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Lung cancer patients with comorbid conditions face higher risk of death

Lung cancer patients with comorbid conditions face higher risk of death

Lung cancer patients with comorbid conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, or congestive heart failure had a higher risk of death than lung cancer patients without comorbid conditions, according to a study published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. [More]
EMR Direct's phiMail Server software achieves ONC-HIT 2014 Edition Modular Certification

EMR Direct's phiMail Server software achieves ONC-HIT 2014 Edition Modular Certification

EMR Direct, a Health Information Service Provider (HISP) and leading developer of Direct messaging software for the secure exchange of Protected Health Information (PHI) over the Internet, announced today that its phiMail Server software has achieved Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC-HIT) 2014 Edition Modular Certification via Drummond Group LLC, an Authorized Certification Body (ACB). [More]
Designing infectious disease forecasting models to predict dengue epidemics

Designing infectious disease forecasting models to predict dengue epidemics

Dengue viruses are on the move. Spread among humans by mosquitoes, and across geographic boundaries through travel, the virus affects up to an estimated 390 million people every year around the world. In the U.S., recent outbreaks have occurred in Florida, Texas, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico. Scientists know one of the best ways to reduce the impact of the disease is to prepare healthcare providers by forecasting epidemics before they happen. [More]
Sexual violence against children significantly higher in low- and middle-income countries

Sexual violence against children significantly higher in low- and middle-income countries

Sexual violence against children is a significant problem in many low- and middle-income countries. At least 25 percent of females and 10 percent of males experienced some form of childhood sexual violence in the majority of seven countries studied, according to findings from the Violence Against Children Surveys (VACS) released today in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [More]
New mobile app may help adolescents make more informed decisions about sexual behavior

New mobile app may help adolescents make more informed decisions about sexual behavior

Teenagers, parents, educators and clinicians will have a new tool to help adolescents make more informed decisions about their sexual behavior. "Seventeen Days," a mobile app based on the interactive movie of the same name, will be available at no cost on iPhone, iPad and Android devices beginning June 4. [More]
Simple pre-surgical intervention can reduce S aureus surgical site infections

Simple pre-surgical intervention can reduce S aureus surgical site infections

Implementation of a pre-surgical intervention that included screening for the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus, treating patients who were positive for this bacteria, and the administration of antibiotics based on these culture results was associated with a modest reduction in S aureus surgical site infections, according to a study in the June 2 issue of JAMA. [More]
Elusys’ Anthim BLA to treat inhalational anthrax accepted for review by the FDA

Elusys’ Anthim BLA to treat inhalational anthrax accepted for review by the FDA

Elusys Therapeutics, Inc. today announced the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has accepted for filing and review its Biologics License Application for Anthim® (obiltoxaximab) for the treatment and prevention of inhalational anthrax, a top bioterror threat which was submitted on March 20, 2015. Anthim is a candidate for future acquisition into the Strategic National Stockpile, the U.S. government's repository of critical medical supplies for biowarfare preparedness. [More]
Scientists develop human cortical spheroids

Scientists develop human cortical spheroids

A patient tormented by suicidal thoughts gives his psychiatrist a few strands of his hair. She derives stem cells from them to grow budding brain tissue harboring the secrets of his unique illness in a petri dish. She uses the information to genetically engineer a personalized treatment to correct his brain circuit functioning. Just Sci-fi? Yes, but... [More]
Glucose Health Natural Blood Sugar Maintenance product for patients with Type-2 diabetes

Glucose Health Natural Blood Sugar Maintenance product for patients with Type-2 diabetes

Healthcare professionals now have a new OTC (over- the-counter) product designed for the 2 in 5 Americans the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) now estimates will develop Type-2 diabetes in their lifetime – Glucose Health Natural Blood Sugar Maintenance. [More]
States may not save much money by ending adult dental coverage under Medicaid: Study

States may not save much money by ending adult dental coverage under Medicaid: Study

