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Ill. fines hospitals for preventable hospital readmissions

Ill. fines hospitals for preventable hospital readmissions

Also, a federal lawsuit in California alleges nursing homes overmedicated their residents and seeks repayment. Illinois will be collecting $16.3 million in penalties from 82 hospitals that had too many Medicaid patients readmitted to their hospital, the state said Friday. [More]
Nearly 18 million people get help with daily activities

Nearly 18 million people get help with daily activities

Nearly half of older adults - 18 million people-have difficulty or get help with daily activities, according to a new study. [More]
MedStar Washington Hospital Center celebrates major safety milestone

MedStar Washington Hospital Center celebrates major safety milestone

The Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at MedStar Washington Hospital Center recently celebrated a major safety milestone: two years without a single Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infection (CLABSI) in its smallest and most vulnerable babies. [More]
USF receives FEMA grant to reduce risk of low back pain, disability in firefighters

USF receives FEMA grant to reduce risk of low back pain, disability in firefighters

The University of South Florida's John Mayer, DC, PhD, recently received a $1.3 million Department of Homeland Security/Federal Emergency Management Agency Assistance of Firefighters grant - a three-year award that will help build upon cumulative research evaluating the effectiveness of targeted exercise programs to reduce the risk of low back pain and disability in firefighters. [More]
LSU Health New Orleans receives $1.3 million grant to report cases of cancer in children

LSU Health New Orleans receives $1.3 million grant to report cases of cancer in children

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention awarded LSU Health New Orleans School of Public Health's Louisiana Tumor Registry a $1.3 million grant over five years to more rapidly find and report cases of cancer in children and young adults. One of only eight state registries to successfully compete for this funding, the award will support efforts to increase the availability of this data for surveillance and research activities at the local, state and national level. [More]
State highlights: Mass. health spending slows, but for how long?

State highlights: Mass. health spending slows, but for how long?

Two years ago, Massachusetts set what was considered an ambitious goal: The state would not let that persistent monster, rising health care costs, increase faster than the economy as a whole. [More]
E-cigarettes may function as "gateway drug" to marijuana and cocaine

E-cigarettes may function as "gateway drug" to marijuana and cocaine

Like conventional cigarettes, electronic cigarettes (or e-cigarettes) may function as a "gateway drug"—a drug that lowers the threshold for addiction to other substances, such as marijuana and cocaine—according to the 120th Shattuck lecture, presented to the Massachusetts Medical Society by Columbia researchers Denise and Eric Kandel and published today in the online edition of the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Researcher discovers that aspirin prevents first attack

Researcher discovers that aspirin prevents first attack

The first researcher in the world to discover that aspirin prevents a first attack, Charles H. Hennekens, M.D., Dr.P.H., the first Sir Richard Doll professor and senior academic advisor to the dean in the Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine at Florida Atlantic University, has published a comprehensive review in the current issue of the journal Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine. [More]
State highlights: Mass. health care costs grow smaller 2.3 percent; new rules in Calif. for inmates with mental illness

State highlights: Mass. health care costs grow smaller 2.3 percent; new rules in Calif. for inmates with mental illness

Two years ago, Massachusetts set what was considered an ambitious goal: The state would not let that persistent monster, rising health care costs, increase faster than the economy as a whole. [More]
Teens and young adults face high risk from opioid-involved overdose

Teens and young adults face high risk from opioid-involved overdose

The prevalence of opioid-involved overdoses has become an increasing concern to health officials both in NYC and nationally. [More]
Many nurses in training feel unprepared to meet patients during end-of-life care

Many nurses in training feel unprepared to meet patients during end-of-life care

Most nurses in their work care for patients who are dying. A study of more than 200 students has shown that many nurses in training feel unprepared and anxious when faced with the prospect of meeting patients during end-of-life care. [More]

Aviv acquires assisted living and skilled nursing facilities for $83.6 million

Aviv REIT, Inc. announced today it acquired four post-acute and long-term care skilled nursing facilities ("SNF") in Washington, an assisted living facility ("ALF") in Washington and a campus in Idaho, which includes a SNF and an ALF, for a total price of $83.6 million. [More]
First Edition: September 2, 2014

First Edition: September 2, 2014

Today's early morning highlights from the major news organizations, including an analysis of care at small military hospitals and a look at the $8 billion in health law taxes that come due Sept. 30. [More]
Study compares harms of marijuana use with alcohol use

Study compares harms of marijuana use with alcohol use

The study found that for high school seniors, alcohol consumption led to unsafe driving and compromised relationships with peers, while marijuana consumption was found to compromise relationships with authority figures. [More]
State highlights: States seek health care autonomy; L.A. nursing home audit; promoting overdose-reversal drug

State highlights: States seek health care autonomy; L.A. nursing home audit; promoting overdose-reversal drug

Kansas, Missouri and seven other states have signed on to a movement that would wrest regulation of most of the nation's health care insurance systems from the federal government. [More]
Technology-assisted interventions in primary care setting help patients achieve weight loss

Technology-assisted interventions in primary care setting help patients achieve weight loss

Despite US Preventive Services Task Force recommendations for screening and treating obesity, there are many barriers, several of which may be ameliorated through technological approaches according to a new study by researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center published online August 21, 2014 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. [More]
Research roundup: Benefits of hip surgery; preventing surgical infections; assessing ACOs' predecessors

Research roundup: Benefits of hip surgery; preventing surgical infections; assessing ACOs' predecessors

Surgical treatment of hip fractures can achieve better survival and functional outcomes than nonoperative treatment, but less is known about its economic benefits. ... We estimated the effects of surgical treatment for displaced hip fractures through a Markov cohort analysis of patients 65 years and older. ... Estimated average lifetime societal benefits per patient exceeded the direct medical costs of hip fracture surgery by $65,000 to $68,000 for displaced hip fractures. With the exception of the assumption of nursing home use, the sensitivity analyses show that surgery produces positive net societal savings (Gu, Koenig, Mather and Tongue, 8/5). [More]
Solid-head power toothbrushes retain less bacteria than hollow-head toothbrushes

Solid-head power toothbrushes retain less bacteria than hollow-head toothbrushes

Solid-head power toothbrushes retain less bacteria compared to hollow-head toothbrushes, according to researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Dentistry. [More]
Study: Young athletes need to avoid continuous repetitive activity to decrease risk of pars fracture

Study: Young athletes need to avoid continuous repetitive activity to decrease risk of pars fracture

Young athletes today often participate in sports year round and with increasingly competitive club and school sports, it has become common to choose one sport to specialize at a young age. While this specialization may seem like a competitive edge, new Northwestern Medicine research suggests that repetitive activity in just one sport, high impact or not, may not be a great idea for growing athletes. [More]
Peer groups, clinicians play critical role in development of effective breastfeeding programs

Peer groups, clinicians play critical role in development of effective breastfeeding programs

The support of peer groups and clinicians is critical to the development of effective breastfeeding programs, according to recent University of Georgia research. [More]