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Insulin is a hormone that is needed to convert glucose, starches and other food into energy needed for daily life. Insulin allows cells to use glucose for fuel and is secreted by beta cells in the islets of Langerhans. The release of insulin from the pancreas is stimulated by increased blood glucose, vagal nerve stimulation, and other factors. Insulin is obtained from various animals and available in a variety of preparations. Commercial insulin preparations differ in a number of ways, including differences in the animal species from which they are obtained; their purity, concentration, and solubility; and the time of onset and duration of their biologic action. An oral hypoglycemic agent is not a form of insulin therapy.
New research shows promising progress in use of anti-inflammatory cytokine for T1D treatment

New research shows promising progress in use of anti-inflammatory cytokine for T1D treatment

New research from Uppsala University shows promising progress in the use of anti-inflammatory cytokine for treatment of type 1 diabetes. The study, published in the open access journal Scientific Reports (Nature Publishing Group), reveals that administration of interleukin-35 (a protein made by immune cells) to mice with type 1 diabetes, reverses or cures the disease by maintaining a normal blood glucose level and the immune tolerance. [More]
Bioenergetic analysis of pancreatic beta-cells shows impaired metabolic signature in type 2 diabetes patients

Bioenergetic analysis of pancreatic beta-cells shows impaired metabolic signature in type 2 diabetes patients

Impaired activation of mitochondrial energy metabolism in the presence of glucose has been demonstrated in pancreatic beta-cells from patients with type 2 diabetes. The cause of this dysfunction has been unknown. Publishing online in Endocrinology, Buck Institute assistant research professor Akos Gerencser, PhD, shows that in patients with type 2 diabetes the balance between supply and demand of the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔψM) is altered causing a decrease in the signaling that turns on insulin secretion. [More]
NEJM publishes positive clinical results from Phase 2 clinical study of volanesorsen

NEJM publishes positive clinical results from Phase 2 clinical study of volanesorsen

Isis Pharmaceuticals, Inc., the leader in RNA-targeted therapeutics, and Akcea Therapeutics, its wholly owned subsidiary, announced today that The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) has published positive clinical results from a Phase 2 clinical study evaluating volanesorsen (formerly ISIS-APOCIII Rx) in patients with very high to severely high triglycerides. [More]
Low blood level of 4 proteins can help diabetics protect against immune attack

Low blood level of 4 proteins can help diabetics protect against immune attack

Patients with type 1 diabetes have significantly lower blood levels of four proteins that help protect their tissue from attack by their immune system, scientists report. [More]
Endocrine Society recommends removal of tumor as first-line treatment for endogenous Cushing's syndrome

Endocrine Society recommends removal of tumor as first-line treatment for endogenous Cushing's syndrome

The Endocrine Society today issued a Clinical Practice Guideline (CPG) on strategies for treating Cushing's syndrome, a condition caused by overexposure to the hormone cortisol. [More]
LixiLan-O Phase III clinical trial meets primary endpoint in patients with type 2 diabetes

LixiLan-O Phase III clinical trial meets primary endpoint in patients with type 2 diabetes

Sanofi announced today that the LixiLan-O Phase III clinical trial met its primary objective in patients with type 2 diabetes treated with metformin. The fixed-ratio combination of insulin glargine 100 units/mL and lixisenatide, a GLP-1 RA, demonstrated statistically superior reduction in HbA1c (average blood glucose over the previous three months) compared with lixisenatide and compared with insulin glargine 100 units/mL. [More]
CMC Biologics, River Vision sign manufacturing agreement for Teprotumumab to treat Grave's Orbitopathy

CMC Biologics, River Vision sign manufacturing agreement for Teprotumumab to treat Grave's Orbitopathy

CMC Biologics, a global leader in clinical and commercial manufacturing of therapeutic proteins, and River Vision Development Corporation (River Vision), a private company focused on ophthalmology, announced today that they have entered into an agreement for the process transfer and cGMP production of RV001 (Teprotumumab) – a recombinant monoclonal antibody targeting insulin-like growth factor 1 that is in development for treatment of Grave's Orbitopathy and other indications. [More]
New study estimates link between coffee consumption habits and incidence of mild cognitive impairment

New study estimates link between coffee consumption habits and incidence of mild cognitive impairment

