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PolyU researchers create comprehensive breast milk nutrient database in Hong Kong

PolyU researchers create comprehensive breast milk nutrient database in Hong Kong

Breastfeeding has become more common all across the world in recent years, however, breastfeeding rate has remained low in Hong Kong. One of the main reasons is that Hong Kong mothers worry about the nutrient adequacy of their breast milk to meet the growing needs of the infant. [More]
GUMC physician leads new national clinical trial for melanoma treatment

GUMC physician leads new national clinical trial for melanoma treatment

A Georgetown University Medical Center physician renowned for his research in melanoma will lead a new national clinical trial involving novel treatments for the disease. The study compares the sequencing of two groups of drugs -- both effective in treating melanoma. [More]
Georgetown's Institute for Reproductive Health receives $30 million from USAID to support Passages Project

Georgetown's Institute for Reproductive Health receives $30 million from USAID to support Passages Project

The U.S. Agency for International Development has awarded $30 million to Georgetown University Medical Center's Institute for Reproductive Health to fund its Passages Project, which aims to improve healthy timing and spacing of pregnancies among youth and first-time parents in developing countries. [More]
Two Pennsylvania nursing homes receive 2015 Silver National Quality Award

Two Pennsylvania nursing homes receive 2015 Silver National Quality Award

Two Pennsylvania nursing homes have received the 2015 Silver National Quality Award, the second of three distinct awards that honor facilities that serve as models of excellence in providing high-quality long term care. [More]
Hospital for Special Surgery named top hospital in nation for orthopedics for sixth consecutive year

Hospital for Special Surgery named top hospital in nation for orthopedics for sixth consecutive year

For the sixth consecutive year, Hospital for Special Surgery has been ranked the top hospital in the country for orthopedics by U.S. News & World Report in its 2015 "Best Hospitals" survey. The hospital was also nationally recognized as a leader in rheumatology, ranking No. 3 in association with NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital. [More]
New BU study reveals challenges of providing good nutrition, hydration in people with dementia in care homes

New BU study reveals challenges of providing good nutrition, hydration in people with dementia in care homes

Unexplained weight loss is often seen in people with dementia, which can lead to further complications, including mental and physical deterioration. New research from Bournemouth University, funded by the Burdett Trust for Nursing, has revealed the challenges of providing good nutrition and hydration in people with dementia who live in care homes. [More]
New genomic fingerprint may predict prostate cancer risk in African American men

New genomic fingerprint may predict prostate cancer risk in African American men

African American men are more likely to develop prostate cancer than European American men, and are also more than twice as likely to die from it. Although there are many reasons that contribute to this health disparity, new research shows that African American men may have a distinctly different type of prostate cancer than European American men, according to new genomic fingerprinting results. [More]
Mothers with chemical intolerances more likely to have children with ASD or ADHD

Mothers with chemical intolerances more likely to have children with ASD or ADHD

A new study from The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio found that mothers with chemical intolerances are two to three times more likely than other women to have a child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). [More]
UChicago, Argonne National Laboratory and USF to jointly study gut microbiomes of premature infants

UChicago, Argonne National Laboratory and USF to jointly study gut microbiomes of premature infants

Scientists have suspected that this initial disruption is linked to health problems down the road—things like autism, asthma, food allergies and autoimmune diseases—but so far they only have circumstantial evidence based on case studies. [More]
Transcranial magnetic stimulation holds promise for tinnitus patients

Transcranial magnetic stimulation holds promise for tinnitus patients

In the largest U.S. clinical trial of its kind funded by the Veterans Affairs Rehabilitation Research and Development Service, researchers at the VA Portland Medical Center and Oregon Health & Science University found that transcranial magnetic stimulation significantly improved tinnitus symptoms for more than half of study participants. [More]
Adverse life events in childhood can increase woman's risk of preterm birth

Adverse life events in childhood can increase woman's risk of preterm birth

Like most health professionals, David Olson has known for some time of the dangers posed by excessive stress. His latest research, though, is giving surprising new insight into how chronic stress in childhood can have an impact years after it occurred in women giving birth. [More]
Depression, urinary incontinence magnify effects of vaginal symptoms in postmenopausal women

Depression, urinary incontinence magnify effects of vaginal symptoms in postmenopausal women

Special efforts should be made to identify and treat depression and urinary incontinence in postmenopausal women with vaginal symptoms, according to UC San Francisco researchers, as these two common conditions not only tend to co-exist with vaginal symptoms but also may complicate the impact of these symptoms on women's daily activities and quality of life. [More]
Family, cultural and geographical factors influence unsafe sleep position of infants

Family, cultural and geographical factors influence unsafe sleep position of infants

When it comes to newborn sleep, mother may not know best. According to Deborah Raines, associate professor in the University at Buffalo School of Nursing, family, cultural and geographical influences may lead some mothers to place their newborn children in unsafe sleeping positions. [More]
Key parts of the human brain network give power to control, redirect attention

Key parts of the human brain network give power to control, redirect attention

Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center have found that key parts of the human brain network that give us the power to control and redirect our attention--a core cognitive ability--may be unique to humans. [More]
Researchers create clinical pathway to identify OSA in high-risk, hospitalized patients

Researchers create clinical pathway to identify OSA in high-risk, hospitalized patients

Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) remains under-recognized in hospitalized patients, despite being associated with cardiovascular complications and sudden death. A multi-disciplinary group of researchers and physicians at Thomas Jefferson University and Hospitals have created a clinical pathway, or screening process, to identify the disorder in higher-risk, hospitalized patients and recently published the results in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine. [More]
Study examines self-reported use of bath salts among high school seniors in the U.S.

Study examines self-reported use of bath salts among high school seniors in the U.S.

Recent years have seen an unprecedented growth in number and availability of new synthetic psychoactive drugs in the US and worldwide. In 2014, 101 new psychoactive drugs were identified, worldwide. Such drugs are often sold as "legal" highs or "research chemicals" over the internet or in head shops. Among these new drugs, "bath salts" appear to be one of the more commonly used in the US. [More]
Research breakthrough opens door to a world of regenerative medicine for treating mitochondrial disease

Research breakthrough opens door to a world of regenerative medicine for treating mitochondrial disease

A study led by Shoukhrat Mitalipov, Ph.D., and Hong Ma, M.D., Ph.D., at the Center for Embryonic Cell and Gene Therapy at Oregon Health & Science University and the Oregon National Primate Research Center has revealed the first critical step in developing novel gene and stem cell therapy treatments for patients with mitochondrial disease. [More]
UC San Diego Health, AccentCare jointly create home health services agency to improve patient outcomes

UC San Diego Health, AccentCare jointly create home health services agency to improve patient outcomes

UC San Diego Health and AccentCare have created a jointly owned home health services agency to serve UC San Diego Health patients in San Diego and surrounding communities. The new agency is designed to provide a comprehensive continuum of care after patients have been discharged from the hospital to facilitate efficient communication, improved safety, and faster healing. [More]
USF College of Nursing awarded NCI grant to study mindfulness-based stress reduction in breast cancer survivors

USF College of Nursing awarded NCI grant to study mindfulness-based stress reduction in breast cancer survivors

The National Cancer Institute has awarded more than $2.8 million to University of South Florida College of Nursing to study memory and concentration among breast cancer survivors using a meditation-based stress reduction intervention. [More]
NAM report calls for strengthening psychosocial interventions for mental health, substance use disorders

NAM report calls for strengthening psychosocial interventions for mental health, substance use disorders

A plan to ensure that evidence-based psychosocial interventions are routinely used in clinical practice and made a part of clinical training for mental health professionals was released today by the National Academy of Medicine. [More]
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