Crohn's Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Crohn's Disease News and Research

Crohn’s disease is a chronic inflammatory disease of the bowel affecting at least 115,000 people in the UK. The condition usually develops in teenagers and young adults, but can be diagnosed at any age and is equally common in men and women.

The condition can affect any part of the digestive tract between the mouth and the anus, although inflammation in the last section of the small bowel (ileum) or the first part of the large bowel (colon) is most common.

Crohn's disease is a ‘relapsing and remitting’ condition characterized by symptom-free periods followed by episodes of “flare-ups,” during which symptoms such as diarrhoea, abdominal pain, fever and fatigue may become particularly bothersome.

Long term, severe inflammation can damage sections of the digestive system, resulting in additional complications, such as a tear in the wall of the anus (fissure), narrowing of the intestine (stricture) or the formation of an abnormal connection between the bowel and another body part such as the bladder, vagina or skin (fistula). Such problems usually require surgical treatment to correct. Crohn's disease also increases the risk of developing bowel cancer.

The exact cause of Crohn's disease is not clear but experts believe a combination of factors may be at work including genetics, immune responses to certain bacteria or viruses and lifestyle factors such as diet or smoking status.
The Medical Minute highlights risk and symptoms of IBD in children

The Medical Minute highlights risk and symptoms of IBD in children

Occasional stomach aches are part of life. But when they continue for more than a few weeks, come back often or are accompanied by bloody stools and additional symptoms, the cause could be inflammatory bowel disease, or IBD. [More]
Young immigrants to Canada at greater risk of developing IBD

Young immigrants to Canada at greater risk of developing IBD

The younger a person is when they immigrate to Canada, the higher their risk of developing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and its major subtypes Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, according to a study by researchers at the University of Ottawa, the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences and the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario. [More]
Key questions about colorectal cancer answered

Key questions about colorectal cancer answered

Colorectal cancer is the fourth most common cancer in the U.S., with more than 136,000 new patients diagnosed last year. But thanks to increased awareness about screenings, the death rate from colorectal cancer has been dropping for more than 20 years. [More]
Celimmune licenses anti-IL-15 monoclonal antibody from Amgen

Celimmune licenses anti-IL-15 monoclonal antibody from Amgen

Celimmune LLC, a clinical development-stage immunotherapy company focused on treating and preventing autoimmune diseases, announced today that it has licensed a Phase 2-stage, anti-IL-15 monoclonal antibody (AMG 714) from Amgen. [More]
Study finds racial disparities among children with Crohn's disease

Study finds racial disparities among children with Crohn's disease

A study published recently in the IBD Journal found significant differences in hospital readmissions, medication usage, and both medical and surgical complications of children with Crohn's disease related to race. In the study, black children had a 1.5 times higher frequency of hospital readmissions because of Crohn's disease compared to white children. [More]
Emulsifiers can alter gut microbiota composition to induce intestinal inflammation

Emulsifiers can alter gut microbiota composition to induce intestinal inflammation

Emulsifiers, which are added to most processed foods to aid texture and extend shelf life, can alter the gut microbiota composition and localization to induce intestinal inflammation that promotes the development of inflammatory bowel disease and metabolic syndrome, new research shows. [More]
Scientists find new links between inflammation and tissue regeneration

Scientists find new links between inflammation and tissue regeneration

Almost all injuries, even minor skin scratches, trigger an inflammatory response, which provides protection against invading microbes but also turns on regenerative signals needed for healing and injury repair - a process that is generally understood but remains mysterious in its particulars. [More]
Shire announces acquisition of Meritage Pharma

Shire announces acquisition of Meritage Pharma

Shire plc and Meritage Pharma, Inc. announced today that Shire has acquired Meritage, a privately-held company, for an upfront fee of $70 million and additional contingent payments based on the achievement of development and regulatory milestones. [More]
InflectraTM (infliximab) patient registry reports interim results in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease

InflectraTM (infliximab) patient registry reports interim results in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease

Data have been presented today on the use of Hospira’s Inflectra (infliximab), the world’s first approved biosimilar monoclonal antibody (mAb), at the European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (ECCO-ibd) conference. [More]
Natalizumab drug helps scientists confirm how 'viral reservoirs' form in HIV patients

Natalizumab drug helps scientists confirm how 'viral reservoirs' form in HIV patients

A drug used to treat patients with Crohn's disease and multiple sclerosis has helped scientists confirm how "viral reservoirs" form in patients living with HIV and also proven effective in animal trials at blocking the pathways to those reservoirs in the brain and gut, a team of researchers reported recently in the journal PLOS Pathogens. [More]
Gut microbial metabolite of linoleic acid has suppressive effect on intestinal inflammation

Gut microbial metabolite of linoleic acid has suppressive effect on intestinal inflammation

Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), including Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis, are hard to completely cure. Globally, IBDs affect more than 4 million people, today. However, Professor Soichi Tanabe (Graduate School of Biosphere Science, Hiroshima University) and his collaborators have demonstrated that 10-hydroxy-cis-12-octadecenoic acid (HYA), a gut microbial metabolite of linoleic acid, has a suppressive effect on intestinal inflammation. [More]
TNF signaling molecule triggers Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis

TNF signaling molecule triggers Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis

Cells lining the intestinal tract form a critical barrier, protecting our bodies from the billions of bacteria living in the gut. Breaches in this barrier are driven largely by a single signaling molecule called tumor necrosis factor (TNF), elevated amounts of which are associated with inflammatory bowel diseases like Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. [More]
Bacteria's DNA can pass trait to offspring in a way similar to parents' own DNA

Bacteria's DNA can pass trait to offspring in a way similar to parents' own DNA

It's a firmly established fact straight from Biology 101: Traits such as eye color and height are passed from one generation to the next through the parents' DNA. [More]
Hospira announces launch of first biosimilar monoclonal antibody in Europe

Hospira announces launch of first biosimilar monoclonal antibody in Europe

Hospira, Inc., a world leader in the development of biosimilar therapies, today announced the launch of the first biosimilar monoclonal antibody (mAb), Inflectra (infliximab), in major European markets. [More]
New study shows that chronic narcotic use more prevalent in children with IBD

New study shows that chronic narcotic use more prevalent in children with IBD

Chronic narcotic use is more than twice as prevalent in children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), compared with children without this disease, according to a new study1 published in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the official journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]
Ohio State allergy specialists study, learn more about eosinophilic esophagitis

Ohio State allergy specialists study, learn more about eosinophilic esophagitis

Its name is daunting. It's the hottest topic among allergy experts. It's showing up more and doctors don't yet know why. Allergy specialists at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center are seeing more people with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), an inflammatory response in the esophagus that makes it hard to swallow food. [More]
Amgen's biosimilar Phase 3 rheumatoid arthritis study meets primary and secondary endpoints

Amgen's biosimilar Phase 3 rheumatoid arthritis study meets primary and secondary endpoints

Amgen today announced a Phase 3 study evaluating the efficacy and safety of biosimilar candidate ABP 501 compared with Humira® (adalimumab) in patients with moderate-to-severe rheumatoid arthritis met its primary and key secondary endpoints. [More]
Some genetic features associated with modern diseases are ancient

Some genetic features associated with modern diseases are ancient

Psoriasis, a chronic skin condition, can cause rashes that itch and sting. So why would a genetic susceptibility to this and other ailments persist for hundreds of thousands of years, afflicting our ancient ancestors, and us? [More]
New study links inflammatory bowel diseases to increase in diversity of viruses

New study links inflammatory bowel diseases to increase in diversity of viruses

Inflammatory bowel diseases are associated with a decrease in the diversity of bacteria in the gut, but a new study led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has linked the same illnesses to an increase in the diversity of viruses. [More]
Findings may lead to novel therapeutic approaches to prevent fibrosis in Crohn's disease patients

Findings may lead to novel therapeutic approaches to prevent fibrosis in Crohn's disease patients

A natural protein made by immune cells may limit fibrosis and scarring in colitis, according to research published in the inaugural issue of Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the new basic science journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]
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