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Insulin is a hormone that is needed to convert glucose, starches and other food into energy needed for daily life. Insulin allows cells to use glucose for fuel and is secreted by beta cells in the islets of Langerhans. The release of insulin from the pancreas is stimulated by increased blood glucose, vagal nerve stimulation, and other factors. Insulin is obtained from various animals and available in a variety of preparations. Commercial insulin preparations differ in a number of ways, including differences in the animal species from which they are obtained; their purity, concentration, and solubility; and the time of onset and duration of their biologic action. An oral hypoglycemic agent is not a form of insulin therapy.
Pre-POINT trial raises hope for Type 1 diabetes prevention

Pre-POINT trial raises hope for Type 1 diabetes prevention

Giving oral insulin to children at genetic high risk of diabetes stimulates a regulatory immune response without inducing hypoglycaemia, show the findings of the Pre-POINT study. [More]
No evidence for cancer risk with growth hormone therapy

No evidence for cancer risk with growth hormone therapy

There is no evidence that growth hormone (GH) therapy increases the likelihood of neoplasms in children with no additional risk factors, says the Pediatric Endocrine Society Drug and Therapeutics Committee. [More]
Dr. Philipp Scherer to receive prestigious Banting Medal for Scientific Achievement from ADA

Dr. Philipp Scherer to receive prestigious Banting Medal for Scientific Achievement from ADA

Dr. Philipp Scherer, Director of the Touchstone Center for Diabetes Research at UT Southwestern Medical Center, will receive the prestigious Banting Medal for Scientific Achievement, the highest honor bestowed by the American Diabetes Association. [More]
Type 2 diabetics can eat more protein at breakfast to reduce glucose spikes at breakfast and lunch

Type 2 diabetics can eat more protein at breakfast to reduce glucose spikes at breakfast and lunch

Individuals with Type 2 Diabetes have difficulty regulating their glucose -- or blood sugar -- levels, particularly after meals. Now, University of Missouri researchers have found that Type 2 diabetics can eat more protein at breakfast to help reduce glucose spikes at both breakfast and lunch. [More]
New genetic mutation appears to protect people from Type 2 diabetes

New genetic mutation appears to protect people from Type 2 diabetes

An international team of scientists led by a Cedars-Sinai researcher has identified a new genetic mutation that appears to protect people from developing Type 2 diabetes. [More]
Simple device to treat sleep apnea may reduce diabetes risk

Simple device to treat sleep apnea may reduce diabetes risk

Using a simple device for eight hours a night to treat sleep apnea can help people with prediabetes improve their blood sugar levels and may reduce the risk of progressing to diabetes, according to a new study published online in the April 21, 2015, issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. [More]
New T1D Prevention Initiative launched to identify pathways to prevent type 1 diabetes

New T1D Prevention Initiative launched to identify pathways to prevent type 1 diabetes

As the incidence of type 1 diabetes (T1D) rises worldwide, The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust today announced the launch of an ambitious new T1D Prevention Initiative to investigate the early stages of development of the disease and identify new pathways to prevent it. [More]
Study suggests that inhibiting FOXO1 protein could speed diabetic wound healing

Study suggests that inhibiting FOXO1 protein could speed diabetic wound healing

A protein that normally fosters tissue repair instead acts to inhibit healing when sugar levels are high, according to a study in The Journal of Cell Biology. The role reversal helps explain why wounds heal slowly in people with diabetes. [More]
New research shows that serious life events in childhood can increase type 1 diabetes risk

New research shows that serious life events in childhood can increase type 1 diabetes risk

New research from Sweden published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes) shows that serious life events (SLEs) in childhood, such as death or illness in the family, divorce/separation, a new child or adult in the family, and conflicts in the family, can triple the risk of subsequently developing type 1 diabetes (T1D). [More]
Remogliflozin etabonate: A potential treatment option for management of NASH and NAFLD

Remogliflozin etabonate: A potential treatment option for management of NASH and NAFLD

