Genomics News and Research RSS Feed - Genomics News and Research

Genomics is the study of the complete genetic material, including genes and their functions, of an organism.
New Sequins technology could help improve quality of genomic analysis

New Sequins technology could help improve quality of genomic analysis

Australian genomics researchers have announced the development of Sequins -- synthetic 'mirror' DNA sequences that reflect the human genome. [More]
New compound could kill parasites of three neglected diseases

New compound could kill parasites of three neglected diseases

Scientists have identified a compound that can kill the parasites responsible for three neglected diseases: Chagas disease, leishmaniasis and sleeping sickness. [More]
UM SOM selected as study site for human safety trial of new Zika vaccine

UM SOM selected as study site for human safety trial of new Zika vaccine

As world leaders increasingly recognize the Zika virus as an international public health threat, the Center for Vaccine Development at the University of Maryland School of Medicine's Institute for Global Health has been chosen as one of three study sites in a human safety trial of a new Zika vaccine. [More]
Scientists make major advance in understanding how stem cells become specialized

Scientists make major advance in understanding how stem cells become specialized

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have made a major advance in understanding how the cells of an organism, which all contain the same genetic information, come to be so diverse. [More]
Scientists develop interactive model to fast-track research and treatment of schizophrenia

Scientists develop interactive model to fast-track research and treatment of schizophrenia

It's called mental imbalance for a reason. Sanity hangs, in part, in the gentle balance of chemicals strung together within regions of the brain in an intricate matrix. [More]
Naturally occurring estrogen in cow’s milk does not affect blood hormone levels, study shows

Naturally occurring estrogen in cow’s milk does not affect blood hormone levels, study shows

Estrogen occurs naturally in cow's milk. Recently, there has been concern that consuming milk containing elevated amounts of estrogen could affect blood levels of the hormone in humans, leading to an increased risk of some cancers. [More]
New Valley Fever testing technology developed by TGen and NAU receives U.S. patent

New Valley Fever testing technology developed by TGen and NAU receives U.S. patent

Valley Fever, a potentially deadly dust-borne fungal disease, should be easier to diagnose and treat thanks to a testing technology developed by the Translational Genomics Research Institute and Northern Arizona University, and now protected by a patent issued today by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. [More]
Researchers use machine-learning approach to predict autism risk genes

Researchers use machine-learning approach to predict autism risk genes

Princeton University and Simons Foundation researchers have developed a machine-learning approach that for the first time analyzes the entire human genome to predict which genes may cause autism spectrum disorder, raising the number of genes that could be linked to the disorder from 65 to 2,500. [More]
New ACMG guidelines recommend NIPT as optimal initial screening test for all pregnant women

New ACMG guidelines recommend NIPT as optimal initial screening test for all pregnant women

Natera, Inc., a leader in non-invasive genetic testing and the analysis of circulating cell-free DNA, applauds the new guidelines just released by the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics, supporting the use of non-invasive prenatal tests (NIPT/NIPS) as an optimal, initial option to screen for specific genetic conditions, such as Trisomy 21 (Down syndrome) during pregnancy. [More]
Scientists use Regeneration Intelligence to assess perturbation status of many signaling pathways

Scientists use Regeneration Intelligence to assess perturbation status of many signaling pathways

Insilico Medicine, Inc in collaboration with scientists from Atlas Regeneration, Inc, Vision Genomics, Inc and Howard University published two research papers on fibrosis in the lung and liver and fibrotic signatures in glaucoma. [More]
VALIDATE D-Dimer kit from LGC Maine Standards receives US FDA approval for use on hemostasis test systems

VALIDATE D-Dimer kit from LGC Maine Standards receives US FDA approval for use on hemostasis test systems

LGC Maine Standards is pleased to announce our VALIDATE D-Dimer calibration verification / linearity test kit has received US FDA 510(k) clearance for use on Instrument Laboratory ACL TOP hemostasis test systems. [More]
Sophia Genetics reveals world’s most advanced collective artificial intelligence platform

Sophia Genetics reveals world’s most advanced collective artificial intelligence platform

Sophia Genetics, the global leader in Data-Driven Medicine, today unveiled SOPHiA, the world’s most advanced collective artificial intelligence (AI) for Data-Driven Medicine. [More]

University of Warwick develops cloud-computing platform for UK's medical microbiology community

The University of Warwick has led the development of a cloud-based microbial bioinformatics resource, which is believed to be the largest of its kind in the world. [More]
New study to examine genomics of anti-platelet therapy after coronary interventions

New study to examine genomics of anti-platelet therapy after coronary interventions

Which antiplatelet medication is best after a coronary stent? The Tailored Antiplatelet Therapy to Lessen Outcomes After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (TAILOR-PCI) Study examines whether prescribing heart medication based on a patient's CYP2C19 genotype will help prevent heart attack, stroke, unstable angina, and cardiovascular death in patients who undergo percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), commonly called angioplasty. [More]
Cancer risk screening for hereditary mutations: an interview with Ted Snelgrove

Cancer risk screening for hereditary mutations: an interview with Ted Snelgrove

Great question – the answer is actually unknown. Every month, there are publications that report on new cancer-related genes, so it's an area of great knowledge growth at the moment. [More]
Researchers find conceivable alternative way to treat Pompe disease

Researchers find conceivable alternative way to treat Pompe disease

Researchers at Duke Health have identified a potential new avenue for treating Pompe disease, a rare condition caused by the build-up of glycogen, a storage form of sugar, in cardiac and skeletal muscle, the liver and other tissues, due to deficiency of a particular enzyme. [More]
Scientists discover group of genes that can help predict damage in transplanted kidney

Scientists discover group of genes that can help predict damage in transplanted kidney

A multicenter team of researchers led by Barbara Murphy, MD, of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai has identified a panel of genes which can help predict whether a transplanted kidney will later develop fibrosis, an injury which can cause the organ to fail. Their results were published in the July 21 edition of Lancet. [More]
Texas Biomed scientists receive $23 million NIH grant to develop AIDS vaccine

Texas Biomed scientists receive $23 million NIH grant to develop AIDS vaccine

To support a coordinated, innovative approach to the development of an AIDS vaccine, Texas Biomedical Research Institute scientists, together with a multi-institutional coalition of experts from the United States and Europe, have received a grant for $23 million from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Researchers identify important therapeutic target for small cell lung cancer

Researchers identify important therapeutic target for small cell lung cancer

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have identified a protein termed ASCL1 that is essential to the development of small cell lung cancer and that, when deleted in the lungs of mice, prevents the cancer from forming. [More]
New study sheds light on pathogenesis of DNA lesions present in leukemia

New study sheds light on pathogenesis of DNA lesions present in leukemia

Researchers have succeeded in shedding light on the pathogenesis of DNA breakpoints that are associated with leukemia. [More]
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