Crohn's Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Crohn's Disease News and Research

Crohn’s disease is a chronic inflammatory disease of the bowel affecting at least 115,000 people in the UK. The condition usually develops in teenagers and young adults, but can be diagnosed at any age and is equally common in men and women.

The condition can affect any part of the digestive tract between the mouth and the anus, although inflammation in the last section of the small bowel (ileum) or the first part of the large bowel (colon) is most common.

Crohn's disease is a ‘relapsing and remitting’ condition characterized by symptom-free periods followed by episodes of “flare-ups,” during which symptoms such as diarrhoea, abdominal pain, fever and fatigue may become particularly bothersome.

Long term, severe inflammation can damage sections of the digestive system, resulting in additional complications, such as a tear in the wall of the anus (fissure), narrowing of the intestine (stricture) or the formation of an abnormal connection between the bowel and another body part such as the bladder, vagina or skin (fistula). Such problems usually require surgical treatment to correct. Crohn's disease also increases the risk of developing bowel cancer.

The exact cause of Crohn's disease is not clear but experts believe a combination of factors may be at work including genetics, immune responses to certain bacteria or viruses and lifestyle factors such as diet or smoking status.
Scientists detect biological markers of chronic fatigue syndrome in gut bacteria

Scientists detect biological markers of chronic fatigue syndrome in gut bacteria

Physicians have been mystified by chronic fatigue syndrome, a condition where normal exertion leads to debilitating fatigue that isn't alleviated by rest. There are no known triggers, and diagnosis requires lengthy tests administered by an expert. [More]

Regenerative medicine shows promise for bronchopleural fistulas

When current treatment isn't enough, patients at Mayo Clinic often are among the first to benefit from innovative therapies, new techniques and technologies. For the first time in human application, Mayo Clinic researchers successfully closed an open wound on the upper chest caused by postoperative complications of lung removal. [More]
New studies provide future treatment strategies for stomach ulcers, IBD and alcoholic liver disease

New studies provide future treatment strategies for stomach ulcers, IBD and alcoholic liver disease

Basic and translational research paves the way for breakthroughs that can ultimately change patient care. [More]
Antiinflammatory drug HUMIRA enhances specific TNF function in rheumatoid arthritis patients

Antiinflammatory drug HUMIRA enhances specific TNF function in rheumatoid arthritis patients

Researchers from University College London have discovered that the widely used antiinflammatory drug HUMIRA doesn't just work by inhibiting its target protein, TNF, but by enhancing a particular function of TNF in rheumatoid arthritis patients. [More]
Scientists discover master dimmer switches that control activity of immune cells

Scientists discover master dimmer switches that control activity of immune cells

A person's genetic makeup plays a role in autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis that develop when the body is attacked by its own immune system. But little is known about how immune cells are pushed into overdrive. [More]
Changes in intestinal microbiota linked to primary sclerosing cholangitis

Changes in intestinal microbiota linked to primary sclerosing cholangitis

Primary sclerosing cholangitis, also known as PSC, is a liver disease with no effective medical treatment. Liver transplantation is the only proven long-term treatment of PSC, although only a fraction of individuals with PSC will ultimately require it. [More]
JBCPP journal publishes new evidence for clinical efficacy of cannabis therapy

JBCPP journal publishes new evidence for clinical efficacy of cannabis therapy

New evidence for the clinical efficacy of cannabis therapy is presented in the latest issue of the Journal of Basic and Clinical Physiology and Pharmacology, a De Gruyter publication. [More]
Scientists take key step towards understanding link between obesity and physically distant diseases

Scientists take key step towards understanding link between obesity and physically distant diseases

Obesity is on the rise throughout the world, and in some developed countries two-third of the adult population is either overweight or obese. This brings with it an increased risk of serious conditions such as heart disease, stroke, cancer and osteoarthritis. [More]
Penn State researchers link mutation in common virus to fatal brain disease

Penn State researchers link mutation in common virus to fatal brain disease

Why people on immunosuppressant drugs for autoimmune conditions have a higher incidence of an often-fatal brain disease may be linked to a mutation in a common virus, according to researchers at Penn State College of Medicine. [More]
Maintaining balance of P1 and P2 isoforms vital for reducing colon cancer, colitis risk

