Anxiety News and Research RSS Feed - Anxiety News and Research

Anxiety disorder is a mental ailment that leads to unnecessary anxiety over different activities and events.
Neuromod Devices, Irish Tinnitus Association announce launch of Tinnitus Awareness Week 2015

Neuromod Devices, Irish Tinnitus Association announce launch of Tinnitus Awareness Week 2015

Saturday 31st of January sees the launch of Tinnitus Awareness Week. This year a public event will take place, hosted by The Neuromod Clinic in conjunction with the Irish Tinnitus Association. This free of charge event will take place at The Hermitage Medical Clinic, Lucan, Dublin at 10.30am on Saturday the 31st January. [More]
Research findings may accelerate work to safely control diabetes

Research findings may accelerate work to safely control diabetes

For those with diabetes, managing blood sugar is a balancing act -- if blood sugar is too high it raises the risk for nerve damage, blindness, kidney failure, and heart trouble, and if too low it can lead to a seizure or unconsciousness. [More]
Personalized approaches to treating intellectual disability

Personalized approaches to treating intellectual disability

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have produced an approach that protects animal models against a type of genetic disruption that causes intellectual disability, including serious memory impairments and altered anxiety levels. [More]
Daily use of Pycnogenol may help improve overall cognitive function

Daily use of Pycnogenol may help improve overall cognitive function

New research delivers exciting news for those seeking natural ways to boost memory and mental performance. A study recently published in the Journal of Neurosurgical Sciences shows daily use of Pycnogenol (pic-noj-en-all), a natural plant extract from French maritime pine tree bark, may help improve attention span, memory, decision-making – including executive-level performance – and overall cognitive function. [More]
Childhood stress, psychiatric disorders linked to cellular changes that cause aging

Childhood stress, psychiatric disorders linked to cellular changes that cause aging

In a new study published online in Biological Psychiatry on January 16, 2015, researchers from Butler Hospital identify an association between biological changes on the cellular level and both childhood adversity and psychiatric disorders. [More]
St. Luke’s offers Frameless Stereotactic Radiosurgery for treatment of brain tumors

St. Luke’s offers Frameless Stereotactic Radiosurgery for treatment of brain tumors

Some treatments for brain and spine tumors traditionally have involved restraining a patient with a heavy immobilization device and pins that pierce the skin and embed into the skull to ensure the accuracy and precision of a treatment. Doctors say the pins can add considerable anxiety. [More]
Prenatal program enhances couples' co-parenting relationship, improves childhood outcomes

Prenatal program enhances couples' co-parenting relationship, improves childhood outcomes

Children whose parents participated in a prenatal program aimed at enhancing couples' co-parenting relationship were better adjusted at age seven than children whose parents were assigned to a control group, according to Penn State researchers. [More]
Controlling acute and chronic pain in women

Controlling acute and chronic pain in women

Despite the variety of effective treatments, and physicians who specialize in treating pain, women often suffer unnecessarily from conditions ranging from backaches to pain after cancer surgery, and also treat their pain with medications that may be ineffective and possibly harmful, according to a review of research related to women and pain by the American Society of Anesthesiologists. [More]
Researchers identify novel life-preserving circuit responsible for recognizing threats

Researchers identify novel life-preserving circuit responsible for recognizing threats

Our existence depends on a bit of evolutionary genius aptly nicknamed "fight or flight." But where in our brain does the alarm first go off, and what other parts of the brain are mobilized to express fear and remember to avoid danger in the future? [More]
Brain uses separate pathway to recall old fear memories

Brain uses separate pathway to recall old fear memories

People with anxiety disorders, such as post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), often experience prolonged and exaggerated fearfulness. Now, an animal study suggests that this might involve disruption of a gradual shifting of brain circuitry for retrieving fear memories. Researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health have discovered in rats that an old fear memory is recalled by a separate brain pathway from the one originally used to recall it when it was fresh. [More]
CSHL researchers describe new pathway that controls fear memories in the mouse brain

CSHL researchers describe new pathway that controls fear memories in the mouse brain

Some people have no fear, like that 17-year-old kid who drives like a maniac. But for the nearly 40 million adults who suffer from anxiety disorders, an overabundance of fear rules their lives. Debilitating anxiety prevents them from participating in life's most mundane moments, from driving a car to riding in an elevator. [More]
Could déjà vu be linked to anxiety?

Could déjà vu be linked to anxiety?

A psychology expert from Sheffield Hallam University has reported what could be the first case of a person experiencing persistent déjà vu stemming from anxiety. [More]
Researchers gain new insight into fragile X syndrome

Researchers gain new insight into fragile X syndrome

Scientists have gained new insight into fragile X syndrome -- the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability -- by studying the case of a person without the disorder, but with two of its classic symptoms. [More]

Sexual objectification can increase women's fears of incurring physical, sexual harm

A study to be published in Sex Roles, published by Springer, offers an explanation for why women fear face-to-face crime more than men, despite being less likely to experience most crimes. The findings by Laurel Watson from the University of Missouri-Kansas City, support the theory that women may have a greater fear of crime due to the potential of also being raped during these encounters. [More]
State and federal prisoners not receiving adequate mental health care

State and federal prisoners not receiving adequate mental health care

A significant portion of state and federal prisoners are not receiving treatment for mental health conditions, according to research by The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Public Health. [More]
FDA approves RYTARY for Parkinson's disease treatment

FDA approves RYTARY for Parkinson's disease treatment

Impax Pharmaceuticals, a division of Impax Laboratories, Inc., today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved RYTARY, an extended-release oral capsule formulation of carbidopa-levodopa, for the treatment of Parkinson's disease, post-encephalitic parkinsonism, and parkinsonism that may follow carbon monoxide intoxication and / or manganese intoxication. [More]
Better physical functioning associated with remission of general anxiety, PTSD symptoms

Better physical functioning associated with remission of general anxiety, PTSD symptoms

In a two-year longitudinal study involving 13 intensive care units in four U.S. hospitals, researchers found that better physical functioning — basic and complex activities considered essential for maintaining independence — is associated with remission of general anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. These findings may help clinicians be better prepared for caring for the growing number of survivors of critical illness, potentially leading to a better quality of recovery for patients. [More]
Improving headache treatment could reduce health care spending, new study suggests

Improving headache treatment could reduce health care spending, new study suggests

Each year more than 12 million Americans visit their doctors complaining of headaches, which result in lost productivity and costs of upward of $31 billion annually. A new study by researchers from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center suggests some of that cost could be offset by physicians ordering fewer tests and an increased focus on counseling about lifestyle changes. [More]
Research findings could lead to new drug design for neurological diseases

Research findings could lead to new drug design for neurological diseases

A new intermediate step and unexpected enzymatic activity in a metabolic pathway in the body, which could lead to new drug design for psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases, has been discovered by researchers at Georgia State University. [More]

People working in prisons, secure hospitals are at increased risk of developing work-related stress

People working in prisons and in secure hospitals in the UK are at considerable risk of work-related stress, exhaustion and depression. This raises serious concerns for safety. [More]