he has the numbers to prove it. [More]
Study discovers microRNA signatures that could predict prognosis, distant metastasis in colorectal cancer

Study discovers microRNA signatures that could predict prognosis, distant metastasis in colorectal cancer

A new study developed at the Center for Gastrointestinal Cancer Research and the Center for Epigenetics, Cancer Prevention and Cancer Genomics at Baylor Research Institute has discovered unique metastasis-specific microRNA signatures in primary colorectal cancers that could predict prognosis and distant metastasis in colorectal cancer. [More]

Study examines fear influenced colorectal cancer screening decisions in UK adults

People who worry about cancer are more likely to want to get screened for colon cancer, but feeling uncomfortable at the thought of cancer makes them less likely to actually go for the test, finds new UCL-led research. [More]
HCI researchers find cell mechanism that may trigger pancreatic cancer

HCI researchers find cell mechanism that may trigger pancreatic cancer

Researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah have found that defects in how cells are squeezed out of overcrowded tissue to die, a process called extrusion, may be a mechanism by which pancreatic cancer begins. From these findings, they may have identified an effective way to reverse the defective extrusion's effects without destroying normal tissues nearby. [More]
Study finds that African-American people with colon cancer have lower survival rates

Study finds that African-American people with colon cancer have lower survival rates

African-American people diagnosed with colon cancer have consistently lower survival rates compared with white patients, despite a nationwide decline in colon cancer deaths overall. [More]
PKC enzymes categorized as cancer promoters are actually tumor suppressors

PKC enzymes categorized as cancer promoters are actually tumor suppressors

Upending decades-old dogma, a team of scientists at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine say enzymes long categorized as promoting cancer are, in fact, tumor suppressors and that current clinical efforts to develop inhibitor-based drugs should instead focus on restoring the enzymes' activities. [More]
Study finds increase in overall survival in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

Study finds increase in overall survival in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

With the dawn of the modern era of new chemotherapeutic and biologic agents available for managing their disease, patients with metastatic colorectal cancer are undergoing less surgery for the removal of their primary tumors, according to research from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. [More]
High vitamin D levels boost survival for metastatic colorectal cancer patients

High vitamin D levels boost survival for metastatic colorectal cancer patients

According to a new study led by researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, clinical trial patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who had high levels of vitamin D in their bloodstream prior to treatment with chemotherapy and targeted drugs, survived longer, on average, than patients with lower levels of the vitamin. [More]