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Hospitalizations for injection drug use-related infective endocarditis increasing among young Americans

Hospitalizations for injection drug use-related infective endocarditis increasing among young Americans

Hospitalizations for infective endocarditis, a heart valve infection often attributed to injection drug use, have increased significantly among young adult Americans--particularly in whites and females--according to a new study by researchers from Tufts Medical Center and Tufts University School of Medicine. [More]
Surveys find public awareness about heart valve disease alarmingly low in the U.S.

Surveys find public awareness about heart valve disease alarmingly low in the U.S.

New public opinion surveys released today by the nonprofit Alliance for Aging Research show that public awareness about heart valve disease (HVD) in the U.S. is alarmingly low. [More]
FAU's College of Nursing receives HRSA grant for advanced education program

FAU's College of Nursing receives HRSA grant for advanced education program

The Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing at Florida Atlantic University has received a three-year, $2 million grant from the Health Resources & Services Administration of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services for an advanced nursing education program titled, "Caring-based Academic Partnerships to Enhance Nurse Practitioner Readiness and Willingness to Practice in Rural and Underserved Communities." [More]
NCATS scientists identify promising compounds effective in inhibiting Zika virus replication

NCATS scientists identify promising compounds effective in inhibiting Zika virus replication

Researchers at the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences recently identified compounds that potentially can be used to inhibit Zika virus replication and reduce its ability to kill brain cells. [More]
Revised FDA guidance recommends universal testing of entire blood supply for Zika virus in the U.S.

Revised FDA guidance recommends universal testing of entire blood supply for Zika virus in the U.S.

As a further safety measure against the emerging Zika virus outbreak, today the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a revised guidance recommending universal testing of donated Whole Blood and blood components for Zika virus in the U.S. and its territories. [More]
Researchers develop new method to culture norovirus in intestinal cells

Researchers develop new method to culture norovirus in intestinal cells

Researchers have succeeded in culturing norovirus in human intestinal cells, a breakthrough that could help scientists develop novel therapeutics and vaccines against the debilitating effects of the virus. [More]
ISCT announces reasons for opposing current version of REGROW Act on cell therapies

ISCT announces reasons for opposing current version of REGROW Act on cell therapies

The International Society for Cellular Therapy, the global society of clinicians, researchers, regulatory specialists, technologists, and industry partners dedicated to the translation of cellular therapy into safe and effective therapies to improve patients’ lives, today announces its reasons for opposition to the current version of the REGROW Act - the US government’s legislative efforts to promote faster patient access to effective new cellular therapies. [More]
NIH researchers discover rare, lethal inflammatory disease that affects young children

NIH researchers discover rare, lethal inflammatory disease that affects young children

National Institutes of Health researchers have discovered a rare and sometimes lethal inflammatory disease - otulipenia - that primarily affects young children. They have also identified anti-inflammatory treatments that ease some of the patients' symptoms: fever, skin rashes, diarrhea, joint pain and overall failure to grow or thrive. [More]
Popular pain and fever reliever does not worsen asthma in children, study shows

Popular pain and fever reliever does not worsen asthma in children, study shows

WIn a study of children with mild, persistent asthma, scientists found that acetaminophen was tolerated without the worsening of asthma, when compared with ibuprofen use. [More]

Cell phone use may lead to feeling less socially connected based on gender and habits, study finds

In this digital age, with phones at our finger tips, you would think that access to constant communication would make us feel closer to one another. [More]
Scientists examine how neural responses change over time in patients with Parkinson's disease

Scientists examine how neural responses change over time in patients with Parkinson's disease

Neuroscientists peered into the brains of patients with Parkinson's disease and two similar conditions to see how their neural responses changed over time. [More]
FDA issues revised draft guidance to improve premarket safety notifications for new dietary ingredients

FDA issues revised draft guidance to improve premarket safety notifications for new dietary ingredients

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today issued a revised draft guidance to improve dietary supplement companies' new dietary ingredient (NDI) premarket safety notifications to the agency. These notifications help the agency identify safety concerns before products reach consumers. [More]
Study finds oral immunotherapy safe, effective at suppressing peanut allergy in preschool children

Study finds oral immunotherapy safe, effective at suppressing peanut allergy in preschool children

Nearly 80 percent of peanut-allergic preschool children successfully incorporated peanut-containing foods into their diets after receiving peanut oral immunotherapy (OIT), a clinical trial has found. [More]
FDA issues updated draft recommendations on submitting new 510(k) for modified devices

FDA issues updated draft recommendations on submitting new 510(k) for modified devices

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today issued draft updated recommendations to help manufacturers determine when they are required to notify the FDA about modifications made to certain medical devices already on the market, including a separate guidance applicable to software devices. [More]
RAND launches new tools for improving community-based efforts to prevent teen pregnancy

RAND launches new tools for improving community-based efforts to prevent teen pregnancy

Researchers from the RAND Corporation have launched a web-based guide for community leaders to use when they are planning to run teen pregnancy prevention programs. [More]
NIH launches clinical trial of experimental vaccine candidate for preventing Zika virus infection

NIH launches clinical trial of experimental vaccine candidate for preventing Zika virus infection

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, has launched a clinical trial of a vaccine candidate intended to prevent Zika virus infection. [More]
Scientists uncover genetic cause of rare pediatric progressive neuropathy

Scientists uncover genetic cause of rare pediatric progressive neuropathy

Researchers from the National Institutes of Health and their colleagues identified the genetic cause and a possible therapeutic target for a rare form of pediatric progressive neuropathy. [More]
Florida reports occurrence of local mosquito-borne Zika virus transmission in four people

Florida reports occurrence of local mosquito-borne Zika virus transmission in four people

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has been informed by the State of Florida that Zika virus infections in four people were likely caused by bites of local Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. [More]
Report: Zika cases soar in Puerto Rico

Report: Zika cases soar in Puerto Rico

As of July 7, Zika has been diagnosed in 5,582 people, including 672 pregnant women, in Puerto Rico according to a new report published today in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR). [More]
Researchers find different immunological profiles in HIV-infected individuals who produce bNAbs

Researchers find different immunological profiles in HIV-infected individuals who produce bNAbs

People living with HIV who naturally produce broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) that may help suppress the virus have different immunological profiles than people who do not, researchers report. [More]
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