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Nearly 179 million cases of acute diarrhea occur each year in the U.S.

Nearly 179 million cases of acute diarrhea occur each year in the U.S.

In the United States, approximately 179 million cases of acute diarrhea occur each year, and most of those cases are entirely preventable, a researcher from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston concluded in a New England Journal of Medicine review article. [More]
New tool can help doctors identify patients at highest risk for respiratory failure after surgery

New tool can help doctors identify patients at highest risk for respiratory failure after surgery

A new prediction tool can help doctors better identify patients who are at highest risk for respiratory failure after surgery and therefore prevent the often deadly condition, suggest data from a large multi-center study published in the May issue of Anesthesiology. [More]

tPA therapy improves outcomes for patients suffering acute ischemic stroke

Administering a clot-dissolving drug to stroke victims quickly — ideally within the first 60 minutes after they arrive at a hospital emergency room — is crucial to saving their lives, preserving their brain function and reducing disability. [More]
Health clinics can ease financial burden on hospitals and insurance companies

Health clinics can ease financial burden on hospitals and insurance companies

Health clinics that can provide primary care for low-income patients may ease the financial burden on both hospitals and insurance companies while improving patient health, researchers have concluded. [More]
State highlights: Tenn. may send addicted moms to jail; Hawaii autism coverage; Florida medical marijuana

State highlights: Tenn. may send addicted moms to jail; Hawaii autism coverage; Florida medical marijuana

Pregnant women addicted to illegal narcotics or prescription pain pills could soon be jailed in Tennessee under a bill awaiting the governor's signature. [More]
New computational tool identifies undiagnosed illnesses and unknown gene mutations

New computational tool identifies undiagnosed illnesses and unknown gene mutations

A computational tool developed at the University of Utah (U of U) has successfully identified diseases with unknown gene mutations in three separate cases, U of U researchers and their colleagues report in a new study in The American Journal of Human Genetics. [More]
University of Utah software successfully identifies diseases with unknown gene mutations in three separate cases

University of Utah software successfully identifies diseases with unknown gene mutations in three separate cases

A computational tool developed at the University of Utah (U of U) has successfully identified diseases with unknown gene mutations in three separate cases, U of U researchers and their colleagues report in a new study in The American Journal of Human Genetics. The software, Phevor (Phenotype Driven Variant Ontological Re-ranking tool), identifies undiagnosed illnesses and unknown gene mutations by analyzing the exomes, or areas of DNA where proteins that code for genes are made, in individual patients and small families. [More]
Study evaluates stigma and public perceptions related to lung cancer

Study evaluates stigma and public perceptions related to lung cancer

It's not uncommon these days to find a colored ribbon representing a disease. A pink ribbon is well known to signify breast cancer. But what color ribbon does one think of with lung cancer? [More]

All Together Better Health conference to be held in Pittsburgh this June

The biennial All Together Better Health conference will hold its first U.S. meeting in Pittsburgh this June to highlight the latest research on interprofessionalism and team-based health care delivery. The international conference serves as a forum for health system executives, educational leaders and policy makers to share new studies and shape the future of the health care workforce. [More]

Study helps physicians better identify patients at risk of acute respiratory distress syndrome

Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a leading cause of respiratory failure after surgery. Patients who develop the lung disorder postoperatively are at higher risk of dying in the hospital, and those who survive the syndrome may still bear its physical effects years later. [More]
New approach to handle people with dementia may help reduce use of antipsychotics drugs

New approach to handle people with dementia may help reduce use of antipsychotics drugs

A new approach to handling agitation, aggression and other unwanted behaviors by people with dementia may help reduce the use of antipsychotics and other psychiatric drugs in this population, and make life easier for them and their caregivers, a team of experts says. [More]

Researchers examine link between alcoholism and loss of muscle strength

Muscle weakness is a common symptom of both long-time alcoholics and patients with mitochondrial disease. Now researchers have found a common link: mitochondria that are unable to self-repair. [More]

New approach may help reduce use of antipsychotics and other psychiatric drugs in dementia patients

A new approach to handling agitation, aggression and other unwanted behaviors by people with dementia may help reduce the use of antipsychotics and other psychiatric drugs in this population, and make life easier for them and their caregivers, a team of experts says. [More]
New hypothesis about emergence of Parkinson's disease

New hypothesis about emergence of Parkinson's disease

The cause of neuronal death in Parkinson's disease is still unknown, but a new study proposes that neurons may be mistaken for foreign invaders and killed by the person's own immune system, similar to the way autoimmune diseases like type I diabetes, celiac disease, and multiple sclerosis attack the body's cells. [More]

Cedars-Sinai nurses screening hospitalized patients for signs of depression

In an effort to identify and treat patients with undiagnosed depression, Cedars-Sinai nurses are screening each hospitalized patient for signs of the illness and for risk factors that could make recoveries harder and longer. [More]

Edna Adan named inaugural recipient of Renfield Foundation Award for Global Women's Health

Following an intense selection process, Edna Adan has been named the inaugural recipient of the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing Renfield Foundation Award for Global Women's Health. The award will be presented to Adan on May 15, 2014 and includes a $100,000 cash prize which will be presented biennially to a leader in the field of global women's health. [More]
Research roundup: Colonscopy in the countryside; retiree health benefits; what should hip surgery cost?

Research roundup: Colonscopy in the countryside; retiree health benefits; what should hip surgery cost?

Rural residents who commonly seek treatment for advanced stages of colorectal cancer have been thought to lack access to cancer screening and adjuvant therapy. ... Several theories have been postulated to explain these findings, some of which include low socioeconomic status, lower educational attainment, lack of insurance coverage, underinsurance, and travel distance to health care facilities. [More]
Researchers devise new approach to treatment of Alzheimer's disease

Researchers devise new approach to treatment of Alzheimer's disease

A team of researchers from Columbia University Medical Center, Weill Cornell Medical College, and Brandeis University has devised a wholly new approach to the treatment of Alzheimer's disease involving the so-called retromer protein complex. Retromer plays a vital role in neurons, steering amyloid precursor protein (APP) away from a region of the cell where APP is cleaved, creating the potentially toxic byproduct amyloid-beta, which is thought to contribute to the development of Alzheimer's. [More]
Viewpoints: Obamacare still has more challenges; GOP needs to help make law work; census change is not Obama's decision

Viewpoints: Obamacare still has more challenges; GOP needs to help make law work; census change is not Obama's decision

The first open enrollment period under the Affordable Care Act ended this week with roughly 7.5 million people obtaining policies through the new state insurance exchanges, including more than 1.3 million at Covered California. [More]

Fish consumption advisories for pregnant women ineffective in reducing infant exposure to POPs

A new modeling study suggests that fish consumption advisories for expecting mothers are ineffective in reducing infant exposure to long-lived contaminants like persistent organic pollutants (POPs). [More]