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Crohn’s disease is a chronic inflammatory disease of the bowel affecting at least 115,000 people in the UK. The condition usually develops in teenagers and young adults, but can be diagnosed at any age and is equally common in men and women.

The condition can affect any part of the digestive tract between the mouth and the anus, although inflammation in the last section of the small bowel (ileum) or the first part of the large bowel (colon) is most common.

Crohn's disease is a ‘relapsing and remitting’ condition characterized by symptom-free periods followed by episodes of “flare-ups,” during which symptoms such as diarrhoea, abdominal pain, fever and fatigue may become particularly bothersome.

Long term, severe inflammation can damage sections of the digestive system, resulting in additional complications, such as a tear in the wall of the anus (fissure), narrowing of the intestine (stricture) or the formation of an abnormal connection between the bowel and another body part such as the bladder, vagina or skin (fistula). Such problems usually require surgical treatment to correct. Crohn's disease also increases the risk of developing bowel cancer.

The exact cause of Crohn's disease is not clear but experts believe a combination of factors may be at work including genetics, immune responses to certain bacteria or viruses and lifestyle factors such as diet or smoking status.
Natalizumab drug helps scientists confirm how 'viral reservoirs' form in HIV patients

Natalizumab drug helps scientists confirm how 'viral reservoirs' form in HIV patients

A drug used to treat patients with Crohn's disease and multiple sclerosis has helped scientists confirm how "viral reservoirs" form in patients living with HIV and also proven effective in animal trials at blocking the pathways to those reservoirs in the brain and gut, a team of researchers reported recently in the journal PLOS Pathogens. [More]
Gut microbial metabolite of linoleic acid has suppressive effect on intestinal inflammation

Gut microbial metabolite of linoleic acid has suppressive effect on intestinal inflammation

Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), including Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis, are hard to completely cure. Globally, IBDs affect more than 4 million people, today. However, Professor Soichi Tanabe (Graduate School of Biosphere Science, Hiroshima University) and his collaborators have demonstrated that 10-hydroxy-cis-12-octadecenoic acid (HYA), a gut microbial metabolite of linoleic acid, has a suppressive effect on intestinal inflammation. [More]
TNF signaling molecule triggers Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis

TNF signaling molecule triggers Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis

Cells lining the intestinal tract form a critical barrier, protecting our bodies from the billions of bacteria living in the gut. Breaches in this barrier are driven largely by a single signaling molecule called tumor necrosis factor (TNF), elevated amounts of which are associated with inflammatory bowel diseases like Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. [More]
Bacteria's DNA can pass trait to offspring in a way similar to parents' own DNA

Bacteria's DNA can pass trait to offspring in a way similar to parents' own DNA

It's a firmly established fact straight from Biology 101: Traits such as eye color and height are passed from one generation to the next through the parents' DNA. [More]
Hospira announces launch of first biosimilar monoclonal antibody in Europe

Hospira announces launch of first biosimilar monoclonal antibody in Europe

Hospira, Inc., a world leader in the development of biosimilar therapies, today announced the launch of the first biosimilar monoclonal antibody (mAb), Inflectra (infliximab), in major European markets. [More]
New study shows that chronic narcotic use more prevalent in children with IBD

New study shows that chronic narcotic use more prevalent in children with IBD

Chronic narcotic use is more than twice as prevalent in children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), compared with children without this disease, according to a new study1 published in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the official journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]
Ohio State allergy specialists study, learn more about eosinophilic esophagitis

Ohio State allergy specialists study, learn more about eosinophilic esophagitis

Its name is daunting. It's the hottest topic among allergy experts. It's showing up more and doctors don't yet know why. Allergy specialists at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center are seeing more people with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), an inflammatory response in the esophagus that makes it hard to swallow food. [More]
Amgen's biosimilar Phase 3 rheumatoid arthritis study meets primary and secondary endpoints

Amgen's biosimilar Phase 3 rheumatoid arthritis study meets primary and secondary endpoints

Amgen today announced a Phase 3 study evaluating the efficacy and safety of biosimilar candidate ABP 501 compared with Humira® (adalimumab) in patients with moderate-to-severe rheumatoid arthritis met its primary and key secondary endpoints. [More]
Some genetic features associated with modern diseases are ancient