A new study suggests that states may not save as much money as anticipated by eliminating adult dental coverage under Medicaid. [More]
Earlier antiretroviral treatment benefits HIV-infected individuals

Earlier antiretroviral treatment benefits HIV-infected individuals

A major international randomized clinical trial has found that HIV-infected individuals have a considerably lower risk of developing AIDS or other serious illnesses if they start taking antiretroviral drugs sooner, when their CD4+ T-cell count--a key measure of immune system health--is higher, instead of waiting until the CD4+ cell count drops to lower levels. Together with data from previous studies showing that antiretroviral treatment reduced the risk of HIV transmission to uninfected sexual partners, these findings support offering treatment to everyone with HIV. [More]
Mayo Clinic scientists create mouse model of ALS, FTD caused by mutations in C9ORF72 gene

Mayo Clinic scientists create mouse model of ALS, FTD caused by mutations in C9ORF72 gene

Scientists at Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida created a novel mouse that exhibits the symptoms and neurodegeneration associated with the most common genetic forms of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, Lou Gehrig's disease), both of which are caused by a mutation in the a gene called C9ORF72. [More]
New microfluidic chip can capture rare clusters of circulating tumor cells

New microfluidic chip can capture rare clusters of circulating tumor cells

Researchers have developed a microfluidic chip that can capture rare clusters of circulating tumor cells, which could yield important new insights into how cancer spreads. The work was funded by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, part of the National Institutes of Health. [More]

WHO Regional Office for the Eastern Mediterranean press release: WHO delivers additional medicines and medical supplies into Yemen

WHO is also providing a shipment of anti-malaria medicines from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria sufficient for 44 950 treatment courses of malaria... [More]
Kent researchers assess how smartphone uses interfere with treadmill exercise

Kent researchers assess how smartphone uses interfere with treadmill exercise

Kent State University researchers Jacob Barkley, Ph.D., and Andrew Lepp, Ph.D., as well as Kent State alumni Michael Rebold, Ph.D., and Gabe Sanders, Ph.D., assessed how common smartphone uses - texting and talking - interfere with treadmill exercise. [More]
MRI screening helps in accurate and rapid stroke treatment

MRI screening helps in accurate and rapid stroke treatment

Time is critical when it comes to stroke, and early treatment is associated with better outcomes. According to the Screening with MRI for Accurate and Rapid stroke Treatment (SMART) study, small changes in quality improvement procedures enabled clinicians to use MRI scans to diagnose stroke patients before giving acute treatment, within 60 minutes of hospital arrival. [More]
Secondhand exposure to cannabis smoke under extreme conditions impairs cognitive performance

Secondhand exposure to cannabis smoke under extreme conditions impairs cognitive performance

Secondhand exposure to cannabis smoke under "extreme conditions," such as an unventilated room or enclosed vehicle, can cause nonsmokers to feel the effects of the drug, have minor problems with memory and coordination, and in some cases test positive for the drug in a urinalysis. [More]
FDA licenses Protein Sciences' Pearl River, NY facility to manufacture Flublok influenza vaccine

FDA licenses Protein Sciences' Pearl River, NY facility to manufacture Flublok influenza vaccine

Protein Sciences Corporation announced that on May 12, 2015 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration licensed its Pearl River, NY manufacturing facility for the commercial manufacturing of Flublok influenza vaccine. Flublok is the world's first licensed influenza vaccine made using modern recombinant technology. [More]

Emergency preparedness pays off as Kathmandu hospitals respond to earthquakes

As of today, more than 8200 people are reported to have been killed in the earthquakes and over 19,000 injured... [More]
Scientists uncover mechanism behind 'tubulin code'

Scientists uncover mechanism behind 'tubulin code'

Driving down the highway, you encounter ever-changing signs -- speed limits, exits, food and gas options. Seeing these roadside markers may cause you to slow down, change lanes or start thinking about lunch. In a similar way, cellular structures called microtubules are tagged with a variety of chemical markers that can influence cell functions. [More]
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