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Early exposure to pathogens may play pivotal role in immune system development

Early exposure to pathogens may play pivotal role in immune system development

Exposure to pathogens early in life is beneficial to the education and development of the human immune system. [More]
Feeding breast milk during first month of life may spur brain growth in preterm infants

Feeding breast milk during first month of life may spur brain growth in preterm infants

Feeding premature babies mostly breast milk during the first month of life appears to spur more robust brain growth, compared with babies given little or no breast milk. [More]
Modified surgical technique may be effective treatment option for chronic temporal headache

Modified surgical technique may be effective treatment option for chronic temporal headache

A modified surgical technique may provide a simpler approach to the surgical treatment for one type of chronic headache, according to an "Ideas and Innovations" paper in the May issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). [More]
Promising method may help identify new antimicrobials to target CRE infection

Promising method may help identify new antimicrobials to target CRE infection

In recent years, hospitals have reported dramatic increases in the number of cases of the highly contagious, difficult-to-treat, and often deadly antibiotic-resistant bacteria carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE). Now, investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center have developed a promising method of identifying new antimicrobials that target these organisms. The research is published in April issue of the journal ASSAY and Drug Development Technologies. [More]
Older women with chronic health problems more likely to have lower quality of life

Older women with chronic health problems more likely to have lower quality of life

Researchers writing in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society recently learned that older women who are frail, and who have six or more chronic health conditions, are twice as likely to have a lower quality of life compared to women with less than three risk factors. [More]
Frailty, depression symptoms in older adults can affect spouses

Frailty, depression symptoms in older adults can affect spouses

Frailty, a condition that affects 10 percent of people aged 65 and older, can make older adults more prone to disability, falls, hospitalization and a shorter lifespan. Recently, researchers writing in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society examined the effects of frailty and depression on married couples. [More]
DIEP flap breast reconstruction improves long-term quality of life for breast cancer patients

DIEP flap breast reconstruction improves long-term quality of life for breast cancer patients

For women who have undergone mastectomy for breast cancer, breast reconstruction using the abdominal "DIEP flap" provides good long-term quality of life (QOL)—similar to that of women without breast cancer, reports a study in the May issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). [More]

Machine learning could become powerful tool in plastic surgery

With an ever-increasing volume of electronic data being collected by the healthcare system, researchers are exploring the use of machine learning—a subfield of artificial intelligence—to improve medical care and patient outcomes. [More]
Excess abdominal fat in obese African American women could hide symptoms of ovarian cancer

Excess abdominal fat in obese African American women could hide symptoms of ovarian cancer

African American women with ovarian cancer are more likely to die from the disease than are White women and they are also much more likely to be obese. These factors may be linked by the new finding that excess abdominal fat in overweight and obese women could interfere with the detection of early symptoms of ovarian cancer, as presented in a study published in Journal of Women's Health, a peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free on the Journal of Women's Health website until May 28, 2016. [More]
People diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis often left with little or no support for emotional problems

People diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis often left with little or no support for emotional problems

In a new University of Manchester study, people with psoriatic arthritis have told researchers about the condition's deeply damaging mental effects and how healthcare services failed to prepare them for its reality. [More]
Daily chocolate consumption may improve cardio-metabolic health

Daily chocolate consumption may improve cardio-metabolic health

A new study published in the British Journal of Nutrition appears to back up the adage that a little of what you fancy does you good. [More]
Outbreak of tropical parasitic infection observed for first time in the Arctic

Outbreak of tropical parasitic infection observed for first time in the Arctic

An outbreak of an intestinal parasite common in the tropics, known as Cryptosporidium, has been identified for the first time in the Arctic. The discovery was made in Nunavik, Quebec, by a team from the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, in collaboration with the Nunavik Department of Public Health, Institut National de Santé Publique du Québec and Health Canada. The discovery, which was documented in the journal PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, could have long-term implications for the health of children in Nunavik and Nunavut's communities. [More]
New model can increase active surveillance for low-risk prostate cancer patients

New model can increase active surveillance for low-risk prostate cancer patients

Urologists at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Genesis Healthcare Partners have tested a new model of care for patients with low-risk prostate cancer. The evidence-based approach uses best practices to appropriately select and follow patients to avoid disease overtreatment. Results of the three-year study are now published online in the journal of Urology. [More]
Study highlights significant burden of migraine on family activities

Study highlights significant burden of migraine on family activities

The debilitating pain and disability of migraine also attacks the emotional, social and financial fabric of a family, according to a new study conducted by researchers at Montefiore Headache Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, affiliated with the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Vedanta Research, the Mayo Clinic and Allergan plc. The findings were published today in Volume 91, Issue 5 of Mayo Clinic Proceedings. [More]
Disparities exist in care for low-income kids with food allergy

Disparities exist in care for low-income kids with food allergy

Low-income families of children with food allergies spend 2.5 times more on emergency department and hospitalization costs nationally, according to new Northwestern Medicine research. [More]
Diagnosing heart attacks in 1 hour: an interview with Dr Richard Body

Diagnosing heart attacks in 1 hour: an interview with Dr Richard Body

Cardiac troponin is a highly sensitive and specific biomarker for myocardial injury but concentrations in the blood rise over several hours after the onset of an acute myocardial infarction. [More]
Researchers develop new quantitative assessment of motor control in kids with cerebral palsy

Researchers develop new quantitative assessment of motor control in kids with cerebral palsy

Children with cerebral palsy frequently undergo invasive surgeries -- lengthening tendons, rotating bones, transferring muscles to new locations -- in hopes of improving their physical ability to walk or move. [More]
Research highlights global economic burden of norovirus

Research highlights global economic burden of norovirus

While norovirus is often linked in the news to outbreaks on cruise ships, the highly contagious stomach bug sickens nearly 700 million around the world every year and results in roughly $4.2 billion in health care costs and $60.3 billion in societal costs annually, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests. [More]
Two London students make innovative medical devices to improve lives of people with Parkinson’s disease

Two London students make innovative medical devices to improve lives of people with Parkinson’s disease

Two London students, who have invented separate pieces of medical technology that could help revolutionise the lives of people with Parkinson’s disease, could soon see their innovative devices available to millions of sufferers after they were shortlisted for a prestigious award. [More]
New national database could help identify major influences on miscarriage

New national database could help identify major influences on miscarriage

A new national database could help relieve the misery of miscarriage for thousands of women. [More]
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