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Resveratrol may be clinically beneficial to people with Alzheimer's disease

Resveratrol may be clinically beneficial to people with Alzheimer's disease

Resveratrol, given to Alzheimer's patients, appears to restore the integrity of the blood-brain barrier, reducing the ability of harmful immune molecules secreted by immune cells to infiltrate from the body into brain tissues, say researchers at Georgetown University Medical Center. [More]
Shorter and longer reproductive durations can raise risk of type 2 diabetes in postmenopausal women

Shorter and longer reproductive durations can raise risk of type 2 diabetes in postmenopausal women

Using data from the Women's Health Initiative, a new study has found that women with reproductive-period durations of less than 30 years had a 37% increased risk of type 2 diabetes compared with women whose reproductive durations were somewhere in the middle (36 to 40 years). [More]
Maternal placental syndromes increase short-term risk of developing cardiovascular disease

Maternal placental syndromes increase short-term risk of developing cardiovascular disease

The short-term risk of developing cardiovascular disease following a first pregnancy is higher for women experiencing placental syndromes and a preterm birth or an infant born smaller than the usual size, a University of South Florida study reports. [More]
Early and late menopause linked to increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes

Early and late menopause linked to increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes

Women who begin menopause before age 46 or after 55 have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to a study of more than 124,000 women enrolled in the Women's Health Initiative, a large national trial aimed at preventing disease in postmenopausal women. [More]
Focused therapy may be effective, less toxic way to treat brain tumors

Focused therapy may be effective, less toxic way to treat brain tumors

Physicians from Carolinas HealthCare System's Neurosciences Institute and Levine Cancer Institute are among the authors of a study that was accepted for publication by the Journal of the American Medical Association. The study, released on July 26, 2016, shows that patients with the most common form of brain tumor can be treated in an effective and substantially less toxic way by omitting a widely used portion of radiation therapy. [More]
Study finds biological basis for gastrointestinal symptoms in people with non-celiac wheat sensitivity

Study finds biological basis for gastrointestinal symptoms in people with non-celiac wheat sensitivity

A new study may explain why people who do not have celiac disease or wheat allergy nevertheless experience a variety of gastrointestinal and extra-intestinal symptoms after ingesting wheat and related cereals. [More]
Large study of familial ALS finds new gene variant present in 3% of all patients with disease

Large study of familial ALS finds new gene variant present in 3% of all patients with disease

Variations in a gene with multiple functions in neurons are present in approximately 3 percent of all cases of ALS in North American and European populations, both sporadic and familial, making it one of the most common genetic causes of the disease, according to a paper published in Nature Genetics. [More]
Odor identification test may help detect early-stage Alzheimer's disease

Odor identification test may help detect early-stage Alzheimer's disease

Researchers from Columbia University Medical Center, New York State Psychiatric Institute, and NewYork-Presbyterian reported that an odor identification test may prove useful in predicting cognitive decline and detecting early-stage Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Study identifies key risk factors involved in patient-to-patient transmission of drug-resistant bacteria

Study identifies key risk factors involved in patient-to-patient transmission of drug-resistant bacteria

Three key factors increase the risk for patient-to-patient transmission of an extremely drug-resistant bacteria known as CP-CRE, according to a new study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. [More]
First confirmed case of Alzheimer’s disease in HIV-positive patient to be presented at AAIC 2016

First confirmed case of Alzheimer’s disease in HIV-positive patient to be presented at AAIC 2016

The first case of Alzheimer's disease diagnosed in an HIV-positive individual will be presented in a poster session at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference 2016 in Toronto July 27. [More]
Salmonella protein can reduce drug resistant molecule found in cancer cells

Salmonella protein can reduce drug resistant molecule found in cancer cells

A surprising result in an experiment on Salmonella bacteria has led to a discovery that may make drug resistant cancer cells more treatable by conventional chemotherapies. [More]
New neuroprotective compounds may prevent development of epilepsy

New neuroprotective compounds may prevent development of epilepsy

A team led by Nicolas Bazan, MD, PhD, Boyd Professor and Director of LSU Health New Orleans' Neuroscience Center of Excellence, has developed neuroprotective compounds that may prevent the development of epilepsy. [More]
Disordered eating trends may not be improving among sexual minority teens, new research finds

Disordered eating trends may not be improving among sexual minority teens, new research finds

Sexual minority boys and girls are more likely to purge or take laxatives, use diet pills, or fast to lose weight than their straight peers, and those disordered eating trends may not be improving, according to new research from the University of British Columbia. [More]
AJCC article outlines role of LTAC hospitals in health care continuum

AJCC article outlines role of LTAC hospitals in health care continuum

Advances in technology have helped more patients survive acute illness and trauma, and these patients are increasingly transferred to long-term acute care hospitals. [More]
Adults with pain could be at higher risk of developing prescription opioid use disorders

Adults with pain could be at higher risk of developing prescription opioid use disorders

What do we really know about the relationship between the experience of pain and risk of developing opioid use disorder? Results from a recent study - the first to directly address this question -- show that people with moderate or more severe pain had a 41 percent higher risk of developing prescription opioid use disorders than those without, independent of other demographic and clinical factors. [More]
HSS researchers launch new study to find if stem cell treatment could help people with knee arthritis

HSS researchers launch new study to find if stem cell treatment could help people with knee arthritis

Researchers at Hospital for Special Surgery have launched a study to determine if a treatment using stem cells could help people with painful knee arthritis. [More]
Adding new monoclonal antibody to chemotherapy improves survival in soft-tissue sarcoma patients

Adding new monoclonal antibody to chemotherapy improves survival in soft-tissue sarcoma patients

Adding a novel monoclonal antibody therapy to traditional chemotherapy increased median survival by nearly a year in patients with advanced sarcoma, a lethal soft-tissue cancer. [More]
Patient characteristics, outcomes differ for indoor and outdoor fallers, study shows

Patient characteristics, outcomes differ for indoor and outdoor fallers, study shows

Falling can have serious consequences for older adults, including a loss of function and increased risk of institutionalization. [More]
In-hospital formula introduction and family history may help explain racial, ethnic breastfeeding disparities

In-hospital formula introduction and family history may help explain racial, ethnic breastfeeding disparities

A national research collaboration funded by the National Institutes of Health has found significant racial and ethnic disparities in breastfeeding outcomes, according to a study published online this week in Pediatrics. [More]
NorthShore launches first clinical trial to examine GRS test for cancer risk assessment

NorthShore launches first clinical trial to examine GRS test for cancer risk assessment

Researchers at NorthShore University HealthSystem have launched the first clinical trial to investigate a genetic risk score (GRS) test to predict the risk of breast, prostate and colorectal cancer in the primary care setting. [More]
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