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Scientists identify transposable element in certain bird genomes

Scientists identify transposable element in certain bird genomes

In rare instances, DNA is known to have jumped from one species to another. If a parasite's DNA jumps to its host's genome, it could leave evidence of that parasitic interaction that could be found millions of years later -- a DNA 'fossil' of sorts. [More]
Georgetown researchers report first case of Alzheimer's disease diagnosed in HIV-positive individual

Georgetown researchers report first case of Alzheimer's disease diagnosed in HIV-positive individual

Georgetown University researchers are reporting the first case of Alzheimer's disease diagnosed in an HIV-positive individual. The finding in a 71-year-old man triggers a realization about HIV survivors now reaching the age when Alzheimer's risk begins to escalate. [More]
Developing countries face health financing crisis due to low domestic investment, stagnating international aid

Developing countries face health financing crisis due to low domestic investment, stagnating international aid

Two major studies published in The Lancet reveal the health financing crisis facing developing countries as a result of low domestic investment and stagnating international aid, which could leave millions of people without access to even the most basic health services. [More]
Funding improves for maternal, child health compared to donor investments in HIV, TB and malaria

Funding improves for maternal, child health compared to donor investments in HIV, TB and malaria

Funding earmarked for improving maternal and child health in low- and middle-income countries has grown faster since 2010 than funding for HIV, TB, and malaria. [More]
Blood test to determine risk of heart disease may benefit middle-aged black women

Blood test to determine risk of heart disease may benefit middle-aged black women

Middle-aged black women have higher levels of a protein in their blood associated with a predictor of heart disease than their white counterparts, even after other factors, such as obesity, are taken into consideration, according to a study conducted by the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health and School of Medicine. [More]
Engineered HIV vaccine protein may prevent HIV infection

Engineered HIV vaccine protein may prevent HIV infection

Some people infected with HIV naturally produce antibodies that effectively neutralize many strains of the rapidly mutating virus, and scientists are working to develop a vaccine capable of inducing such "broadly neutralizing" antibodies that can prevent HIV infection. [More]
Study suggests strong treatment programs can help make headway against AIDS epidemic

Study suggests strong treatment programs can help make headway against AIDS epidemic

Botswana appears to have achieved very high rates of HIV diagnosis, treatment, and viral suppression--much better than most Western nations, including the United States--according to a new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and colleagues in Botswana. [More]
Female childhood cancer survivors have a good chance of conceiving

Female childhood cancer survivors have a good chance of conceiving

A new study examines fertility issues in male and female childhood cancer survivors who had received chemotherapy. The study found that while most female survivors still have a good chance of conceiving, male survivors are significantly less likely to father children. [More]
World TB Day 2016: WHO calls to Unite to End TB

World TB Day 2016: WHO calls to Unite to End TB

In advance of World TB Day, to be observed on 24 March, the World Health Organization is calling on countries and partners to Unite to End TB. [More]
Specialized gene editing system paves way to eventual cure for HIV patients

Specialized gene editing system paves way to eventual cure for HIV patients

A specialized gene editing system designed by scientists at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University is paving the way to an eventual cure for patients infected with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. [More]
Clinical study finds no added benefit of using four TB drugs to save people with advanced HIV/AIDS

Clinical study finds no added benefit of using four TB drugs to save people with advanced HIV/AIDS

In a report on the so-called REMEMBER (Reducing Early Mortality and Early Morbidity by Empiric Tuberculosis Treatment) study -- a 10-nation, randomized clinical trial of adult outpatients -- investigators concluded that there was no added benefit of using four drugs for TB over just using one drug, isoniazid, to save lives in people with advanced HIV/AIDS. [More]
New microfluidic biosensor can identify white blood cells quickly for AIDS diagnosis

New microfluidic biosensor can identify white blood cells quickly for AIDS diagnosis

Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a highly sensitive biosensor based on a differential immuno-capture technology that can detect sub-populations of white blood cells. As part of a small, disposable biochip, the microfluidic biosensor can count CD4+/CD8+ T cells quickly and accurately for AIDS diagnosis in the field. [More]
Negative cancer clinical trials have long-term impact on research

Negative cancer clinical trials have long-term impact on research

Cancer clinical trials with negative results don't make an immediate splash in the scientific literature, but they do have a long-term impact on cancer research, according to a new study by SWOG, the federally funded international clinical trials network. [More]
VIGH study seeks to eliminate mother-to-child transmission of HIV in Africa

VIGH study seeks to eliminate mother-to-child transmission of HIV in Africa

Mother-to-child transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which causes AIDS, is still a major problem in resource-limited, rural areas of the world where health care providers are scarce. [More]
Scientists track rare potent antibodies in HIV-infected individual

Scientists track rare potent antibodies in HIV-infected individual

One of the most crucial and elusive goals of an effective HIV vaccine is to stimulate antibodies that can attack the virus even as it relentlessly mutates. [More]
Targeted Case Management has major impact on HIV-positive patients

Targeted Case Management has major impact on HIV-positive patients

Providing comprehensive, holistic case management to people dealing with multiple comorbid conditions, including HIV, can yield tangible health improvements and long-term cost savings, according to a new study released by Amida Care, a New York City nonprofit health plan, and ACRIA, an HIV/AIDS research organization. [More]
Sangamo presents immunological data from SB-728-T HIV clinical study at CROI 2016

Sangamo presents immunological data from SB-728-T HIV clinical study at CROI 2016

Sangamo BioSciences, Inc., the leader in therapeutic genome editing, announced the presentation of immunological data from the Company's clinical trials of SB-728-T, a ZFP Therapeutic designed to provide functional control of HIV. [More]
ARV drug atazanavir may have significant effects on infant development

ARV drug atazanavir may have significant effects on infant development

The antiretroviral (ARV) drug atazanavir—sometimes included in treatments to prevent mother-to-child HIV transmission during pregnancy—may have small but significant effects on infant development, reports a study in the journal AIDS, official journal of the International AIDS Society. [More]
Dapivirine ring can help prevent HIV-1 infection in women

Dapivirine ring can help prevent HIV-1 infection in women

In an important scientific achievement for women's health, two large Phase III clinical trials -- The Ring Study and ASPIRE -- have shown that a monthly vaginal ring containing the antiretroviral drug (ARV) dapivirine can safely help prevent HIV-1 infection in women. [More]
Researchers devise new approach to improve current T-cell therapy methods

Researchers devise new approach to improve current T-cell therapy methods

T-cell therapy, a form of immunotherapy that uses a patient's own immune cells to attack their cancer, has been making waves recently. The "living" therapy involves engineering the patient's T cells in the laboratory to carry new proteins that guide the immune cells directly to tumor cells, allowing the engineered T cells to attack and kill the cancer. [More]
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