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Acquired immune deficiency syndrome or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a disease of the human immune system caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

This condition progressively reduces the effectiveness of the immune system and leaves individuals susceptible to opportunistic infections and tumors. HIV is transmitted through direct contact of a mucous membrane or the bloodstream with a bodily fluid containing HIV, such as blood, semen, vaginal fluid, preseminal fluid, and breast milk.
Binghamton University plays role in improving Rwandan’s healthcare system

Binghamton University plays role in improving Rwandan’s healthcare system

Twenty years after the Rwandan Genocide left nearly 1 million dead and 2 million homeless, Binghamton University is playing a role in improving the nation's healthcare. Karen Feltham, a clinical instructor in the Decker School of Nursing, spent the 2013 fall semester in Rwanda working with women in the Rwandan Midwives Association. [More]
Programs for heterosexuals who use drugs linked with subsequent lower rates of AIDS incidence

Programs for heterosexuals who use drugs linked with subsequent lower rates of AIDS incidence

Although community network studies show that sexual relationships occur between members of "risk groups" -- men who have sex with other men (MSM), people who inject drugs (PWID), non-injection drug users (NIDU) -- and heterosexuals, researchers at New York University's Center for Drug Use and HIV Research (CDUHR) note that little research has been done to help explain how HIV epidemics and programs in one population affect others and how to reduce the risks of transmission. [More]
UCSF School of Medicine ranked fourth nationwide in research and primary care education

UCSF School of Medicine ranked fourth nationwide in research and primary care education

UC San Francisco's School of Medicine ranked fourth nationwide in both research and primary care education this year, according to a new survey conducted by U.S. News & World Report. [More]

As enrollment deadline looms, subsidies still confuse some consumers

The Wall Street Journal unveils a calculator to help explain these tax credits, or subsidies, while the CT Mirror looks at last-minute consumer questions. [More]
Thirteen graduate students to receive 2014 Harold M. Weintraub Graduate Student Award

Thirteen graduate students to receive 2014 Harold M. Weintraub Graduate Student Award

Thirteen graduate students from institutes throughout North America have been chosen to receive the 2014 Harold M. Weintraub Graduate Student Award sponsored by the Basic Sciences Division of Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. [More]
Longer looks: Health care in jail; preventing Medicare drug fraud; new medical codes

Longer looks: Health care in jail; preventing Medicare drug fraud; new medical codes

"Sheriff Ashe," [the waitress] began. "My daughter is in your jail." She then told me her daughter's story. "Laura," as I'll call her here, was a bright and sociable girl who, after graduating from high school, went on to community college. [More]
Research shows how patient experiences can be used to improve healthcare

Research shows how patient experiences can be used to improve healthcare

A research project led by Oxford University is showing how patient experiences can be used to improve healthcare - not through targets and surveys, but by getting doctors, nurses and patients talking together about care on the ward. [More]
Stock-outs of ARV drugs in Central African Republic impact health of HIV-infected people

Stock-outs of ARV drugs in Central African Republic impact health of HIV-infected people

​According to Pierre-Marie David of the University of Montreal's Faculty of Pharmacy, stock-outs of antiretroviral (ARV) drugs in recent years in the Central African Republic have had a dramatic impact on the health of HIV-infected people. [More]

Novel HIV prevention products for women demonstrate safety in clinical studies

Two early clinical studies of novel HIV prevention products for women - the first combination antiretroviral (ARV) vaginal ring and a vaginal film - show the products to be safe and open the door to product improvements that could expand options for women-initiated prevention tools. The results of both studies were presented today at the 21st Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections. [More]

New analysis offers insights for hospitals in implementing community health improvement programs

A new analysis led by the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health offers insights for nonprofit hospitals in implementing community health improvement programs. In a special issue of the Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved that focuses on the Affordable Care Act, a multidisciplinary team of Pitt researchers explore published research on existing community benefit programs at U.S. hospitals and explain how rigorous implementation of such programs could help hospitals both meet federal requirements and improve the health of the populations they serve. [More]

Women using DMPA injection more likely to acquire HIV than women using NET-EN

Women who used an injectable contraceptive called DMPA were more likely to acquire HIV than women using a similar product called NET-EN, according to a secondary analysis of data from a large HIV prevention trial called VOICE, researchers from the National Institutes of Health-funded Microbicide Trials Network reported today at the 21st Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections in Boston. [More]
Higher consumption of omega-3 fatty acids helps ward off heart disease

Higher consumption of omega-3 fatty acids helps ward off heart disease

Eating fish in amounts comparable to those of people living in Japan seems to impart a protective factor that wards off heart disease, according to an international study funded by the National Institutes of Health and led by the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. [More]

Study: Combination intervention completely eliminates HIV transmission

A computer model has created the most effective formula for reducing the spread of HIV among drug users in New York City over the next 25 years. [More]

Researchers examine how ACA could affect Americans living with HIV/AIDS

A series of papers in the March issue of Health Affairs examines how the Affordable Care Act could affect two sectors of the most vulnerable Americans - those living with HIV/AIDS and people who have recently cycled through jail. [More]
NPR correspondent to deliver keynote address at Seattle Biomed's annual event

NPR correspondent to deliver keynote address at Seattle Biomed's annual event

Seattle BioMed today announced that Jason Beaubien, global health and development correspondent of National Public Radio (NPR), will deliver the keynote address at the Passport to Global Health Celebration on March 5. [More]
UNC receives $40M for clinical trials unit devoted to HIV/AIDS treatment, prevention and research

UNC receives $40M for clinical trials unit devoted to HIV/AIDS treatment, prevention and research

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has received a seven-year, more than $40 million award from the National Institutes of Health for a clinical trials unit that will implement the scientific agendas of five NIH networks devoted to HIV/AIDS treatment, prevention, and cure research. [More]
Fred Hutchinson, SCCA researchers receive Seattle Business Magazine's 2014 Leaders in Health Care Awards

Fred Hutchinson, SCCA researchers receive Seattle Business Magazine's 2014 Leaders in Health Care Awards

Researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and Seattle Cancer Care Alliance (SCCA) were recognized in several categories of Seattle Business Magazine's 2014 Leaders in Health Care Awards, including the publication's Lifetime Achievement Award, given to Frederick R. Appelbaum, M.D., executive vice president and deputy director of Fred Hutch and president of SCCA. [More]

U.S study:10% of non-lifetime marijuana users report that they would try marijuana if legal

​National support for marijuana ("cannabis") legalization is increasing in the United States (US). Recreational use was recently legalized in the states of Colorado and Washington; other states across the country are expected to follow suit. [More]
CBT improves blood sugar control and brings faster relief of depression in patients with type 2 diabetes

CBT improves blood sugar control and brings faster relief of depression in patients with type 2 diabetes

Although maintaining good blood sugar control is crucial for avoiding complications of diabetes, it has been estimated that only about half of patients are successful in meeting target blood glucose levels. [More]
State highlights: 'Health care homes' show promise in Minn.; Texas women's health providers; Fla.'s hidden costs

State highlights: 'Health care homes' show promise in Minn.; Texas women's health providers; Fla.'s hidden costs

A selection of health policy stories from Minnesota, Texas, Louisiana, Florida, New York and Massachusetts. [More]