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Oregon's new birth control law could improve access to all forms of contraception

Oregon's new birth control law could improve access to all forms of contraception

Researchers at Oregon Health & Science University, University of Minnesota School of Public Health and George Mason University applaud Oregon's new birth control law which allows women age 18 or older to obtain some methods of hormonal contraception directly from pharmacies, without having to visit a prescribing clinician, yet note how the law could go even further to improve access to all forms of contraception, according to a viewpoint article published in the Journal of the American Medical Association today. [More]
Young people with Cushing syndrome may be at higher risk for suicide, depression

Young people with Cushing syndrome may be at higher risk for suicide, depression

Children with Cushing syndrome may be at higher risk for suicide as well as for depression, anxiety and other mental health conditions long after their disease has been successfully treated, according to a study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health. [More]
FDA issues draft guidance to support development of approved ADF opioids

FDA issues draft guidance to support development of approved ADF opioids

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today issued a draft guidance intended to support industry in their development of generic versions of approved opioids with abuse-deterrent formulations (ADF) while ensuring that generic ADF opioids are no less abuse-deterrent than the brand-name drug. [More]
Couple's caffeinated beverage consumption can increase risk of miscarriage

Couple's caffeinated beverage consumption can increase risk of miscarriage

A woman is more likely to miscarry if she and her partner drink more than two caffeinated beverages a day during the weeks leading up to conception, according to a new study from researchers at the National Institutes of Health and Ohio State University, Columbus. [More]
FDA announces required class-wide safety labeling changes for IR opioid pain medications

FDA announces required class-wide safety labeling changes for IR opioid pain medications

In a continuing effort to educate prescribers and patients about the potential risks related to opioid use, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration today announced required class-wide safety labeling changes for immediate-release (IR) opioid pain medications. Among the changes, the FDA is requiring a new boxed warning about the serious risks of misuse, abuse, addiction, overdose and death. [More]
Physical and mental well-being tied closely to one another

Physical and mental well-being tied closely to one another

In a study of more than 8,000 adults, those with a chronic health condition such as diabetes or asthma were more likely to report psychological distress and functional impairment if they were residents of poor or middle-income households. [More]
Cinqair (reslizumab) approved for treatment of severe asthma

Cinqair (reslizumab) approved for treatment of severe asthma

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Cinqair (reslizumab) for use with other asthma medicines for the maintenance treatment of severe asthma in patients aged 18 years and older. Cinqair is approved for patients who have a history of severe asthma attacks (exacerbations) despite receiving their current asthma medicines. [More]
Anthim (obiltoxaximab) injection approved for treatment of inhalational anthrax

Anthim (obiltoxaximab) injection approved for treatment of inhalational anthrax

On Friday, March 18, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Anthim (obiltoxaximab) injection to treat inhalational anthrax in combination with appropriate antibacterial drugs. Anthim is also approved to prevent inhalational anthrax when alternative therapies are not available or not appropriate. [More]
New 3D micro-scaffold technology promotes reprogramming of stem cells into neurons

New 3D micro-scaffold technology promotes reprogramming of stem cells into neurons

National Institutes of Health-funded scientists have developed a 3D micro-scaffold technology that promotes reprogramming of stem cells into neurons, and supports growth of neuronal connections capable of transmitting electrical signals. [More]
Many kidney transplant patients may benefit from lower-than-standard dose of CNIs

Many kidney transplant patients may benefit from lower-than-standard dose of CNIs

The kidney is the most commonly transplanted organ in the United States, with more than 17,000 transplants performed each year. Following kidney transplant, patients are routinely placed on a regimen of immunosuppressant medications to prevent organ rejection, which often includes calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) as the backbone medication of this regimen. [More]
Fish's retina inspired autofocus contact lens could benefit presbyopia patients

Fish's retina inspired autofocus contact lens could benefit presbyopia patients

Making the most of the low light in the muddy rivers where it swims, the elephant nose fish survives by being able to spot predators amongst the muck with a uniquely shaped retina, the part of the eye that captures light. In a new study, researchers looked to the fish's retinal structure to inform the design of a contact lens that can adjust its focus. [More]
Promoting breastfeeding as 'natural' way could result in harmful decision-making, experts warn

Promoting breastfeeding as 'natural' way could result in harmful decision-making, experts warn

Breastfeeding campaigns that extol breastfeeding as the "natural" way to feed infants could result in harmful decision-making by some parents on other important health matters, according to experts from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
NIMH-supported researchers discover key secrets of the underlying brain circuitry

NIMH-supported researchers discover key secrets of the underlying brain circuitry

A few years ago, researchers supported by the National Institutes of Health discovered in rats that awake mental replay of past experiences is critical for learning and making informed choices. Now, the team has discovered key secrets of the underlying brain circuitry -- including a unique system that encodes location during inactive periods. [More]
FDA approves Xalkori (crizotinib) to treat patients with ROS-1 positive NSCLC

FDA approves Xalkori (crizotinib) to treat patients with ROS-1 positive NSCLC

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Xalkori (crizotinib) to treat people with advanced (metastatic) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose tumors have an ROS-1 gene alteration. Xalkori is the first and only FDA approved treatment for patients with ROS-1 positive NSCLC. [More]
Newly released Dietary Guidelines ignore environmental provisions, sustainable agriculture practices

Newly released Dietary Guidelines ignore environmental provisions, sustainable agriculture practices

A national survey of 800 Americans shows that 74 percent of adults believe the newly released Dietary Guidelines should include environmental provisions and support sustainable agriculture practices. [More]
IUPUI researcher awarded $1.1 million grant to develop tools to improve care for chronic pain patients

IUPUI researcher awarded $1.1 million grant to develop tools to improve care for chronic pain patients

An Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis researcher has been awarded $1.1 million to develop information-based tools to help primary care providers improve care for patients with chronic pain, a condition that affects 100 million Americans at a cost of $630 billion annually in health care costs and lost worker productivity. [More]
Early childhood intervention guide can help prevent substance use disorders

Early childhood intervention guide can help prevent substance use disorders

An online guide about interventions in early childhood that can help prevent drug use and other unhealthy behaviors was launched today by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, part of the National Institutes of Health. [More]
NIH scientists show how neurons in the eye may use math to differentiate moving objects

NIH scientists show how neurons in the eye may use math to differentiate moving objects

Our eyes constantly send bits of information about the world around us to our brains where the information is assembled into objects we recognize. Along the way, a series of neurons in the eye uses electrical and chemical signals to relay the information. In a study of mice, National Institutes of Health scientists showed how one type of neuron may do this to distinguish moving objects. [More]
FDA allows marketing of one-time use contact lens to help measure patient's intraocular pressure

FDA allows marketing of one-time use contact lens to help measure patient's intraocular pressure

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today allowed marketing of a one-time use contact lens that may help practitioners identify the best time of day to measure a patient's intraocular pressure (IOP). Elevated IOP is often associated with the optic nerve damage that is characteristic of glaucoma. [More]
Complex biomarker tests for molecularly targeted therapies lack evidentiary standards

Complex biomarker tests for molecularly targeted therapies lack evidentiary standards

Potentially useful biomarker tests for molecularly targeted therapies are not being adopted appropriately into clinical practice because of a lack of common evidentiary standards necessary for regulatory, reimbursement, and treatment decisions. [More]
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