Data presented today at The International Liver Congress 2015 demonstrates that remogliflozin etabonate, an investigational drug in type 2 diabetes, is a potential treatment option for the management of patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). [More]
New Tel Aviv University study may pave way for personalized bipolar disorder treatment

New Tel Aviv University study may pave way for personalized bipolar disorder treatment

Rapidly swinging from extremes of joy and energy to sadness, fatigue, and confusion, bipolar disorder (BD) patients feel desperate and largely alone in the world. And according to the National Institutes of Health, between 25-50 percent of the roughly 3% of Americans living with BD attempt suicide at least once. [More]
James Shapiro's latest research could soon mark new standard for diabetes treatment

James Shapiro's latest research could soon mark new standard for diabetes treatment

James Shapiro, one of the world's leading experts in emerging treatments of diabetes, can't help but be excited about his latest research. The results he says, could soon mark a new standard for treatment--not only in diabetes, but in several other diseases as well. [More]
Oral insulin could help prevent type 1 diabetes in high-risk children

Oral insulin could help prevent type 1 diabetes in high-risk children

Children at risk for type 1 diabetes, who were given daily doses of oral insulin, developed a protective immune response to the disease that researchers with the Barbara Davis Center for Childhood Diabetes at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus say could possibly lay the groundwork for a vaccine against the chronic illness. [More]
New class of drugs targeting blood glucose level could benefit individuals with type 2 diabetes

New class of drugs targeting blood glucose level could benefit individuals with type 2 diabetes

Individuals with type 2 diabetes, who are resistant to insulin, have an excess blood glucose level, which they are now trying to reduce using a new class of diabetes drugs known as the gliflozins. [More]
UC Davis assistant professor wins Hartwell Foundation award to explore treatment for juvenile diabetes

UC Davis assistant professor wins Hartwell Foundation award to explore treatment for juvenile diabetes

UC Davis Assistant Professor Mark Huising is a recipient of The Hartwell Foundation 2014 Individual Biomedical Research Award to support his early-stage research toward a cure for juvenile diabetes. Diabetes affects 10 percent of the entire United States population, including approximately a million children. Remarkably, 40 children every day receive the diagnosis of diabetes. [More]
Insulin signaling pathway has significant influence on the growth of glioblastomas

Insulin signaling pathway has significant influence on the growth of glioblastomas

Drugs that target insulin pathways to slow or stop the growth of brain tumors are going in the right direction but appear to be on the wrong track, according to new research at Rice University. [More]
Tandem Diabetes Care commences shipments of t:slim Insulin Pumps with enhanced software

Tandem Diabetes Care commences shipments of t:slim Insulin Pumps with enhanced software

Tandem Diabetes Care, Inc., a medical device company and manufacturer of the t:slim and t:flex Insulin Pumps, today commenced shipments of t:slim Pumps featuring enhanced software. [More]
Obesity in African-American men increases prostate cancer risk

Obesity in African-American men increases prostate cancer risk

Obesity has a profoundly different effect on prostate cancer risk in African-American as compared to non-Hispanic white men. Obesity in black men substantially increases the risk of low- and high-grade prostate cancer, while obesity in white men moderately reduces the risk of low-grade cancer and only slightly increases the risk of high-grade cancer, according to the first large, prospective study to examine how race and obesity jointly affect prostate cancer risk. [More]
High-fat diet can alter your muscle metabolism, new study finds

High-fat diet can alter your muscle metabolism, new study finds

You might think that you can get away with eating fatty foods for a few days without it making any significant changes to your body. Think again. After just five days of eating a high-fat diet, the way in which the body's muscle processes nutrients changes, which could lead to long-term problems such as weight gain, obesity, and other health issues, a new study has found. [More]
Study: Children with type 1 diabetes five times more likely to be admitted to hospital

Study: Children with type 1 diabetes five times more likely to be admitted to hospital

Children living with type 1 diabetes are nearly five times more likely to be admitted to hospital than non-diabetic children, a new study (attached) has found. [More]
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