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Genomics is the study of the complete genetic material, including genes and their functions, of an organism.
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Duke researchers closer to developing rapid blood test for bacterial and viral infections

Duke researchers closer to developing rapid blood test for bacterial and viral infections

Researchers at Duke Health are fine-tuning a test that can determine whether a respiratory illness is caused by infection from a virus or bacteria so that antibiotics can be more precisely prescribed. [More]
Scientists solve atomic structure of ubiquitin ligase complex that plays key role in protein degradation

Scientists solve atomic structure of ubiquitin ligase complex that plays key role in protein degradation

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have solved the atomic structure of a unique ubiquitin ligase complex. Ubiquitin is best known for its role in protein degradation, but more recently seen as important for cell signaling, DNA repair, anti-inflammatory, and immune responses. [More]
UM SOM study leads to FDA approval of Neulasta drug for treatment of radiation injury

UM SOM study leads to FDA approval of Neulasta drug for treatment of radiation injury

As a result of research performed by scientists at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the use of a drug to treat the deleterious effects of radiation exposure following a nuclear incident. The drug, Neulasta, is one of a very small number that have been approved for the treatment of acute radiation injury. [More]
UC Berkeley researchers make major improvement in CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing technology

UC Berkeley researchers make major improvement in CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing technology

University of California, Berkeley, researchers have made a major improvement in CRISPR-Cas9 technology that achieves an unprecedented success rate of 60 percent when replacing a short stretch of DNA with another. [More]
Variations in RANBP1 gene may disrupt brain signaling in neuropsychiatric conditions

Variations in RANBP1 gene may disrupt brain signaling in neuropsychiatric conditions

Scientists have identified a gene that appears to play a significant role in raising a person's risk of having more severe subtypes of autism that co-occur with other genetic diseases, such as the chromosomal disorder 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. [More]
Mount Sinai Heart starts TANSNIP-PESA study to determine how workplace-based lifestyle intervention reduces CV risk

Mount Sinai Heart starts TANSNIP-PESA study to determine how workplace-based lifestyle intervention reduces CV risk

World-renowned cardiologist Valentin Fuster, MD, PhD, Director of Mount Sinai Heart and Physician-in-Chief of The Mount Sinai Hospital, is undertaking a three-year study, known as the TANSNIP-PESA study, to determine whether a workplace-based lifestyle intervention, accompanied by imaging data, will lead to a reduction in the prevalence of cardiovascular (CV) disease risk factors related to lifestyle. [More]
UM SOM selected to work with BARDA to develop radiologic and nuclear countermeasures

UM SOM selected to work with BARDA to develop radiologic and nuclear countermeasures

University of Maryland School of Medicine Department of Radiation Oncology Chair and Professor William F. Regine, MD, FACR, FACRO, and UM SOM Dean E. Albert Reece, MD, PhD, MBA, announced today that researchers at the UM SOM have been selected as key contractors by the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority, for its Radiation Nuclear Animal Model Development program. [More]
UM SOM to team up with industry to develop vaccine for preventing deadly bacterial infections

UM SOM to team up with industry to develop vaccine for preventing deadly bacterial infections

The Center for Vaccine Development at the University of Maryland School of Medicine will participate in a partnership with industry to develop a vaccine to prevent a group of deadly bacterial infections that occur commonly among hospital patients. [More]
New discovery may help researchers tackle mitochondrial diseases and age-related diseases

New discovery may help researchers tackle mitochondrial diseases and age-related diseases

Buck Institute faculty Judith Campisi, PhD, says age researchers need to stop thinking of cellular senescence, now accepted as an important driver of aging, as a single phenotype that stems from genotoxic stress. Research from her lab reveals that cellular senescence, a process whereby cells permanently lose the ability to divide, is also induced by signaling from dysfunctional mitochondria - and that the arrested cells secrete a distinctly different "stew" of biologically active factors in a process unrelated to the damaging free radicals that are created in mitochondria as part of oxygen metabolism. [More]
CPMC study discovers six genes that affect sleep duration

CPMC study discovers six genes that affect sleep duration

The Coriell Personalized Medicine Collaborative, a research initiative exploring the utility of genetic information in the clinical setting, has published a study and identified six noteworthy genes that affect human sleep duration. [More]
Genomics portfolio expanded by Illumina

Genomics portfolio expanded by Illumina

Illumina, Inc., the global leader in sequencing and array-based technologies, today announced the newest addition to its industry-leading next-generation sequencing (NGS) portfolio with the launch of the MiniSeq Sequencing System. [More]
NIH-funded analysis identifies three genes that contribute to most common form of glaucoma

NIH-funded analysis identifies three genes that contribute to most common form of glaucoma

An analysis funded by the National Eye Institute (NEI), part of the National Institutes of Health, has identified three genes that contribute to the most common type of glaucoma. The study increases the total number of such genes to 15. [More]
Cholesterol-lowering drug simvastatin could become effective treatment for Parkinson's

Cholesterol-lowering drug simvastatin could become effective treatment for Parkinson's

A clinical trial using cholesterol-lowering treatment Simvastatin in people living with Parkinson's is getting underway in centres across the country -- with the hope that it could become one of a number of effective treatments available to treat Parkinson's. [More]
New strategy may reduce growth of pancreatic cancers in patients with KRAS gene mutation

New strategy may reduce growth of pancreatic cancers in patients with KRAS gene mutation

University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers have found a promising strategy that may limit the growth of pancreatic cancers in patients with a mutation in a gene called KRAS. [More]
SDPR gene may help to predict disease progression, serve as target for future breast cancer therapies

SDPR gene may help to predict disease progression, serve as target for future breast cancer therapies

A gene that plays a role in the development of breast cancer to metastatic disease has been identified which may help to predict disease progression and serve as a target for the development of future breast cancer therapies. [More]
New CRISPR technology can be used to make designer babies

New CRISPR technology can be used to make designer babies

How should we handle the new CRISPR technology that can both advance science and medicine, but also be used to make designer babies? Scientist and author Paul Knoepfler tackles this and other difficult questions related to this revolutionary technology in his new book, GMO Sapiens: The Life-Changing Science of Designer Babies, targeted at a broad, lay audience. [More]
Physician-researchers find link between 'dry eye' and chronic pain syndromes

Physician-researchers find link between 'dry eye' and chronic pain syndromes

Physician-researchers with Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, part of UHealth--the University of Miami Health System, have found a link between "dry eye" and chronic pain syndromes -- a finding that suggests that a new paradigm is needed for diagnosis and treatment to improve patient outcomes. [More]
Vanderbilt-led study questions about reporting genetic results to patients

Vanderbilt-led study questions about reporting genetic results to patients

A genetic test that suggests a patient may be at increased risk for potentially fatal heart rhythms is very often not as ominous as it sounds. [More]

Study findings question validity of some genetic variations linked with cardiac disorders

A review of medical records of patients with genetic variations linked with cardiac disorders found that patients often did not have any symptoms or signs of the conditions, questioning the validity of some genetic variations thought to be related to serious disorders, according to a study in the January 5 issue of JAMA. [More]
Pathway Genomics secures over $40 million in Series E financing

Pathway Genomics secures over $40 million in Series E financing

Pathway Genomics Corporation, a global precision medicine company with mobile health solutions, today announced it has successfully raised over $40 million in a Series E financing. [More]
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