Depression News and Research RSS Feed - Depression News and Research

Depression is a serious medical illness that involves the brain. It's more than just a feeling of being "down in the dumps" or "blue" for a few days. If you are one of the more than 20 million people in the United States who have depression, the feelings do not go away. They persist and interfere with your everyday life.
Researchers discover molecular switch that triggers stress processes in the brain

Researchers discover molecular switch that triggers stress processes in the brain

At the Center for Brain Research at the MedUni Vienna an important factor for stress has been identified in collaboration with the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm (Sweden). This is the protein secretagogin that plays an important role in the release of the stress hormone CRH and which only then enables stress processes in the brain to be transmitted to the pituitary gland and then onwards to the organs. [More]
Assessing patient's decision-making capacity

Assessing patient's decision-making capacity

Physicians often find it hard to tell if a patient suffering from dementia or depression is capable of making sound judgements. This is shown by a study conducted within the scope of the National Research Programme "End of Life" (NRP 67). The Central Ethics Committee of the Swiss Academy of Medical Sciences now aims to elaborate new assessment principles. [More]
Perfectionism drives depression in bipolar/anxiety comorbidity

Perfectionism drives depression in bipolar/anxiety comorbidity

People with comorbid bipolar spectrum disorders and anxiety tend to display higher levels of depressive symptoms than their counterparts with BSD alone, say researchers. [More]

Group mindfulness treatment as effective as individual CBT in patients with depression, anxiety

Group mindfulness treatment is as effective as individual cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) in patients with depression and anxiety, according to a new study from Lund University in Sweden and Region Skåne. [More]
UT Arlington researcher receives grant to educate Hispanic patients about depression, treatment options

UT Arlington researcher receives grant to educate Hispanic patients about depression, treatment options

A University of Texas at Arlington researcher hopes to dispel myths about depression and its treatment, as well as reduce the stigma associated with receiving mental health care among Hispanics. [More]
Long-term T therapy in hypogonadal men is safe, does not increase PCa risk, study finds

Long-term T therapy in hypogonadal men is safe, does not increase PCa risk, study finds

Testosterone (T) therapy is routinely used in men with hypogonadism, a condition in which diminished function of the gonads occurs. Although there is no evidence that T therapy increases the risk of prostate cancer (PCa), there are still concerns and a paucity of long-term data. [More]
Research findings could provide insight into how doctors could restore human memory

Research findings could provide insight into how doctors could restore human memory

UCLA neurophysicists have found that space-mapping neurons in the brain react differently to virtual reality than they do to real-world environments. Their findings could be significant for people who use virtual reality for gaming, military, commercial, scientific or other purposes. [More]
Women with symptoms of serious psychological distress less likely to receive routine cancer screenings

Women with symptoms of serious psychological distress less likely to receive routine cancer screenings

Women with symptoms of serious mental illness are significantly less likely to receive three routine cancer screenings - Pap tests, mammograms and clinical breast exams - than women in the general population, despite being at elevated risk for medical comorbidities and early death, a new study indicates. [More]
Mindfulness practices ease depression among pregnant women

Mindfulness practices ease depression among pregnant women

Pregnant women with histories of major depression are about 40 percent less likely to relapse into depression if they practice mindfulness techniques--such as meditation, breathing exercises and yoga--along with cognitive therapy, according to a new study led by the University of Colorado Boulder. [More]
Kidney disease patients can benefit from simple and structured exercise

Kidney disease patients can benefit from simple and structured exercise

Simple yet structured exercise can significantly improve kidney disease patients' quality of life as well as decrease their pain, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (CJASN). [More]
Self-acupressure may be effective for treating constipation

Self-acupressure may be effective for treating constipation

About 19 percent of North Americans suffer from constipation, with the digestive condition being more common among women, non-whites, people older than 60, those who are not physically active and the poor. [More]
Childhood affective features may guide adult psychiatric diagnosis

Childhood affective features may guide adult psychiatric diagnosis

Clinical features that can appear many years ahead of a psychiatric diagnosis may help doctors to predict whether patients will develop bipolar disorder or unipolar depression, say researchers. [More]
Job authority increases symptoms of depression among women

Job authority increases symptoms of depression among women

Job authority increases symptoms of depression among women, but decreases them among men, according to a new study from University of Texas at Austin sociologist Tetyana Pudrovska. [More]
Cyberonics' worldwide net sales increase 5% to $73.4M in Q2 of fiscal 2015

Cyberonics' worldwide net sales increase 5% to $73.4M in Q2 of fiscal 2015

Cyberonics, Inc. today announced results for the quarter ended October 24, 2014. [More]
Physical pain and social pain use distinct neural circuits, new study reveals

Physical pain and social pain use distinct neural circuits, new study reveals

Over the last decade, neuroscientists have largely come to believe that physical pain and social pain are processed by the brain in the same way. But a new study led by the University of Colorado shows that the two kinds of pain actually use distinct neural circuits, a finding that could lead to more targeted treatments and a better understanding of how the two kinds of pain interact. [More]
Poor young people with positive perceptions report better health than people with worse perceptions

Poor young people with positive perceptions report better health than people with worse perceptions

Young people growing up in impoverished neighborhoods who perceive their poor communities in a positive light report better health and well-being than those with worse perceptions of where they live, new research led by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests. [More]
Vital exhaustion may increase risk of first-time cardiovascular disease by 36%

Vital exhaustion may increase risk of first-time cardiovascular disease by 36%

Fatigue, increased irritability, and feeling demoralized, may raise a healthy man or woman's risk of first-time cardiovascular disease by 36 percent, according to a study led by researchers at Mount Sinai St. Luke's and Mount Sinai Roosevelt hospitals presented on Nov. 17 at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2014 in Chicago, IL. [More]
Spinal cord injuries can cause brain degeneration, find UM SOM researchers

Spinal cord injuries can cause brain degeneration, find UM SOM researchers

Most research on spinal cord injuries has focused on effects due to spinal cord damage and scientists have neglected the effects on brain function. University of Maryland School of Medicine researchers have found for the first time that spinal cord injuries (SCI) can cause widespread and sustained brain inflammation that leads to progressive loss of nerve cells, with associated cognitive problems and depression. [More]
Sleep disorders increase risk of motor vehicle accidents, poor health status among firefighters

Sleep disorders increase risk of motor vehicle accidents, poor health status among firefighters

Sleep disorders are independent risk factors for heart attacks and motor vehicle crashes, which are the two leading causes of death for firefighters in the United States. [More]
New study shows that brain’s ability to manage stress depends on brain protein

New study shows that brain’s ability to manage stress depends on brain protein

The brain's ability to effectively deal with stress or to lack that ability and be more susceptible to depression, depends on a single protein type in each person's brain, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published November 12 in the journal Nature. [More]