Hypothermia News and Research RSS Feed - Hypothermia News and Research

When exposed to cold temperatures, your body begins to lose heat faster than it can be produced. Prolonged exposure to cold will eventually use up your body’s stored energy. The result is hypothermia, or abnormally low body temperature. Body temperature that is too low affects the brain, making the victim unable to think clearly or move well. This makes hypothermia particularly dangerous because a person may not know it is happening and won’t be able to do anything about it.

Hypothermia is most likely at very cold temperatures, but it can occur even at cool temperatures (above 40°F) if a person becomes chilled from rain, sweat, or submersion in cold water.
ECMO improves survival, neurological outcomes in patients suffering from cardiac arrest

ECMO improves survival, neurological outcomes in patients suffering from cardiac arrest

A new study shows that survival and neurological outcomes for patients in cardiac arrest can be improved by adding extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) when performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). [More]
New version of Belmont Rapid Infuser to be introduced at ASA 2014

New version of Belmont Rapid Infuser to be introduced at ASA 2014

Belmont Instrument Corporation, the widely recognized provider of blood and fluid infusers, will be introducing the new version of The Belmont Rapid Infuser, the RI-2 at the American Society of Anesthesiologists Meeting this week in New Orleans, LA. [More]
New partners join Grand Challenges Canada to help protect early brain development

New partners join Grand Challenges Canada to help protect early brain development

Grand Challenges Canada, funded by the Government of Canada, today welcomed three new partners to the Saving Brains Grand Challenge: Aga Khan Foundation Canada, Norlien Foundation and World Vision Canada. These organizations strengthen the existing partnership with the Bernard van Leer Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and the Maria Cecilia Souto Vidigal Foundation. [More]
Extreme environment medicine: an interview with Dr Kevin Fong, University College London

Extreme environment medicine: an interview with Dr Kevin Fong, University College London

The understanding of how long-duration space flight affects the human body has come on quite considerably in recent years, and in large part, we owe that to programs of research that have taken place aboard the International Space Station and the Mir Space Station. [More]
EMIT receives CE-Mark for HypothermX Intravenous Fluid and Blood Warming Devices

EMIT receives CE-Mark for HypothermX Intravenous Fluid and Blood Warming Devices

EMIT Corporation announced today that it has received CE-Mark for its HypothermX Intravenous Fluid and Blood Warming Devices with sterile fluid paths, allowing for sales expansion into the European and other OUS markets. [More]
New reporting standards proposed for spinal cord injury experiments

New reporting standards proposed for spinal cord injury experiments

The difficulty in replicating and directly comparing and confirming the scientific results reported by researchers worldwide who are studying new approaches to treating spinal cord injuries is slowing the translation of important new findings to patient care. [More]
New discovery links two important hypotheses in Alzheimer's disease research

New discovery links two important hypotheses in Alzheimer's disease research

In Alzheimer's disease, accumulation of amyloid plaque in the brain is believed to play an important role in many characteristic disease symptoms, including memory loss and other mental state changes. [More]
Study offers detailed insights into homeless, alcohol-dependent patients

Study offers detailed insights into homeless, alcohol-dependent patients

A phenomenological study offers detailed insights into homeless, alcohol-dependent patients often stigmatized by the public and policymakers as drains on the health care system, showing the constellation of reasons they are incapable of escaping social circumstances that perpetuate and exacerbate their problems. [More]
AHA honors two Mount Sinai Health System experts as "Heart and Stroke Lifesavers"

AHA honors two Mount Sinai Health System experts as "Heart and Stroke Lifesavers"

The American Heart Association has honored two Mount Sinai Health System experts as "Heart and Stroke Lifesavers" for going above and beyond the call of duty in support of the AHA's mission to build lives free of cardiovascular diseases and stroke. [More]
New guidelines to protect burn victims from hypothermia risk during surgery

New guidelines to protect burn victims from hypothermia risk during surgery

Loyola University Health System has established new guidelines to protect burn victims at risk for hypothermia during surgery. [More]
Eagle Pharmaceuticals total revenue increases by $2.5 million for Q2 2014

Eagle Pharmaceuticals total revenue increases by $2.5 million for Q2 2014

Eagle Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced its financial results for the three-month period ended March 31, 2014. This marks the first period for which Eagle is reporting financial results as a public company. [More]
Scientists develop magnetic bacteria that may help diagnose digestive diseases like stomach cancer

Scientists develop magnetic bacteria that may help diagnose digestive diseases like stomach cancer

Scientists from the University of Granada have successfully created magnetic bacteria that could be added to foodstuffs and could, after ingestion, help diagnose diseases of the digestive system like stomach cancer. [More]
DTI assessment indicates that mild hypothermia therapy may be beneficial for patients with diffuse axonal injury

DTI assessment indicates that mild hypothermia therapy may be beneficial for patients with diffuse axonal injury

Mild hypothermia has been shown to exert apparent neuroprotective effects in animal models of diffuse axonal injury. However, the clinical efficacy of mild hypothermia is controversial. [More]
Therapeutic hypothermia may not be effective in all patients who suffered heart attack, says study

Therapeutic hypothermia may not be effective in all patients who suffered heart attack, says study

Whole body cooling in comatose patients who have suffered a heart attack can limit the damage to brain tissue caused by the restoration of blood flow and oxygen. [More]

Study examines forensic cases of hypothermia deaths in South Australia and Sweden

New research from the University of Adelaide shows that the state of South Australia has a higher rate of deaths from extreme cold compared with the northern European nation of Sweden. [More]
St. Joseph's Hospital opens new $20 million Heart Institute

St. Joseph's Hospital opens new $20 million Heart Institute

St. Joseph's Hospital entered the next era of cardiac care by opening a new $20 million Heart Institute on Feb. 10, 2014. St. Joseph's Hospital Heart Institute is one of the most advanced and comprehensive centers for cardiovascular medicine in Florida, performing more than 50,000 adult cardiac catheterizations. It is also has the only pediatric catheterization program in Hillsborough County. [More]
Study to evaluate connections between brain networks and religious thought

Study to evaluate connections between brain networks and religious thought

Building on previous evidence showing that religious belief involves cognitive activity that can be mapped to specific brain regions, a new study has found that causal, directional connections between these brain networks can be linked to differences in religious thought. [More]
USAMRMC to develop strategic research plan that identifies critical research priority areas in TBI

USAMRMC to develop strategic research plan that identifies critical research priority areas in TBI

The U.S. Department of Defense funds more than 500 neurotrauma research projects totaling over $700 million. Yet there remains a large unmet medical need for effective treatments of traumatic brain injury (TBI), a major cause of disability and mortality. [More]
Professor studies impact of different levels of physical contact on premature infants

Professor studies impact of different levels of physical contact on premature infants

The benefit that premature infants gain from skin-to-skin contact with their mothers is measurable even 10 years after birth, reports a new study in Biological Psychiatry. [More]
New projects advance treatments for radiation syndrome, cardiac arrest-induced brain injury and rare blood disorder

New projects advance treatments for radiation syndrome, cardiac arrest-induced brain injury and rare blood disorder

​The National Institutes of Health today has launched three pre-clinical projects to advance potential new treatments for acute radiation syndrome, brain injury following cardiac arrest and a rare blood disorder called beta thalassemia. [More]