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Acupuncture may be a viable treatment for women experiencing hot flashes

Acupuncture may be a viable treatment for women experiencing hot flashes

Acupuncture may be a viable treatment for women experiencing hot flashes as a result of estrogen-targeting therapies to treat breast cancer, according to a new study from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Hot flashes are particularly severe and frequent in breast cancer survivors, but current FDA-approved remedies for these unpleasant episodes, such as hormone replacement therapies are off-limits to breast cancer survivors because they include estrogen. [More]
Acupuncture: A viable treatment for breast cancer survivors experiencing hot flashes

Acupuncture: A viable treatment for breast cancer survivors experiencing hot flashes

Acupuncture may be a viable treatment for women experiencing hot flashes as a result of estrogen-targeting therapies to treat breast cancer, according to a new study from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Hot flashes are particularly severe and frequent in breast cancer survivors, but current FDA-approved remedies for these unpleasant episodes, such as hormone replacement therapies are off-limits to breast cancer survivors because they include estrogen. [More]
Common drug used for treating fungal infections in lung transplant recipients increases risk for skin cancer, death

Common drug used for treating fungal infections in lung transplant recipients increases risk for skin cancer, death

Voriconazole, a prescription drug commonly used to treat fungal infections in lung transplant recipients, significantly increases the risk for skin cancer and even death, according to a new study by UC San Francisco researchers. [More]
Eating disorders more common in bisexual women

Eating disorders more common in bisexual women

Young women who are attracted to both sexes or who are unsure about who they are attracted to are more likely to develop an eating disorder than those attracted to only one sex, according to a new study from Drexel University. [More]
Children in northern Israel emergency departments receive equal pain treatment, regardless of ethnicity

Children in northern Israel emergency departments receive equal pain treatment, regardless of ethnicity

Children with broken bones or joint dislocations in northern Israel emergency departments received equal pain treatment, regardless of their ethnicity or the ethnicity of the nurses who treated them, even during a period of armed conflict between the two ethnic groups. [More]
Novel approach to reduce 'bad' lipids in blood circulation

Novel approach to reduce 'bad' lipids in blood circulation

Xian-Cheng Jiang, PhD, professor of cell biology at SUNY Downstate Medical Center, has led a study identifying a new approach for lowering "bad" lipids in blood circulation, a critical means to combat devastating cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. The research was published in the online edition of Gastroenterology. [More]
FDA approves Allergan's sNDA to update label for TEFLARO (ceftaroline fosamil)

FDA approves Allergan's sNDA to update label for TEFLARO (ceftaroline fosamil)

Allergan plc today announced the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the company's supplemental new drug application (sNDA) to update the label for TEFLARO (ceftaroline fosamil) for the treatment of adult patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) and community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP). [More]
USF, FARA to jointly host scientific symposium on Friedreich's ataxia

USF, FARA to jointly host scientific symposium on Friedreich's ataxia

The University of South Florida will again bring together leading researchers and patients searching for a treatment for Friedreich's ataxia and related disorders at the seventh annual scientific symposium "Understanding Energy for A Cure." The symposium will be held 5 to 8:30 p.m., Thursday, Sept. 17, at the USF Marshall Student Center Ballroom, USF Cedar Circle, Tampa, FL 33620. [More]
European cardiomyopathies registry shows higher than expected use of defibrillators, genetic testing

European cardiomyopathies registry shows higher than expected use of defibrillators, genetic testing

The most representative snapshot of real world practice in cardiomyopathies in Europe has shown a higher than expected use of defibrillators and genetic testing. The baseline results of the ESC's EORP Cardiomyopathy Registry Pilot are presented for the first time today at ESC Congress 2015. [More]
Study calls for new strategies to shape perceptions of patients at risk for falls in hospitals

Study calls for new strategies to shape perceptions of patients at risk for falls in hospitals

Falls are the most common adverse event among hospitalized patients, and a study published in the September issue of the American Journal of Critical Care examines an often overlooked element to preventing falls in hospitals: patient perceptions of their personal risk. [More]
Sleep loss increases chance of catching a cold

