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Penn State Health, CHI complete transfer of St. Joseph Regional Health Network ownership

Penn State Health, CHI complete transfer of St. Joseph Regional Health Network ownership

Penn State Health and Catholic Health Initiatives have completed the transfer of ownership of CHI's affiliate, St. Joseph Regional Health Network (St. Joseph) in Reading, Pa., to Penn State Health. [More]
CWRU researcher raises awareness of flame-retardants found in common household products

CWRU researcher raises awareness of flame-retardants found in common household products

Parents might be surprised to learn their cellphones, living room sofas, baby carriers, bouncy baby chairs and even some pizza boxes may contain chemicals harmful to young children, according to Case Western Reserve University nursing school researcher Laura Distelhorst. [More]
Study identifies trends in use of antipsychotic medications in young people in the U.S.

Study identifies trends in use of antipsychotic medications in young people in the U.S.

Despite concerns that use of antipsychotic medications in treating young people has increased, use actually declined between 2006 and 2010 for children ages 12 and under, and increased for adolescents and young adults. [More]

Continental Who's Who recognizes Dr. Judith D. Mcleod as pinnacle professional in the nursing field

Dr. Judith D. McLeod, R.N., BSN, MSN, DNP, CPNP, is recognized by Continental Who's Who as a Pinnacle Professional in the field of Nursing. Dr. McLeod is the Director of the BSN-MSN Program at Stanbridge College. [More]
UCSF workshop helps improve palliative care communication skills among critical care nurses

UCSF workshop helps improve palliative care communication skills among critical care nurses

A workshop at the University of California San Francisco helped critical care nurses improve their palliative care communication skills, according to an article in the July issue of the American Journal of Critical Care. [More]
Study: Around 6% survive cardiac arrest outside of hospital setting

Study: Around 6% survive cardiac arrest outside of hospital setting

Cardiac arrest strikes almost 600,000 people each year, killing the vast majority of those individuals, says a new report from the Institute of Medicine. Every year in the U.S., approximately 395,000 cases of cardiac arrest occur outside of a hospital setting, in which less than 6 percent survive. Approximately 200,000 cardiac arrests occur each year in hospitals, and 24 percent of those patients survive. Estimates suggest that cardiac arrest is the third leading cause of death in the U.S. behind cancer and heart disease. [More]
ASHG declares 2015 recipients of annual Award for Excellence in Human Genetics Education

ASHG declares 2015 recipients of annual Award for Excellence in Human Genetics Education

The American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) has named Robert L. Nussbaum, M.D., chief medical officer of invitae and clinical professor of medicine (volunteer) at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF); Roderick R. McInnes, CM, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Lady Davis Institute at the Jewish General Hospital and Alva chair in human genetics, Canada Research chair in neurogenetics, and professor of human genetics and biochemistry at McGill University; and Huntington F. Willard, Ph.D., president and director of the Marine Biological Laboratory and professor of human genetics at the University of Chicago; as the 2015 recipients of its annual Award for Excellence in Human Genetics Education. [More]
Males may play positive role in development of offspring's brains before pregnancy

Males may play positive role in development of offspring's brains before pregnancy

A new study from Indiana University provides evidence in mice that males may play a positive role in the development of offspring's brains starting before pregnancy. [More]
National trial aims to reduce unnecessary use of antibiotics in post-acute and long-term care facilities

National trial aims to reduce unnecessary use of antibiotics in post-acute and long-term care facilities

The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine will be leading a $1.5 million national trial to examine methods to reduce unnecessary use of antibiotics in post-acute and long-term care (PA/LTC) facilities. [More]
Hospital-wide clinical improvement initiative for patients at risk for DASH reduces readmission rates

Hospital-wide clinical improvement initiative for patients at risk for DASH reduces readmission rates

Brigham and Women's Hospital finds that developing and implementing an interdisciplinary care improvement initiative improves outcomes. [More]
Ranit Mishori awarded Macy Foundation grant to educate medical trainees about health needs of refugees

Ranit Mishori awarded Macy Foundation grant to educate medical trainees about health needs of refugees

The Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation has awarded a President's Grant to Georgetown family medicine physician Ranit Mishori, MD, MHS, FAAFP, to create a comprehensive curriculum to educate health professions students, residents and clinicians about the health needs of immigrants, migrants, torture survivors, asylum seekers and refugees. [More]
FAU awarded $2.1 million to examine effectiveness of antipsychotic medication for schizophrenia

FAU awarded $2.1 million to examine effectiveness of antipsychotic medication for schizophrenia

Florida Atlantic University's Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine was recently awarded a $2.1 million, two-year contract by Otsuka America Pharmaceutical Inc. to conduct a study to examine the effectiveness of an injectable long-acting antipsychotic medication for schizophrenia and its impact on 30-day hospital readmission rates. [More]
Poor sleep linked to negative mood in women with bipolar disorder

Poor sleep linked to negative mood in women with bipolar disorder

Poor sleep is associated with negative mood in women with bipolar disorder, according to researchers at Penn State College of Medicine and University of Michigan Medical School. [More]
Ebola outbreak: Shaping new strategies to improve health care among rural Liberians

Ebola outbreak: Shaping new strategies to improve health care among rural Liberians

As Liberia rebuilds a health care system decimated by the 2014 Ebola outbreak, understanding precisely how far citizens live from health facilities and its impact on seeking care can help shape new strategies to improve health care delivery and reduce geographic disparities. [More]

New report finds variability in wait times for health care appointments throughout U.S.

Tremendous variability in wait times for health care appointments exists throughout the U.S., ranging from same day service to several months, says a new report from the Institute of Medicine. However, there is currently an opportunity to develop "systems-based approaches" -- similar to systems-based engineering approaches applied successfully in industries beyond health care -- that aim to provide immediate engagement of a patient's concern at the point of initial contact and can be used in in-person appointments as well as alternatives such as team-based care, electronic or telephone consultations, telehealth, and surge capacity agreements with other caregivers and facilities. [More]
New study examines how reasons for illicit marijuana use relate to use of other drugs

New study examines how reasons for illicit marijuana use relate to use of other drugs

Marijuana is the most prevalent drug in the U.S. Approximately 70% of the 2.8 million individuals who initiated use of illicit drugs in 2013 reported that marijuana was their first drug. [More]
Student applications to PNP and NNP training programs falling

Student applications to PNP and NNP training programs falling

While the number of graduates from family or adult nurse practitioner programs continues to rise, student applications to pediatric nurse practitioner and neonatal nurse practitioner programs are falling. Yet there is capacity in PNP and NNP training programs and unmet demand for graduates. [More]
New species of tRNA-derived small RNAs contribute to cell proliferation in cancer

New species of tRNA-derived small RNAs contribute to cell proliferation in cancer

Since their discovery in the 1950s, transfer RNAs (tRNAs) have been best known for their role in helping the cell make proteins from messenger RNA templates. However, recent studies have led to a previously-unsuspected concept that tRNAs are not always the end product; namely, they further serve as a source of small RNAs. [More]

Researchers reconstruct infants' visual perception of the world

A newborn infant can see its parents' expressions at a distance of 30 cm. For the first time researchers have managed to reconstruct infants visual perception of the world. [More]

Mental Health Advisory Committee to hold hearings on two bills to enhance care for patients suffering from acute mental illness

Behavioral health care advocates and nurses will testify Monday on two critically important bills designed to improve care for residents of Massachusetts suffering from acute mental illness who are currently going without proper care while being boarded in overcrowded hospital emergency departments or being inappropriately housed in our corrections system. [More]
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