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In-hospital formula introduction and family history may help explain racial, ethnic breastfeeding disparities

In-hospital formula introduction and family history may help explain racial, ethnic breastfeeding disparities

A national research collaboration funded by the National Institutes of Health has found significant racial and ethnic disparities in breastfeeding outcomes, according to a study published online this week in Pediatrics. [More]
NorthShore launches first clinical trial to examine GRS test for cancer risk assessment

NorthShore launches first clinical trial to examine GRS test for cancer risk assessment

Researchers at NorthShore University HealthSystem have launched the first clinical trial to investigate a genetic risk score (GRS) test to predict the risk of breast, prostate and colorectal cancer in the primary care setting. [More]
New TSRI study may bring doctors closer to using gene therapies to grow, repair tendons

New TSRI study may bring doctors closer to using gene therapies to grow, repair tendons

With the Rio Olympics just weeks away, many are wondering how Jamaican sprinter Usain Bolt will perform. [More]
New research shows how toxic Alzheimer's protein spreads through the brain

New research shows how toxic Alzheimer's protein spreads through the brain

A toxic Alzheimer's protein can spread through the brain--jumping from one neuron to another--via the extracellular space that surrounds the brain's neurons, suggests new research from Columbia University Medical Center. [More]
Intranasal vaccine may provide long-term protection against multiple flu strains

Intranasal vaccine may provide long-term protection against multiple flu strains

Intranasal flu vaccines may be able to provide long-lasting protection against pandemic flu strains, according to a new study from immunologists at Columbia University Medical Center. [More]
Blood utilization practice guidelines can save millions of dollars, reduce blood wastage

Blood utilization practice guidelines can save millions of dollars, reduce blood wastage

Improving the processes of ordering, transporting, and storing blood can save millions of dollars and drastically reduce blood wastage, reported a research team from one academic medical center after implementing institutional initiatives to address blood management. [More]
Food chemists find garlic aroma in breast milk of women who have consumed garlic

Food chemists find garlic aroma in breast milk of women who have consumed garlic

Food chemists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg have found that garlic aroma is evident in the breast milk of women who have consumed garlic. [More]
E-cigarettes likely to provide public health benefits, study finds

E-cigarettes likely to provide public health benefits, study finds

A modeling study by top tobacco control experts finds that e-cigarettes are likely to provide public health benefits based on "conservative estimates" of the likely uptake of vaping and smoking by adolescents and young adults. [More]
Researchers demonstrate important functional role of lincRNA in immune system

Researchers demonstrate important functional role of lincRNA in immune system

A long non-coding RNA (lincRNA) - called lincRNA-EPS - responsible for regulating innate immunity has been identified by a team of scientists at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. [More]
New study shows team training of health care staff can reduce patient mortality by 15%

New study shows team training of health care staff can reduce patient mortality by 15%

Team training of health care employees can reduce patient mortality by 15 percent, according to a new study from Rice University, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, the University of Central Florida, the U.S. Department of Defense and the Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center. [More]
Medical journalist describes slow journey to recovery from traumatic brain injuries

Medical journalist describes slow journey to recovery from traumatic brain injuries

Eleven years ago in the New England Journal of Medicine, medical journalist Susan Okie, MD, first introduced readers to two U.S. Army veterans who suffered traumatic brain injuries in Iraq, and the challenges they faced in the recovery period after returning home. [More]
UCLA-led study finds wide acceptance of end-of-life care orders among California nursing home residents

UCLA-led study finds wide acceptance of end-of-life care orders among California nursing home residents

UCLA-led research finds broad acceptance of written end-of-life care orders among California nursing home residents, with nearly half completing a Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment, or POLST, form in 2011. [More]
UCLA researchers find that male and female brains have opposite response patterns

UCLA researchers find that male and female brains have opposite response patterns

While measuring brain activity with magnetic resonance imaging during blood pressure trials, UCLA researchers found that men and women had opposite responses in the right front of the insular cortex, a part of the brain integral to the experience of emotions, blood pressure control and self-awareness. [More]
Study identifies specific characteristics that predispose women to different hot flashes, night sweat patterns

Study identifies specific characteristics that predispose women to different hot flashes, night sweat patterns

Most women will get hot flashes or night sweats at some point in life. However, when these symptoms occur and how long they last can vary dramatically among women. [More]
Study finds ethnic differences in circadian blood pressure variation

Study finds ethnic differences in circadian blood pressure variation

Differences in circadian blood pressure variation due to a combination of genetic and cultural factors may contribute to ethnic differences in cardiovascular morbidity, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. [More]
Fecal transplants may help treat home and hospital-acquired scourge

Fecal transplants may help treat home and hospital-acquired scourge

Fecal transplants are increasingly being used as the treatment of last resort for certain infections in the human gut and have had remarkable success treating the nursing home and hospital-acquired scourge, Clostridium difficile colitis, an infectious diarrhea that often follows antibiotic treatment. [More]
Study shows workplace conditions may contribute to gender-based job stress

Study shows workplace conditions may contribute to gender-based job stress

Social scientists have long known that women working in numerically male-dominated occupations like physics and firefighting report experiencing workplace stress, but men who work in numerically female-dominated occupations like nursing and child care do not. [More]
VMS during menopause transition linked to sociodemographic, psychosocial factors

VMS during menopause transition linked to sociodemographic, psychosocial factors

More data analysis about hot flashes from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation has been published today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society. [More]
Diabetic patients inspire family members, study finds

Diabetic patients inspire family members, study finds

Better outcomes may be possible if family members receive support to help their loved ones with diabetes, according to the DAWN2 study, with analysis led by a Penn State College of Medicine researcher. [More]
Leukemia drug increases brain dopamine, lowers toxic proteins linked to Parkinson's or dementia

Leukemia drug increases brain dopamine, lowers toxic proteins linked to Parkinson's or dementia

A small phase I study provides molecular evidence that an FDA-approved drug for leukemia significantly increased brain dopamine and reduced toxic proteins linked to disease progression in patients with Parkinson's disease or dementia with Lewy bodies. [More]
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