HIV/AIDS News and Research RSS Feed - HIV/AIDS News and Research Twitter

Acquired immune deficiency syndrome or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a disease of the human immune system caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

This condition progressively reduces the effectiveness of the immune system and leaves individuals susceptible to opportunistic infections and tumors. HIV is transmitted through direct contact of a mucous membrane or the bloodstream with a bodily fluid containing HIV, such as blood, semen, vaginal fluid, preseminal fluid, and breast milk.
Mylan announces launch of Capecitabine Tablets USP, 150 mg and 500 mg

Mylan announces launch of Capecitabine Tablets USP, 150 mg and 500 mg

Mylan Inc. today announced that it has launched Capecitabine Tablets USP, 150 mg and 500 mg, the generic version of Genentech's Xeloda Tablets. Mylan received final approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for its Abbreviated New Drug Application for this product, which is indicated as monotherapy, adjuvant therapy and combination therapy for certain types of breast, colon and colorectal cancers. [More]
Racial differences in life expectancy vary substantially across U.S. states

Racial differences in life expectancy vary substantially across U.S. states

Racial differences in life expectancy have declined nationally but still vary substantially across U.S. states, according to a new study by McGill University researchers. [More]
Laboratories at TSRI investigate antibodies to fight Ebola virus

Laboratories at TSRI investigate antibodies to fight Ebola virus

Laboratories at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) are investigating antibodies to fight Ebola virus, including the three antibodies recently used to treat two American health care workers infected with the Ebola virus. [More]
Herpes zoster vaccine effective in protecting older adults against shingles, even after chemotherapy

Herpes zoster vaccine effective in protecting older adults against shingles, even after chemotherapy

The herpes zoster vaccine continues to be effective in protecting older adults against shingles, even after they undergo chemotherapy, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published today in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases. [More]
Medical education in sub-Saharan Africa is being revitalized through U.S. funded effort

Medical education in sub-Saharan Africa is being revitalized through U.S. funded effort

Medical education in sub-Saharan Africa is being revitalized and expanded through a U.S.-funded effort that is dramatically increasing enrollment, broadening curricula, upgrading Internet access and providing cutting-edge skills labs and other technologies. [More]
Johns Hopkins School of Nursing to launch new HIV curriculum for non-physician providers

Johns Hopkins School of Nursing to launch new HIV curriculum for non-physician providers

The 31-year-old Moore Clinic operated by the Johns Hopkins AIDS Service at the School of Medicine is a historic operation — the second-oldest AIDS clinic in the country. But when Jason Farley, PhD, MPH, CRNP, looks nowadays at the makeup of Moore's caregiving staff, he worries that he's seeing too much history. [More]
U.S.-funded effort revitalizes, expands medical education in sub-Saharan Africa

U.S.-funded effort revitalizes, expands medical education in sub-Saharan Africa

Medical education in sub-Saharan Africa is being revitalized and expanded through a U.S.-funded effort that is dramatically increasing enrollment, broadening curricula, upgrading Internet access and providing cutting-edge skills labs and other technologies. [More]
EGPAF and ACS partner to improve access to essential pain medications for HIV people

EGPAF and ACS partner to improve access to essential pain medications for HIV people

Today the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation (EGPAF) and the American Cancer Society (ACS) announced a new partnership to improve access to essential pain medications for people living with HIV in Swaziland. [More]
Tuberculosis in children: an interview with Dr Peter Dodd, University of Sheffield

Tuberculosis in children: an interview with Dr Peter Dodd, University of Sheffield

It was recently announced that new estimates indicated over 650,000 children develop tuberculosis (TB) every year in the 22 countries with a high burden of the disease (HBCs). Which countries are these and why are so many children developing TB in these areas? [More]
EMD Serono begins MSB0010718C Phase II study in mMCC patients

EMD Serono begins MSB0010718C Phase II study in mMCC patients

EMD Serono, Inc., a subsidiary of Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany, today announced the initiation of an international Phase II study designed to assess the efficacy and safety of MSB0010718C, an investigational fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibody that binds to programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1). [More]
Non-endoscopic procedure effective in treating severe chronic migraine headaches

Non-endoscopic procedure effective in treating severe chronic migraine headaches

A revised version of a surgical procedure to treat severe chronic migraine headaches led to significant symptom relief more than 90 percent of the time in patients treated at Massachusetts General Hospital. [More]
RI Defeats Hepatitis C project aims to eliminate HCV in Rhode Island

RI Defeats Hepatitis C project aims to eliminate HCV in Rhode Island

Lynn E. Taylor, M.D., director of The Miriam Hospital's HIV/Viral Hepatitis Coinfection program, states in the July, 2014 Rhode Island Medical Journal special edition, "RI Defeats Hep C" that eliminating hepatitis c virus infection (hep c or HCV) is feasible, can provide economic benefits, enhance capacity to address other health challenges, and improve health care disparities. [More]
Immunologic mechanism makes broadly neutralizing antibodies in people infected with HIV

Immunologic mechanism makes broadly neutralizing antibodies in people infected with HIV

Scientists at Duke Medicine have found an immunologic mechanism that makes broadly neutralizing antibodies in people who are HIV-1 infected. [More]
Clinic-based audio project gives HIV patients a chance to share experiences with diagnosis

Clinic-based audio project gives HIV patients a chance to share experiences with diagnosis

The voice on the recording was low and calm as the speaker recounted the telephone call that brought the news he was infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that causes AIDS: "My heart just stopped for a little bit and next thing you know I was on the floor flat on my face boohooing, crying like a baby." [More]
EGPAF experts to deliver presentations at AIDS 2014

EGPAF experts to deliver presentations at AIDS 2014

Experts from the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation (EGPAF) will give oral presentations, moderate conference events, and exhibit a variety of educational posters and abstracts related to ending AIDS in children. [More]
Drug for reduction of abdominal fat in HIV patients may also reduce fatty liver disease

Drug for reduction of abdominal fat in HIV patients may also reduce fatty liver disease

The only drug to receive FDA approval for reduction of the abdominal fat deposits that develop in some patients receiving antiviral therapy for HIV infection may also reduce the incidence of fatty liver disease in such patients. [More]
Growth hormone reduces liver fat in HIV-infected patients with excess abdominal fat

Growth hormone reduces liver fat in HIV-infected patients with excess abdominal fat

In a preliminary study, HIV-infected patients with excess abdominal fat who received the growth hormone-releasing hormone analog tesamorelin for 6 months experienced modest reductions in liver fat, according to a study in the July 23/30 issue of JAMA, a theme issue on HIV/AIDS. [More]

HIV self-testing increases proportion of adults initiating antiretroviral therapy

Among adults in the African country of Malawi offered HIV self-testing, optional home initiation of care compared with standard HIV care resulted in a significant increase in the proportion of adults initiating antiretroviral therapy, according to a study in the July 23/30 issue of JAMA, a theme issue on HIV/AIDS. [More]

Annual HIV diagnosis rate in the U.S. decreases more than 30%: Study

The annual HIV diagnosis rate in the U.S. decreased more than 30 percent from 2002-2011, with declines observed in several key populations, although increases were found among certain age groups of men who have sex with men, especially young men, according to a study in the July 23/30 issue of JAMA, a theme issue on HIV/AIDS. [More]
Large proportion of PLHA in US are not sufficiently engaged in care and not taking ART

Large proportion of PLHA in US are not sufficiently engaged in care and not taking ART

Regular attendance at HIV primary care visits and high adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) are vital for people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHA), as these health behaviors lead to lowered rates of morbidity and mortality, increased quality of life, and reducing the risk of HIV transmission to others. [More]