Health and Human Services News and Research RSS Feed - Health and Human Services News and Research

New approach may offer improved way to detect early breast cancer

New approach may offer improved way to detect early breast cancer

Researchers have shown that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can detect the earliest signs of breast cancer recurrence and fast-growing tumors. Their approach detects micromestastases, breakaway tumor cells with the potential to develop into dangerous secondary breast cancer tumors elsewhere in the body. [More]
Findings may lead to more accurate diagnostic test, possible vaccine for oral and genital herpes

Findings may lead to more accurate diagnostic test, possible vaccine for oral and genital herpes

Findings from a pair of new studies could speed up the development of a universally accurate diagnostic test for human herpes simplex viruses, according to researchers at Johns Hopkins and Harvard universities and the National Institutes of Health. [More]
New study reveals role of hydrogen sulfide gas in autoimmune disease

New study reveals role of hydrogen sulfide gas in autoimmune disease

The immune system not only responds to infections and other potentially problematic abnormalities in the body, it also contains a built-in brake in the form of regulatory T cells, or Tregs. Tregs ensure that inflammatory responses don't get out of hand and do damage. In autoimmune diseases, sometimes these Treg cells don't act as they should. [More]
Many reproductive-age women experience pelvic pain that goes untreated, study finds

Many reproductive-age women experience pelvic pain that goes untreated, study finds

A high proportion of reproductive-age women may be experiencing pelvic pain that goes untreated, according to a study by researchers from the National Institutes of Health and the University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City. [More]
Grant program aims to provide oral health care to underserved people facing substance abuse issues

Grant program aims to provide oral health care to underserved people facing substance abuse issues

People with drug problems don't often come to mind as an underserved population regarding health care. Yet, because of their substance abuse issues, they often go without essential medical services, particularly when it comes to caring for their teeth and other oral tissues. [More]
Experimental Ebola virus vaccine protects cynomolgus macaques against current EBOV outbreak strain

Experimental Ebola virus vaccine protects cynomolgus macaques against current EBOV outbreak strain

National Institutes of Health scientists report that a single dose of an experimental Ebola virus (EBOV) vaccine completely protects cynomolgus macaques against the current EBOV outbreak strain, EBOV-Makona, when given at least seven days before exposure, and partially protects them if given three days prior. [More]
Clinical study shows two-drug combination can prolong survival in men with metastatic prostate cancer

Clinical study shows two-drug combination can prolong survival in men with metastatic prostate cancer

Newly diagnosed patients with metastatic, hormone-sensitive prostate cancer gained a dramatic survival benefit when started on two drugs simultaneously, rather than delaying the second drug until the cancer began to worsen, according to results of a clinical trial led by a Dana-Farber Cancer Institute scientist. [More]
Diet high in refined carbohydrates may lead to depression risk in postmenopausal women

Diet high in refined carbohydrates may lead to depression risk in postmenopausal women

A diet high in refined carbohydrates may lead to an increased risk for new-onset depression in postmenopausal women, according to a study published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. [More]
Dementia patients, caregivers think better care, support more important than finding cure for disease

Dementia patients, caregivers think better care, support more important than finding cure for disease

More than $100 million in federal funding was spent last year toward searching for a cure for Alzheimer's disease. However, if given the choice, most people with dementia and those caring for them would like to see the money go elsewhere, according to a recent study led by University at Buffalo researcher Davina Porock. [More]
NAM, FDA's CTP name 2015-2016 class of FDA Tobacco Regulatory Science Fellows

NAM, FDA's CTP name 2015-2016 class of FDA Tobacco Regulatory Science Fellows

The National Academy of Medicine, formerly the Institute of Medicine, along with the Food and Drug Administration's Center for Tobacco Products (CTP) have named the 2015-2016 class of the FDA Tobacco Regulatory Science Fellows. The five individuals were chosen through a highly selective national competition based on their exceptional, diverse professional qualifications to contribute to the work of CTP. [More]
Atomic level images reveal how neuropeptide hormone neurotensin may activate its receptors

