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In-hospital program improves community mobility, posthospitalization function in older adults

In-hospital program improves community mobility, posthospitalization function in older adults

Decreased mobility during hospitalization for older adults is associated with increased risk of death, nursing home admission and functional decline. University of Alabama at Birmingham investigators found that patients who participated in a mobility program were less likely to experience a decline in mobility when compared to the usual care provided during hospilization. [More]
Creative art making can help reduce stress

Creative art making can help reduce stress

Whether you're Van Gogh or a stick-figure sketcher, a new Drexel University study found that making art can significantly reduce stress-related hormones in your body. [More]
MUTAs and GTAs act as medical model to train students

MUTAs and GTAs act as medical model to train students

Every profession has a basic skill it seems they should just know. Architects can draw a blueprint, lawyers can write a brief and physicians and nurses can perform a physical exam. [More]
New technique may help replace brain cells, restore memory

New technique may help replace brain cells, restore memory

Although brains—even adult brains—are far more malleable than we used to think, they are eventually subject to age-related illnesses, like dementia, and loss of cognitive function. [More]
POLYCARE project aims to develop integrated home care model for older chronic patients

POLYCARE project aims to develop integrated home care model for older chronic patients

Fraunhofer FIT in St. Augustin and the University Hospital of Bonn are among the partners in the new European POLYCARE project, which is developing an integrated care system that will improve the care of chronic patients at home. The University Hospital of Bonn will be one of three pilot sites for the project. [More]
Stroke can cause long-term damage to blood-spinal cord barrier, study finds

Stroke can cause long-term damage to blood-spinal cord barrier, study finds

A team of researchers at the University of South Florida investigating the short and long-term effects of ischemic stroke in a rodent model has found that stroke can cause long-term damage to the blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB), creating a "toxic environment" in the spinal cord that might leave stroke survivors susceptible to motor dysfunction and disease pathology. [More]
T memory cells with naive phenotype can help boost immunity in older adults

T memory cells with naive phenotype can help boost immunity in older adults

Sixty-five is the age when many people retire, kick back and take it easy. And so it often is with the human immune system. [More]
Study underscores importance of developing PRMT5 inhibitors as promising treatment for GB patients

Study underscores importance of developing PRMT5 inhibitors as promising treatment for GB patients

A new study suggests that blocking an enzyme called PRMT5 in tumor cells could be a promising new strategy for the treatment of glioblastoma (GB), the most aggressive and lethal form of brain cancer. [More]
Nearly half of newly-infected HIV patients experience neurologic issues

Nearly half of newly-infected HIV patients experience neurologic issues

A team led by researchers from UCSF and Yale has found that half of people newly infected with HIV experience neurologic issues. These neurologic findings are generally not severe and usually resolve after participants started anti-retroviral therapy. [More]
High-quality palliative care can help offset severe anxiety symptoms in terminal cancer patients

High-quality palliative care can help offset severe anxiety symptoms in terminal cancer patients

A new study out of Chang Gung University School of Nursing in Taiwan suggests that people with cancer experience severe anxiety toward end of life, not solely due to proximity to death, but rather to factors related to psychosocial issues and disease burden. [More]
Controlling corneal blindness by 2030: an interview with Dr Pravin Vaddavalli

Controlling corneal blindness by 2030: an interview with Dr Pravin Vaddavalli

Corneal blindness is estimated to be the second most prevalent cause of blindness in many less developed countries. Globally, bilateral corneal blindness is estimated to afflict 4.9 million persons and accounts for 12% of 39 million blind, utilizing WHO 2010 global blindness data. [More]
Unique method opens door to development of simple diagnostic tests for myriad diseases

Unique method opens door to development of simple diagnostic tests for myriad diseases

Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh have developed a unique method for detecting antibodies in the blood of patients in a proof-of-principle study that opens the door to development of simple diagnostic tests for diseases for which no microbial cause is known, including auto-immune diseases, cancers and other conditions. [More]
Far-UVC light can combat deadly scourge of drug-resistant surgical site infections

Far-UVC light can combat deadly scourge of drug-resistant surgical site infections

Scientists from the Center for Radiological Research at Columbia University Medical Center have shown that a narrow wavelength of ultraviolet (UV) light safely killed drug-resistant MRSA bacteria in mice, demonstrating a potentially safe and cost-effective way to reduce surgical site infections, a major public health concern. [More]
Need for improved care in and out of ICU to treat patients with PICS, PICS-F

Need for improved care in and out of ICU to treat patients with PICS, PICS-F

Thanks to advances in modern medicine, more ICU patients are surviving critical illness, but most are unprepared for the challenges ahead for themselves and their families on their journey toward recovery. [More]
Panel of microRNAs can predict patients at risk for developing HBV-driven liver cancer

Panel of microRNAs can predict patients at risk for developing HBV-driven liver cancer

Hepatocellular carcinoma, the most common type of liver cancer, is increasing in incidence in the United States, and infection with the Hepatitis B virus (HBV) causes about 50 percent of cases. [More]
Video conference technology connects hospital specialists and nursing home staff to care for dementia patients

Video conference technology connects hospital specialists and nursing home staff to care for dementia patients

Nursing homes in the United States care for increasing numbers of people with dementia, yet many lack access to geriatric psychiatrists, behavioral neurologists and other specialists who may help manage symptoms associated with dementia, including behavioral issues. [More]
Research shows IFITM3 protein can block Zika virus from infecting human, mouse cells

Research shows IFITM3 protein can block Zika virus from infecting human, mouse cells

Eight weeks after receiving their first samples of Zika virus, scientists at the University of Massachusetts Medical School have shown that a very small protein we all have in our bodies, interferon-induced protein 3 (IFITM3), can dramatically reduce the ability of Zika virus to infect human and mouse cells. [More]
Scientists use new technique to repair fibrotic liver cells within the organ

Scientists use new technique to repair fibrotic liver cells within the organ

Advances in stem cell research have made it possible to convert patients' skin cells into heart cells, kidney cells, liver cells and more in the lab dish, giving researchers hope that one day such cells could replace organ transplantation for patients with organ failure. [More]
Understanding mechanisms of aortic pathology to improve care

Understanding mechanisms of aortic pathology to improve care

Aortic disease, including aortic aneurysm and aortic dissection, is an important cause of cardiovascular morbidity and death. There have been exciting developments in caring for patients with aortic aneurysm and dissection, including great advances in diagnosis and endovascular therapies. [More]
In-home radar, bed sensors can capture early signs of illness in older adults

In-home radar, bed sensors can capture early signs of illness in older adults

Developing and evaluating motion-capture technology to help older adults "age in place" has been the focus of researchers at the University of Missouri for more than a decade. [More]
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