Some genetic features associated with modern diseases are ancient

Psoriasis, a chronic skin condition, can cause rashes that itch and sting. So why would a genetic susceptibility to this and other ailments persist for hundreds of thousands of years, afflicting our ancient ancestors, and us? [More]
New study links inflammatory bowel diseases to increase in diversity of viruses

New study links inflammatory bowel diseases to increase in diversity of viruses

Inflammatory bowel diseases are associated with a decrease in the diversity of bacteria in the gut, but a new study led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has linked the same illnesses to an increase in the diversity of viruses. [More]
Findings may lead to novel therapeutic approaches to prevent fibrosis in Crohn's disease patients

Findings may lead to novel therapeutic approaches to prevent fibrosis in Crohn's disease patients

A natural protein made by immune cells may limit fibrosis and scarring in colitis, according to research published in the inaugural issue of Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the new basic science journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]
British scientists take major initiative to tackle Crohn's disease

British scientists take major initiative to tackle Crohn's disease

British scientists are playing a key role in a global quest to find the causes of an incurable bowel condition. [More]
LJI researcher awarded $1.6 million grant to study factors that trigger onset of type 1 diabetes

LJI researcher awarded $1.6 million grant to study factors that trigger onset of type 1 diabetes

The American Diabetes Association has awarded La Jolla Institute researcher Stephanie Stanford, Ph.D., a $1.6 million grant to investigate the genetic and environmental factors that trigger the onset of type 1 diabetes. [More]
Findings could accelerate development of prebiotic medicines for bowel problems, autoimmune diseases

Findings could accelerate development of prebiotic medicines for bowel problems, autoimmune diseases

Bacteria that have evolved to eat their way through yeast in the human gut could inform the development of new treatments for people suffering from bowel diseases. [More]
Soligenix's SGX301 receives FDA 'Fast Track' designation for CTCL treatment

Soligenix's SGX301 receives FDA 'Fast Track' designation for CTCL treatment

Soligenix, Inc., a late-stage biopharmaceutical company developing products that address unmet medical needs in the areas of inflammation, oncology and biodefense, announced today that its SGX301 (synthetic hypericin) development program for the first-line treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) has received "Fast Track" designation from the US Food and Drug Administration. [More]
TxCell announces further enhancement to development of Ovasave for IBD treatment

TxCell announces further enhancement to development of Ovasave for IBD treatment

Paulsen Foundation to provide specialist management and scientific and development expertise that is dedicated to advanced therapies, i.e. cellular and gene therapies. This new class of highly promising biological therapies includes TxCell’s Ovasave. [More]
Soligenix closes previously announced registered public offering

Soligenix closes previously announced registered public offering

Soligenix, Inc., a late-stage biopharmaceutical company developing products that address unmet medical needs in the areas of inflammation, oncology and biodefense, announced today that on December 24, 2014 it closed its previously announced registered public offering. [More]
Oral budesonide suspension offers hope for pediatric patients with EoE

Oral budesonide suspension offers hope for pediatric patients with EoE

A new formulation of oral budesonide suspension, a steroid-based treatment, is safe and effective in treating pediatric patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), according to a new study in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the official clinical practice journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]
New study shows that people may inherit intestinal bacteria that cause inflammatory bowel disease

New study shows that people may inherit intestinal bacteria that cause inflammatory bowel disease

A new study by an international team of researchers shows for the first time that people may inherit some of the intestinal bacteria that cause Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, collectively know as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The study, recently published in Genome Medicine, also confirmed that antibiotics could worsen the imbalance in the gut microbes. [More]
Alere starts voluntary correction about use of Alere INRatio and INRatio 2 PT/INR Monitor system

Alere starts voluntary correction about use of Alere INRatio and INRatio 2 PT/INR Monitor system

Alere Inc. has initiated a voluntary correction to inform U.S. users of the Alere INRatio and INRatio 2 PT/INR Monitor system of certain medical conditions that should not be tested with the system (INRatio Monitor or INRatio 2 Monitor and INRatio Test Strips). [More]
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