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Genomics is the study of the complete genetic material, including genes and their functions, of an organism.
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Interaction between 2 proteins can be responsible for allergic asthma after eating infected fruit

Interaction between 2 proteins can be responsible for allergic asthma after eating infected fruit

Researchers at the UPM suggest that the interaction between two proteins can be the responsible for the allergic asthma episodes after eating an infected fruit. [More]
Researchers recover genome of bacterium from 700-year-old skeleton

Researchers recover genome of bacterium from 700-year-old skeleton

European researchers have recovered a genome of the bacterium Brucella melitensis from a 700-year-old skeleton found in the ruins of a Medieval Italian village. [More]
Tute Genomics agrees to provide NGS analytics for Lineagen's NextStepDx PLUS

Tute Genomics agrees to provide NGS analytics for Lineagen's NextStepDx PLUS

Tute Genomics, the leader in genome annotation and interpretation, today announced an agreement with Lineagen, Inc., to provide next-generation sequencing (NGS) analytics for Lineagen's NextStepDx PLUS. [More]
TCGA finds novel mutations in key cancer-causing pathway in lung adenocarcinoma

TCGA finds novel mutations in key cancer-causing pathway in lung adenocarcinoma

Researchers from The Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network have identified novel mutations in a well-known cancer-causing pathway in lung adenocarcinoma, the most common subtype of lung cancer. [More]
NCGR, Simbiot join forces to create new solutions for handling genomic data

NCGR, Simbiot join forces to create new solutions for handling genomic data

On Tuesday, the National Center for Genome Resources and Simbiot announced a strategic partnership to create new solutions for handling 'big data' in the genomics space. [More]
High-resolution, high-throughput pre-implantation genetic screening microarray launched by OGT

High-resolution, high-throughput pre-implantation genetic screening microarray launched by OGT

Oxford Gene Technology (OGT), The Molecular Genetics Company, has announced the launch of a new high-resolution, high-throughput pre-implantation genetic screening (PGS) microarray aimed at improving embryo screening for in vitro fertilisation (IVF). The CytoSure™ Embryo Screen Array offers eight arrays of 60,000 spots for high-resolution genome-wide aneuploidy and copy number detection in pre-implantation embryos. [More]
Study reveals mechanism underlying abnormal fat accumulation in HIV patients

Study reveals mechanism underlying abnormal fat accumulation in HIV patients

Building upon their earlier research on the biology of fat metabolism, Joslin scientists discovered that microRNAs -small RNA molecules that play important roles in regulation in many types of tissue - play a major role in the distribution and determination of fat cells and whole body metabolism. [More]
Lung cancer patients could benefit from new 'QTA' technique

Lung cancer patients could benefit from new 'QTA' technique

Lung cancer patients could receive more precise treatment, and their progress could be better tracked, using a new high-tech method of non-invasive medical imaging analysis, according to a study published today by the journal PLOS ONE. [More]
New collaborative fundraising effort focuses on AYA cancer

New collaborative fundraising effort focuses on AYA cancer

Leaders from Case Western Reserve University and University Hospitals this evening announced a new collaborative fundraising effort focused on Adolescent and Young Adult (AYA) cancer. [More]
Eurofins Genomics, AmpTec sign co-marketing agreement for IVT-RNAs

Eurofins Genomics, AmpTec sign co-marketing agreement for IVT-RNAs

Eurofins Genomics, international market leader in genomic services, and AmpTec, internationally recognized provider of RNA technology products, have agreed on non-exclusively co-marketing AmpTec's IVT-RNAs globally. [More]
CHOP study: Children with specific gene variants may require higher doses of pain-control drugs

CHOP study: Children with specific gene variants may require higher doses of pain-control drugs

In the first genome-wide analysis of postsurgical pain in children, pediatric researchers identified variations in genes that affect a child's need for pain-control drugs. The findings suggest that at some point physicians may calibrate pain-medication dosages according to a child's individual genetic makeup. [More]
UCLA receives $7.2 million grant to develop ways to diagnose rare genetic disorders

UCLA receives $7.2 million grant to develop ways to diagnose rare genetic disorders

The David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA is one of six institutions nationwide chosen by the National Institutes of Health to join their effort in tackling the most difficult-to-solve medical cases and develop ways to diagnose rare genetic disorders. [More]
Study uncovers new information on genes that may increase risk of cardiac arrhythmias

Study uncovers new information on genes that may increase risk of cardiac arrhythmias

Two international research studies, both led by investigators affiliated with Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, have uncovered new information about genes that may increase the risk of serious cardiac arrhythmias. [More]
A*STAR scientists pioneered a molecular connection between obesity and diabetes

A*STAR scientists pioneered a molecular connection between obesity and diabetes

Scientists from the Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, a research institute under the Agency for Science, Technology and Research, have discovered that obese individuals lack a protein that is essential for regulating blood glucose levels, causing them to face higher risks of developing diabetes. [More]
Video interview highlights latest research developments in women’s reproductive health using Chromatrap solid state ChIP assay

Video interview highlights latest research developments in women’s reproductive health using Chromatrap solid state ChIP assay

An informative video interview with Professor Steve Conlan of the College of Medicine at Swansea University (UK) highlights the latest research developments in women’s reproductive health using unique molecular biology tools. [More]
First step toward new drugs that can transcend antibiotic resistance issues

First step toward new drugs that can transcend antibiotic resistance issues

Scientists in the United States and India have successfully modified the precursor to one of the drugs used to treat tuberculosis, an important first step toward new drugs that can transcend antibiotic resistance issues that experts consider a serious threat to global health. [More]
Non-Hodgkin lymphoma subgroups found to have different survival rates

Non-Hodgkin lymphoma subgroups found to have different survival rates

A Mayo Clinic-led group of researchers has discovered three subgroups of a single type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma that have markedly different survival rates. These subgroups could not be differentiated by routine pathology but only with the aid of novel genetic tests, which the research team recommends giving to all patients with ALK-negative anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL). Findings are published in the journal Blood. [More]

Jackson Laboratory Cancer Center earns renewal of Cancer Center Support Grant from NCI

The Jackson Laboratory Cancer Center has once again earned the renewal of its Cancer Center Support Grant from the National Cancer Institute (NCI). [More]

Foundation Medicine provides assistance to cancer patients, families seeking access to targeted therapies

Foundation Medicine, Inc. today announced that it has partnered with Patient Advocate Foundation (PAF) on a national program to provide assistance to patients with cancer and their families seeking access to targeted therapies. [More]
Researchers compare genome sequences of malaria vectors to investigate insecticide resistance

Researchers compare genome sequences of malaria vectors to investigate insecticide resistance

Researchers from LSTM have exploited a natural experiment created by insecticidal pressure to determine how the most important malaria vectors - A. gambiae s.s. and A. coluzzii - respond rapidly to environmental change. [More]