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Insulin is a hormone that is needed to convert glucose, starches and other food into energy needed for daily life. Insulin allows cells to use glucose for fuel and is secreted by beta cells in the islets of Langerhans. The release of insulin from the pancreas is stimulated by increased blood glucose, vagal nerve stimulation, and other factors. Insulin is obtained from various animals and available in a variety of preparations. Commercial insulin preparations differ in a number of ways, including differences in the animal species from which they are obtained; their purity, concentration, and solubility; and the time of onset and duration of their biologic action. An oral hypoglycemic agent is not a form of insulin therapy.
Tree nut consumption associated with lower body weight and lower risk of obesity

Tree nut consumption associated with lower body weight and lower risk of obesity

In a study published this week in Nutrition Journal*, researchers compared risk factors for heart disease and metabolic syndrome of tree nut consumers versus those who did not consume tree nuts. Tree nut (almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, hazelnuts, macadamias, pecans, pine nuts, pistachios and walnuts) consumption was associated with lower body mass index (p=0.004), systolic blood pressure (p=0.001), insulin resistance (p=0.043) and higher levels of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (good cholesterol) (p=0.022). [More]
Oramed Pharmaceuticals submits study protocol to FDA for Phase IIb trial of ORMD-0801

Oramed Pharmaceuticals submits study protocol to FDA for Phase IIb trial of ORMD-0801

Oramed Pharmaceuticals Inc., a clinical-stage pharmaceutical company focused on the development of oral drug delivery systems, announced today that it has submitted the study protocol for the company's Phase IIb trial of ORMD-0801, its oral insulin capsule, to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. [More]
Imperial College London researchers discover new inherited form of obesity, type 2 diabetes

Imperial College London researchers discover new inherited form of obesity, type 2 diabetes

Scientists have discovered a new inherited form of obesity and type 2 diabetes in humans. A large number of genes are involved in regulating body weight, and there are now over 30 genes known in which people with harmful changes in DNA sequence become extremely overweight. Similarly, there are a number of genes that can, when altered, cause type 2 diabetes. These conditions are inherited through families in exactly the same way as disorders such as cystic fibrosis or Huntington's disease. [More]
Researchers discover mechanism that regulates metabolism

Researchers discover mechanism that regulates metabolism

The protein complex mTORC1 is a central regulator of cell metabolism. In the active state, it stimulates anabolic processes and increases the production and storage of proteins and lipids. Researchers from the German Leibniz Institute for Age Research in Jena and the Dutch Ageing Institute ERIBA in Groningen discovered a mechanism how mTORC1 regulates metabolism: It controls the expression of a specific variant of the transcriptional regulator C/EBPβ. [More]
Neuralstem's HK532-IGF-1 neural stem cells therapy for Alzheimer's disease presented at ISSCR Annual Meeting

Neuralstem's HK532-IGF-1 neural stem cells therapy for Alzheimer's disease presented at ISSCR Annual Meeting

Neuralstem, Inc., a biopharmaceutical company using neural stem cell technology to develop small molecule and cell therapy treatments for central nervous system diseases, announced that the poster "Human Neural Stem Cells Expressing IGF-1: A Novel Cellular Therapy for Alzheimer's Disease" was presented yesterday at the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) Annual Meeting in Stockholm, Sweden. [More]
Study: High blood pressure linked to lower risk for Alzheimer's disease

Study: High blood pressure linked to lower risk for Alzheimer's disease

A new study suggests that people with a genetic predisposition to high blood pressure have a lower risk for Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Fructose stimulates reward system in the brain to a lesser degree than glucose

Fructose stimulates reward system in the brain to a lesser degree than glucose

Fructose not only results in a lower level of satiety, it also stimulates the reward system in the brain to a lesser degree than glucose. This may cause excessive consumption accompanied by effects that are a risk to health, report researchers from the University of Basel in a study published in the scientific journal PLOS ONE. Various diseases have been attributed to industrial fructose in sugary drinks and ready meals. [More]
Aeterna Zentaris selects Ergomed to manage Phase 3 clinical study of Macrilen

Aeterna Zentaris selects Ergomed to manage Phase 3 clinical study of Macrilen

Aeterna Zentaris Inc. announced today that it has executed a definitive agreement with Ergomed PLC, pursuant to which Ergomed will manage the new, confirmatory Phase 3 clinical study to demonstrate the efficacy of Macrilen (macimorelin), a novel orally-active ghrelin agonist for use in evaluating adult growth hormone deficiency ("AGHD"). [More]
Emperra’s ESYSTA® diabetes smartphone app, ESYSTA® Smart Insulin Pen under CE conformity assessment procedure

