Crohn's Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Crohn's Disease News and Research

Crohn’s disease is a chronic inflammatory disease of the bowel affecting at least 115,000 people in the UK. The condition usually develops in teenagers and young adults, but can be diagnosed at any age and is equally common in men and women.

The condition can affect any part of the digestive tract between the mouth and the anus, although inflammation in the last section of the small bowel (ileum) or the first part of the large bowel (colon) is most common.

Crohn's disease is a ‘relapsing and remitting’ condition characterized by symptom-free periods followed by episodes of “flare-ups,” during which symptoms such as diarrhoea, abdominal pain, fever and fatigue may become particularly bothersome.

Long term, severe inflammation can damage sections of the digestive system, resulting in additional complications, such as a tear in the wall of the anus (fissure), narrowing of the intestine (stricture) or the formation of an abnormal connection between the bowel and another body part such as the bladder, vagina or skin (fistula). Such problems usually require surgical treatment to correct. Crohn's disease also increases the risk of developing bowel cancer.

The exact cause of Crohn's disease is not clear but experts believe a combination of factors may be at work including genetics, immune responses to certain bacteria or viruses and lifestyle factors such as diet or smoking status.
NEJM publishes results of Cosentyx Phase III studies in ankylosing spondylitis

NEJM publishes results of Cosentyx Phase III studies in ankylosing spondylitis

Novartis announced today that the results of the MEASURE 1 and MEASURE 2 Phase III studies for Cosentyx® (secukinumab) in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) were published in The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM). These pivotal studies demonstrated significant clinical improvements with Cosentyx versus placebo in reducing the signs and symptoms of active AS – a long-term, painful and debilitating inflammation of the spine. [More]
Stem cell therapy not significantly better than conventional treatment for Crohn's disease

Stem cell therapy not significantly better than conventional treatment for Crohn's disease

A clinical trial to test the effectiveness of a stem cell therapy among adults with difficult to treat Crohn's disease has found it is not significantly better than conventional treatment in producing sustained disease remission after one year. [More]
Acupuncture may be safe, effective treatment for chronic pain in pediatric patients

Acupuncture may be safe, effective treatment for chronic pain in pediatric patients

It is upsetting to see anyone in pain, but it's especially heartbreaking to watch a child endure chronic pain. In addition to the suffering itself, chronic pain can cause traumatic effects on a child's quality of life, and it can have significant physical, psychological and social consequences. Making matters worse, chronic pain greatly can affect the child's parents or caregivers by causing feelings of helplessness and inadequacy. [More]
Soligenix reports positive results from SGX942 Phase 2 trial in patients with head and neck cancer

Soligenix reports positive results from SGX942 Phase 2 trial in patients with head and neck cancer

Soligenix, Inc., a late-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on developing and commercializing products to treat rare diseases where there is an unmet medical need, announced today positive results in its Phase 2 clinical trial, in which SGX942, a first-in-class Innate Defense Regulator (IDR), at a dose of 1.5 mg/kg, successfully reduced the median duration of severe oral mucositis by 50% in all patients and by 67% in patients receiving the most aggressive chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for treatment of their head and neck cancer. [More]
Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation does not provide improvement for patients with Crohn disease

Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation does not provide improvement for patients with Crohn disease

Among adults with difficult to treat Crohn disease not amenable to surgery, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, compared with conventional therapy, did not result in significant improvement in sustained disease remission at l year and was associated with significant toxicity, according to a study in the December 15 issue of JAMA. [More]
Human-gut-on-a-chip model offers hope for patients suffering from IBD

Human-gut-on-a-chip model offers hope for patients suffering from IBD

It's estimated that as many as 1,000,000 Americans suffer from inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, which cause mild to severe symptoms that at best can be managed and at worst can lead to life-threatening complications. [More]
Lupuzor may become first non-immunosuppressant therapy for lupus

Lupuzor may become first non-immunosuppressant therapy for lupus

Lupuzor may become the first specific and non-immunosuppressant therapy for lupus, a disabling autoimmune disease that is currently incurable. [More]
IBD Plexus brings patients, researchers and doctors together to create IBD research initiative

IBD Plexus brings patients, researchers and doctors together to create IBD research initiative

For the first time, more than 40,000 IBD patients, researchers, and healthcare providers will be brought together by IBD Plexus to create the world's largest registry of IBD patients of all ages which will transform how IBD research is being conducted. [More]
New way to antagonize human nuclear receptor

