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Delirium is a mental state in which a person is confused, disoriented, and not able to think or remember clearly. The person may also be agitated and have hallucinations, and extreme excitement.
BIDMC investigators develop three-minute assessment that identifies delirium in older hospital patients

BIDMC investigators develop three-minute assessment that identifies delirium in older hospital patients

Delirium is a state of confusion that develops suddenly, often following an acute medical illness, a surgical procedure or a hospitalization. Although delirium is estimated to complicate hospital stays for over 2.5 million elderly individuals in the U.S. each year, this common condition often goes undetected. The end result can be serious complications with sometimes devastating consequences for vulnerable hospitalized elders. [More]
Research roundup: Malpractice reforms and doctors' practice; Medicaid expansion's effect

Research roundup: Malpractice reforms and doctors' practice; Medicaid expansion's effect

Defensive medicine is considered by many to be a major source of wasteful medical spending in the United States. [More]
Study: Nursing home care quality not associated with risk of hospital readmission or death

Study: Nursing home care quality not associated with risk of hospital readmission or death

Nursing home care quality does not impact the likelihood of patients being readmitted to the hospital or dying within 30 days of discharge from hospital to nursing home, according to a new analysis of Medicare data and nursing home performance measures by Penn Medicine researchers. [More]
Nurse-led initiatives reduce length of stay, improve patient outcomes in Philadelphia hospitals

Nurse-led initiatives reduce length of stay, improve patient outcomes in Philadelphia hospitals

Recent nurse-led initiatives addressing some of critical care's most pressing challenges resulted in shorter average lengths of stay and other positive patient and fiscal outcomes in seven Philadelphia-area hospitals. [More]
Study: Benzodiazepine sedatives may increase death risk in patients receiving mechanical ventilation

Study: Benzodiazepine sedatives may increase death risk in patients receiving mechanical ventilation

Sedation is frequently required for mechanically ventilated intensive care unit (ICU) patients to reduce anxiety, provide comfort, and assist in providing optimal respiratory support. [More]
Survey finds low awareness about risks of cognitive side effects following surgery

Survey finds low awareness about risks of cognitive side effects following surgery

Postsurgical cognitive side effects can have major implications for the level of care, length of hospital stay, and the patient's perceived quality of care, especially in elderly and fragile patients. A nationwide survey of Swedish anesthesiologists and nurse anesthetists has found there is low awareness of the risks of cognitive side effects following surgery. [More]
Anti-cholinergic drugs could be responsible for decline in cognitive, physical function in elderly patients

Anti-cholinergic drugs could be responsible for decline in cognitive, physical function in elderly patients

Drugs widely prescribed to the elderly could be responsible for a decline in cognitive and physical function according to research from the University of East Anglia and the Regenstrief Institute. [More]
Stimulating specific brain pathway may induce active emergence from anesthesia

Stimulating specific brain pathway may induce active emergence from anesthesia

Researchers may be one step closer to better understanding how anesthesia works. A study in the August issue of Anesthesiology, the official medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists- (ASA-), found stimulating a major dopamine-producing region in the brain, the ventral tegmental area (VTA), caused rats to wake from general anesthesia, suggesting that this region plays a key role in restoring consciousness after general anesthesia. [More]
DBS improves motor and non motor symptoms of patients with early Parkinson's disease

DBS improves motor and non motor symptoms of patients with early Parkinson's disease

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has become a well-recognized non-pharmacologic treatment that improves motor symptoms of patients with early and advanced Parkinson's disease. [More]
Two Regenstrief investigators receives Career Development K23 Awards from NIH

Two Regenstrief investigators receives Career Development K23 Awards from NIH

Two Regenstrief Institute investigators and Indiana University Center for Aging Research scientists -- Michael LaMantia, M.D., MPH, and Noll L. Campbell, PharmD -- have each received five-year Mentored Patient-Oriented Research Career Development K23 Awards from the National Institute on Aging at the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Critically ill patients receiving steroids in ICU are more likely to develop delirium

Critically ill patients receiving steroids in ICU are more likely to develop delirium

New Johns Hopkins research suggests that critically ill patients receiving steroids in a hospital’s intensive care unit (ICU) are significantly more likely to develop delirium. Results of their research, they say, suggest minimizing the use of steroids could reduce delirium in the ICU. [More]
New understanding of toxicity levels of chemotherapy regimens used for early stage breast cancer

New understanding of toxicity levels of chemotherapy regimens used for early stage breast cancer

Oncologists now have a new understanding of the toxicity levels of specific chemotherapy regimens used for women with early stage breast cancer, according to research from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. [More]
Patients receiving steroids in hospital's ICU more likely to develop delirium, says study

Patients receiving steroids in hospital's ICU more likely to develop delirium, says study

New Johns Hopkins research suggests that critically ill patients receiving steroids in a hospital's intensive care unit (ICU) are significantly more likely to develop delirium. Results of their research, they say, suggest minimizing the use of steroids could reduce delirium in the ICU. [More]

Norwegian Accident and Emergency departments not designed for elderly patients

Norwegian Accident and Emergency departments are not designed for elderly patients, and their staff often lack geriatric experience. [More]
Patients with chronic pulmonary thromboembolic disease may benefit from PTE

Patients with chronic pulmonary thromboembolic disease may benefit from PTE

Patients with chronic pulmonary thromboembolic disease may benefit from pulmonary thromboendarterectomy (PTE), even if the patients don't have severe pulmonary hypertension, according to University of California, San Diego, researchers. [More]
New intervention program may benefit chronically homeless, alcohol-dependent individuals

New intervention program may benefit chronically homeless, alcohol-dependent individuals

Chronically homeless, alcohol-dependent individuals might benefit from a new intervention that does not require them to stop or even reduce drinking, according to the results of a preliminary study in Seattle. [More]
Study: Depression affects more than one out of three critical care survivors

Study: Depression affects more than one out of three critical care survivors

Depression affects more than one out of three survivors of critical illness, according to a Vanderbilt study released in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine, and the majority of patients experience their symptoms physically rather than mentally. [More]
Clot-busting tPA therapy for ischemic stroke patients can avoid lengthy, restrictive monitoring in ICU

Clot-busting tPA therapy for ischemic stroke patients can avoid lengthy, restrictive monitoring in ICU

A Johns Hopkins study of patients with ischemic stroke suggests that many of those who receive prompt hospital treatment with "clot-busting" tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) therapy can avoid lengthy, restrictive monitoring in an intensive care unit (ICU). [More]
Nearly half of hospitalized American adults age 65 require decision-making assistance

Nearly half of hospitalized American adults age 65 require decision-making assistance

Nearly half of hospitalized American adults age 65 and older require decision-making assistance from family members or other surrogates because the patient is too impaired to make decisions independently, according to a new study from the Regenstrief Institute and the Indiana University Center for Aging Research. [More]
Basic hospice strategies can make last days of dying inpatients more comfortable and dignified

Basic hospice strategies can make last days of dying inpatients more comfortable and dignified

There is much value in training hospital and nursing home staff in the basics of palliative care to make the last days of a dying patient's life as comfortable and dignified as possible. [More]