Emperra’s ESYSTA® diabetes smartphone app, ESYSTA® Smart Insulin Pen under CE conformity assessment procedure

Emperra GmbH E-Health Technologies, specialized in digital health systems and Tele-diabetology, today announced an important further development of the innovative, integrated telemonitoring product system ESYSTA for insulin-dependent diabetes patients. [More]
Scripps Florida scientists receive $3.5 million to accelerate development of anti-diabetic compounds

Scripps Florida scientists receive $3.5 million to accelerate development of anti-diabetic compounds

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have been awarded $3.5 million from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases of the National Institutes of Health to accelerate development of a new class of anti-diabetic compounds. [More]
Nutrition experts offer tips to employees working in sedentary environment

Nutrition experts offer tips to employees working in sedentary environment

When it comes to taking a physical activity break at work, it's more about the frequency than duration. That's advice Kansas State University experts in human nutrition and kinesiology are offering to employees working in a sedentary environment who are looking to improve their health. [More]
Perle Bioscience announces enrollment for Phase 3 trial of combination therapy in type 1 diabetics

Perle Bioscience announces enrollment for Phase 3 trial of combination therapy in type 1 diabetics

Perle Bioscience, Inc. announces enrollment for the Insulin Independence Trial (IIT). This trial is the first and only Phase 3 trial to test a combination therapy in type 1 diabetics. [More]
Pioglitazone drug significantly decreases risk of dementia

Pioglitazone drug significantly decreases risk of dementia

Patients with type 2 diabetes have a dysfunctional sugar metabolism because the essential hormone insulin does not work effectively. Once the disease reaches an advanced stage, the body stops producing insulin altogether, which means that it has to be administered externally. [More]
New 'smart insulin patch' could help patients suffering from diabetes

New 'smart insulin patch' could help patients suffering from diabetes

Painful insulin injections could become a thing of the past for the millions of Americans who suffer from diabetes, thanks to a new invention from researchers at the University of North Carolina and NC State, who have created the first "smart insulin patch" that can detect increases in blood sugar levels and secrete doses of insulin into the bloodstream whenever needed. [More]
Small intestine causes chronic inflammation in obese patients

Small intestine causes chronic inflammation in obese patients

Obesity is caused by numerous and complex factors, some of which are as yet unsuspected. Scientists from the CNRS, INSERM, UPMC and Université Paris Descartes, working with research clinicians from Paris Public Hospitals (AP-HP) have now shown that severe obesity is accompanied by inflammation of the small intestine and enhanced immune response in that region. [More]
WSU research provides new strategies for prevention, treatment of obesity

WSU research provides new strategies for prevention, treatment of obesity

Washington State University scientists have shown that berries, grapes and other fruits convert excess white fat into calorie-burning "beige" fat, providing new strategies for the prevention and treatment of obesity. [More]
Endocrine Society's diabetes tool, diversity programs earn top honors in ASAE 2015 Power of A Awards

Endocrine Society's diabetes tool, diversity programs earn top honors in ASAE 2015 Power of A Awards

An Endocrine Society-led diabetes initiative's interactive tools earned top honors and two other Society programs won Silver in the ASAE 2015 Power of A Awards, the Society announced today. [More]
IDIBELL researchers identify potential treatment for type 2 diabetes

IDIBELL researchers identify potential treatment for type 2 diabetes

Currently, there are more than 350 million type 2 diabetics and according to the World Health Organization (WHO) by 2030 it will be the 7th leading cause of death worldwide. [More]

Many people with type 2 diabetes also suffer from hypoglycaemia

Researchers from the University of Leicester and Leicester's Hospitals have discovered that many people suffering from type 2 diabetes also suffer from low blood sugar levels that can pose a significant risk to their health. [More]
Higher consumption of dietary trans fatty acids may affect memory

Higher consumption of dietary trans fatty acids may affect memory

Higher consumption of dietary trans fatty acids (dTFA), commonly used in processed foods to improve taste, texture and durability, has been linked to worsened memory function in men 45 years old and younger, according to a University of California, San Diego School of Medicine study published online on June 17 in PLOS ONE. [More]
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