A new study by researchers at the University of Bari Aldo Moro, Bari, Italy, Geriatric Unit & Laboratory of Gerontology and Geriatrics, IRCCS "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Foggia, Italy, and Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Roma, Italy, estimates the association between change or constant habits in coffee consumption and the incidence of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), evaluating 1,445 individuals recruited from 5,632 subjects, aged 65-84 year old, from the Italian Longitudinal Study on Aging (ILSA), a population-based sample from eight Italian municipalities with a 3.5-year median follow-up. [More]
New Tel Aviv University study reveals impact of skipping breakfast on the health of diabetics

New Tel Aviv University study reveals impact of skipping breakfast on the health of diabetics

More and more Americans on-the-go are skipping the "most important meal of the day," not eating until lunch. This tendency to miss breakfast has already been linked to the growing epidemic of obesity and cardiovascular problems in the US -- and it may put the health of diabetics at risk as well. [More]
Recipients of GSA poster awards announced at 20th International C. elegans Meeting

Recipients of GSA poster awards announced at 20th International C. elegans Meeting

The Genetics Society of America and the C. elegans research community are pleased to announce the recipients of the GSA poster awards at the 20th International C. elegans Meeting, which took place at the University of California, Los Angeles, June 24-28, 2015. [More]
IU awarded $4.5 million NIH grant to create new federally designated diabetes research center

IU awarded $4.5 million NIH grant to create new federally designated diabetes research center

The National Institutes of Health has awarded the Indiana University School of Medicine a five-year, $4.5 million grant to create a new federally designated Indiana Diabetes Research Center, one of just 16 such centers in the country. [More]
Resistance training can help reduce liver fat levels in patients suffering from fatty liver disease

Resistance training can help reduce liver fat levels in patients suffering from fatty liver disease

Resistance training in the gym leads to a fall in liver fat levels. This is the finding of a new study held at the University of Haifa in cooperation with Tel Aviv Medical Center and Tel Aviv University. [More]
New Iowa State study finds strong link between insulin resistance and increased Alzheimer's disease risk

New Iowa State study finds strong link between insulin resistance and increased Alzheimer's disease risk

The fact that obesity increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and some cancers is well known. But a new Iowa State University study adds to the growing evidence that memory loss should also be a top concern. [More]
Scientists develop exercise mimic molecule that could help treat type 2 diabetes and obesity

Scientists develop exercise mimic molecule that could help treat type 2 diabetes and obesity

Scientists from the University of Southampton have developed a molecule that acts as an exercise mimic, which could potentially help treat type 2 diabetes and obesity. [More]
Girls are born with weaker spines compared to boys, study finds

Girls are born with weaker spines compared to boys, study finds

Looking at measurements of the vertebrae - the series of small bones that make up the spinal column - in newborn children, investigators at Children's Hospital Los Angeles found that differences between the sexes are present at birth. Results of the study, now online in advance of publication in the August issue of the Journal of Pediatrics, suggest that this difference is evolutionary, allowing the female spine to adapt to the fetal load during pregnancy. [More]
Endocrine Society selects 18 endocrinologists as winners of 2016 Laureate Awards

Endocrine Society selects 18 endocrinologists as winners of 2016 Laureate Awards

The Endocrine Society today announced it has chosen 18 accomplished endocrinologists as winners of the organization's prestigious 2016 Laureate Awards. [More]
Study shows glitazone antidiabetic drug may reduce risk of Parkinson’s disease

Study shows glitazone antidiabetic drug may reduce risk of Parkinson’s disease

A type of drug used to treat diabetes may reduce the risk of developing Parkinson’s disease, according to a new study published in PLOS Medicine. [More]
Losing single night of sleep could alter genes that control biological clocks in cells

Losing single night of sleep could alter genes that control biological clocks in cells

Swedish researchers at Uppsala University and the Karolinska Institute have found that genes that control the biological clocks in cells throughout the body are altered after losing a single night of sleep, in a study that is to be published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. [More]
Alefacept drug offers clinical benefit to certain individuals with new-onset type 1 diabetes

Alefacept drug offers clinical benefit to certain individuals with new-onset type 1 diabetes

Individuals with new-onset type 1 diabetes who took two courses of alefacept (Amevive®, Astellas Pharma Inc.) soon after diagnosis show preserved beta cell function after two years compared to those who received a placebo. [More]
Binghamton University researchers creating 3-D printing process to help treat incurable diseases

Binghamton University researchers creating 3-D printing process to help treat incurable diseases

A team of Binghamton University researchers are creating a 3-D printing process to build implantable tissues and organs to treat otherwise incurable diseases. [More]
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