Sleep loss increases chance of catching a cold

A new study led by a UC San Francisco sleep researcher supports what parents have been saying for centuries: to avoid getting sick, be sure to get enough sleep. [More]
UCSF-led team develops new technique to create tiny models of human tissues

UCSF-led team develops new technique to create tiny models of human tissues

A UCSF-led team has developed a technique to build tiny models of human tissues, called organoids, more precisely than ever before using a process that turns human cells into a biological equivalent of LEGO bricks. These mini-tissues in a dish can be used to study how particular structural features of tissue affect normal growth or go awry in cancer. They could be used for therapeutic drug screening and to help teach researchers how to grow whole human organs. [More]
Newly discovered prion causes Multiple System Atrophy

Newly discovered prion causes Multiple System Atrophy

Multiple System Atrophy (MSA), a neurodegenerative disorder with similarities to Parkinson's disease, is caused by a newly discovered type of prion, akin to the misfolded proteins involved in incurable progressive brain diseases such Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD), according to two new research papers led by scientists at UC San Francisco. [More]
Penn Medicine hospitals named among HRC Foundation's 'Leader in LGBT Healthcare Equality' list

Penn Medicine hospitals named among HRC Foundation's 'Leader in LGBT Healthcare Equality' list

The Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania Hospital, Penn Presbyterian Medical Center, and Chester County Hospital were announced among the 2015 class of the Human Rights Campaign (HRC) Foundation's "Leader in LGBT Healthcare Equality" list, and the first to be announced in the organization's rolling admissions in 2015. [More]
CUMC vision researchers discover gene that causes myopia

CUMC vision researchers discover gene that causes myopia

Vision researchers at Columbia University Medical Center have discovered a gene that causes myopia, but only in people who spend a lot of time in childhood reading or doing other "nearwork." [More]
Bystander CPR can prevent brain damage, nursing home admission following cardiac arrest

Bystander CPR can prevent brain damage, nursing home admission following cardiac arrest

Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has been linked to a 30% lower risk of nursing home admission and brain damage in survivors of cardiac arrest outside hospital in research presented at ESC Congress today by Dr Kristian Kragholm, a PhD student in the Department of Anesthesiology, Cardiovascular Research Centre, Aalborg University Hospital, Denmark. [More]
Patterson completes sale of medical business to Madison Dearborn Partners

Patterson completes sale of medical business to Madison Dearborn Partners

Patterson Medical, formerly the medical business of Patterson Companies, Inc., is now an independent company with today's completion of the previously announced acquisition of Patterson Medical by Madison Dearborn Partners. [More]
Mary Naylor named recipient of GSA's Doris Schwartz Gerontological Nursing Research Award

Mary Naylor named recipient of GSA's Doris Schwartz Gerontological Nursing Research Award

The Gerontological Society of America -- the nation's largest interdisciplinary organization devoted to the field of aging -- has chosen Mary Naylor, PhD, RN, FAAN, of the University of Pennsylvania as the 2015 recipient of the Doris Schwartz Gerontological Nursing Research Award. [More]
New study may lead to effective treatment to prevent common chemotherapy side effects in cancer patients

New study may lead to effective treatment to prevent common chemotherapy side effects in cancer patients

Annually, hundreds of thousands of patients battling cancer undergo chemotherapy, which often results in poorly tolerated side effects such as nausea, vomiting, and loss of the desire to eat. [More]
Dr. Karin L. Ciance recognized as Strathmore's Who's Who Professional of the Year 2015

Dr. Karin L. Ciance recognized as Strathmore's Who's Who Professional of the Year 2015

Dr. Karin L. Ciance of Holden, Massachusetts, has been recognized as Strathmore's Who's Who Professional of the Year 2015 for her outstanding contributions and achievements in the field of Community Health Nursing. She is being honored with a Times Square, New York appearance on Friday, August 28, 2015. [More]
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