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Autism (sometimes called “classical autism”) is the most common condition in a group of developmental disorders known as the autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Autism is characterized by impaired social interaction, problems with verbal and nonverbal communication, and unusual, repetitive, or severely limited activities and interests. Other ASDs include Asperger syndrome, Rett syndrome, childhood disintegrative disorder, and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (usually referred to as PDD-NOS). Experts estimate that three to six children out of every 1,000 will have autism. Males are four times more likely to have autism than females.
Study could pave way for more targeted treatments for individuals with brain disorders

Study could pave way for more targeted treatments for individuals with brain disorders

Like Duke Ellington's 1931 jazz standard, the human brain improvises while its rhythm section keeps up a steady beat. But when it comes to taking on intellectually challenging tasks, groups of neurons tune in to one another for a fraction of a second and harmonize, then go back to improvising, according to new research led by UC Berkeley. [More]
UC Davis health economists predict total costs of caring for individuals with ASD in the U.S.

UC Davis health economists predict total costs of caring for individuals with ASD in the U.S.

UC Davis health economists have for the first time projected the total costs of caring for all people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in the U.S. for the current calendar year and in 10 years if effective interventions and preventive treatments for the condition are not identified and widely available. [More]
Study suggests potential way to predict autism or psychosis risk in children with genetic abnormality

Study suggests potential way to predict autism or psychosis risk in children with genetic abnormality

Doctors and researchers have long known that children who are missing about 60 genes on a certain chromosome are at a significantly elevated risk for developing either a disorder on the autism spectrum or psychosis — that is, any mental disorder characterized by delusions and hallucinations, including schizophrenia. But there has been no way to predict which child with the abnormality might be at risk for which disorder. [More]
Houston Abilities Expo to take place on July 31-August 2 at NRG Center

Houston Abilities Expo to take place on July 31-August 2 at NRG Center

Thousands of people with disabilities, their families, caregivers, seniors, wounded veterans and healthcare professionals are expected to attend Abilities Expo on July 31-August 2, 2015 at NRG Center (formerly Reliant Center), Hall E. Admission is free and show hours will be Friday 11 am to 5 pm, Saturday 11 am to 5 pm and Sunday 11 am to 4 pm. [More]

Adults born very premature display socially withdrawn personality

New research indicates that adults born very premature are more likely to be socially withdrawn and display signs of autism. [More]
New guidelines for nutrition of management GI symptoms in children with autism

New guidelines for nutrition of management GI symptoms in children with autism

A new guideline for the nutrition of management gastrointestinal symptoms in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) provides a framework for clinicians to navigate frequently seen issues such as food selectivity, alternative diets and nutritional deficits. The expert panel was convened at Marcus Autism Center, an affiliate of Children's Healthcare of Atlanta and the resulting guideline was published online by the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. [More]
Deep Genomics set to bring the power of deep learning technologies to genomics

Deep Genomics set to bring the power of deep learning technologies to genomics

Evolution has altered the human genome over hundreds of thousands of years -- and now humans can do it in a matter of months. [More]
More vocational employment services needed for young people with autism, indicates new research

More vocational employment services needed for young people with autism, indicates new research

As autism becomes more prevalent, the need grows for services that help young people with the disorder to find and keep jobs, indicates new research led by Michigan State University education scholars. [More]
Multi-year project aims to develop, improve clinical research tools for studying ASD

Multi-year project aims to develop, improve clinical research tools for studying ASD

Government, non-profit, and other private partners will fund a multi-year project to develop and improve clinical research tools for studying autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The project will receive a total of $28 million over the next four years to test and refine clinical measures of social impairment in ASD in order to better evaluate potential behavioral and drug therapies. [More]
Yale researchers lead NIH-funded study of preschool and school-aged children with ASD

Yale researchers lead NIH-funded study of preschool and school-aged children with ASD

Yale School of Medicine researchers will lead a national multi-center study of preschool and school-aged children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) to identify non-invasive biological markers (biomarkers) that could help physicians diagnose, track, and assess treatments in autism patients. [More]
Duke study finds that gut worms can protect babies' brains from chronic inflammation

