Colon Cancer News and Research RSS Feed - Colon Cancer News and Research

Every year, about one million new cases of colon cancer are diagnosed worldwide. About 150,000 new cases are detected each year in the United States. Over a lifetime, about 1 in 19 people develop colon cancer and nearly 50,000 people are expected to die from it in the U.S. this year. According to the American Cancer Society, colon cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related death in the U.S., accounting for about 10 percent of all cancer deaths.
Free e-book provides advice for lowering breast cancer risk at every stage of life

Free e-book provides advice for lowering breast cancer risk at every stage of life

Surprisingly, preventing breast cancer can begin as early as age 2. Eating right, being physically active and keeping weight in check - even at a young age - can substantially lower breast cancer risk. [More]
MACC1 gene can help predict better treatment options for patients with Klatskin carcinoma

MACC1 gene can help predict better treatment options for patients with Klatskin carcinoma

Bile duct cancer is rare and is usually detected too late. Often only extensive liver surgery can help or, in rare cases, liver transplantation. But which patients will benefit from surgery and which will not, because their risk of cancer recurrence is too high? With the oncogene MACC1 as a biomarker, physicians for the first time have a tool to decide which treatment option is best for patients with Klatskin carcinoma, one type of bile duct cancer. [More]
Bionomics submission of BNC101 IND for cancer treatment passes FDA review

Bionomics submission of BNC101 IND for cancer treatment passes FDA review

Bionomics Limited, a biopharmaceutical company focused on the discovery and development of innovative therapeutics for the treatment of diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) and cancer, today announced that its BNC101 IND submission has passed review by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). [More]
Researchers identify druggable target to potentially root out colon cancer, end relapse

Researchers identify druggable target to potentially root out colon cancer, end relapse

Researchers targeting colorectal cancer stem cells - the root cause of disease, resistance to treatment and relapse - have discovered a mechanism to mimic a virus and potentially trigger an immune response to fight the cancer like an infection. [More]
Researchers uncover important cellular functions that help regulate inflammation

Researchers uncover important cellular functions that help regulate inflammation

Researchers at the Virginia Bioinformatics Institute at Virginia Tech have uncovered key cellular functions that help regulate inflammation -- a discovery that could have important implications for the treatment of allergies, heart disease, and certain forms of cancer. [More]
Researchers find way to trigger 'virus alert' that may help boost drug's ability to prevent cancer cells

Researchers find way to trigger 'virus alert' that may help boost drug's ability to prevent cancer cells

Working with human cancer cell lines and mice, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center and elsewhere have found a way to trigger a type of immune system "virus alert" that may one day boost cancer patients' response to immunotherapy drugs. An increasingly promising focus of cancer research, the drugs are designed to disarm cancer cells' ability to avoid detection and destruction by the immune system. [More]
New study describes multi-method strategy to improve detection of PMS2 gene mutations in Lynch syndrome

New study describes multi-method strategy to improve detection of PMS2 gene mutations in Lynch syndrome

About 3% of colorectal cancers are due to Lynch syndrome, an inherited cancer susceptibility syndrome that predisposes individuals to various cancers. Close blood relatives of patients with Lynch syndrome have a 50% chance of inheritance. The role that PMS2 genetic mutations play in Lynch syndrome has been underestimated in part due to technological limitations. [More]
Theresa Alenghat receives 2015 AGA-CCFA-Janssen Research Award in IBD Epigenetics Research

Theresa Alenghat receives 2015 AGA-CCFA-Janssen Research Award in IBD Epigenetics Research

The American Gastroenterological Association, in partnership with the Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America and Janssen Biotech, Inc., announced today that Theresa Alenghat, VMD, PhD, from Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, OH, was awarded with the 2015 AGA-CCFA-Janssen Research Award in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) Epigenetics Research. [More]
Purple potatoes may help prevent colon cancer

Purple potatoes may help prevent colon cancer

Compounds found in purple potatoes may help kill colon cancer stem cells and limit the spread of the cancer, according to a team of researchers. [More]
Physical inactivity poses important clinical, public health and fiscal challenges for the U.S.

Physical inactivity poses important clinical, public health and fiscal challenges for the U.S.

