Anxiety News and Research RSS Feed - Anxiety News and Research

Anxiety disorder is a mental ailment that leads to unnecessary anxiety over different activities and events.
New therapy appears to help tinnitus patients cope better with phantom noise

New therapy appears to help tinnitus patients cope better with phantom noise

Patients with tinnitus hear phantom noise and are sometimes so bothered by the perceived ringing in their ears, they have difficulty concentrating. A new therapy does not lessen perception of the noise but appears to help patients cope better with it in their daily lives, according to new research. [More]
ISBD Task Force examines suicide predictors

ISBD Task Force examines suicide predictors

The International Society for Bipolar Disorders Task Force on Suicide has published a meta-analysis of predictors of suicide attempts and deaths. [More]
Around-the-clock visitation during patient's stay improves patient satisfaction

Around-the-clock visitation during patient's stay improves patient satisfaction

Regardless of the circumstances, hospitalization can be a fearful thing. Patients find themselves in a new environment, surrounded by new people, new sights, new sounds - and often, the only thing that can quell that strange sense of unfamiliarity is having a loved one there to visit. [More]
University Medical Center's first atrial fibrillation unit opens in Germany

University Medical Center's first atrial fibrillation unit opens in Germany

Nearly 1.8 million people in Germany suffer from atrial fibrillation. This is the most common and clinically significant form of heart rhythm disorder. Shortness of breath, a sudden sense of dizziness, a feeling of pressure in the chest, and palpitations or thumping of the heart so extreme it can be felt beating rapidly and irregularly - this is how many patients describe their first episode of atrial fibrillation. [More]
Study finds that mental health disorders double heart disease, stroke risks

Study finds that mental health disorders double heart disease, stroke risks

People facing mental health challenges are significantly more likely to have heart disease or stroke, according to a study presented today at the Canadian Cardiovascular Congress. [More]
Dietary cocoa flavanols can reverse age-related memory decline in healthy older adults

Dietary cocoa flavanols can reverse age-related memory decline in healthy older adults

Dietary cocoa flavanols—naturally occurring bioactives found in cocoa—reversed age-related memory decline in healthy older adults, according to a study led by Columbia University Medical Center scientists. [More]
Johns Hopkins to lead, design interactive Web-based Ebola training program

Johns Hopkins to lead, design interactive Web-based Ebola training program

Johns Hopkins Medicine has been tasked by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to lead a group and to design an interactive Web-based learning program that guides health care workers, nurses and physicians through government-approved protocols to aid clinicians as they provide care to patients who may be at risk of contracting the Ebola virus. [More]
Butler neuropsychologist studies OCD patients undergoing gamma knife radiosurgery

Butler neuropsychologist studies OCD patients undergoing gamma knife radiosurgery

Supported by a $750,000 K23 Career Development Award from the National Institutes of Health, Butler Hospital neuropsychologist Nicole McLaughlin, PhD, is conducting a first-of-its-kind study of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) undergoing gamma knife radiosurgery. [More]
Study shows that obese children may mistake asthma symptoms, overuse rescue medications

Study shows that obese children may mistake asthma symptoms, overuse rescue medications

New research shows obese children with asthma may mistake symptoms of breathlessness for loss of asthma control leading to high and unnecessary use of rescue medications. The study was published online in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, the official scientific journal of the American Association of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. [More]
Sleep problems very common among young children receiving treatment for psychiatric disorders

Sleep problems very common among young children receiving treatment for psychiatric disorders

John Boekamp, Ph.D., clinical director of the Pediatric Partial Hospital Program at Bradley Hospital recently led a study that found sleep difficulties - particularly problems with falling asleep - were very common among toddlers and preschool-aged children who were receiving clinical treatment for a wide range of psychiatric disorders. [More]
Hospitals' purchase of doctors' practices boosts costs, study finds

Hospitals' purchase of doctors' practices boosts costs, study finds

Hospital ownership of physician groups increased patient care costs by as much as 20 percent, according to the UC Berkeley study. Meanwhile, another study by Harvard researchers finds that switching to for-profit status may boost hospitals' financial health but has no effect on quality of care. [More]
Helping children understand Ebola

Helping children understand Ebola

It dominates the headlines and is striking fear and panic in many communities around the world, Ebola. The constant barrage of information and so much unknown can be especially difficult for children, making it all the more important for parents to help their kids feel safe and to have a dialogue with them at the appropriate developmental level. [More]
Verbal abuse worsens bipolar disease outcome

Verbal abuse worsens bipolar disease outcome

Experiencing verbal abuse in childhood has a lasting negative effect on the course of bipolar disorder, researchers have found. [More]
Walnuts may help prevent Alzheimer's disease, study finds

Walnuts may help prevent Alzheimer's disease, study finds

A new animal study published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease indicates that a diet including walnuts may have a beneficial effect in reducing the risk, delaying the onset, slowing the progression of, or preventing Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Novel way for treating non-cardiac chest pain due to esophageal hypersensitivity

Novel way for treating non-cardiac chest pain due to esophageal hypersensitivity

Chest pain doesn't necessarily come from the heart. An estimated 200,000 Americans each year experience non-cardiac chest pain, which in addition to pain can involve painful swallowing, discomfort and anxiety. Non-cardiac chest pain can be frightening for patients and result in visits to the emergency room because the painful symptoms, while often originating in the esophagus, can mimic a heart attack. [More]
Study reveals that people with stress-related inflammation may suffer from depression

Study reveals that people with stress-related inflammation may suffer from depression

Preexisting differences in the sensitivity of a key part of each individual's immune system to stress confer a greater risk of developing stress-related depression or anxiety, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published October 20 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. [More]
Bright daylight could trigger panic attack

Bright daylight could trigger panic attack

Fear of bright daylight is associated with panic disorder, according to new presented at the ECNP congress in Berlin. [More]

Panasonic to introduce tablet-based telehealth service for assisted living facilities

Panasonic Corporation of North America has announced it will launch On4TodayTM, a tablet-based telehealth service, in November. T [More]
New drug naming system to be presented at ECNP conference in Berlin

New drug naming system to be presented at ECNP conference in Berlin

What's in a name? Doctors have found that the name of the drug you are prescribed significantly influences how the patient sees the treatment. [More]
Depression, anxiety after MI more common in women than men

Depression, anxiety after MI more common in women than men

Women are more likely to develop anxiety and depression after a heart attack (myocardial infarction; MI) than men, according to research presented at Acute Cardiovascular Care 2014 by Professor Pranas Serpytis from Lithuania. [More]