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Air pollution from wildfires may heighten risk of heart-related incidents

Air pollution from wildfires may heighten risk of heart-related incidents

Air pollution from wildfires may increase risk of cardiac arrests, and other sudden acute heart problems, researchers have found. [More]
Teen birth, mental illness increase hospitalization of children in Texas

Teen birth, mental illness increase hospitalization of children in Texas

From 2004 to 2010 in Texas, mental illness was the most common reason for the hospitalization of children ages 10-14 while pregnancy/birth was the most common reason for the hospitalization of adolescents ages 15-17, according to researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston Medical School. [More]
Research findings may help health care providers curb painkiller misuse

Research findings may help health care providers curb painkiller misuse

People who misuse prescription pain relievers all have one thing in common, University of Georgia researchers have discovered: a history of recent illicit drug use. How they acquire such drugs varies according to age, however. [More]
Huntsman Cancer Institute receives NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Center designation

Huntsman Cancer Institute receives NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Center designation

The National Cancer Institute has awarded Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah its Comprehensive Cancer Center status, the highest designation possible. [More]
AMGF announces results, impact of Measure Up/Pressure Down campaign

AMGF announces results, impact of Measure Up/Pressure Down campaign

The American Medical Group Foundation today announced the results and impact of its second annual Measure Up/Pressure Down National Day of Action: Roll Up Your Sleeves! event. On May 7, during National High Blood Pressure Education Month, more than 140 campaign supporters across the country took an "action" for blood pressure control - including blood pressure screenings, materials dissemination, social media posts, web chats, website content updates, employee trainings, health fairs, and garnering media coverage - reaching 84.3 million Americans. [More]
Partnerships between healthcare insurers and pharmaceutical companies promote real-world value

Partnerships between healthcare insurers and pharmaceutical companies promote real-world value

PwC's Health Research Institute (HRI) reports that market forces are driving new sector collaborations– pairing traditional drug makers with insurers, health systems, patient groups and technology firms – to maximize real-world value and health outcomes. [More]
People who survive stroke may experience accelerated and persistent decline in cognitive function

People who survive stroke may experience accelerated and persistent decline in cognitive function

In a study that included nearly 24,000 participants, those who experienced a stroke had an acute decline in cognitive function and also accelerated and persistent cognitive decline over 6 years, according to an article in the July 7 issue of JAMA. [More]
Physical and psychological factors related to cognitive function vary in older women with ischemic stroke

Physical and psychological factors related to cognitive function vary in older women with ischemic stroke

An estimated 65 percent of ischemic stroke survivors experience cognitive impairment and decline. However, little is known about the varying roles of cognitive risk and protective factors before, during and after stroke. [More]
NIH-sponsored clinical trial evaluates new investigational vaccine against West Nile Virus infection

NIH-sponsored clinical trial evaluates new investigational vaccine against West Nile Virus infection

A clinical trial of a new investigational vaccine designed to protect against West Nile Virus infection will be sponsored by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health. [More]
FMNCA's disaster response program makes difference in patients' lives during Super Storm Sandy

FMNCA's disaster response program makes difference in patients' lives during Super Storm Sandy

Fresenius Medical Care North America, a division of Fresenius Medical Care and North America's largest provider of kidney care, hospitalist services and renal products, today hailed a new study by the Department of Health and Human Services this week showing that dialysis patients who received treatments immediately before Super Storm Sandy experienced a much better survival rate and less frequent visits to the hospital. [More]
New NEI study shows that microglia can accelerate damage wrought by blinding eye disorders

New NEI study shows that microglia can accelerate damage wrought by blinding eye disorders

Spider-like cells inside the brain, spinal cord and eye hunt for invaders, capturing and then devouring them. These cells, called microglia, often play a beneficial role by helping to clear trash and protect the central nervous system against infection. But a new study by researchers at the National Eye Institute (NEI) shows that they also accelerate damage wrought by blinding eye disorders, such as retinitis pigmentosa. [More]
New study shows negative effects of using high heels

New study shows negative effects of using high heels

A new study showing the negative effects of prolonged high heel use confirms expert consensus on the footwear, according to a UNC Charlotte expert. [More]
Study of genetic mutations could lead to optimized treatment plans for aplastic anemia patients

Study of genetic mutations could lead to optimized treatment plans for aplastic anemia patients

Scientists have identified a group of genetic mutations in patients with aplastic anemia, which likely will help doctors optimize treatment for this rare and deadly blood condition. The study, appearing in the New England Journal of Medicine, could lead to tailor-made treatment plans for aplastic anemia patients as part of the emerging precision medicine movement. [More]
Use of antipsychotic drugs more common in boys than girls, research shows

Use of antipsychotic drugs more common in boys than girls, research shows

Boys are more likely than girls to receive a prescription for antipsychotic medication regardless of age, researchers have found. [More]
R. Rodney Howell receives ASHG’s annual Advocacy Award

R. Rodney Howell receives ASHG’s annual Advocacy Award

The American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) has named R. Rodney Howell, MD, Professor in the Department of Pediatrics, Chairman Emeritus of Pediatrics, and Member of the Hussman Institute for Human Genomics, at the University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, as the first recipient of its new, annual Advocacy Award. [More]
National trial aims to reduce unnecessary use of antibiotics in post-acute and long-term care facilities

National trial aims to reduce unnecessary use of antibiotics in post-acute and long-term care facilities

The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine will be leading a $1.5 million national trial to examine methods to reduce unnecessary use of antibiotics in post-acute and long-term care (PA/LTC) facilities. [More]
Study: Umbilical cord milking improves blood pressure, red blood cell levels in preterm infants

Study: Umbilical cord milking improves blood pressure, red blood cell levels in preterm infants

A technique to increase the flow of blood from the umbilical cord into the infant's circulatory system improves blood pressure and red blood cell levels in preterm infants delivered by Cesarean section, according to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. [More]
NIDA announces recipients of Avenir Award programs for HIV/AIDS, genetics or epigenetics research

NIDA announces recipients of Avenir Award programs for HIV/AIDS, genetics or epigenetics research

The National Institute on Drug Abuse today announced the first six recipients of its two newly developed Avenir Award programs for HIV/AIDS and genetics or epigenetics research. The Avenir (meaning "future" in French) Awards support early stage investigators who propose highly innovative studies. The six scientists will each receive up to $300,000 per year for five years to support their research. [More]
Researchers call on government to drop restrictions on total fat consumption in Dietary Guidelines for Americans

Researchers call on government to drop restrictions on total fat consumption in Dietary Guidelines for Americans

In a Viewpoint published today in the Journal of the Medical Association (JAMA), researchers from the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University and Boston Children's Hospital call on the federal government to drop restrictions on total fat consumption in the forthcoming 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. [More]
Three studies describe advances toward development of antibodies to stop HIV

Three studies describe advances toward development of antibodies to stop HIV

A trio of studies being published today in the journals Science and Cell describes advances toward the development of an HIV vaccine. The three study teams all demonstrated techniques for stimulating animal cells to produce antibodies that either could stop HIV from infecting human cells in the laboratory or had the potential to evolve into such antibodies. [More]
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