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Black and Hispanic SLE patients are more likely to be readmitted than white patients

Black and Hispanic SLE patients are more likely to be readmitted than white patients

A new study reveals that one in six patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is readmitted to the hospital within 30 days of being discharged. [More]
AANP urges VA secretary to utilize nurse practitioners as full partners in VA health care delivery system

AANP urges VA secretary to utilize nurse practitioners as full partners in VA health care delivery system

The American Association of Nurse Practitioners today congratulates Robert McDonald on his new role as Secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs and urges him to increase veterans' access to nurse practitioners by utilizing them as full partners in the VA health care delivery system. [More]

Healthcare Staffing Services recognized as one of largest healthcare staffing firms

Healthcare Staffing Services, parent to U.S. Nursing and Fastaff Travel Nursing brands, was named the fourth largest travel nurse staffing firm, the fifteenth largest healthcare staffing firm and the 119th largest staffing and talent engagement firm the in the U.S. by Staffing Industry Analysts in its July 2014 tallies of the country's largest healthcare staffing firms and largest staffing and talent engagement firms. [More]
First Edition: August 8, 2014

First Edition: August 8, 2014

Today's headlines include reports that President Barack Obama signed into law the $16.3 billion measure to overhaul the veterans' health system. [More]
Scientists analyze genetic characteristics of cancers using multiple genomic technology platforms

Scientists analyze genetic characteristics of cancers using multiple genomic technology platforms

New research partly led by UC San Francisco-affiliated scientists suggests that one in 10 cancer patients would be more accurately diagnosed if their tumors were defined by cellular and molecular criteria rather than by the tissues in which they originated, and that this information, in turn, could lead to more appropriate treatments. [More]
Diabetes education reduces blood sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol levels

Diabetes education reduces blood sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol levels

Diabetes education significantly improves outcomes among people with the condition, leading to reduced blood sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol levels, according to data presented by the Diabetes Self-Management Education Program from New York-Presbyterian Hospital today at AADE14, the American Association of Diabetes Educators Annual Meeting & Exhibition. [More]
Patients recovering from total joint replacement surgery who receive AAT require less pain drugs

Patients recovering from total joint replacement surgery who receive AAT require less pain drugs

Patients recovering from total joint replacement surgery who receive animal-assisted therapy (AAT) require less pain medication than those who do not experience this type of therapy. [More]
Study highlights day-to-day difficulties nurses face with medical equipment, clinical workflow, EHRs

Study highlights day-to-day difficulties nurses face with medical equipment, clinical workflow, EHRs

While U.S. healthcare continues its radical digital transformation, nurses continue to face legacy physical burdens that potentially impact the quality of patient care. [More]
Medicare benefits from immigrants, study says

Medicare benefits from immigrants, study says

A study by the Partnership for a New American Economy concluded that immigrants make a substantial contribution to the Medicare Hospital Insurance Trust Fund -- putting more into the system than they take out. [More]
Researchers plan to develop vaccine into a type of antibody serum therapy

Researchers plan to develop vaccine into a type of antibody serum therapy

By many estimates, an Ebola vaccine could be available in humans as early as next year. But will it be the right one? There are a number of vaccines in development and each is in a race to prove that it is most effective, safe and that it will protect the largest number of people. [More]
Study focuses on benefits of human milk for sick newborns

Study focuses on benefits of human milk for sick newborns

Human milk is infant food, but for sick, hospitalized babies, it's also medicine. That's the central premise of a series of articles in a neonatal nursing journal's special issue focused on human milk for sick newborns. [More]
UCSF study: Acute psychological stress promotes healing in mouse models of different skin irritations

UCSF study: Acute psychological stress promotes healing in mouse models of different skin irritations

Brief, acute psychological stress promoted healing in mouse models of three different types of skin irritations, in a study led by UC San Francisco researchers. [More]
PSAL students to receive free comprehensive health screening at HSS

PSAL students to receive free comprehensive health screening at HSS

It's a parent's worst nightmare, and it happens out of the blue. While playing a sport, often football, a teen athlete collapses on the field and doesn't make it. [More]
UCSF researchers identify novel molecular features within the developing human brain

UCSF researchers identify novel molecular features within the developing human brain

UC San Francisco researchers have identified cells' unique features within the developing human brain, using the latest technologies for analyzing gene activity in individual cells, and have demonstrated that large-scale cell surveys can be done much more efficiently and cheaply than was previously thought possible. [More]
Almost Family records net service revenues of $125 million for Q2 2014

Almost Family records net service revenues of $125 million for Q2 2014

Almost Family, Inc., a leading regional provider of home health nursing and personal care services, announced today its financial results for the three and six months ended June 30, 2014. [More]
Sinai Hospital’s groundbreaking program helps ER patients to manage own care

Sinai Hospital’s groundbreaking program helps ER patients to manage own care

Sinai Hospital of Baltimore and HealthCare Access Maryland are piloting a groundbreaking program developed to proactively help patients, who frequently use the hospital's Emergency Department for non-urgent and chronic health conditions, better manage their own care, lead healthier lives, and in turn, save precious health-related resources. [More]
Home based medical care for frail elders reduces Medicare costs by 17%

Home based medical care for frail elders reduces Medicare costs by 17%

MedStar Washington Hospital Center geriatricians found that when medical care for frail elders with advanced illness shifts to the home, total Medicare costs were reduced by 17 percent during a two-year period. [More]
Emergency department closures can affect death rates, finds UCSF research

Emergency department closures can affect death rates, finds UCSF research

In the first analysis of its kind, UC San Francisco research shows that emergency department closures can have a ripple effect on patient outcomes at nearby hospitals. [More]
Drug used for treating rheumatoid arthritis can improve health of kidney transplant recipients

Drug used for treating rheumatoid arthritis can improve health of kidney transplant recipients

UC San Francisco is the lead institution on a new seven-year, $17 million multicenter study funded by the National Institutes of Health to determine if certain immune system cells and/or a drug now used for treating rheumatoid arthritis can be effective in improving and maintaining the long-term health of kidney transplant recipients. [More]
Subtle changes in gene can predict how brain reacts to stress

Subtle changes in gene can predict how brain reacts to stress

Scientists studying depression in teens have discovered that subtle changes in a gene can predict how the brain reacts to stress, which can cause such health issues as depression, post-traumatic stress disorder and obesity. [More]