Duke study finds that gut worms can protect babies' brains from chronic inflammation

A Duke University study in rats finds that gut worms can protect babies' brains from long-term learning and memory problems caused by newborn infections. [More]
Study finds mechanism that identifies cause of intellectual disabilities in autism, Rett syndrome

Study finds mechanism that identifies cause of intellectual disabilities in autism, Rett syndrome

The term intellectual disability covers a large number of clinical entities, some with known cause and others of uncertain origin. For example Down syndrome is due to an extra copy of chromosome 21 and Rett syndrome is in part caused by a mutation in the control switch gene called MeCP2. [More]
Mothers with chemical intolerances more likely to have children with ASD or ADHD

Mothers with chemical intolerances more likely to have children with ASD or ADHD

A new study from The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio found that mothers with chemical intolerances are two to three times more likely than other women to have a child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). [More]
UChicago, Argonne National Laboratory and USF to jointly study gut microbiomes of premature infants

UChicago, Argonne National Laboratory and USF to jointly study gut microbiomes of premature infants

Scientists have suspected that this initial disruption is linked to health problems down the road—things like autism, asthma, food allergies and autoimmune diseases—but so far they only have circumstantial evidence based on case studies. [More]
Cognitive training can help reduce civilian shooting casualties

Cognitive training can help reduce civilian shooting casualties

Although firing a gun seems like one action, it is made up of many smaller decisions and movements that require coordination between multiple brain areas. The sudden decision to not shoot, called 'response inhibition,' is critical when someone innocent comes into the line of fire. That is what soldiers in war experience when they're about to pull the trigger and then realize that their target is a civilian or an ally. Or when a law enforcement officer realizes that a person they thought was armed and dangerous is actually an innocent bystander. [More]
Neuroscientists interpret code the brain uses to make noisy neuronal circuits

Neuroscientists interpret code the brain uses to make noisy neuronal circuits

By analyzing the signals of individual neurons in animals undergoing behavioral tests, neuroscientists at Rice University, Baylor College of Medicine, the University of Geneva and the University of Rochester have deciphered the code the brain uses to make the most of its inherently "noisy" neuronal circuits. [More]
Scientists discover protein that plays significant role in development of fragile X syndrome

Scientists discover protein that plays significant role in development of fragile X syndrome

Scientists at VIB and KU Leuven have discovered that the protein APP plays a significant role in the development of fragile X syndrome (FXS) at young stages. They identified an unexpected biological pathway as a promising target to ameliorate deficits associated with FXS and autism. The results have recently been published in Neuron, one of the most influential journals in the field of neuroscience. [More]
New imaging technique could help with early detection of Alzheimer's disease

New imaging technique could help with early detection of Alzheimer's disease

Various types of information can be ascertained by the way blood flows through the brain. When a region of the brain has been activated, blood flow increases and oxygenation rises. By observing variations in blood flow with the help of non-invasive imaging, it is possible to determine which regions are at work at a given point in time and how they work together. [More]
TSRI scientists reveal how mutations in specific autism risk gene alter pattern of early brain development

TSRI scientists reveal how mutations in specific autism risk gene alter pattern of early brain development

As early as 1943, when autism was first described by psychiatrist Leo Kanner, reports were made that some, but not all, children with autism spectrum disorder have relatively enlarged heads. But even today, more than half a century later, the exact cause of this early abnormal growth of the head and brain has remained unclear. [More]
New article examines nutritional needs of individuals with autism spectrum disorder

New article examines nutritional needs of individuals with autism spectrum disorder

About 1 in 88 children has an autism spectrum disorder. This represents a 78% increase in the incidence of autism spectrum disorder since 2002 (although some of the increase may be due to improved diagnostic capabilities). Individuals with an autism spectrum disorder may have poor nutrition because they often exhibit selective eating patterns as well as sensory sensitivity that predispose them to restrict their diets. [More]
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