Anxiety News and Research RSS Feed - Anxiety News and Research

Anxiety disorder is a mental ailment that leads to unnecessary anxiety over different activities and events.
Pain from social rejection lasts longer for people with untreated depression

Pain from social rejection lasts longer for people with untreated depression

Rejected by a person you like? Just "shake it off" and move on, as music star Taylor Swift says. [More]
Study finds link between violence during Guatemala civil war and mental health problems

Study finds link between violence during Guatemala civil war and mental health problems

Violence during the civil war in Guatemala from 1960 to 1996 resulted in the development of significant mental health problems and conditions for the county's people, according to a new multi-institution study from researchers under the Guatemala-Penn Partnership. [More]
Study explores association between back pain and depression

Study explores association between back pain and depression

Genetic factors help to explain the commonly found association between low back pain and depression, suggests a large study of twins in the March issue of PAIN, the official publication of the International Association for the Study of Pain. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
Scientists identify novel gene that affects brain function

Scientists identify novel gene that affects brain function

U.S. and Australian scientists have found the mechanism a novel gene uses to affect brain function and elicit behavior related to neuropsychiatric disease. [More]
Teen girls from rural areas have undiagnosed asthma, face higher risk of depression

Teen girls from rural areas have undiagnosed asthma, face higher risk of depression

Teen girls who live in rural areas are more likely than their male counterparts to have undiagnosed asthma, and they often are at a higher risk of depression, according to researchers at the Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University. [More]
Hormone therapy safe for transgender individuals, say BUSM researchers

Hormone therapy safe for transgender individuals, say BUSM researchers

In the most comprehensive review to date addressing the relative safety of hormone therapy for transgender persons, researchers from Boston University School of Medicine have found that hormone therapy in transgender adults is safe. The findings, which appear in the Journal of Clinical and Translational Endocrinology, may help reduce the barriers for transgender individuals to receive medical care. [More]
Body hang-ups prevent UK women to have health checkup, finds new HeartAge research

Body hang-ups prevent UK women to have health checkup, finds new HeartAge research

New research revealed today by HeartAge has found that almost four million British women are putting their own health at risk, as they are too embarrassed to have a health check. [More]
Rogers Behavioral Health announces addition of eating disorder program to Tampa location

Rogers Behavioral Health announces addition of eating disorder program to Tampa location

Rogers Behavioral Health-Tampa Bay announced today that it is adding a partial hospitalization eating disorder program to its Tampa location beginning March 30. This news is particularly timely as the nation recognizes National Eating Disorder Awareness Week February 22-28. [More]
International study shows potential new therapy to treat patients with neuropathic pain

International study shows potential new therapy to treat patients with neuropathic pain

An international study led by scientists at McGill University reports, for the first time, that drugs that selectively target the melatonin MT2 receptor represent a novel class of analgesic drugs that could be used to treat patients with neuropathic pain. [More]
Survey finds high levels of abuse, serious harm associated with human trafficking

Survey finds high levels of abuse, serious harm associated with human trafficking

The largest survey to date of the health of trafficking survivors has found high levels of abuse and serious harm associated with human trafficking. For the first time, the findings reveal severe mental and physical health problems experienced by men, women and children trafficked for forced labour and sexual exploitation in Southeast Asia. [More]

Study calls for strong policies against workplace bullying

Bullying at work grinds victims down and makes them an 'easy target' for further abuse according to new research from the University of East Anglia. [More]
Breast density laws could pose risk of unnecessary procedures for women with breast cancer

Breast density laws could pose risk of unnecessary procedures for women with breast cancer

Women with dense breast tissue are at increased risk of breast cancer. Dense breast tissue, generally defined as having more fibroglandular than fatty tissue, can make it more difficult for radiologists to detect cancer on screening mammography. [More]
Latino teens who experience discrimination-related stress more likely to experience mental health issues

Latino teens who experience discrimination-related stress more likely to experience mental health issues

Latino adolescents who experience discrimination-related stress are more likely to experience anxiety, depression, and issues with sleep, according to research led by NYU's Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development. These mental health outcomes were more pronounced among Latino teens born in the U.S. to immigrant parents, as opposed to foreign-born teens. [More]
Study findings help improve lung cancer screening guidelines

Study findings help improve lung cancer screening guidelines

A set of guidelines developed to help standardized lung cancer screening would have generated considerably fewer false-positives than the National Lung Screening Trial produced, according to a new retrospective study. [More]
Velano Vascular announces FDA approval of new blood-draw technology

Velano Vascular announces FDA approval of new blood-draw technology

Velano Vascular today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted marketing clearance for a new technology that provides an innovative approach to one of the most common procedures in medicine – the in-hospital blood draw. [More]
New study shows that chronic narcotic use more prevalent in children with IBD

New study shows that chronic narcotic use more prevalent in children with IBD

Chronic narcotic use is more than twice as prevalent in children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), compared with children without this disease, according to a new study1 published in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the official journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]
Smart watch that remotely monitors real-time health status of older adults

Smart watch that remotely monitors real-time health status of older adults

The trend of wearable devices (smart accessories) like bracelets, sunglasses and watches, is rarely focused on the elderly population. However, Mexican Francisco Lopez-Lira Fennel, who lives in Spain, wants these devices to be used by older adults benefiting them with the first smart watch that remotely monitors real-time health status. [More]
Scientists show pattern of connectivity in newly-generated hippocampal neurons

Scientists show pattern of connectivity in newly-generated hippocampal neurons

Research by a team of scientists from Cologne, Munich and Mainz has shown an unprecedented degree of connectivity reorganization in newly-generated hippocampal neurons in response to experience, suggesting their direct contribution to the processing of complex information in the adult brain. [More]
Extremely low birth weight babies at increased risk for psychiatric disorders

Extremely low birth weight babies at increased risk for psychiatric disorders

The good news is that people born as extremely low birth weight babies are less likely than others to have alcohol or substance use disorders as adults. The less encouraging news is that they may have a higher risk of other types of psychiatric problems. [More]
New study sheds light on anorexia nervosa

New study sheds light on anorexia nervosa

A study led by Howard Steiger, PhD, head of the Douglas Mental Health University Institute Eating Disorders Program, in Montreal, in collaboration with Linda Booij, a researcher with Sainte-Justine Hospital and an assistant professor at Queen's University, is the first to observe effects suggesting that the longer one suffers from active anorexia nervosa (AN), the more likely they are to show disorder-relevant alterations in DNA methylation. [More]