Amnesia News and Research RSS Feed - Amnesia News and Research

Amnesia is a form of memory loss that is usually temporary and affecting short term memory. Common causes and risk factors of amnesia and memory loss include concomitant psychological problems, trauma or head injury and so forth.
3-D model of famous amnesiac's brain helps illuminate human memory

3-D model of famous amnesiac's brain helps illuminate human memory

During his lifetime, Henry G. Molaison (H.M.) was the best-known and possibly the most-studied patient of modern neuroscience. Now, thanks to the postmortem study of his brain, based on histological sectioning and digital three-dimensional construction led by Jacopo Annese, PhD, at the University of California, San Diego, scientists around the globe will finally have insight into the neurological basis of the case that defined modern studies of human memory. [More]
U.S. Marines investigate association between traumatic brain injury and risk of PTSD

U.S. Marines investigate association between traumatic brain injury and risk of PTSD

In a novel study of U.S. Marines investigating the association between traumatic brain injury (TBI) and the risk of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) over time, a team of scientists led by researchers from the Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System and University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that TBIs suffered during active-duty deployment to Iraq and Afghanistan were the greatest predictor for subsequent PTSD, but found pre-deployment PTSD symptoms and high combat intensity were also significant factors. [More]

Researchers use popular music to help severely brain-injured patients recall personal memories

In the first study of its kind, two researchers have used popular music to help severely brain-injured patients recall personal memories. Amee Baird and Séverine Samson outline the results and conclusions of their pioneering research in the recent issue of the journal Neuropsychological Rehabilitation. [More]
Researchers examine why depression messes with memory

Researchers examine why depression messes with memory

To pinpoint why depression messes with memory, researchers took a page from Sesame Street's book. The show's popular game "One of these things is not like the others" helps young viewers learn to differentiate things that are similar - a process known as "pattern separation." [More]

Opinions on shutdown: Using Obamacare is a sham cause; GOP isn't crazy; what's the endgame?

House Republicans' irresponsible brinkmanship may finally lead to the government shutdown that some of its members have been coveting since they took control of that chamber in 2011. This time, though, the fight hasn't been a battle over spending on federal agencies. It's been a symbolic one over the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, a.k.a. Obamacare. And it's been a sham. The inconvenient truth for the GOP is that "defunding Obamacare," as the House tried to do, wouldn't stop most of the major provisions of the health care law, some of which have already gone into effect [More]
Research shows specific form of memory associations is encoded in cerebral cortex

Research shows specific form of memory associations is encoded in cerebral cortex

'Where' and 'how' memories are encoded in a nervous system is one of the most challenging questions in biological research. The formation and recall of associative memories is essential for an independent life. The hippocampus has long been considered a centre in the brain for the long-term storage of spatial associations. [More]
Viewpoints: Fears of health law's adverse selection; GOP's 'fundamental miscalculation;' special deal for Congress keeps dissent low

Viewpoints: Fears of health law's adverse selection; GOP's 'fundamental miscalculation;' special deal for Congress keeps dissent low

Yet despite the care the administration took in establishing incentives and safeguards, even some of Obamacare's most committed backers are wondering whether the experiment will work as advertised -; or, like Harvard's P.P.O., go off the rails along the way. Adverse selection is perhaps the direst threat. ... Healthier Americans will probably flock to cheaper bronze plans. And insurers will vie to enroll the healthy. In some states, big insurers have chosen not to participate in exchanges to avoid their strictures. On the outside, they could still sell cheap plans to skim off the healthy and avoid a rule that insurers on the exchanges must also offer more generous silver and gold plans (Eduardo Porter, 8/7). [More]
Research couple receives 2013 Khalid Iqbal Lifetime Achievement Award for Alzheimer's study

Research couple receives 2013 Khalid Iqbal Lifetime Achievement Award for Alzheimer's study

‚ÄčThe research couple receives the "2013 Khalid Iqbal Lifetime Achievement Award" for its role as pioneers in investigating the role of tau in Alzheimer's disease. The award ceremony was held yesterday (10:45 am US EST) within the framework of the "Alzheimer's Association International Conference (AAIC 2013)" in Boston (USA). [More]

Research: CFL players are more likely to value medical tests after concussions compared to university-level players

Research from the University of Alberta shows CFL players are more likely to value medical tests after concussions compared to university-level players. But the professional athletes were more apt to incorrectly believe it's OK to return to the sport within 24 to 48 hours if they had no symptoms. [More]
Severe sports-related concussions in children prolong recovery time

Severe sports-related concussions in children prolong recovery time

Most children who suffer from sports-related concussions recover within a few days. However, in a small number of children, symptoms can last for a month or more. Although there have been numerous theories as to what might predict a longer recovery time, there is no definitive answer as to why it takes some children longer to recover. [More]
Research on sports-related concussion, sudden cardiac death to be presented at 2013 AMSSM Annual Meeting

Research on sports-related concussion, sudden cardiac death to be presented at 2013 AMSSM Annual Meeting

The latest research for sports-related concussion and sudden cardiac death in athletes, in addition to a record number of sports medicine research submissions, will be presented by members of the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine at the 2013 AMSSM Annual Meeting. [More]
Homeless people have disproportionately higher risk for TBI compared to general population

Homeless people have disproportionately higher risk for TBI compared to general population

Homeless people and their health care providers need to know more about traumatic brain injuries to help prevent and treat such injuries, a new study has found. [More]
Brain imaging can detect tiny lesions that may provide target for treating people with mTBI: Study

Brain imaging can detect tiny lesions that may provide target for treating people with mTBI: Study

Brain imaging soon after mild traumatic brain injury or mild concussion can detect tiny lesions that may eventually provide a target for treating people with mTBI, according to a study released today and that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 65th Annual Meeting in San Diego, March 16 to 23, 2013. [More]
Research findings could lead to new sleep therapies to improve memory disorders

Research findings could lead to new sleep therapies to improve memory disorders

A team of sleep researchers led by UC Riverside psychologist Sara C. Mednick has confirmed the mechanism that enables the brain to consolidate memory and found that a commonly prescribed sleep aid enhances the process. [More]

Important updates on traumatic brain injury in military personnel

Researchers are making new strides in understanding the health consequences and treatment and rehabilitation needs of combat veterans and other service members affected by traumatic brain injury (TBI). [More]
Hospital MRIs may effectively predict long-term outcomes for people with mild TBI

Hospital MRIs may effectively predict long-term outcomes for people with mild TBI

Hospital MRIs may be better at predicting long-term outcomes for people with mild traumatic brain injuries than CT scans, the standard technique for evaluating such injuries in the emergency room, according to a clinical trial led by researchers at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) and the San Francisco General Hospital and Trauma Center (SFGH). [More]
Traumatic brain injury incidence: an interview with Professor Valery Feigin

Traumatic brain injury incidence: an interview with Professor Valery Feigin

Traumatic brain injury can be defined as an injury to the brain due to mechanical forces. Mechanical forces usually include falls, car accidents, accidental forces from another person or animal. It also includes sports-related brain injuries. [More]

Perception test could predict mild cognitive impairment

Psychologists at the University of Toronto and the Georgia Institute of Technology - commonly known as Georgia Tech - have shown that an individual's inability to recognize once-familiar faces and objects may have as much to do with difficulty perceiving their distinct features as it does with the capacity to recall from memory. [More]
Navigating the Labyrinth of Traumatic Brain Injury to Discover a Secondary Neurological Condition

Navigating the Labyrinth of Traumatic Brain Injury to Discover a Secondary Neurological Condition

Working with individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI) every day, I see the debilitating effects and long-term struggles firsthand. [More]

NIH funded researchers identify and explore different aspects of anesthesia

Anesthesia helps many of us during our lives, whether we need a local painkiller at the dentist, numbing eye drops for laser vision correction or general anesthesia for major surgery. But even though anesthetics have been used in many procedures for more than 150 years, doctors and scientists still don't know exactly how these medicines work in the body. [More]