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Every year, about one million new cases of colon cancer are diagnosed worldwide. About 150,000 new cases are detected each year in the United States. Over a lifetime, about 1 in 19 people develop colon cancer and nearly 50,000 people are expected to die from it in the U.S. this year. According to the American Cancer Society, colon cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related death in the U.S., accounting for about 10 percent of all cancer deaths.
Researchers provide new clues, mechanisms to understand functions of 'rebel' DNA in cancer

Researchers provide new clues, mechanisms to understand functions of 'rebel' DNA in cancer

Genes usually always be expressed as in Western writing: from left to right on the white canvas of our DNA. So when we speak of the activity of our genome, in fact we are referring to the expression of genes in this sense of the double-stranded DNA. [More]
Allele-specific lncRNA regulates cancer metabolism

Allele-specific lncRNA regulates cancer metabolism

Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA) are unusual in that they don't encode proteins like normal RNA. Yet they do play a role in regulating cellular functions and interest cancer researchers. [More]
MGH researchers find probable mechanism associated with risk of developing serious diseases

MGH researchers find probable mechanism associated with risk of developing serious diseases

Massachusetts General Hospital investigators have found the probable mechanism underlying a previously described biomarker associated with the risk of developing serious diseases ranging from cancer to cardiovascular disease and the risk of serious complications. In a paper published in the American Journal of Hematology, the research team reports finding that higher levels of a measure routinely taken as part of the complete blood count - the extent of variation in the size of red blood cells - is caused by reduced clearance of aging cells from the bloodstream. [More]
Aspirin use continues to surge among older adults in US

Aspirin use continues to surge among older adults in US

A national survey suggests that slightly more than half of the older adults in the United States are now taking a daily dose of aspirin, even though its use is not recommended by the Food and Drug Administration for most people who have not yet had a heart attack or stroke. [More]
Two UC Davis researchers awarded grant to help improve surveillance for patients with small lung nodules

Two UC Davis researchers awarded grant to help improve surveillance for patients with small lung nodules

Two UC Davis researchers will help run a major national study to improve surveillance practices for patients with small lung nodules identified on CT imaging and extremely low risk for lung cancer. [More]
New, cross-sector collaboration aims to discover clinical biomarker for pancreatic cancer

New, cross-sector collaboration aims to discover clinical biomarker for pancreatic cancer

The search to discover and validate the first-ever clinical biomarker to diagnose and treat pancreatic cancer is at the foundation of a new, cross-sector collaboration. Berg, a biopharmaceutical company committed to uncovering health solutions through a data-driven, biological research approach; the Cancer Center at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, a Harvard Medical School teaching hospital, and the Pancreatic Cancer Research Team managed by Cancer Research And Biostatistics announced today they will work together to eradicate the disease. [More]
MabVax closes $11.6 million in private placement

MabVax closes $11.6 million in private placement

MabVax Therapeutics Holdings, Inc., a clinical-stage cancer immunotherapy company, is pleased to announce that it has closed on gross proceeds of approximately $11.6 million in a private placement (the "Private Placement") led by OPKO Health, Inc. and Dr. Phillip Frost, CEO and Chairman of OPKO Health. [More]
UC Davis researchers unravel how micro RNA could potentially lead to novel cancer therapies

UC Davis researchers unravel how micro RNA could potentially lead to novel cancer therapies

The micro RNA miR-22 has long been known for its ability to suppress cancer. However, questions remain about how it achieves this feat. For example, which molecules are regulating miR-22, and which are miR22 targets? [More]
Leukemia drug could prevent and control growth of colorectal tumours

Leukemia drug could prevent and control growth of colorectal tumours

Scientists from Nanyang Technological University (NTU Singapore) and Sweden's Karolinska Institutet, one of Europe's largest and most prestigious medical universities, have discovered that an existing chemotherapy drug used to treat leukaemia could prevent and control the growth of colorectal tumours. [More]
American Cancer Society awards 100 national research and training grants for cancer studies