What do a prominent physiologist and two-time survivor of pancreatic cancer and a world-renowned researcher whose landmark discoveries on aspirin, drug therapies of proven benefit and therapeutic lifestyle changes that have saved more than 1.1 million lives have in common? They are both passionate about the importance of regular physical activity in reducing risks of dying from heart attacks and strokes, as well as developing diabetes, hypertension and colon cancer. And more importantly, enhancing mental health and fostering healthy muscles, bones and joints in all Americans from childhood to the elderly. [More]
Study reveals how inflammation triggers colon cancer cells to metastasize

Study reveals how inflammation triggers colon cancer cells to metastasize

A new Arizona State University research study led by Biodesign Institute executive director Raymond DuBois, M.D., Ph.D., has identified for the first time the details of how inflammation triggers colon cancer cells to spread to other organs, or metastasize. [More]
Researchers find way to screen blood samples to detect presence of precancerous polyps in the colon

Researchers find way to screen blood samples to detect presence of precancerous polyps in the colon

Canadian researchers have found a way to screen blood samples for molecular traces that indicate the presence of precancerous polyps in the colon, a key warning sign for colon cancer. Their results, published this week in the journal Biomedical Optics Express, from The Optical Society, may yield a cheaper and less invasive initial screening test for colon cancer that could complement colonoscopy, though further clinical trials will need to demonstrate the safety and effectiveness of the blood test before it is routinely used. [More]
Electronic triggers can help identify, reduce follow-up delays in evaluation for cancer diagnosis

Electronic triggers can help identify, reduce follow-up delays in evaluation for cancer diagnosis

Electronic triggers designed to search for key data, developed by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine and Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center, were able to identify and reduce follow-up delays for patients being evaluated for a diagnosis of colon or prostate cancer. [More]
Regen BioPharma implements gene silencing technology in killing cancer stem cells

Regen BioPharma implements gene silencing technology in killing cancer stem cells

Regen BioPharma Inc. reported today the successful implementation of its gene silencing technology, covered by patent # 8,263,571, in killing cancer stem cells. [More]
UT System Board of Regents approves new UT Southwestern Monty and Tex Moncrief Medical Center

UT System Board of Regents approves new UT Southwestern Monty and Tex Moncrief Medical Center

The University of Texas System Board of Regents has approved establishment of the UT Southwestern Monty and Tex Moncrief Medical Center at Fort Worth, made possible by an extraordinary $25 million commitment from W.A. "Tex" Moncrief Jr. The Center is UT Southwestern's first named campus outside of Dallas. [More]
Hospira announces TGA approval of Inflectra (infliximab) for treatment of eight inflammatory conditions

Hospira announces TGA approval of Inflectra (infliximab) for treatment of eight inflammatory conditions

Hospira today announced that Inflectra (infliximab), the first monoclonal antibody (mAb) biosimilar therapy, has been registered in Australia. This registration paves the way for the Federal Government to reduce the cost of some of the most expensive medicines on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS). [More]
Chances of survival due to chemotherapy significantly lower for older breast cancer patients

Chances of survival due to chemotherapy significantly lower for older breast cancer patients

Chemotherapy prolongs life for older adults with most types of cancer, but for women over the age of 80 with breast cancer, the chances of survival due to chemotherapy are significantly lower, according to a study led by researchers from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. [More]
CSN6 protein linked to poor survival among patients with colorectal cancer

CSN6 protein linked to poor survival among patients with colorectal cancer

A protein called CSN6 has been found to be correlated with poor survival among patients with colorectal cancer, according to a study at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. [More]
Penn research reveals additional pathway for origin of colon cancer

Penn research reveals additional pathway for origin of colon cancer

Cancer researchers already know of some oncogenes and other factors that promote the development of colon cancers, but they don't yet have the full picture of how these cancers originate and spread. Now researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have illuminated another powerful factor in this process. [More]
CRI commits $29.3 million in new funds to accelerate development of cancer immunotherapies

CRI commits $29.3 million in new funds to accelerate development of cancer immunotherapies

The Cancer Research Institute, a nonprofit organization dedicated to fueling the discovery and development of immunotherapies for all forms of cancer, announced that it has committed more than $29.3 million in new funds to accelerate cancer immunology research and cancer immunotherapy clinical development in the United States, Australia, Canada, France, Sweden, Switzerland, and The Netherlands. [More]
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