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Nursing is a healthcare profession that focuses on the care of individuals and their families to help them recover from illness and maintain optimal health and quality of life.
Manganese-based antioxidant complex of Deinococcus protects mice from gamma radiation

Manganese-based antioxidant complex of Deinococcus protects mice from gamma radiation

They call it "Conan the Bacterium," and now it may be used to help save lives in the event of a nuclear disaster or terrorist attack. [More]
TTUHSC El Paso receives USDA grant to offer long-distance health education to rural communities

TTUHSC El Paso receives USDA grant to offer long-distance health education to rural communities

The Gayle Greve Hunt School of Nursing at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center El Paso has received a $430,780 grant from the United States Department of Agriculture to provide long-distance health education to underserved communities in rural West Texas. [More]
Educated, committed and empowered health care team recommended for surgical safety

Educated, committed and empowered health care team recommended for surgical safety

Patient safety before, during, and after surgery requires an appropriately educated, committed and empowered health care team, according to recommendations being presented today at the inaugural National Surgical Patient Safety Summit. [More]
New study compares sexual experiences linked to alcohol and marijuana use

New study compares sexual experiences linked to alcohol and marijuana use

A new study, published in Archives of Sexual Behavior by researchers affiliated with New York University's Center for Drug Use and HIV Research, compared self-reported sexual experiences related to use of alcohol and marijuana. [More]
Sickle cell trait linked to increased risk of rhabdomyolysis among African American Soldiers

Sickle cell trait linked to increased risk of rhabdomyolysis among African American Soldiers

A new study published Aug. 4 in the New England Journal of Medicine indicates that among African American U.S. Army Soldiers, sickle cell trait is not associated with an increase in mortality, but is associated with a modest increase in the risk of exertional rhabdomyolysis. [More]
New review finds link between sleep disorders and stroke risk

New review finds link between sleep disorders and stroke risk

There is growing evidence that sleep disorders like insomnia and sleep apnea are related to stroke risk and recovery from stroke, according to a recent literature review. [More]
New research provides insight into how exercise helps retain old memories

New research provides insight into how exercise helps retain old memories

Research has found that exercise causes more new neurons to be formed in a critical brain region, and contrary to an earlier study, these new neurons do not cause the individual to forget old memories, according to research by Texas A&M College of Medicine scientists, in the Journal of Neuroscience. [More]
Study points to deep disruptions caused by Ebola epidemic to pregnancy services

Study points to deep disruptions caused by Ebola epidemic to pregnancy services

The first known household survey examining the collateral harm to pregnancy services in areas affected by the West African Ebola epidemic suggests a significant slide backwards in child and maternal health. [More]
Study confirms virtual dental homes as safe, effective way to provide care

Study confirms virtual dental homes as safe, effective way to provide care

Bringing "virtual dental homes" to schools, nursing homes and long-term care facilities can keep people healthy - reducing school absenteeism, lessening the need for parents to leave work to care for an ailing child, and helping to prevent suffering for millions of people who have no access to a dentist, a six-year study by University of the Pacific demonstrates. [More]
School-based program helps parents and children from low-income families eat healthier food

School-based program helps parents and children from low-income families eat healthier food

Brighter Bites, a school-based program that combines the distribution of donated produce with nutritional education and a fun food experience for low-income families in food desert areas, was successful in improving the intake of fruits and vegetables in first-grade children and their parents, according to a new study by The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. [More]
New smartwatch app may improve communication and notification systems for nursing homes

New smartwatch app may improve communication and notification systems for nursing homes

Poor communication systems at nursing homes can lead to serious injury for residents who are not tended to in a timely manner. A new smartwatch app being developed at Binghamton University could help certified nursing assistants (CNAs) respond to alerts more quickly and help prevent falls. [More]
New CCN article offers guidance on providing optimal care to critically ill obese patients

New CCN article offers guidance on providing optimal care to critically ill obese patients

The U.S. obesity epidemic means more critically ill patients have weight-associated conditions affecting their illness or are at greater risk of specific complications during their hospital stay. [More]

High Desert Medical College to start new chapter with major move to centrally located branch campus

High Desert Medical College will begin a new chapter in growth and commitment to higher education with a major move and expansion for their branch campus in Bakersfield, California. [More]
Northwell Health receives grant to assess pulmonary rehabilitation via telehealth for Hispanic COPD patients

Northwell Health receives grant to assess pulmonary rehabilitation via telehealth for Hispanic COPD patients

Northwell Health's Feinstein Institute for Medical Research has been awarded a $1.5 million grant from the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute to study whether home-based pulmonary rehabilitation improves quality of life and decreases hospitalization in Hispanic patients with moderate to severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). [More]
Experts recommend several measures to reduce firearm suicide rates in the U.S.

Experts recommend several measures to reduce firearm suicide rates in the U.S.

Researchers from Columbia University Medical Center nd New York State Psychiatric Institute have found that legislation reducing access to firearms has lowered firearm suicide rates in other countries. [More]
One in four dermatology nurses likely to be the only regular home visitor for patients, survey reveals

One in four dermatology nurses likely to be the only regular home visitor for patients, survey reveals

Almost one in four nurses reported that they were likely to be the only regular visitor for around half of the patients they see at home in a recent survey by the British Skin Foundation. [More]
Study discovers mechanism by which bioscaffolds influence cellular behavior

Study discovers mechanism by which bioscaffolds influence cellular behavior

A study from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and the McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine identifies a mechanism by which bioscaffolds used in regenerative medicine influence cellular behavior, a question that has remained unanswered since the technology was first developed several decades ago. [More]
Resveratrol may be clinically beneficial to people with Alzheimer's disease

Resveratrol may be clinically beneficial to people with Alzheimer's disease

Resveratrol, given to Alzheimer's patients, appears to restore the integrity of the blood-brain barrier, reducing the ability of harmful immune molecules secreted by immune cells to infiltrate from the body into brain tissues, say researchers at Georgetown University Medical Center. [More]
Shorter and longer reproductive durations can raise risk of type 2 diabetes in postmenopausal women

Shorter and longer reproductive durations can raise risk of type 2 diabetes in postmenopausal women

Using data from the Women's Health Initiative, a new study has found that women with reproductive-period durations of less than 30 years had a 37% increased risk of type 2 diabetes compared with women whose reproductive durations were somewhere in the middle (36 to 40 years). [More]
Maternal placental syndromes increase short-term risk of developing cardiovascular disease

Maternal placental syndromes increase short-term risk of developing cardiovascular disease

The short-term risk of developing cardiovascular disease following a first pregnancy is higher for women experiencing placental syndromes and a preterm birth or an infant born smaller than the usual size, a University of South Florida study reports. [More]
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