Amnesia News and Research RSS Feed - Amnesia News and Research

Amnesia is a form of memory loss that is usually temporary and affecting short term memory. Common causes and risk factors of amnesia and memory loss include concomitant psychological problems, trauma or head injury and so forth.

Study finds link between alcohol use and risky sexual encounters among young women

In-depth interviews conducted by researchers at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine of 20 young women attending an urban sexually transmitted disease clinic have documented a variety of unexpected, unintended sexual encounters linked to their alcohol use before sex occurs. [More]
Others consider our moral traits, not memory, to be core component of our identity

Others consider our moral traits, not memory, to be core component of our identity

We may view our memory as being essential to who we are, but new findings suggest that others consider our moral traits to be the core component of our identity. Data collected from family members of patients suffering from neurodegenerative disease showed that it was changes in moral behavior, not memory loss, that caused loved ones to say that the patient wasn't "the same person" anymore. [More]
Discovery could pave way for new drugs to treat people with memory problems

Discovery could pave way for new drugs to treat people with memory problems

A team of scientists believe they have shown that memories are more robust than we thought and have identified the process in the brain, which could help rescue lost memories or bury bad memories, and pave the way for new drugs and treatment for people with memory problems. [More]

Same brain cells involved in encoding and retrieving memories

Are the same regions and even the same cells of the brain area called hippocampus involved in encoding and retrieving memories or are different areas of this structure engaged? This question has kept neuroscientists busy for a long time. Researchers at the Mercator Research Group "Structure of Memory" at RUB have now found out that the same brain cells exhibit activity in both processes. [More]
Retrosplenial cortex serves as 'conjunction junction' for brain's navigation function

Retrosplenial cortex serves as 'conjunction junction' for brain's navigation function

Ever wake at night needing a drink of water and then find your way to the kitchen in the dark without stubbing your toe? [More]
St John's Wort may cause same adverse reactions as antidepressants

St John's Wort may cause same adverse reactions as antidepressants

St John's Wort can produce the same adverse reactions as antidepressants, and serious side effects can occur when the two are taken together, according to new University of Adelaide research. [More]
Lund University research questions the doctrine on how the brain recognizes and processes information

Lund University research questions the doctrine on how the brain recognizes and processes information

New research from Lund University in Sweden questions the prevailing doctrine on how the brain absorbs and processes information. The idea that the brain has a mechanism to maintain activity at the lowest possible level is incorrect. [More]
New Cedars-Sinai study identifies unique set of neurons involved in memory-based decision making

New Cedars-Sinai study identifies unique set of neurons involved in memory-based decision making

The witness on the stand says he saw the accused at the scene of the crime. Is he sure? How sure? The jury's verdict could hinge on that level of certainty. Many decisions we make every day are influenced by our memories and the confidence we have in them. But very little is known about how we decide whether we can trust a memory or not. [More]
Patients with traumatic brain injuries need effective cognitive neuroscience-based therapies

Patients with traumatic brain injuries need effective cognitive neuroscience-based therapies

Patients with traumatic brain injuries are not benefiting from recent advances in cognitive neuroscience research - and they should be, scientists report in a special issue of Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences. [More]
Early symptoms of post-traumatic stress strongly predict later disability in military personnel

Early symptoms of post-traumatic stress strongly predict later disability in military personnel

Evaluating military personnel with blast-related mild traumatic brain injuries, researchers have found that early symptoms of post-traumatic stress, such as anxiety, emotional numbness, flashbacks and irritability, are the strongest predictors of later disability. [More]
Study findings question benefit of giving sedatives before surgery for patients under general anesthesia

Study findings question benefit of giving sedatives before surgery for patients under general anesthesia

Although sedatives are often administered before surgery, a randomized trial finds that among patients undergoing elective surgery under general anesthesia, receiving the sedative lorazepam before surgery, compared with placebo or no premedication, did not improve the self-reported patient experience the day after surgery, but was associated with longer time till removal off a breathing tube (extubation) and a lower rate of early cognitive recovery, according to a study in the March 3 issue of JAMA. [More]

New study challenges scientific theory about role of hippocampus in unconscious memory

A new study by a UT Dallas researcher challenges a long-accepted scientific theory about the role the hippocampus plays in our unconscious memory. [More]

Vanderbilt scientists shed new light on how the brain executes 'mental time travel'

In Proust's novel Recollection of Things Past, the distinctive smell of a lemon madeleine launches the narrator on a long, involved reminiscence of his past that fills seven chapters. [More]
Joyce and Don Massey Family Foundation supports U-M’s TBI care and research

Joyce and Don Massey Family Foundation supports U-M’s TBI care and research

A tragic accident 32 years ago forever altered the lives of an entire prominent Michigan auto industry family, as a beloved wife and mother suffered a devastating traumatic brain injury, or TBI. [More]

People may have to 'turn on' their memories to remember experiences

People may have to "turn on" their memories in order to remember even the simplest details of an experience, according to Penn State psychologists. This finding, which has been named "attribute amnesia," indicates that memory is far more selective than previously thought. [More]
New study reveals promising path for rehabilitation of mild traumatic brain injury patients

New study reveals promising path for rehabilitation of mild traumatic brain injury patients

As football players are learning, a violent blow to the head has the potential to cause mild to severe traumatic brain injury -- physical damage to the brain that can be debilitating, even fatal. The long-term effects run the gamut of human functioning, from trouble communicating to extensive cognitive and behavioral deterioration. To date, there is no effective medical or cognitive treatment for patients with traumatic brain injuries. [More]
Human stem cells can be reset to their native undifferentiated state

Human stem cells can be reset to their native undifferentiated state

Scientists at the Babraham Institute, in collaboration with colleagues at the Cambridge Stem Cell Institute and the European Bioinformatics Institute, have made a breakthrough in stem cell research. Their paper, published today in Cell, describes how human stem cells can be reverted back to non-specialised cells. [More]
Study sheds new light on sleep drunkenness disorder

Study sheds new light on sleep drunkenness disorder

A study is shining new light on a sleep disorder called "sleep drunkenness". The disorder may be as prevalent as affecting one in every seven people. The research is published in the August 26, 2014, print issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
FDA approves BELSOMRA® (suvorexant) for the treatment of insomnia

FDA approves BELSOMRA® (suvorexant) for the treatment of insomnia

Merck (NYSE: MRK), known as MSD outside the United States and Canada, announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved BELSOMRA® (suvorexant) for adults with insomnia who have difficulty falling asleep and/or staying asleep. BELSOMRA (pronounced bell-SOM-rah) is a highly selective antagonist for orexin receptors. [More]
More accurate tests could be created to diagnose memory problems

More accurate tests could be created to diagnose memory problems

UEA research finds hope for more accurate diagnosis of memory problems. More accurate tests could be created to diagnose diseases such as Alzheimer's or memory problems stemming from head injuries, leading to earlier intervention, according to new findings from the University of East Anglia (UEA). [More]
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