Maintaining balance of P1 and P2 isoforms vital for reducing colon cancer, colitis risk

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), of which Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are the main types, is on the increase in the United States, affecting more than 1.6 million people and explaining perhaps the increase in advertisements offering treatments and cures. [More]
Caltech researchers discover new potential cause for Crohn's disease

Caltech researchers discover new potential cause for Crohn's disease

The community of beneficial bacteria that live in our intestines, known as the gut microbiome, are important for the development and function of the immune system. There has been growing evidence that certain probiotics--therapies that introduce beneficial bacteria into the gut--may help alleviate some of the symptoms of intestinal disorders such as Crohn's disease. [More]
Genetic variations that prevent beneficial gut bacteria from working may lead to Crohn's disease

Genetic variations that prevent beneficial gut bacteria from working may lead to Crohn's disease

A major type of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may be caused in part by genetic variants that prevent beneficial bacteria in the gut from doing their job, according to a new study published today in the journal Science. [More]
Serum biomarkers can help predict risk of IBD development and complications

Serum biomarkers can help predict risk of IBD development and complications

Years before inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is diagnosed and symptoms exist, biomarkers are already circulating that can help predict risk not only of disease development but also of complications, according to research published online last week, which will also appear in the June 15th print issue of Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics. [More]
Certain sugars in the body play key role in colitis, colon cancer development

Certain sugars in the body play key role in colitis, colon cancer development

An Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation scientist has discovered that certain sugars produced by the body play an important role in the development of colitis and, ultimately, colon cancer. The new finding could potentially lead to therapies for ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease and colon cancer. [More]
Promising specialty medical home approach to patient-centered, cost-effective care for IBD patients

Promising specialty medical home approach to patient-centered, cost-effective care for IBD patients

A specialty medical home--providing expert medical care coordinated with attention to social support and mental health--is a promising new approach to patient-centered, cost-effective care for patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, according to a special "Future Directions" paper in the May issue of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, official journal of the Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
CMGH study offers insight into future interventions for Crohn's disease, chronic pancreatitis

CMGH study offers insight into future interventions for Crohn's disease, chronic pancreatitis

Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology is committed to publishing impactful digestive biology research covering a broad spectrum of themes in GI, hepatology and pancreatology. We wanted to share two new CMGH articles, which both offer important insight into future interventions for chronic conditions. [More]
ATR-FTIR spectroscopy could be effective for detecting ulcerative colitis

ATR-FTIR spectroscopy could be effective for detecting ulcerative colitis

A minimally invasive screening for ulcerative colitis, a debilitating gastrointestinal tract disorder, using emerging infrared technology could be a rapid and cost-effective method for detecting disease that eliminates the need for biopsies and intrusive testing of the human body, according to researchers at Georgia State University. [More]
TNF-alpha protein involved in autoimmune diseases may also promote tissue healing

TNF-alpha protein involved in autoimmune diseases may also promote tissue healing

As its name suggests, inflammatory bowel disease, which afflicts more than 1.6 million Americans, involves chronic inflammation of all or some of the digestive tract. An autoimmune disease known to have a strong genetic component, its symptoms are abdominal cramps, bloody diarrhea, and fever and, sometimes, weight loss. IBD, which is a group of inflammatory conditions, includes Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. [More]
RedHill Biopharma initiates phase II study of BEKINDA for irritable bowel syndrome

RedHill Biopharma initiates phase II study of BEKINDA for irritable bowel syndrome

RedHill Biopharma Ltd. (NASDAQ; RDHL) (TASE: RDHL) (“RedHill” or the “Company”), a biopharmaceutical company primarily focused on development and commercialization of late clinical-stage, proprietary, orally-administered, small molecule drugs for inflammatory and gastrointestinal diseases, including cancer, today announced that it has initiated a randomized, double-blind, 2-arm parallel group Phase II clinical study in the U.S. evaluating the safety and efficacy of BEKINDA™ 12 mg in patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D). [More]
Bacteria uses sensitive, nano-sized pump to transport magnesium

Bacteria uses sensitive, nano-sized pump to transport magnesium

Researchers at UiO and NCMM have discovered that the system used by bacteria to transport magnesium is so sensitive that it can detect a pinch of magnesium salt in a swimming pool. [More]
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