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Columbia University professor recommends vaccination for people travelling abroad

Columbia University professor recommends vaccination for people travelling abroad

Planning to travel outside the U.S. this holiday season? Check with your primary care provider or travel clinic when you book your flight. [More]
Scientists combine new type of nanoparticle with photodynamic therapy to kill cancer cells

Scientists combine new type of nanoparticle with photodynamic therapy to kill cancer cells

An international group of scientists led by Gang Han, PhD, at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, has combined a new type of nanoparticle with an FDA-approved photodynamic therapy to effectively kill deep-set cancer cells in vivo with minimal damage to surrounding tissue and fewer side effects than chemotherapy. This promising new treatment strategy could expand the current use of photodynamic therapies to access deep-set cancer tumors. [More]
Nurse-led initiatives reduce length of stay, improve patient outcomes in Philadelphia hospitals

Nurse-led initiatives reduce length of stay, improve patient outcomes in Philadelphia hospitals

Recent nurse-led initiatives addressing some of critical care's most pressing challenges resulted in shorter average lengths of stay and other positive patient and fiscal outcomes in seven Philadelphia-area hospitals. [More]
High court allows Texas abortion clinics to stay open

High court allows Texas abortion clinics to stay open

The Supreme Court's order, staying a decision of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit, will allow more than a dozen clinics to resume operations at least temporarily, until a legal challenge has been settled. [More]
Boehringer Ingelheim's OFEV (nintedanib) capsules receive FDA approval for IPF treatment

Boehringer Ingelheim's OFEV (nintedanib) capsules receive FDA approval for IPF treatment

Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved OFEV (nintedanib) capsules for oral use for the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). [More]
Researchers reveal gene variants that delay fracture healing

Researchers reveal gene variants that delay fracture healing

Slow-healing or non-healing bone fractures in otherwise healthy people may be caused by gene variants that are common in the population, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. [More]
CDC re-evaluating safety procedures after nurse contracts Ebola

CDC re-evaluating safety procedures after nurse contracts Ebola

Thomas Frieden, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, announces that the agency will look again at the protocols for hospitals to see if more training or equipment is necessary to protect health care workers and the public. [More]
UMMS, UMMSM researchers identify key genetic pathway underlying bipolar disorder

UMMS, UMMSM researchers identify key genetic pathway underlying bipolar disorder

A team of scientists led by researchers at the University of Massachusetts Medical School and the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine have identified what is likely a key genetic pathway underlying bipolar (manic depressive) disorder, a breakthrough that could lead to better drugs for treating bipolar affective disorder, as well as depression and other related mood disorders. [More]
Western Dental signs research collaboration agreement with UCSF

Western Dental signs research collaboration agreement with UCSF

Western Dental, one of the nation's leaders in accessible, affordable oral health care, announced a first-of-its-kind research collaboration agreement with the University of California, San Francisco, a leading center of health sciences research, patient care, and education. [More]
Johns Hopkins' new HIV/AIDS degree program to draw plenty of interest from prospective students

Johns Hopkins' new HIV/AIDS degree program to draw plenty of interest from prospective students

Assistant Professor Jason Farley says one reason he's confident that the new HIV/AIDS degree program at the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing will draw plenty of interest from prospective students is that so many of the current students and alumni he's met over the years arrive on campus with a strong interest in HIV. [More]
Nursing home chain agrees to pay $38M to settle government poor care claims

Nursing home chain agrees to pay $38M to settle government poor care claims

Extendicare, which owns 150 nursing homes in 11 states and denied any wrongdoing, was accused of inappropriate billing and providing inadequate care. [More]
HIV-infected users of stimulants derive benefits from antiretroviral therapy

HIV-infected users of stimulants derive benefits from antiretroviral therapy

New clinical research from UC San Francisco shows that 341 HIV-infected men who reported using stimulants such as methamphetamine or cocaine derived life-saving benefits from being on antiretroviral therapy that were comparable to those of HIV-infected men who do not use stimulants. [More]
Medicare premium holds steady in 2015

Medicare premium holds steady in 2015

The premium that most older people pay for outpatient, or "Part B," care will stay the same in 2015 -- $104.90 a month, while cost-sharing for hospital and skilled nursing stays will increase slightly, the government announced. [More]
Hormone loss may cause colon cancer, say Thomas Jefferson University researchers

Hormone loss may cause colon cancer, say Thomas Jefferson University researchers

Some cancers, like breast and prostate cancer, are driven by hormones such as estrogen and testosterone, but to date, there are none that are driven by the lack of a hormone. New evidence suggests that human colon cells may become cancerous when they lose the ability to produce a hormone that helps the cells maintain normal biology. If verified by further studies, it suggests that treating patients at high risk for colon cancer by replacing the hormone guanylin could prevent the development of cancer. [More]
NAMS set to launch first-ever menopause mobile app

NAMS set to launch first-ever menopause mobile app

The North American Menopause Society is set to launch a first-ever menopause mobile app designed for use by both clinicians and patients to help manage menopausal symptoms and assess risk factors. [More]
Views on giving flu shot to younger children

Views on giving flu shot to younger children

It's a common question parents ask themselves this time of year: Does my child really need a flu shot? Though the flu may seem harmless, the truth is on average 20,000 children age 5 and younger are hospitalized due to flu symptoms each year. [More]
Columbia University's imaging software gets FDA 510k clearance

Columbia University's imaging software gets FDA 510k clearance

Columbia University's imaging software that facilitates 3-D lung tumor segmentation, licensed to Varian Medical Systems, has been incorporated into the Smart Segmentation module of Varian's Eclipse treatment planning system and has received FDA 510k clearance. [More]
CUMC researchers use innovative algorithm to find driving force behind aggressive form of glioblastoma

CUMC researchers use innovative algorithm to find driving force behind aggressive form of glioblastoma

Using an innovative algorithm that analyzes gene regulatory and signaling networks, Columbia University Medical Center researchers have found that loss of a gene called KLHL9 is the driving force behind the most aggressive form of glioblastoma, the most common form of brain cancer. [More]
UC Berkeley, UCSF researchers team up to create center for neurodegenerative disease research

UC Berkeley, UCSF researchers team up to create center for neurodegenerative disease research

Researchers at UC San Francisco and UC Berkeley have teamed up to create an innovative, integrated center for research on neurodegenerative diseases. Supported by a $3 million grant from the Glenn Foundation for Medical Research, the new center aims to pave the way to developing novel treatments for diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease by investigating the many ways that proteins can malfunction within cells. [More]
BHVH cardiologists implant investigational cardiac pacemaker the size of multivitamin

BHVH cardiologists implant investigational cardiac pacemaker the size of multivitamin

Cardiologists on the medical staff at Baylor Jack and Jane Hamilton Heart and Vascular Hospital (BHVH) today implanted an investigational cardiac pacemaker the size of a multivitamin. [More]