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Women more afraid of childbirth than previously thought

Women more afraid of childbirth than previously thought

Every woman who has ever had a baby shower has had to sit through the gruesome war stories about labor and childbirth. [More]
First real-time study to test effectiveness of fertility app

First real-time study to test effectiveness of fertility app

In what is believed to be the first study of its kind, researchers at Georgetown University Medical Center's Institute for Reproductive Health are recruiting as many as 1,200 women to study, in real time, a smartphone app that calculates a woman's chance for pregnancy on a daily basis. [More]
The future of simulated teaching methods: an interview with Dr Robert Amyot

The future of simulated teaching methods: an interview with Dr Robert Amyot

In healthcare, we have physicians, nurses and paramedics who know the textbook by heart and know exactly what they need to do, but have never experienced the procedure first-hand, or they have no experience responding to adverse events that may occur. [More]
Mice study shows influence of dad's obesity on daughter’s body weight and breast cancer risk

Mice study shows influence of dad's obesity on daughter’s body weight and breast cancer risk

Obese male mice and normal weight female mice produce female pups that are overweight at birth through childhood, and have delayed development of their breast tissue as well as increased rates of breast cancer. [More]
New optogenetic manipulation technique could possibly reduce migraine headaches

New optogenetic manipulation technique could possibly reduce migraine headaches

Despite decades of research, migraines are often not well controlled with medication. For those prone to this type of debilitating headache, it sometimes seems nothing can stop the pain and the sensitivity to light. But what if light itself was key to their relief? [More]
First CRISPR/Cas9 screen helps identify human proteins required for Zika virus replication

First CRISPR/Cas9 screen helps identify human proteins required for Zika virus replication

Scientists at the University of Massachusetts Medical School have performed the first CRISPR/Cas9 screen to discover human proteins that Zika virus needs for replication. [More]
Kidney transplant recipients with inflammation prior to surgery more likely to develop diabetes

Kidney transplant recipients with inflammation prior to surgery more likely to develop diabetes

Up to 30 percent of people who receive organ transplants will develop diabetes, but researchers are unsure why. Although doctors typically blame immunosuppressive drugs that transplant recipients take to prevent organ rejection, it's unclear why some people develop the lifelong disorder, while others do not. [More]
Long-term opioid therapy may not be effective to manage pain in sickle cell disease patients

Long-term opioid therapy may not be effective to manage pain in sickle cell disease patients

In a small study looking at pain assessments in adults with sickle cell disease, researchers at Johns Hopkins says overall, those treated long-term with opioids often fared worse in measures of pain, fatigue and curtailed daily activities than those not on long-term opioids. [More]
Molecular diagnostics of the future: an interview with Elaine Warburton, OBE

Molecular diagnostics of the future: an interview with Elaine Warburton, OBE

Firstly, a sample must be transported from the clinic to the laboratory. Simple tests may be undertaken in a small lab within the hospital or clinic, whilst complex testing such as drug susceptibility testing is often done in a large centralized laboratory many miles from the clinic [More]
Study emphasizes need for Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program to receive basic HIV care

Study emphasizes need for Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program to receive basic HIV care

A Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine study of insurance coverage of more than 28,000 people with HIV concludes that a decades-old program that offers free medical care remains a critical necessity despite the availability of coverage under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). [More]
Study finds nearly half of older Americans spend heavily on end-of-life care

Study finds nearly half of older Americans spend heavily on end-of-life care

Last-ditch, high-tech heroic treatments. Days in the hospital intensive care unit. You might think this is what makes dying in America so expensive - and that it's where we should focus efforts to spend the nation's healthcare dollars more wisely. [More]
Researcher aims to develop easy-to-use, inexpensive sperm sorting devices to help infertile couples

Researcher aims to develop easy-to-use, inexpensive sperm sorting devices to help infertile couples

The competition is fierce and only the strongest survive the obstacle course within the female reproductive tract. Of the millions of sperm that enter the vagina, only about 10 or so make it to the oocyte or egg, demonstrating how rigorous the natural sperm selection process really is. [More]
New collaborative research program connects canine and human cancers

New collaborative research program connects canine and human cancers

A new collaborative research program pairs oncologists who treat childhood and adult sarcomas with veterinarians who manage the same cancers in canine patients. [More]
Natural molecule NAC could benefit patients with Parkinson's disease

Natural molecule NAC could benefit patients with Parkinson's disease

The natural molecule, n-acetylcysteine (NAC), with strong antioxidant effects, shows potential benefit as part of the management for patients with Parkinson's disease, according to a study published today in the journal PLOS ONE. [More]
Study sheds new light on how overeating may lead to more eating

Study sheds new light on how overeating may lead to more eating

Research is finally beginning to shed light on some of the reasons that extra weight is difficult to shed permanently. Now, a new study has uncovered another method by which the gut senses how much food a person eats and relays that to the brain. [More]
Study shows for-profit hospices have persistently high rates of hospitalization

Study shows for-profit hospices have persistently high rates of hospitalization

Patients who were asked where they wanted to die upon entering hospice had lower rates of hospitalization at the end of life, as did those in hospices that monitored symptoms more frequently, according to a new study led by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. [More]
Researchers explore how African-Americans use spirituality to ease burden of chronic illnesses

Researchers explore how African-Americans use spirituality to ease burden of chronic illnesses

Spirituality plays a central role in many aspects of African-American culture, and University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing postdoctoral scholar Deborah Ejem, Ph.D., will explore how significant a factor it is in the relationships among patients with chronic illnesses and their caregivers and clinicians. [More]
In-hospital program improves community mobility, posthospitalization function in older adults

In-hospital program improves community mobility, posthospitalization function in older adults

Decreased mobility during hospitalization for older adults is associated with increased risk of death, nursing home admission and functional decline. University of Alabama at Birmingham investigators found that patients who participated in a mobility program were less likely to experience a decline in mobility when compared to the usual care provided during hospilization. [More]
Creative art making can help reduce stress

Creative art making can help reduce stress

Whether you're Van Gogh or a stick-figure sketcher, a new Drexel University study found that making art can significantly reduce stress-related hormones in your body. [More]
MUTAs and GTAs act as medical model to train students

MUTAs and GTAs act as medical model to train students

Every profession has a basic skill it seems they should just know. Architects can draw a blueprint, lawyers can write a brief and physicians and nurses can perform a physical exam. [More]
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