Syphilis News and Research RSS Feed - Syphilis News and Research

Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease (STD) caused by the bacterium Treponema pallidum. It has often been called “the great imitator” because so many of the signs and symptoms are indistinguishable from those of other diseases.

In the United States, health officials reported over 36,000 cases of syphilis in 2006, including 9,756 cases of primary and secondary (P&S) syphilis. In 2006, half of all P&S syphilis cases were reported from 20 counties and 2 cities; and most P&S syphilis cases occurred in persons 20 to 39 years of age. The incidence of P&S syphilis was highest in women 20 to 24 years of age and in men 35 to 39 years of age. Reported cases of congenital syphilis in newborns increased from 2005 to 2006, with 339 new cases reported in 2005 compared to 349 cases in 2006.

Between 2005 and 2006, the number of reported P&S syphilis cases increased 11.8 percent. P&S rates have increased in males each year between 2000 and 2006 from 2.6 to 5.7 and among females between 2004 and 2006. In 2006, 64% of the reported P&S syphilis cases were among men who have sex with men (MSM).

Syphilis is passed from person to person through direct contact with a syphilis sore. Sores occur mainly on the external genitals, vagina, anus, or in the rectum. Sores also can occur on the lips and in the mouth. Transmission of the organism occurs during vaginal, anal, or oral sex. Pregnant women with the disease can pass it to the babies they are carrying. Syphilis cannot be spread through contact with toilet seats, doorknobs, swimming pools, hot tubs, bathtubs, shared clothing, or eating utensils.
Informed consent is not required for certain health research, say bioethics experts

Informed consent is not required for certain health research, say bioethics experts

Under the right conditions, full informed consent is not ethically required for some types of health research, according to leading bioethics experts. [More]
AHF opens new Men's Wellness Center in Brooklyn in partnership with GMAD

AHF opens new Men's Wellness Center in Brooklyn in partnership with GMAD

AIDS Healthcare Foundation will open its newest Men's Wellness Center in Brooklyn on Wednesday in partnership with local nonprofit Gay Men of African Descent. [More]
HIV test for new inmates may not yield new diagnoses, says study

HIV test for new inmates may not yield new diagnoses, says study

More than 90 percent of HIV-infected inmates entering prison in North Carolina had previously tested positive for the virus, according to a study published in the November 27 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. [More]
New evidence shows probiotics offer enormous potential for treatment of depression

New evidence shows probiotics offer enormous potential for treatment of depression

Probiotics are not new, but their status as a nutritional buzzword is. Most folks have now heard and seen the term countless times in commercials and advertisements, as yogurt, dietary supplement, natural food product, and even cosmetic companies promote their probiotic-containing products. [More]

Stop L.A. Corruption: A new awareness campaign that highlights failures of LA County

Health and public policy advocates from AIDS Healthcare Foundation (AHF) will unveil 'Stop L.A. Corruption,' a new advocacy and awareness campaign highlighting the profound failures of Los Angeles County and its key elected and appointed officials in carrying out their sworn duties to serve and protect the nearly 10 million residents of the County. [More]

HIV risk-reduction counseling at time of HIV testing shows no reduction in STI rates

Brief risk-reduction counseling at the time of a rapid human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) test was not effective for reducing new sexually transmitted infections (STIs) during the subsequent 6 months among persons at risk for HIV, according to a study in the October 23/30 issue of JAMA. [More]
Strategic analysis on opportunities in the US blood banking market

Strategic analysis on opportunities in the US blood banking market

Reportlinker.com announces that a new market research report is available in its catalogue: 2014 Opportunities in the US Blood Banking Market [More]
New quick test promises to reduce economic, health burden of syphilis cases in Latin America

New quick test promises to reduce economic, health burden of syphilis cases in Latin America

Demystifying the chemical processes that create a wine's aroma, and the invaluable potential application of that understanding in winemaking, is the new objective of scientists in Uruguay who, with European partners, also recently sequenced the genome of the high-value Tannat grape, from which "the most healthy of red wines" are fermented. [More]
HIV prevention programs for female sex workers in India reduce syphilis, HIV

HIV prevention programs for female sex workers in India reduce syphilis, HIV

HIV prevention programs for female sex workers in India reduce rates of syphilis, HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs), a University of Toronto study has found. [More]
Research could lead to new ways to combat chlamydia

Research could lead to new ways to combat chlamydia

A protein secreted by the chlamydia bug has a very unusual structure, according to scientists in the School of Medicine at The University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio. The discovery of the protein's shape could lead to novel strategies for diagnosing and treating chlamydia, a sexually transmitted disease that infects an estimated 2.8 million people in the U.S. each year. [More]
New plug-in optical sensor can help diagnose Kaposi's sarcoma

New plug-in optical sensor can help diagnose Kaposi's sarcoma

As antiretroviral drugs that treat HIV have become more commonplace, the incidence of Kaposi's sarcoma, a type of cancer linked to AIDS, has decreased in the United States. [More]
DNAzymes, gold nanoparticles and disease detection: an interview with Dr Chan and Kyryl Zagorovsky, University of Toronto

DNAzymes, gold nanoparticles and disease detection: an interview with Dr Chan and Kyryl Zagorovsky, University of Toronto

Gold nanoparticles are tiny spherical particles made out of gold atoms with sizes on nanometre scale. This is around 1,000 times smaller than the thickness of human hair. [More]

Experts to discuss changes to medical ethics paradigms proposed by bioethics colleagues

Experts from across disciplines at Johns Hopkins will hold a symposium on Thursday, April 11, 2013 to discuss changes to medical ethics paradigms as proposed by their own bioethics colleagues in a recent, groundbreaking publication. [More]
Untested products sold in stores during patent medicine era, study shows

Untested products sold in stores during patent medicine era, study shows

Scientists provided a glimpse today based on an analysis of a museum collection of patent medicines used in turn-of-the-century America. [More]
Peter Piot to be recognized with Hideyo Noguchi Africa Prize for Medical Research

Peter Piot to be recognized with Hideyo Noguchi Africa Prize for Medical Research

Professor Peter Piot, Director of the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, will be awarded the Hideyo Noguchi Africa Prize for Medical Research, the Government of Japan have announced. [More]

Study findings call for major change in approach to syphilis testing

Syphilis is on the rise worldwide and there is an urgent need for reliable and rapid screening, particularly for people who live in areas where access to healthcare is limited. An international research team, led by scientists at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) in Montreal, has demonstrated that rapid and point-of-care tests (POC) for syphilis are as accurate as conventional laboratory tests. [More]

Syphilis in pregnancy widespread but preventable

Syphilis is still a widespread problem among pregnant women worldwide, despite tests and treatment being inexpensive and readily available, show study findings. [More]

North Dakota, Kansas join list of states considering further abortion restrictions

An abortion clinic fights to stay open amid new proposed restrictions in North Dakota while Kansas lawmakers spar over new proposed restrictions on using state money for the procedure in that state. [More]
DNAzymes and gold nanoparticles used to detect infectious diseases

DNAzymes and gold nanoparticles used to detect infectious diseases

Infectious diseases such as malaria and syphilis can be diagnosed rapidly and reliably in the field by using a simple test developed by Canadian scientists. The test is based on the use of DNAzymes and gold nanoparticles. As the researchers report in the journal Angewandte Chemie, their test allows for the sensitive detection of bacteria, viruses, and parasites. [More]

CIHR-funded researchers raise awareness of sexual health

Being comfortable in our sexuality and making choices that support our sexual health are essential to our overall well-being. Promoting sexual health includes both preventing disease and helping people find pleasure in their sexual lives. [More]