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New gene editing technique could hinder retinal degeneration in rats with inherited blindness

New gene editing technique could hinder retinal degeneration in rats with inherited blindness

A new technique that has the potential to treat inherited diseases by removing genetic defects has been shown for the first time to hinder retinal degeneration in rats with a type of inherited blindness, according to a Cedars-Sinai study. [More]
DNA damage may lead to mutation and changes in cell

DNA damage may lead to mutation and changes in cell

A team of researchers from Colorado State University has been studying DNA damage in living cells to learn more about how genetic abnormalities arise. It has long been known that DNA molecules in every cell get constantly damaged by things from the outside environment, like sunlight, cigarette smoke and radiation. However, more recently researchers have discovered that sources from within the cell itself can sometimes be even more damaging. [More]
Study may hold new revelations about how stress during pregnancy affects mothers and offspring

Study may hold new revelations about how stress during pregnancy affects mothers and offspring

The sequencing of the first genome involving a cockroach species may one day serve as a model system comparable to how research on mice can apply to humans. In this case, the model could hold new revelations about how stress during pregnancy could affect both the mother and her offspring. [More]
Roche announces availability of cobas HBVassay for use on cobas 4800 System

Roche announces availability of cobas HBVassay for use on cobas 4800 System

Roche announced today the commercial availability of the cobas HBVassay for use on the cobas 4800 System in countries accepting the CE mark. This new molecular diagnostic assay expands the available virology menu on the cobas 4800 System, improving system efficiency and providing testing flexibility that allows physicians to assess a patient's response to antiviral therapy. [More]
Discovery could offer clues to how some viruses control expression of genetic material

Discovery could offer clues to how some viruses control expression of genetic material

Researchers at Case Western Reserve University and the University of Michigan have produced the first image of an important human protein as it binds with ribonucleic acid (RNA), a discovery that could offer clues to how some viruses, including HIV, control expression of their genetic material. [More]
Two studies explore potential new blood tests for Alzheimer's disease

Two studies explore potential new blood tests for Alzheimer's disease

There is increasing evidence that the brain changes of Alzheimer's disease begin decades before memory and thinking problems occur, prompting the need for better methods of early detection for this progressive, fatal brain disease. Consequently, there is a growing school of thought that the most effective future Alzheimer's drug therapies will be administered to those who are at high risk of the disease before cognitive symptoms appear. [More]
Xuriden (uridine triacetate) now approved for patients with hereditary orotic aciduria

Xuriden (uridine triacetate) now approved for patients with hereditary orotic aciduria

Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Xuriden (uridine triacetate), the first FDA-approved treatment for patients with hereditary orotic aciduria. Hereditary orotic aciduria is a rare metabolic disorder, which has been reported in approximately 20 patients worldwide. [More]
New type of mycovirus can cause aspergillosis in humans

New type of mycovirus can cause aspergillosis in humans

Researchers, led by Dr Robert Coutts, Leverhulme Research Fellow from the School of Life and Medical Sciences at the University of Hertfordshire, and Dr Ioly Kotta-Loizou, Research Associate at Imperial College, have discovered a completely novel type of mycovirus. [More]
UK study suggests new approach to develop highly-potent drugs

UK study suggests new approach to develop highly-potent drugs

A new study led by University of Kentucky researchers suggests a new approach to develop highly-potent drugs which could overcome current shortcomings of low drug efficacy and multi-drug resistance in the treatment of cancer as well as viral and bacterial infections. [More]
MU scientists develop RNAMiner tool to make genetic science easier

MU scientists develop RNAMiner tool to make genetic science easier

Technology rapidly is advancing the study of genetics and the search for causes of major diseases. Analysis of genomic sequences that once took days or months now can be performed in a matter of hours. Yet, for most genetic scientists, the lack of access to computer servers and programs capable of quickly handling vast amounts of data can hinder genetic advancements. [More]
NDSU researcher awarded $1.35 million research grant to develop targeted treatment for colorectal cancer

NDSU researcher awarded $1.35 million research grant to develop targeted treatment for colorectal cancer

A researcher at North Dakota State University, Fargo, is receiving a four-year $1.35 million research project grant from the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health to develop a targeted treatment for colorectal cancer. [More]
New test could identify resistant tuberculosis faster

New test could identify resistant tuberculosis faster

Tuberculosis (TB) disease rates in some parts of London are as high as in Sub-Saharan Africa, and drug-resistant strains are becoming increasingly common. [More]
UCL-led team develops new technique to find resistant TB faster

UCL-led team develops new technique to find resistant TB faster

The time needed to genetically sequence the bacteria causing tuberculosis (Mtb) from patient samples has been reduced from weeks to days using a new technique developed by a UCL-led team. This could help health service providers to better treat disease, control transmission of this infection, and monitor outbreaks. [More]
Case Western researchers awarded NSF grant to develop new method to reduce risk of Ebola virus

Case Western researchers awarded NSF grant to develop new method to reduce risk of Ebola virus

Health care workers must diagnose and isolate Ebola victims at an early stage to have a chance to save them and prevent the virus from spreading. But the most sensitive and quickest diagnostic test produces a small percentage of false negative results that undermine efforts to control the deadly agent. [More]

Researchers reveal how humans get infected with cholera

Karl Klose, professor of biology and a researcher in UTSA's South Texas Center for Emerging Infectious Diseases, has teamed up with researchers at Ruhr University in Bochum, Germany to understand how humans get infected with cholera. [More]
Research findings provide avenue for targeted therapy to treat AML

Research findings provide avenue for targeted therapy to treat AML

A novel study by the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore at the National University of Singapore found that an increase in a gene known as Leo1 affects other genes that are directly implicated in acute myelogenous leukaemia (AML), increasing the incidence of cancer. [More]
Alternatives to cigarette smoking may still pose a risk to human health due to over-use

Alternatives to cigarette smoking may still pose a risk to human health due to over-use

Cigarette smoking kills approximately 440,000 Americans each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Protection. It's the leading cause of preventable death worldwide. In order to overcome this addiction, many people resort to nicotine replacement therapies. [More]
New UCLA study finds that oxidized lipids may also contribute to pulmonary hypertension

New UCLA study finds that oxidized lipids may also contribute to pulmonary hypertension

Oxidized lipids are known to play a key role in inflaming blood vessels and hardening arteries, which causes diseases like atherosclerosis. A new study at UCLA demonstrates that they may also contribute to pulmonary hypertension, a serious lung disease that narrows the small blood vessels in the lungs. [More]
Researchers discover how immunosensory system attacks viruses on a molecular level

Researchers discover how immunosensory system attacks viruses on a molecular level

Our immunosensory system detects virus such as influenza via specific characteristics of viral ribonucleic acid. Previously, it was unclear how the immune system prevents viruses from simply donning molecular camouflage in order to escape detection. [More]
Study to understand molecular interplay between Roquin and RNA to treat autoimmune diseases

Study to understand molecular interplay between Roquin and RNA to treat autoimmune diseases

Scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München, the Ludwig-Maximilians University of Munich (LMU) and the Technische Universität München (TUM) have moved an important step closer to understanding molecular mechanisms of autoimmune diseases. [More]
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