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UM SOM Dean E. Albert Reece, UMMS President and CEO Robert Chrencik named recipients of 'Speaker's Medallion'

UM SOM Dean E. Albert Reece, UMMS President and CEO Robert Chrencik named recipients of 'Speaker's Medallion'

The Maryland House of Delegates and House Speaker Michael E. Busch, has announced that University of Maryland School of Medicine Dean E. Albert Reece, MD, PhD, MBA and University of Maryland Medical System President and CEO Robert Chrencik, MBA, are recipients of the "Speaker's Medallion," the highest honor given to the public by the leader of the Maryland House of Delegates. [More]
Cranberry capsules more effective in lowering UTI risk than juice

Cranberry capsules more effective in lowering UTI risk than juice

A UTI is an infection in any part of the urinary system, kidneys, bladder or urethra. They are more common in women and affect more than 3 million Americans per year. Many in the population will turn to sipping on a cranberry juice cocktail to alleviate their symptoms, but, according to a Texas A&M Health Science Center urologist, drinking cranberry juice to treat a UTI is little more than an old wives' tale. [More]
Cancer patients who miss scheduled radiation therapy appointments have worse outcomes

Cancer patients who miss scheduled radiation therapy appointments have worse outcomes

Cancer patients who miss two or more radiation therapy sessions have a worse outcome than fully compliant patients, investigators at Montefiore Einstein Center for Cancer Care and Albert Einstein College of Medicine's NCI-designated Albert Einstein Cancer Center have found. [More]
2020 dementia challenge to be tackled by MOOC

2020 dementia challenge to be tackled by MOOC

The University of Derby’s Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) titled ‘Bridging the Dementia Divide’ is back by popular demand after the University received high levels of requests to run the course again. [More]
LifeWatch's wireless, patch-based vital signs monitoring system receives FDA clearance

LifeWatch's wireless, patch-based vital signs monitoring system receives FDA clearance

LifeWatch AG, a leading developer and provider of medical solutions and remote diagnostic monitoring services in the digital health market, is pleased to announce that it has received FDA clearance for its continuous Vital Signs Monitoring Service. [More]
Clinical observations: replacing paper with mobiles? An interview with Eran David

Clinical observations: replacing paper with mobiles? An interview with Eran David

Replacing paper with technology has significant safety ramifications. Using a mobile device for electronic observations increases the accuracy of documentation and score calculations. [More]
Transformational leadership could have positive effects on quality of patient care

Transformational leadership could have positive effects on quality of patient care

A recent study shows that encouraging nurses to work towards a collective goal within a supportive milieu--a style of management called transformational leadership--can have positive effects on the quality of the care given to patients. It was also a predictor of nurses' intentions to stay on at their current healthcare facilities. [More]
New method could help physicians detect infection in wounds in less than a minute

New method could help physicians detect infection in wounds in less than a minute

A new method for detection of infection in wounds could take physicians less than a minute to complete, rather than the current 24 hours it takes to plate bacteria and leave it to incubate overnight, according to research by the George Washington University's Victoria Shanmugam, M.D. [More]
Discovery takes researchers one step closer to preventing C. diff

Discovery takes researchers one step closer to preventing C. diff

Exposure to specific antibiotics is linked to the development of certain strains of antibiotic-resistant C. difficile, one of the fastest growing bacteria superbugs, according to a new study published by Stuart Johnson, MD, of Loyola University Health System, Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine and the Hines VA Medical Hospital. [More]
Lamin nucleoskeleton disordered in Alzheimer's

Lamin nucleoskeleton disordered in Alzheimer's

Brain cell death in Alzheimer's disease is linked to disruption of a skeleton that surrounds the nucleus of the cells, a researcher in the School of Medicine at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio said. [More]
Using corticosteroids before late preterm delivery reduces respiratory complications in babies

Using corticosteroids before late preterm delivery reduces respiratory complications in babies

A multicenter clinical trial led by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center and NewYork-Presbyterian has found that the use of corticosteroids in mothers at risk for late preterm delivery significantly reduced the incidence of severe respiratory complications in their babies. [More]
Study: Prior surgical abortion appears to increase risk of later preterm birth

Study: Prior surgical abortion appears to increase risk of later preterm birth

Surgical methods used in a common form of abortion or to clear the womb after a spontaneous miscarriage appears to significantly increase the risk of a later preterm birth, say researchers at Thomas Jefferson University who analyzed 36 studies that enrolled more than 1 million women. [More]
American Diabetes Association issues statement to address diabetes management in LTC facilities

American Diabetes Association issues statement to address diabetes management in LTC facilities

The care of adults over age 65 with type 2 diabetes is a growing concern: the prevalence of diabetes is highest in this age group and is expected to grow as the U.S. population ages, with many needing care at long-term care (LTC) facilities. [More]
Innovative mattresses to stop pressure ulcers: an interview with Mike Hutson

Innovative mattresses to stop pressure ulcers: an interview with Mike Hutson

Pressure ulcers are wounds that occur when a continuous pressure or friction is placed on one area of the body, damaging the skin. They occur when pressure stops blood from flowing normally, leading the cells to die and the skin to break down. [More]
Study: Young African-Americans often have distorted view of stroke risk

Study: Young African-Americans often have distorted view of stroke risk

Young African-Americans often hold a distorted view of their personal risk for a stroke, two nursing researchers at Georgia State University's Byrdine F. Lewis School of Nursing and Health Professions say in a recently published study in the Journal of Neuroscience Nursing. [More]
New article provides guidance on managing critically ill patients at risk for alcohol withdrawal

New article provides guidance on managing critically ill patients at risk for alcohol withdrawal

Alcohol withdrawal adds challenges to caring for critically ill patients, and nurses must be diligent at each stage of care to minimize complications, according to an article in the February issue of Critical Care Nurse. [More]

Critical access hospitals help meet need for high-quality palliative care in rural communities

Nurses at critical access hospitals are well positioned to provide high-quality palliative care close to home for millions of Americans in rural communities, according to an article in the February issue of Critical Care Nurse. [More]
Confronting the global concern of pressure ulcers

Confronting the global concern of pressure ulcers

Almost 700,000 people in the UK are affected by pressure ulcers every year, making this global issue a substantial concern for health professionals and care units worldwide. [More]
FDA-approved blood pressure drug reduces cell damage linked to Alzheimer's disease

FDA-approved blood pressure drug reduces cell damage linked to Alzheimer's disease

In laboratory neuronal cultures, an FDA-approved drug used to treat high blood pressure reduced cell damage often linked to Alzheimer's disease, say researchers at Georgetown University Medical Center and the National Institutes of Health. [More]

Understanding military's culture could help health care providers improve care for veterans

Health care systems and providers need to understand the unique realities of military culture in order to work effectively with veterans and military families, according to the findings of a study by a University at Buffalo research team. [More]
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