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Nursing home chain agrees to pay $38M to settle government poor care claims

Nursing home chain agrees to pay $38M to settle government poor care claims

Extendicare, which owns 150 nursing homes in 11 states and denied any wrongdoing, was accused of inappropriate billing and providing inadequate care. [More]
HIV-infected users of stimulants derive benefits from antiretroviral therapy

HIV-infected users of stimulants derive benefits from antiretroviral therapy

New clinical research from UC San Francisco shows that 341 HIV-infected men who reported using stimulants such as methamphetamine or cocaine derived life-saving benefits from being on antiretroviral therapy that were comparable to those of HIV-infected men who do not use stimulants. [More]
Medicare premium holds steady in 2015

Medicare premium holds steady in 2015

The premium that most older people pay for outpatient, or "Part B," care will stay the same in 2015 -- $104.90 a month, while cost-sharing for hospital and skilled nursing stays will increase slightly, the government announced. [More]
Hormone loss may cause colon cancer, say Thomas Jefferson University researchers

Hormone loss may cause colon cancer, say Thomas Jefferson University researchers

Some cancers, like breast and prostate cancer, are driven by hormones such as estrogen and testosterone, but to date, there are none that are driven by the lack of a hormone. New evidence suggests that human colon cells may become cancerous when they lose the ability to produce a hormone that helps the cells maintain normal biology. If verified by further studies, it suggests that treating patients at high risk for colon cancer by replacing the hormone guanylin could prevent the development of cancer. [More]
NAMS set to launch first-ever menopause mobile app

NAMS set to launch first-ever menopause mobile app

The North American Menopause Society is set to launch a first-ever menopause mobile app designed for use by both clinicians and patients to help manage menopausal symptoms and assess risk factors. [More]
Views on giving flu shot to younger children

Views on giving flu shot to younger children

It's a common question parents ask themselves this time of year: Does my child really need a flu shot? Though the flu may seem harmless, the truth is on average 20,000 children age 5 and younger are hospitalized due to flu symptoms each year. [More]
Columbia University's imaging software gets FDA 510k clearance

Columbia University's imaging software gets FDA 510k clearance

Columbia University's imaging software that facilitates 3-D lung tumor segmentation, licensed to Varian Medical Systems, has been incorporated into the Smart Segmentation module of Varian's Eclipse treatment planning system and has received FDA 510k clearance. [More]
CUMC researchers use innovative algorithm to find driving force behind aggressive form of glioblastoma

CUMC researchers use innovative algorithm to find driving force behind aggressive form of glioblastoma

Using an innovative algorithm that analyzes gene regulatory and signaling networks, Columbia University Medical Center researchers have found that loss of a gene called KLHL9 is the driving force behind the most aggressive form of glioblastoma, the most common form of brain cancer. [More]
UC Berkeley, UCSF researchers team up to create center for neurodegenerative disease research

UC Berkeley, UCSF researchers team up to create center for neurodegenerative disease research

Researchers at UC San Francisco and UC Berkeley have teamed up to create an innovative, integrated center for research on neurodegenerative diseases. Supported by a $3 million grant from the Glenn Foundation for Medical Research, the new center aims to pave the way to developing novel treatments for diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease by investigating the many ways that proteins can malfunction within cells. [More]
BHVH cardiologists implant investigational cardiac pacemaker the size of multivitamin

BHVH cardiologists implant investigational cardiac pacemaker the size of multivitamin

Cardiologists on the medical staff at Baylor Jack and Jane Hamilton Heart and Vascular Hospital (BHVH) today implanted an investigational cardiac pacemaker the size of a multivitamin. [More]
CTCs in blood of metastatic cancer patients give genomic read-out of breast cancer

CTCs in blood of metastatic cancer patients give genomic read-out of breast cancer

The genetic fingerprint of a metastatic cancer is constantly changing, which means that the therapy that may have stopped a patient's cancer growth today, won't necessarily work tomorrow. [More]
Researchers discover mitochondrial and nuclear tRNA-lookalikes in human genome

Researchers discover mitochondrial and nuclear tRNA-lookalikes in human genome

Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) are ancient workhorse molecules and part of the cellular process that creates the proteins, critical building blocks of life that keep a cell running smoothly. [More]
Gold Crest Care Center joins the cause to raise awareness for breast cancer

Gold Crest Care Center joins the cause to raise awareness for breast cancer

Gold Crest Care Center, one of the leading nursing homes in NYC, has joined the cause to raise awareness for breast cancer education, prevention and treatment. The Bronx, N.Y. facility is dedicated to providing top-notch care for all patients while providing educational services to clients and their families. [More]
Conventional laparoscopy less complicated than robot-assisted surgery for benign gynecologic conditions

Conventional laparoscopy less complicated than robot-assisted surgery for benign gynecologic conditions

For benign gynecologic conditions, robot-assisted surgery involves more complications during surgery and may be significantly more expensive than conventional laparoscopic surgery, according to a study by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center. [More]
Pediatric specialist in EGIDs helps lead $6.25 million NIH clinical research project

Pediatric specialist in EGIDs helps lead $6.25 million NIH clinical research project

A pediatric specialist in eosinophilic gastrointestinal diseases (EGIDs) at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and Children's Hospital Colorado will help lead a five-year, $6.25 million clinical research project recently funded by the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Columbia Nursing researcher suggests ways to prevent nursing home infections

Columbia Nursing researcher suggests ways to prevent nursing home infections

Nursing home infection rates are on the rise, a study from Columbia University School of Nursing found, suggesting that more must be done to protect residents of these facilities from preventable complications. The study, which examined infections in U.S. nursing homes over a five-year period, found increased infection rates for pneumonia, urinary tract infections (UTIs), viral hepatitis, septicemia, wound infections, and multiple drug-resistant organisms (MDROs). [More]
NIH announces high-risk, high-reward grants for UCSF researchers

NIH announces high-risk, high-reward grants for UCSF researchers

UC San Francisco researchers received five awards announced this week by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for high-risk, high-reward scientific research projects. Their work will focus on novel approaches for diagnosing and treating diseases ranging from autoimmune and chronic inflammatory diseases, to cancer, diabetes and neurological disorders. [More]
PointRight announces phased strategic partnership with Prime Care Technologies

PointRight announces phased strategic partnership with Prime Care Technologies

PointRight, the industry-standard predictive analytics leader and Prime Care Technologies, the post-acute industry's leading provider of technology-enabled business solutions, announce a phased strategic partnership whereby the industry-standard PointRight® Pro 30™ rehospitalization measure will be incorporated into primeVIEW, Prime Care Technology's business intelligence solution. [More]
Arizona resident receives donor heart transplant after living with SynCardia Total Artificial Heart

Arizona resident receives donor heart transplant after living with SynCardia Total Artificial Heart

Randy Shepherd, an Arizona resident nicknamed the "tin man," has received a donor heart transplant after 15 months of support from the SynCardia temporary Total Artificial Heart. [More]
Elkhart General Hospital named Accredited Heart Failure Center

Elkhart General Hospital named Accredited Heart Failure Center

The Healthcare Colloquium, a Battelle company, announces that Elkhart General Hospital has achieved the designation of being named an Accredited Heart Failure Center. [More]