Hypothermia News and Research RSS Feed - Hypothermia News and Research

When exposed to cold temperatures, your body begins to lose heat faster than it can be produced. Prolonged exposure to cold will eventually use up your body’s stored energy. The result is hypothermia, or abnormally low body temperature. Body temperature that is too low affects the brain, making the victim unable to think clearly or move well. This makes hypothermia particularly dangerous because a person may not know it is happening and won’t be able to do anything about it.

Hypothermia is most likely at very cold temperatures, but it can occur even at cool temperatures (above 40°F) if a person becomes chilled from rain, sweat, or submersion in cold water.
DTI assessment indicates that mild hypothermia therapy may be beneficial for patients with diffuse axonal injury

DTI assessment indicates that mild hypothermia therapy may be beneficial for patients with diffuse axonal injury

Mild hypothermia has been shown to exert apparent neuroprotective effects in animal models of diffuse axonal injury. However, the clinical efficacy of mild hypothermia is controversial. [More]

Therapeutic hypothermia may not be effective in all patients who suffered heart attack, says study

Whole body cooling in comatose patients who have suffered a heart attack can limit the damage to brain tissue caused by the restoration of blood flow and oxygen. [More]

Study examines forensic cases of hypothermia deaths in South Australia and Sweden

New research from the University of Adelaide shows that the state of South Australia has a higher rate of deaths from extreme cold compared with the northern European nation of Sweden. [More]
St. Joseph's Hospital opens new $20 million Heart Institute

St. Joseph's Hospital opens new $20 million Heart Institute

St. Joseph's Hospital entered the next era of cardiac care by opening a new $20 million Heart Institute on Feb. 10, 2014. St. Joseph's Hospital Heart Institute is one of the most advanced and comprehensive centers for cardiovascular medicine in Florida, performing more than 50,000 adult cardiac catheterizations. It is also has the only pediatric catheterization program in Hillsborough County. [More]

Study to evaluate connections between brain networks and religious thought

Building on previous evidence showing that religious belief involves cognitive activity that can be mapped to specific brain regions, a new study has found that causal, directional connections between these brain networks can be linked to differences in religious thought. [More]
USAMRMC to develop strategic research plan that identifies critical research priority areas in TBI

USAMRMC to develop strategic research plan that identifies critical research priority areas in TBI

The U.S. Department of Defense funds more than 500 neurotrauma research projects totaling over $700 million. Yet there remains a large unmet medical need for effective treatments of traumatic brain injury (TBI), a major cause of disability and mortality. [More]
Professor studies impact of different levels of physical contact on premature infants

Professor studies impact of different levels of physical contact on premature infants

The benefit that premature infants gain from skin-to-skin contact with their mothers is measurable even 10 years after birth, reports a new study in Biological Psychiatry. [More]
New projects advance treatments for radiation syndrome, cardiac arrest-induced brain injury and rare blood disorder

New projects advance treatments for radiation syndrome, cardiac arrest-induced brain injury and rare blood disorder

​The National Institutes of Health today has launched three pre-clinical projects to advance potential new treatments for acute radiation syndrome, brain injury following cardiac arrest and a rare blood disorder called beta thalassemia. [More]

Better to fat finger a text than to lose a finger due to the cold

The popular half-gloves that leave fingers uncovered for texting may be good for communicating electronically but they may also lead to permanent loss of fingers due to exposure to the cold. "Fingers are one of the first body parts to feel the effects of the cold and damp and along with toes, ears and the nose are frequently subjected to frostbite and even amputation," says Arthur Sanford, MD, Division of Trauma, Surgical Critical Care and Burns, Loyola University Health System. [More]
NIH Stroke Trials Network includes UC San Diego Health System as grant recipient

NIH Stroke Trials Network includes UC San Diego Health System as grant recipient

A network of 25 nationally recognized stroke centers has been created to rapidly address the three core features of stroke research and care: prevention, treatment and recovery. The regional coordinating centers, working with nearby satellite facilities, will span the country and have teams of researchers representing every stroke-related medical specialty, with the primary goal of bringing new therapies and strategies to the stroke community more rapidly. [More]
Spaceflights cause cellular-level damage and may lead to long-term vision problems

Spaceflights cause cellular-level damage and may lead to long-term vision problems

Those who travel to space are rewarded with a beautiful sight - planet Earth. But the effects of space travel on the human sense of sight aren't so beautiful. More than 30 percent of astronauts who returned from two-week space shuttle missions and 60 percent who spent six months aboard the International Space Station were diagnosed with eye problems. Two recent investigations examined mechanisms that may explain eye changes in spaceflight, help find ways to minimize this health risk to astronauts and eventually prevent and treat eye diseases on Earth. [More]
Pediatrician offers tips to keep kids safe while playing outside in cold

Pediatrician offers tips to keep kids safe while playing outside in cold

Cold winds, icy rain and, in some places, snow—Old Man Winter is here. With the snowball fights, snow forts and snowy hills come some serious dangers. In addition to ducking from flying snow balls and avoiding out-of-control skiers, parents need to be on the lookout for dangerously low body temperatures and frostbite related to cold weather exposure. [More]

Researchers analyze protective effects of mild hypothermia on CNS injuries

There are few data on the effectiveness and mechanism underlying mild hypothermia in the treatment of central nervous system injuries. Therefore, there is a need to investigate the potentially beneficial effects of mild hypothermia on central nervous system injuries. [More]

Higher 36°C temperature as effective as 33°C for therapeutic hypothermia treatment

Therapeutic hypothermia - cooling the body and brain down to 33-C - is the method used worldwide to treat cardiac arrest, even though a lower body temperature may raise the risk of side-effects. However, keeping the temperature steady at 36-C is just as effective, a study led by Lund University researchers has found. [More]

Lowering body temperature improves survival, neurological outcome in cardiac arrest patients

Francis Kim, M.D., of Harborview Medical Center, Seattle, and colleagues evaluated whether early prehospital cooling (lowering body temperature) improved survival to hospital discharge and neurological outcome in cardiac arrest patients with or without ventricular fibrillation (VF). [More]
ZOLL Medical announces establishment of ZOLL Foundation

ZOLL Medical announces establishment of ZOLL Foundation

ZOLL Medical Corporation, a manufacturer of medical devices and related software solutions, announced today the establishment of the ZOLL Foundation, an independent entity organized for scientific and educational purposes. [More]

Hypothermia does not improve result in patients with severe bacterial meningitis

Bruno Mourvillier, M.D., of the Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, and colleagues conducted a study to examine whether treatment with hypothermia would improve the functional outcome of comatose patients with bacterial meningitis compared with standard care. [More]

Study shows beneficial effects of mild hypothermia on cellular responses to TBI

Moderate reductions in body temperature can improve outcomes after a person suffers a traumatic brain injury (TBI). New research that identifies positive effects of mild hypothermia on brain tissue is presented in an article published in Therapeutic Hypothermia and Temperature Management, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
CRF to present groundbreaking clinical trial findings at TCT 2013 scientific symposium

CRF to present groundbreaking clinical trial findings at TCT 2013 scientific symposium

The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) has announced the late breaking trials and first report investigations that will be presented at next month's Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) 2013 scientific symposium. [More]
Fingerstick blood sample test using i-STAT device not accurate in determining troponin level: Study

Fingerstick blood sample test using i-STAT device not accurate in determining troponin level: Study

Researchers have determined that fingerstick cardiac troponin I assay testing using thepoint-of-care i-STAT device is not accurate enough to determine the exact troponin level without the application of a corrective term. [More]