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USC, CHLA receive prestigious Clinical and Translational Science Award from NIH

USC, CHLA receive prestigious Clinical and Translational Science Award from NIH

On June 30, 2016, a team of researchers led by Thomas Buchanan, MD, Michele Kipke PhD and Jonathan Samet, MD, of the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California received a prestigious Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) from the National Institutes of Health. [More]
FDA approves new topical retinoid gel for OTC treatment of acne

FDA approves new topical retinoid gel for OTC treatment of acne

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Differin Gel 0.1% (adapalene), a once-daily topical gel for the over-the-counter (OTC) treatment of acne. Differin Gel 0.1% is approved for use in people 12 years of age and older. [More]
Healthy weight programs for lesbian and bisexual women aim to achieve changes in lifestyle habits

Healthy weight programs for lesbian and bisexual women aim to achieve changes in lifestyle habits

Lesbian and bisexual women have higher rates of obesity, smoking and stress when compared to their heterosexual counterparts, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office on Women's Health. [More]
FDA approves Roche cobas HPV Test to be used with SurePath Preservative Fluid

FDA approves Roche cobas HPV Test to be used with SurePath Preservative Fluid

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved the Roche cobas HPV Test as the first test for Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) that can be used with cervical cells obtained for a Pap test and collected in SurePath Preservative Fluid. [More]
Researchers develop conceptual model to improve acute care delivery and outcomes

Researchers develop conceptual model to improve acute care delivery and outcomes

Researchers at the George Washington University created a conceptual model for episodes of acute, unscheduled care - care that can be delivered in a variety of settings from emergency departments to doctors' offices, from urgent care centers to telemedicine. [More]
Group intervention may be effective in improving overall health of aging lesbian, bisexual women

Group intervention may be effective in improving overall health of aging lesbian, bisexual women

The Bay Area has long been one of the nation's leading advocates for LGBT equality and community support. Recent studies, however, reveal that one population -- aging lesbian and bisexual women -- are overlooked in the realm of health care and the promotion of healthy lifestyle choices tailored to their needs. [More]
New study to investigate how genetic factors contribute to breast cancer disparities

New study to investigate how genetic factors contribute to breast cancer disparities

The largest study ever to investigate how genetic and biological factors contribute to breast cancer risk among black women launched today. [More]
PREVAIL IV trial opens in Liberia for EVD survivors with persistent traces of Ebola virus RNA

PREVAIL IV trial opens in Liberia for EVD survivors with persistent traces of Ebola virus RNA

The Partnership for Research on Ebola Virus in Liberia, a U.S.-Liberia joint Clinical Research Partnership, today announced the opening of PREVAIL IV, a treatment trial for men who have survived Ebola virus disease (EVD) but continue to have evidence of Ebola virus genetic material, RNA, in their semen. [More]
FDA approves Absorb GT1 BVS to treat coronary artery disease

FDA approves Absorb GT1 BVS to treat coronary artery disease

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved the first fully absorbable stent to treat coronary artery disease. [More]
Implementation science may help prevent mother-to-child HIV transmissions

Implementation science may help prevent mother-to-child HIV transmissions

An emerging field, known as implementation science, may help reduce the nearly 150,000 instances of mother-to-child HIV transmissions that occur annually around the world, mostly in developing countries. c [More]
Report highlights need to strengthen response to major public health threats

Report highlights need to strengthen response to major public health threats

In a report released today by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, an Independent Panel formed to review HHS's response to Ebola made several recommendations on how the nation's federal public health system should strengthen its response to major public health threats, both internationally and domestically. [More]
FDA approves Raindrop Near Vision Inlay device for patients with presbyopia

FDA approves Raindrop Near Vision Inlay device for patients with presbyopia

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved the Raindrop Near Vision Inlay, a device implanted in the cornea (the clear, front surface) of one eye to improve near vision in certain patients with presbyopia. [More]
Epclusa drug receives FDA approval for treating adult patients with chronic HCV

Epclusa drug receives FDA approval for treating adult patients with chronic HCV

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Epclusa to treat adult patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) both with and without cirrhosis (advanced liver disease). [More]
Scientists explain how engineered anthrax toxin proteins could help eliminate cancerous tumors

Scientists explain how engineered anthrax toxin proteins could help eliminate cancerous tumors

Scientists from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute all parts of the National Institutes of Health, describe how combining engineered anthrax toxin proteins and existing chemotherapy drugs could potentially yield a therapy to reduce or eliminate cancerous tumors. [More]
Study finds dramatic increase in nonmedical use of prescription opioids in the U.S.

Study finds dramatic increase in nonmedical use of prescription opioids in the U.S.

Nonmedical use of prescription opioids more than doubled among adults in the United States from 2001-2002 to 2012-2013, based on a study from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, part of the National Institutes of Health. Nearly 10 million Americans, or 4.1 percent of the adult population, used opioid medications in 2012-2013 a class of drugs that includes OxyContin and Vicodin, without a prescription or not as prescribed (in greater amounts, more often, or longer than prescribed) in the past year. [More]
Study to evaluate magnitude of health risks caused by Zika virus in pregnant women, infants

Study to evaluate magnitude of health risks caused by Zika virus in pregnant women, infants

The National Institutes of Health and Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz-Fiocruz, a national scientific research organization linked to the Brazilian Ministry of Health, have begun a multi-country study to evaluate the magnitude of health risks that Zika virus infection poses to pregnant women and their developing fetuses and infants. [More]
New study suggests how rod photoreceptors may have originated to give rise to nocturnal mammals

New study suggests how rod photoreceptors may have originated to give rise to nocturnal mammals

Retinas from our earliest vertebrate ancestors had cone-like photoreceptors, presumably allowing them to see in daylight, but little ability to see at night. Then, millions of years ago in the Mesozoic era, and in relatively short order, mammals emerged that had retinas with predominantly rod photoreceptors, allowing for them to see at night perhaps to hunt for food while their dinosaur predators were dozing. [More]
Brain imaging finds link between blood-brain barrier disruption and severity of bleeding after stroke therapy

Brain imaging finds link between blood-brain barrier disruption and severity of bleeding after stroke therapy

In a study of stroke patients, investigators confirmed through MRI brain scans that there was an association between the extent of disruption to the brain's protective blood-brain barrier and the severity of bleeding following invasive stroke therapy. The results of the National Institutes of Health-funded study were published in Neurology. [More]
FDA approves novel stomach-draining device to treat obesity

FDA approves novel stomach-draining device to treat obesity

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved a new obesity treatment device that uses a surgically-placed tube to drain a portion of the stomach contents after every meal. [More]
Physical activity can counteract genetic risk linked to bone fragility in childhood

Physical activity can counteract genetic risk linked to bone fragility in childhood

Exercise, particularly high-impact activity, builds stronger bones in children, even for those who carry genetic variants that predispose them to bone weakness, according to new research. [More]
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