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Nursing is a healthcare profession that focuses on the care of individuals and their families to help them recover from illness and maintain optimal health and quality of life.
Non-wearable sensor system can be used to predict risk of falling among seniors within 3 weeks

Non-wearable sensor system can be used to predict risk of falling among seniors within 3 weeks

Each year, millions of people--especially those 65 and older--fall. Such falls can be serious, leading to broken bones, head injuries, hospitalizations or even death. Now, researchers from the Sinclair School of Nursing and the College of Engineering at the University of Missouri found that sensors that measure in-home gait speed and stride length can predict likely falls. [More]
Common practice of storing patient's used respiratory devices in plastic bags results in infections

Common practice of storing patient's used respiratory devices in plastic bags results in infections

Infection Prevention Products Inc. releases lab results and test studies that prove the common practice of storing a patient's used respiratory devices in plastic bags is spreading pathogens and resulting in respiratory infections throughout thousands of nursing homes in the U.S. [More]
Scientists report new neurological complication from Zika virus infection

Scientists report new neurological complication from Zika virus infection

Dr. John England, Professor and Chair of Neurology at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, and colleagues in Honduras and Venezuela have reported a new neurological complication of infection with the Zika virus. [More]
Non-wearable sensor system measures walking patterns of senior citizens to predict risk of falling

Non-wearable sensor system measures walking patterns of senior citizens to predict risk of falling

Each year, millions of people—especially those 65 and older—fall. Such falls can be serious, leading to broken bones, head injuries, hospitalizations or even death. [More]
Novel inhibitory brain receptor reduces seizure-like activity in pubertal mice

Novel inhibitory brain receptor reduces seizure-like activity in pubertal mice

More than half of children with epilepsy outgrow their seizures, yet the mechanism underlying this remission is unknown. [More]
New camera technology paired with electron microscope allows biologists to see tiny cellular components

New camera technology paired with electron microscope allows biologists to see tiny cellular components

Using a new, lightning-fast camera paired with an electron microscope, Columbia University Medical Center scientists have captured images of one of the smallest proteins in our cells to be "seen" with a microscope. [More]
UCSF researchers identify new strategy to cultivate beneficial energy-burning fat

UCSF researchers identify new strategy to cultivate beneficial energy-burning fat

UC San Francisco researchers studying beige fat — a calorie-burning tissue that can help to ward off obesity and diabetes — have discovered a new strategy to cultivate this beneficial blubber. [More]
People with psychosis engage in low levels of physical activity, study reveals

People with psychosis engage in low levels of physical activity, study reveals

A large international study of more than 200,000 people in nearly 50 countries has revealed that people with psychosis engage in low levels of physical activity, and men with psychosis are over two times more likely to miss global activity targets compared to people without the illness. [More]
New imaging technique may help detect amyloid-related heart failure

New imaging technique may help detect amyloid-related heart failure

A type of heart failure caused by a build-up of amyloid can be accurately diagnosed and prognosticated with an imaging technique, eliminating the need for a biopsy, according to a multicenter study led by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center. [More]
New study may offer vital clues to understanding how Zika virus affects the developing brain

New study may offer vital clues to understanding how Zika virus affects the developing brain

In a very severe, genetic form of microcephaly, stem cells in the brain fail to divide, according to a new Columbia University Medical Center study that may provide important clues to understanding how the Zika virus affects the developing brain. [More]

GSA selects Kali St. Marie Thomas as recipient of 2016 Carroll L. Estes Rising Star Award

The Gerontological Society of America (GSA) -- the nation's largest interdisciplinary organization devoted to the field of aging -- has chosen Kali St. Marie Thomas, PhD, MA, of Brown University and the Providence VA Medical Center as the 2016 recipient of the Carroll L. Estes Rising Star Award. [More]
Injecting omega-3 fatty acid reduces brain damage in neonatal mouse model of stroke

Injecting omega-3 fatty acid reduces brain damage in neonatal mouse model of stroke

Researchers from Columbia University Medical Center found that omega-3 fatty acids reduced brain damage in a neonatal mouse model of stroke. [More]
Men experience greater pain relief than women after smoking marijuana, study finds

Men experience greater pain relief than women after smoking marijuana, study finds

Researchers from Columbia University Medical Center found that men had greater pain relief than women after smoking marijuana. [More]
Moffitt research underscores importance of continued lung cancer screening in high-risk patients

Moffitt research underscores importance of continued lung cancer screening in high-risk patients

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death for men and women. It is also one of the most complex cancers, both at the molecular level and through its clinical behavior. [More]
Novel marine natural product appears to reduce pancreatic tumor size

Novel marine natural product appears to reduce pancreatic tumor size

Scientists at Florida Atlantic University's Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute found that a deep-water marine sponge collected off of Fort Lauderdale's coast contains leiodermatolide, a natural product that has the ability to inhibit the growth of cancer cells as well as block cancer cells from dividing using extremely low concentrations of the compound. [More]
Poor prenatal nutrition may be linked to ADHD symptoms and conduct problems in children

Poor prenatal nutrition may be linked to ADHD symptoms and conduct problems in children

New research led by scientists from King's College London and the University of Bristol has found that a high-fat, high-sugar diet during pregnancy may be linked to symptoms of ADHD in children who show conduct problems early in life. [More]
Music interventions help improve quality of life in cancer patients

Music interventions help improve quality of life in cancer patients

We've all heard of laughter being the best medicine, but what about music? A systematic review published by the Cochrane Library found that there is significant evidence that music interventions help alleviate symptoms of anxiety, pain and fatigue in cancer patients, while also boosting their quality of life. [More]
New article highlights positive impact of the BFHI on breastfeeding outcomes

New article highlights positive impact of the BFHI on breastfeeding outcomes

The 10-step Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative, aimed at promoting breastfeeding initiation and exclusivity to improve early infant health in the U.S. is having a positive impact on some measures, but others have proven more challenging to influence or assess. [More]
Study throws light on service efficacy of sexual assault hotlines

Study throws light on service efficacy of sexual assault hotlines

Since the 1970s, sexual assault hotlines have grown in popularity in North America as conduits for survivors, their loved ones and professionals to unite for immediate support. [More]
Combining virtual reality and treadmill training could help reduce risk of falls in older adults

Combining virtual reality and treadmill training could help reduce risk of falls in older adults

Combining virtual reality and treadmill training helps prevent falls in older adults better than treadmill training alone, according to a new randomised controlled trial published in The Lancet. [More]
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