New way to antagonize human nuclear receptor

On Monday 7 December the journal Nature Communications published the research findings of Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e), Merck Research Laboratories (Merck is known as MSD outside the US and Canada) and Leiden University concerning an entirely new way of antagonizing a human nuclear receptor. [More]
Genetic information of patients with IBD could provide road map for more effective treatments

Genetic information of patients with IBD could provide road map for more effective treatments

Genetic variation in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) appears to play a major role in determining how sick they will become and could provide a road map for more effective treatments. [More]
High-fat diet appears to prompt immune cells to start consuming connections between neurons

High-fat diet appears to prompt immune cells to start consuming connections between neurons

When a high-fat diet causes us to become obese, it also appears to prompt normally bustling immune cells in our brain to become sedentary and start consuming the connections between our neurons, scientists say. [More]
Research findings may lead to potential therapeutic target for treating inflammatory bowel diseases

Research findings may lead to potential therapeutic target for treating inflammatory bowel diseases

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have shown that a pathogen-sensing molecule plays a vital role in keeping gastrointestinal (GI) systems healthy. [More]
First patient enrolled in Phase 2 clinical trial of Immune's bertilimumab in Ulcerative Colitis

First patient enrolled in Phase 2 clinical trial of Immune's bertilimumab in Ulcerative Colitis

Immune Pharmaceuticals Inc. announced today that the first patient has been enrolled into the Phase 2 clinical trial evaluating the safety and efficacy of its first in class fully human monoclonal antibody, bertilimumab in Ulcerative Colitis (UC). [More]
Some gut microbes may hold the key to regulating good health, say Oregon scientists

Some gut microbes may hold the key to regulating good health, say Oregon scientists

University of Oregon scientists have found that strength in numbers doesn't hold true for microbes in the intestines. A minority population of the right type might hold the key to regulating good health. [More]
Saint Louis University ophthalmologist offers tips to manage night vision issues

Saint Louis University ophthalmologist offers tips to manage night vision issues

Owls and cats are at an advantage as the days get darker, but humans may notice their vision takes a hit during their evening commute home as daylight hours shrink. [More]
Takeda highlights safety, efficacy of vedolizumab for UC and CD at ACG Annual Scientific Meeting

Takeda highlights safety, efficacy of vedolizumab for UC and CD at ACG Annual Scientific Meeting

Takeda Pharmaceuticals, U.S.A., Inc., today announced that data highlighting the efficacy and safety of vedolizumab for the treatment of adults with moderately to severely active ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), will be presented during the 2015 American College of Gastroenterology Annual Scientific Meeting in Honolulu, Hawaii, held on October 16-21. [More]
Different Crohn's disease treatments affect children's gut microbes in distinct ways

Different Crohn's disease treatments affect children's gut microbes in distinct ways

Different treatments for Crohn's disease in children affects their gut mi-crobes in distinct ways, which has implications for future development of microbial-targeted therapies for these patients, according to a study led by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Scientists calculate precise measurements of heritability in nine pediatric-onset autoimmune diseases

Scientists calculate precise measurements of heritability in nine pediatric-onset autoimmune diseases

Scientists have calculated more precise measurements of heritability--the influence of underlying genes--in nine autoimmune diseases that begin in childhood. The research may strengthen researchers' abilities to better predict a child's risk for associated autoimmune diseases. [More]
Phase II psoriasis study shows efficacy of Boehringer Ingelheim's BI 655066 over ustekinumab

Phase II psoriasis study shows efficacy of Boehringer Ingelheim's BI 655066 over ustekinumab

New results from a Phase II head-to-head psoriasis study showed superior efficacy of Boehringer Ingelheim's investigational biologic compound BI 655066, over ustekinumab. After nine months, 69 percent of patients with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis maintained clear or almost clear skin (PASI 90) with BI 655066 in the higher dose group compared to 30 percent of patients on ustekinumab. [More]
Immune submits Bertilimumab IND application to FDA for treatment of Bullous Pemphigoid

Immune submits Bertilimumab IND application to FDA for treatment of Bullous Pemphigoid

Immune Pharmaceuticals, Inc. announced today that it has submitted an Investigational New Drug Application in the U.S. to expand recruiting for its first in class lead product candidate, Bertilimumab, for the treatment of Bullous Pemphigoid (BP). [More]
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