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Researchers develop new how-to exercise program to help MS people stay more physically active

Researchers develop new how-to exercise program to help MS people stay more physically active

Fatigue and pain, along with other symptoms, prevent many people with multiple sclerosis (MS) from exercising. But a new how-to guide for a home-based exercise program, tested by researchers at Case Western Reserve University's nursing school and the Lerner Research Institute at the Cleveland Clinic, offers a way for people with MS to stay more physically active. [More]
Study reveals how the human brain heals itself after surgical removal of brain tumor

Study reveals how the human brain heals itself after surgical removal of brain tumor

An interdisciplinary team of neuroscientists and neurosurgeons from the University of Rochester has used a new imaging technique to show how the human brain heals itself in just a few weeks following surgical removal of a brain tumor. [More]
RNF announces 2014 Excellence in Rehabilitation Nursing Honorees

RNF announces 2014 Excellence in Rehabilitation Nursing Honorees

The Rehabilitation Nursing Foundation announced the 2014 Excellence in Rehabilitation Nursing Honorees at its 40th Annual Educational Conference, held October 29 - November 1 in Anaheim, CA. [More]
CUMC researchers devise way to replace torn knee meniscus

CUMC researchers devise way to replace torn knee meniscus

Columbia University Medical Center researchers have devised a way to replace the knee's protective lining, called the meniscus, using a personalized 3D-printed implant, or scaffold, infused with human growth factors that prompt the body to regenerate the lining on its own. [More]
Genetic variations may contribute to treatment-related cognitive problems in children with ALL

Genetic variations may contribute to treatment-related cognitive problems in children with ALL

Common variations in four genes related to brain inflammation or cells' response to damage from oxidation may contribute to the problems with memory, learning and other cognitive functions seen in children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), according to a study led by researchers from Boston Children's Hospital, The Children's Hospital at Montefiore, and Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center. [More]
E-cigarettes not as addictive as tobacco cigarettes

E-cigarettes not as addictive as tobacco cigarettes

E-cigarettes appear to be less addictive than cigarettes in former smokers and this could help improve understanding of how various nicotine delivery devices lead to dependence, according to researchers. [More]
New study compares characteristics of hospice patients in nursing homes and community settings

New study compares characteristics of hospice patients in nursing homes and community settings

As hospice for nursing home patients grows dramatically, a new study from the Regenstrief Institute and the Indiana University Center for Aging Research compares the characteristics of hospice patients in nursing homes with hospice patients living in the community. The study also provides details on how hospice patients move in and out of these two settings. [More]
Immunizing school-aged children from flu can protect others as well

Immunizing school-aged children from flu can protect others as well

Mathematical models predicted it, and now a University of Florida study confirms it: Immunizing school-aged children from flu can protect other segments of the population, as well. [More]
Drug proves effective at inhibiting growth of drug-resistant bacteria

Drug proves effective at inhibiting growth of drug-resistant bacteria

A treatment pioneered at the University of Pittsburgh Center for Vaccine Research is far more effective than traditional antibiotics at inhibiting the growth of drug-resistant bacteria, including so-called "superbugs" resistant to almost all existing antibiotics, which plague hospitals and nursing homes. [More]
Good first aid kit can help make your vacation perfect

Good first aid kit can help make your vacation perfect

Planning a vacation? Make a little room in your luggage for a travel first aid kit. It won't cost much, and it won't take up much space. Once you reach your destination, you won't need to reach any further than your suitcase to relieve those minor aches and pains that can put a major damper on your plans. [More]
Leicester medical students create volunteer programme to support homeless people

Leicester medical students create volunteer programme to support homeless people

Medical students at the University of Leicester have designed and developed an interprofessional, student-led, response system to support homeless people in Leicester supported by health and social care students from De Montfort University. [More]
Children living in non-redeveloped public housing more likely to take repeated trips to emergency rooms

Children living in non-redeveloped public housing more likely to take repeated trips to emergency rooms

San Francisco children living in non-redeveloped public housing are 39 percent more likely to repeatedly visit emergency rooms, according to new research from UC San Francisco and UC Berkeley. [More]
Nationwide Children's Hospital receives ANCC Magnet Recognition for third time

Nationwide Children's Hospital receives ANCC Magnet Recognition for third time

The American Nurses Credentialing Center's Magnet Recognition Program for excellence in nursing services has granted Nationwide Children's Hospital ANCC Magnet Recognition for a third time. This prestigious recognition is the ultimate benchmark in nursing excellence and is awarded to only about seven percent of the nation's more than 6,000 hospitals across the country. [More]
Researchers gain new insights into potential treatment for Alzheimer's disease

Researchers gain new insights into potential treatment for Alzheimer's disease

It is estimated that about 35 million people worldwide currently suffer from dementia and it is expected that the number will increase to 135 million by the year 2050. The disease is already one of the most common health problems in the elderly, which is why experts predict that the numbers of people affected will increase over time. [More]
Novo Nordisk reports positive data from Novoeight phase 3 study in people with haemophilia A

Novo Nordisk reports positive data from Novoeight phase 3 study in people with haemophilia A

Today, Novo Nordisk announced a new analysis of phase 3 data demonstrating people with haemophilia A who had the highest annualised bleeding rate (ABR) during initial treatment with Novoeight (Antihemophilic Factor [Recombinant]) showed the largest reduction in bleeding over the duration of treatment. [More]
Researchers assess efficiency and safety of breast milk stimulant

Researchers assess efficiency and safety of breast milk stimulant

Most women can make all the milk their baby needs, but some mothers turn to medications to help increase their supply. While some specialists encourage the off-label use of domperidone to stimulate breast milk production, some studies have suggested it may be related to negative side effects, including irregular heartbeat and sudden cardiac death. [More]
Empathic partnership: A health care model for marginalized populations

Empathic partnership: A health care model for marginalized populations

Sitting on an exam table in a flimsy gown can intimidate anyone. If you also happen to be lesbian, gay or bisexual, the experience can be even worse. [More]
UB researchers explore link between behavioral symptoms and chronic traumatic encephalopathy

UB researchers explore link between behavioral symptoms and chronic traumatic encephalopathy

Aggression, violence, depression, suicide. Media reports routinely link these behavioral symptoms with chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), the neurodegenerative brain disease, in former football players. [More]
Study on hospital alarm fatigue records more than 2.5 million alarms in one month

Study on hospital alarm fatigue records more than 2.5 million alarms in one month

Jessica Zègre-Hemsey, a cardiac monitoring expert at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and her colleagues at the University of California San Francisco, revealed more than 2.5 million alarms were triggered on bedside monitors in a single month - the first figure ever reported from a real-world hospital setting. [More]

New research collaboration aims to collect, share research on solution-focused therapy

A new research collaboration that will for the first time bring together philosophy of mind and practical applications in terms of therapy and caring practice has been launched at the University of Hertfordshire this week. [More]