Atomic level images reveal how neuropeptide hormone neurotensin may activate its receptors

Many hormones and neurotransmitters work by binding to receptors on a cell's exterior surface. This activates receptors causing them to twist, turn and spark chemical reactions inside cells. [More]
U.S. Navy leads government category in annual ranking of patent portfolios

U.S. Navy leads government category in annual ranking of patent portfolios

Predicting the risk of pirate attacks on vital shipping lanes could soon be easier, thanks to a data system that's just one of 364 technologies patented by the U.S. Navy (DoN) in 2014. [More]
New non-invasive spinal cord stimulation helps paralyzed men voluntarily move their legs

New non-invasive spinal cord stimulation helps paralyzed men voluntarily move their legs

Five men with complete motor paralysis were able to voluntarily generate step-like movements thanks to a new strategy that non-invasively delivers electrical stimulation to their spinal cords, according to a new study funded in part by the National Institutes of Health. The strategy, called transcutaneous stimulation, delivers electrical current to the spinal cord by way of electrodes strategically placed on the skin of the lower back. [More]
Study shows why candidate vaccine used in HVTN 505 clinical trial not protective against HIV infection

Study shows why candidate vaccine used in HVTN 505 clinical trial not protective against HIV infection

A study by researchers at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and Duke University helps explain why the candidate vaccine used in the HVTN 505 clinical trial was not protective against HIV infection despite robustly inducing anti-HIV antibodies: the vaccine stimulated antibodies that recognized HIV as well as microbes commonly found in the intestinal tract, part of the body's microbiome. [More]
Finding by UCSF researchers could increase availability of kidneys for transplant

Finding by UCSF researchers could increase availability of kidneys for transplant

Mild hypothermia in deceased organ donors significantly reduces delayed graft function in kidney transplant recipients when compared to normal body temperature, according to UC San Francisco researchers and collaborators, a finding that could lead to an increase in the availability of kidneys for transplant. [More]
National survey finds improvements in self-reported insurance coverage, access to care and health under ACA

National survey finds improvements in self-reported insurance coverage, access to care and health under ACA

Results of a national survey that included more than half a million adults indicates significant improvements in trends for self-reported insurance coverage, access to a personal physician and medications, affordability and health after the Affordable Care Act's first and second open enrollment periods, according to a study in the July 28 issue of JAMA, a theme issue on Medicare and Medicaid at 50. [More]
Parents with low health literacy less likely to select recommended weight-control strategies for children

Parents with low health literacy less likely to select recommended weight-control strategies for children

Parents who have low health literacy are less likely to choose government-recommended weight-loss strategies, such as increasing physical activity or serving more fruits and vegetables, to help their children control their weight than parents who are better able to understand basic health-related information, a new study suggests. [More]
Two-step regimen of experimental MERS vaccines show promise in mice

Two-step regimen of experimental MERS vaccines show promise in mice

A two-step regimen of experimental vaccines against Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) prompted immune responses in mice and rhesus macaques, report National Institutes of Health scientists who designed the vaccines. Vaccinated mice produced broadly neutralizing antibodies against multiple strains of the MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV), while vaccinated macaques were protected from severe lung damage when later exposed to MERS-CoV. [More]
RGS2 protein plays significant role in healthy egg-sperm union in mice

RGS2 protein plays significant role in healthy egg-sperm union in mice

Researchers at the National Institutes of Health have discovered a protein that plays a vital role in healthy egg-sperm union in mice. The protein RGS2 can delay an egg's development into an embryo in order to allow time for sperm to arrive and merge with the egg in a healthy fertilization process. The embryo cannot survive without the male chromosomes. [More]

Healthfirst notifies data privacy incident

Healthfirst, 100 Church Street, New York, New York 10007, is notifying approximately 5300 affected members and past members that their personal information may have been compromised in the course of a criminal fraud scheme perpetrated against Healthfirst. Social Security numbers and credit card information were not affected. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement