Depression News and Research RSS Feed - Depression News and Research

Depression is a serious medical illness that involves the brain. It's more than just a feeling of being "down in the dumps" or "blue" for a few days. If you are one of the more than 20 million people in the United States who have depression, the feelings do not go away. They persist and interfere with your everyday life.
Research: Spending time online has potential to ward off depression among retirees

Research: Spending time online has potential to ward off depression among retirees

Spending time online has the potential to ward off depression among retirees, particularly among those who live alone, according to research published online in The Journals of Gerontology, Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences. [More]

Viewpoints: Cooking the Census books; immigrants left off health law; abortion still a 'tripwire'

You can't manage what you don't measure, as the great Peter Drucker used to say, and for the White House that seems to be the goal. Out of the blue, the Census Bureau has changed how it counts health insurance-;at the precise moment when ObamaCare is roiling the insurance markets (4/15). [More]
Structural changes in hippocampus region improve memory function in children

Structural changes in hippocampus region improve memory function in children

Our ability to store memories improves during childhood, associated with structural changes in the hippocampus and its connections with prefrontal and parietal cortices. [More]
Apathy signals brain shrinkage in old people

Apathy signals brain shrinkage in old people

Launer's team used brain volume as a measure of accelerated brain aging. Brain volume losses occur during normal aging, but in this study, larger amounts of brain volume loss could indicate brain diseases. [More]

Adolescent girls having romantic relationship play out differently than they imagined

A new study reveals that for adolescent girls, having a romantic relationship play out differently than they imagined it would has negative implications for their mental health. [More]
Study: Feeling stress about finances leads some Black adults to rate health more poorly

Study: Feeling stress about finances leads some Black adults to rate health more poorly

Feeling stress about finances leads some Black adults to rate their health more poorly, finds a new study in the American Journal of Health Behavior. While lower income and education among minorities have been linked to poor health for decades, this study focused just on the connection between financial worries and poor health. [More]
Study sheds light on factors that lead to development of rare condition affecting inner ear

Study sheds light on factors that lead to development of rare condition affecting inner ear

A new study has shed light on the factors likely to lead to the development of a rare condition affecting the inner ear. [More]
Prenatal exposure to SSRIs linked with ASD and developmental delays in boys

Prenatal exposure to SSRIs linked with ASD and developmental delays in boys

In a study of nearly 1,000 mother-child pairs, researchers from the Bloomberg School of Public health found that prenatal exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), a frequently prescribed treatment for depression, anxiety and other disorders, was associated with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and developmental delays (DD) in boys. [More]

Researchers develop translucent panel that redirects sunlight onto alleyways

In dense, urban centers around the world, many people live and work in dim and narrow streets surrounded by tall buildings that block sunlight. And as the global population continues to rise and buildings are jammed closer together, the darkness will only spread. [More]
New drug combination proves effective in treating patients with HCV genotype 1

New drug combination proves effective in treating patients with HCV genotype 1

Treatment options for the 170 million people worldwide with chronic Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) are evolving rapidly, although the available regimens often come with significant side effects. Two multi-center clinical trials led by Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center show promise for a new option that could help lead to both an increase in patients cured with a much more simple and tolerable all oral therapy. [More]

Researchers find link between patient satisfaction and SDM during radiation treatment

Playing an active role in their radiation treatment decisions leaves cancer patients feeling more satisfied with their care, and may even relieve psychological distress around the experience, researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania report in the journal Cancer. [More]
Research may provide insight into identifying, helping children with emotional behavior issues

Research may provide insight into identifying, helping children with emotional behavior issues

Research on children orphaned by HIV/AIDS in South Africa may provide insight on how to identify and help children with emotional behavior issues in other areas of the world, which may have limited access to healthcare and further research that could lead to successful interventions. [More]
New antidepressants open promising perspective for management of treatment-resistant depression

New antidepressants open promising perspective for management of treatment-resistant depression

Notwithstanding numerous advances in the pharmacological treatment of depression, approximately 70% of patients do not remit after first-line antidepressant treatment. [More]

Study: Domestic abuse closely linked to postpartum mental health problems in mothers

A new study shows that domestic abuse is closely linked to postpartum mental health problems, including depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), in mothers. The research also found that specific types of abuse are associated with specific mental health problems. [More]
Study identifies young fathers who are at increased risk of developing depressive symptoms

Study identifies young fathers who are at increased risk of developing depressive symptoms

​Depression can hit young fathers hard -- with symptoms increasing dramatically during some of the most important years of their children's lives, a new Northwestern Medicine- study has found. [More]
Irrational health beliefs associated with lower adherence to prescribed cardiac rehab program, says study

Irrational health beliefs associated with lower adherence to prescribed cardiac rehab program, says study

​Heart patients with beliefs about health that aren't based on medical evidence are more likely to skip sessions of cardiac rehabilitation, new research suggests. [More]
Longer looks: Vermont's single payer system; Nevada's cancer cluster; the toll of dementia on a family

Longer looks: Vermont's single payer system; Nevada's cancer cluster; the toll of dementia on a family

Skatchewan is a vast prairie province in the middle of Canada. It's home to hockey great Gordie Howe and the world's first curling museum. But Canadians know it for another reason: it's the birthplace of the country's single-payer health-care system. [More]

Women on antidepressant medication are more successful at breastfeeding

University of Adelaide researchers have found that women on antidepressant medication are more successful at breastfeeding their babies if they keep taking the medication, compared with women who quit antidepressants because of concerns about their babies' health. [More]

Researchers win 2014 Joint Team Science Award to improve care for depression in low-income areas

A team of community leaders and researchers from UCLA and RAND has been awarded the 2014 Joint Team Science Award in recognition of a 10-year effort to conduct community engaged, population-based translational science to improve care for depression in low-income areas. [More]

Researchers examine mental health toll exacted on civilians who work with military in war zones

The punishing psychological toll endured by military personnel in war zones has been extensively documented for years by researchers, perhaps more than ever in the wake of recent military engagements in Iraq and Afghanistan. [More]