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Patients at ER departments regarded as "symptoms", shunted around as "production units”

Patients at ER departments regarded as "symptoms", shunted around as "production units”

The healthcare work of providing care at Emergency departments is medicalized and result-driven. As a consequence of this, patients are regarded as "symptoms", and are shunted around the department as "production units". [More]
Surprise WHI finding points to age, not menopause, as a risk factor for pelvic organ prolapse

Surprise WHI finding points to age, not menopause, as a risk factor for pelvic organ prolapse

Removing ovaries at hysterectomy does not increase a woman's risk of pelvic organ prolapse after menopause. In fact, removing ovaries lowers the risk of prolapse. This surprising finding from a Women's Health Initiative study was published online this week in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society. [More]
Research findings could lead to better tests for predicting breast cancer spread

Research findings could lead to better tests for predicting breast cancer spread

A study combining tumor cells from patients with breast cancer with a laboratory model of blood vessel lining provides the most compelling evidence so far that a specific trio of cells is required for the spread of breast cancer. The findings could lead to better tests for predicting whether a woman's breast cancer will spread and to new anti-cancer therapies. [More]
Two researchers receive Naomi Berrie Award for Outstanding Research in Diabetes

Two researchers receive Naomi Berrie Award for Outstanding Research in Diabetes

Columbia University Medical Center has presented Andrew Hattersley, DM, and Mark McCarthy, MD, with the 16th Naomi Berrie Award for Outstanding Research in Diabetes, for their work on the genetics of the disease. Their research has contributed to the discovery of new forms of the disease, improvements in diagnostic methodology, and the development of more effective treatments. [More]
Study finds that starting ART treatment soon after HIV infection improves immune health

Study finds that starting ART treatment soon after HIV infection improves immune health

HIV-1-infected U.S. military members and beneficiaries treated with antiretroviral therapy (ART) soon after infection were half as likely to develop AIDS and were more likely to reconstitute their immune-fighting CD4+ T-cells to normal levels, researchers reported Nov. 24 in JAMA Internal Medicine. [More]
Study shows that abuse of anti-anxiety, sleep drugs becomes a growing issue among teens

Study shows that abuse of anti-anxiety, sleep drugs becomes a growing issue among teens

The medical community may be inadvertently creating a new generation of illegal, recreational drug users by prescribing anti-anxiety or sleep medications to teenagers, say University of Michigan researchers. [More]
ADHD information on social media: an interview with Gemma Ryan

ADHD information on social media: an interview with Gemma Ryan

It came about through the implementation of another ADHD project called One Stop Shop, which is a collaborative project with Leicestershire Partnership NHS trust (LPT) and ADHD Solutions, a charitable support organization. [More]
Research paves way for improving efficacy of ALS treatement

Research paves way for improving efficacy of ALS treatement

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, is a neurodegenerative disease that primarily kills motor neurons, leading to paralysis and death 2 to 5 years from diagnosis. Currently ALS has no cure. Despite promising early-stage research, the majority of drugs in development for ALS have failed. Now researchers have uncovered a possible explanation. [More]

First issue of GSA's new publication series explores pain as public health problem

The first issue of a new publication series from The Gerontological Society of America called From Policy to Practice explores pain as a public health problem and takes a look at how various policies impact the care provided to patients in a range of practice settings. [More]
Early support and education program has positive impact on people with rheumatoid arthritis

Early support and education program has positive impact on people with rheumatoid arthritis

A study at Hospital for Special Surgery finds that a support group addressing the psychological and educational needs of people recently diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has a strong positive impact on their lives. [More]
Promising molecular diagnostic approach to endometriosis

Promising molecular diagnostic approach to endometriosis

Researchers at UC San Francisco have identified patterns of genetic activity that can be used to diagnose endometriosis and its severity, a finding that may offer millions of women an alternative to surgery through a simple noninvasive procedure. [More]
New app directly connects single ventricle heart defect patients to doctors

New app directly connects single ventricle heart defect patients to doctors

A powerful new app is directly connecting single ventricle heart defect patients to their doctors, dramatically improving their monitoring while they recover from heart surgery at home. Girish Shirali, MBBS, FACC, FASE, Co-Director of the Ward Family Heart Center at Children's Mercy Kansas City, will report today on how the technology is changing patient care at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2014. [More]
UH professor receives NIH grant for breast cancer research

UH professor receives NIH grant for breast cancer research

After earning her medical degree in China, Qian Lu, an associate professor of psychology at the University of Houston, felt she could help patients more by treating the mind as well as the body. She then decided to pursue a doctorate in psychology in the U.S. [More]
Excess fat in lungs may cause pulmonary fibrosis

Excess fat in lungs may cause pulmonary fibrosis

Pulmonary fibrosis has no cure. It's caused by scarring that seems to feed on itself, with the tougher, less elastic tissue replacing the ever moving and stretching lung, making it increasingly difficult for patients to breathe. [More]
Janssen announces submission of NDA for three-month paliperidone palmitate

Janssen announces submission of NDA for three-month paliperidone palmitate

Janssen Research & Development, LLC today announced the submission of a New Drug Application (NDA) for three-month atypical antipsychotic paliperidone palmitate to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The NDA seeks approval for the medication as a treatment for schizophrenia in adults. [More]
Cigna Foundation awards World of Difference grant to improve heart healthy behaviors in women

Cigna Foundation awards World of Difference grant to improve heart healthy behaviors in women

When it comes to hearts, men and women are not created equally. Women who have experienced a heart attack have a higher risk of a subsequent heart attack, or death, compared to men, according to the American Heart Association. [More]
BMI plays role in rheumatoid arthritis patients' ability to achieve sustained remission

BMI plays role in rheumatoid arthritis patients' ability to achieve sustained remission

A study by Hospital for Special Surgery researchers finds that body mass index (BMI) plays a role in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients' ability to achieve a sustained remission. Looking at patients who had received an RA diagnosis within the past 12 months, investigators found that those who were significantly underweight or overweight/obese were the least likely to remain in remission. [More]
Total hip replacement: An excellent option for younger patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

Total hip replacement: An excellent option for younger patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

When you think of hip replacement surgery, you generally envision an older adult with painful osteoarthritis. But the procedure is also used for younger patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) whose joints have been severely damaged by the disease. [More]
UMMS scientists awarded $9.5 million grant to study Fragile X syndrome

UMMS scientists awarded $9.5 million grant to study Fragile X syndrome

The National Institutes of Health has awarded a $9.5 million grant to investigators at the University of Massachusetts Medical School to establish a Center for Collaborative Research in Fragile X, one of three centers designated by the NIH. [More]
Hispanics hospitalized less than other ethnic groups, study finds

Hispanics hospitalized less than other ethnic groups, study finds

For nearly three decades, researchers have pondered the Hispanic Mortality Paradox -- why Hispanics in the U.S. tend to outlive non-Hispanic whites by several years, despite having, in general, lower income and educational attainment levels that are associated with shorter lives. [More]