American Cancer Society awards 100 national research and training grants for cancer studies

The American Cancer Society, the largest non-government, not-for-profit funding source of cancer research in the United States, has awarded 100 national research and training grants totaling more than $45.6 million in the first of two grant cycles for 2015. [More]
New study finds that walnuts have potential to benefit overall health

New study finds that walnuts have potential to benefit overall health

Multiple new research abstracts suggest walnuts may have the potential to positively affect several important health factors. From their impact on colon cancer and certain aspects of cognitive aging, to their positive effect on both gut health and vascular health, the research findings presented at Experimental Biology 2015 detail our latest understanding of walnuts' inner workings. [More]
Drug-resistant E. coli outbreak linked to contaminated endoscopes in Washington state hospital

Drug-resistant E. coli outbreak linked to contaminated endoscopes in Washington state hospital

An outbreak of a novel Escherichia coli (E. coli) strain resistant to antibiotics has been linked to contaminated endoscopes in a Washington state hospital. The study indicates that industry standard cleaning guidelines, which were exceeded by hospital staff, may not be sufficient for sterilizing endoscopes adequately. [More]
DNA samples collected from tampons may help detect endometrial cancer

DNA samples collected from tampons may help detect endometrial cancer

Researchers at Mayo Clinic have shown that it is possible to detect endometrial cancer using tumor DNA picked up by ordinary tampons. The new approach specifically examines DNA samples from vaginal secretions for the presence of chemical "off" switches — known as methylation — that can disable genes that normally keep cancer in check. [More]
Vitamin D3 and metformin show promising results in preventing colorectal cancer

Vitamin D3 and metformin show promising results in preventing colorectal cancer

The concept was simple: If two compounds each individually show promise in preventing colon cancer, surely it's worth trying the two together to see if even greater impact is possible. [More]
How our DNA may prevent bowel cancer

How our DNA may prevent bowel cancer

The link between taking aspirin, and similar medications called non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (or NSAIDS), and bowel (colorectal) cancer prevention is well established. [More]
New strategies to improve screening rates for colorectal cancer in low-income populations

New strategies to improve screening rates for colorectal cancer in low-income populations

Since the colonoscopy was developed more than four decades ago, the screening procedure for colorectal cancer has undoubtedly saved millions of lives. [More]
New pre-clinical, clinical data for IMBRUVICA to be highlighted at AACR Annual Meeting

New pre-clinical, clinical data for IMBRUVICA to be highlighted at AACR Annual Meeting

Pharmacyclics, Inc. today announced that new pre-clinical and clinical data for ibrutinib (IMBRUVICA) will be highlighted at the 2015 American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting to be held April 18 – 22, 2015, in Philadelphia, PA. [More]
Genetic markers may help decide who benefits from aspirin, NSAIDs in lowering risk of colorectal cancer

Genetic markers may help decide who benefits from aspirin, NSAIDs in lowering risk of colorectal cancer

An Indiana University cancer researcher and her colleagues have identified genetic markers that may help determine who benefits from regular use of aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for lowering one's risk of developing colorectal cancer. [More]
Loyola's Neil Gupta recommends patients to ask four questions when planning a colonoscopy

Loyola's Neil Gupta recommends patients to ask four questions when planning a colonoscopy

"Most people focus on the dislike of the preparation, the need to arrange transportation and the fear of being anesthetized during the procedure and then potentially getting a cancer diagnosis," says Neil Gupta, MD, MPH, Director of Endoscopy at Loyola University Health System. "Screening colonoscopy is a very critical examination that really can determine life and death when it comes to colon cancer. It is now clear that not every colonoscopy is equal. Once you've decided it's time to get a screening colonoscopy, the next step is to make sure that you get a high-quality one." [More]
Penn researchers find evidence of new culprit in colon cancer

Penn researchers find evidence of new culprit in colon cancer

Colon cancer is a heavily studied disease -- and for good reason. It is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide, and its numbers are on the rise, from 500,00 deaths in 1990 to 700,000 in 2010. [More]
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