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Hospital-initiated smoking cessation interventions may improve patient outcomes, decrease re-hospitalization

Hospital-initiated smoking cessation interventions may improve patient outcomes, decrease re-hospitalization

A new study from the University of Ottawa Heart Institute, in collaboration with the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, has established that greater adoption of hospital-initiated tobacco cessation interventions improve patient outcomes and decrease further healthcare utilization. [More]
UofL expands oncology research with addition of 33,000 human tissue samples

UofL expands oncology research with addition of 33,000 human tissue samples

The University of Louisville has expanded its oncology research strength through the addition of approximately 33,000 human tissue samples and specimens. The samples were transferred by Catholic Health Initiatives to further the shared commitment and collaboration in advancing research and action in the fight against cancer. [More]
SR Instruments launches new SR585i Stand-on Scale for obtaining accurate weight data

SR Instruments launches new SR585i Stand-on Scale for obtaining accurate weight data

SR Instruments, a leading manufacturer of purpose-built scales for hospitals, medical facilities, and long-term care centers today announced the addition of a new stand-on scale, the SR585i, to its SR Scales product line. [More]
ECDC assessment outlines current and future CRE risks for human health

ECDC assessment outlines current and future CRE risks for human health

Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) infections are associated with high mortality, primarily due to delays in administration of effective treatment and the limited availability of effective treatment options. [More]
Discrimination linked to lower vaccination rates among racial/ethnic minorities

Discrimination linked to lower vaccination rates among racial/ethnic minorities

Yearly flu shots are strongly recommended for adults with certain chronic illnesses, but patients of racial/ethnic minority groups are less likely to receive them. [More]
Depressive symptoms may affect fertility of women

Depressive symptoms may affect fertility of women

Women with severe depressive symptoms have a decreased chance of becoming pregnant, while the use of psychotropic medications does not appear to harm fertility, a study by researchers from the Boston University Schools of Public Health and Medicine shows. [More]
Marijuana use among teens declines despite widespread legalization

Marijuana use among teens declines despite widespread legalization

A survey of more than 216,000 adolescents from all 50 states indicates the number of teens with marijuana-related problems is declining. Similarly, the rates of marijuana use by young people are falling despite the fact more U.S. states are legalizing or decriminalizing marijuana use and the number of adults using the drug has increased. [More]
New smart phone app connects patient and doctor via Facebook

New smart phone app connects patient and doctor via Facebook

Telemedicine, which allows doctors to communicate, diagnose and even treat their patients remotely is on the rise thanks to advances in information technology. It allows healthcare workers to securely monitor patients in inaccessible parts of the world as well as providing more timely responses for patients in many situations. [More]
Existing MCI screening tools result in more than 7% false-negative error rate, study finds

Existing MCI screening tools result in more than 7% false-negative error rate, study finds

Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a slight but noticeable and measurable decline in cognitive abilities, such as remembering names or a list of items. While changes may not be severe enough to disrupt daily life, a clinical diagnosis of MCI indicates an increased risk of eventually developing Alzheimer's disease or another type of dementia. [More]
Researchers find genetic mutations linked to increased risk factor for PTSD

Researchers find genetic mutations linked to increased risk factor for PTSD

In the largest study of DNA samples from service members with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), researchers have identified genetic mutations that may be associated with an increased risk factor for PTSD. [More]
Two new optical devices could accelerate disease diagnosis, cut healthcare costs

Two new optical devices could accelerate disease diagnosis, cut healthcare costs

Two new optical devices could reduce the need to take tissue samples during medical examinations and operations and to then send them for testing – potentially speeding up diagnosis and treatment and cutting healthcare costs. [More]
Understanding structure of HIV-1 protease vital to development of next-generation HIV drugs

Understanding structure of HIV-1 protease vital to development of next-generation HIV drugs

HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, has become one of the world’s most serious health and development challenges. [More]
Heart failure patients who receive influenza vaccine less likely to develop dementia

Heart failure patients who receive influenza vaccine less likely to develop dementia

Influenza vaccination is associated with a lower risk of dementia in patients with heart failure, according to a study in more than 20 000 patients presented today at Heart Failure 2016 and the 3rd World Congress on Acute Heart Failure by Dr Ju-Chi Liu, director of the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Taipei Medical University - Shuang Ho Hospital, in New Taipei City, Taiwan. [More]
Chemical compound eCF506 may be highly effective at blocking growth of breast cancer cells

Chemical compound eCF506 may be highly effective at blocking growth of breast cancer cells

A drug for breast cancer that is more effective than existing medicines may be a step closer thanks to new research. [More]
Clinical study examines efficacy of new interactive software game to treat pediatric food allergies

Clinical study examines efficacy of new interactive software game to treat pediatric food allergies

Elizabeth McQuaid, Ph.D., a staff psychologist from the Bradley Hasbro Children's Research Center, is leading the Phase II trial of an interactive software game developed to help children with food allergies better manage allergy symptoms, social situations and proper food avoidance. [More]
Studies explore possible link between pediatric cancer and light therapy for newborn jaundice

Studies explore possible link between pediatric cancer and light therapy for newborn jaundice

Two new studies raise enough questions about a possible link between childhood cancer and light therapy for newborn jaundice that clinicians should exercise caution in prescribing the treatment for infants whose jaundice is likely to resolve on its own, a pediatric oncologist from Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center argues in an editorial published today by the journal Pediatrics. [More]
Researchers developing web-based, decision-support tool for osteoarthritis patients

Researchers developing web-based, decision-support tool for osteoarthritis patients

Researchers at UMass Medical School are developing a web-based, decision-support tool for osteoarthritis patients that will provide individualized, evidence-based information in real time to guide optimal knee and hip care, including joint replacement. [More]
Study: One-third of patients hospitalised with heart failure do not return to work

Study: One-third of patients hospitalised with heart failure do not return to work

One-third of patients hospitalised with heart failure for the first time have not returned to work one year later, reveals a study in nearly 12 000 patients presented today at Heart Failure 2016 and the 3rd World Congress on Acute Heart Failure by Dr Rasmus Roerth, a physician at Copenhagen University Hospital in Copenhagen, Denmark. [More]
Nine creative ways to improve cognitive development of children in developing countries

Nine creative ways to improve cognitive development of children in developing countries

Grand Challenges Canada, funded by the Government of Canada, and the "Saving Brains" partners today announced investments in nine creative ways to protect and nurture the cognitive development of children in developing countries. [More]
Robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy may reduce risk of blood loss, prolonged hospital stays in obese men

Robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy may reduce risk of blood loss, prolonged hospital stays in obese men

In obese prostate cancer patients, robotic-assisted surgery to remove the prostate reduces the risk of blood loss and prolonged hospital stays, a Loyola Medicine study has found. [More]
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