Depression News and Research RSS Feed - Depression News and Research

Depression is a serious medical illness that involves the brain. It's more than just a feeling of being "down in the dumps" or "blue" for a few days. If you are one of the more than 20 million people in the United States who have depression, the feelings do not go away. They persist and interfere with your everyday life.
UAB researchers discover novel underlying mechanism involved in anxiety disorders, PTSD

UAB researchers discover novel underlying mechanism involved in anxiety disorders, PTSD

University of Alabama at Birmingham neurobiologist Lynn Dobrunz, Ph.D., has discovered a novel mechanism for how stress-induced anxiety — the type of experience that can produce post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD — affects circuit function in the hippocampus, the area of the brain where aversive memories are formed. [More]
Tiny 'submarines' could help treat stomach diseases with acid-sensitive drugs

Tiny 'submarines' could help treat stomach diseases with acid-sensitive drugs

Tiny “submarines” that speed independently through the stomach, use gastric acid for fuel (while rapidly neutralizing it), and release their cargo precisely at the desired pH: Though it may sound like science fiction, this is a new method for treating stomach diseases with acid-sensitive drugs introduced by scientists in the journal Angewandte Chemie. [More]
Survey reports symptoms and treatments that impact lives of HD patients and caregivers

Survey reports symptoms and treatments that impact lives of HD patients and caregivers

Huntington's disease (HD) has no cure and no therapies to slow the course of this fatal disease. HD patients can experience a wide range of cognitive, physical, and psychiatric symptoms. [More]
Researchers find link between later school start times and better sleep for teens

Researchers find link between later school start times and better sleep for teens

Delaying school start times could help Canadian teenagers sleep better - giving them a better chance for success, according to McGill University researchers. [More]
Hormone can boost activity in brain regions linked to sexual arousal and love

Hormone can boost activity in brain regions linked to sexual arousal and love

The hormone kisspeptin can enhance activity in brain regions associated with sexual arousal and romantic love, according to new research. [More]
Vagus nerve stimulation may hold potential to reduce drug cravings, study shows

Vagus nerve stimulation may hold potential to reduce drug cravings, study shows

A new preclinical study led by a University of Texas at Dallas researcher shows that vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) therapy might have the potential to help people overcome drug addiction by helping them learn new behaviors to replace those associated with seeking drugs. [More]
Characterizing the brain, cell by cell

Characterizing the brain, cell by cell

My group develops approaches to study cell-to-cell signaling in the brain – how the cells of the brain talk to each other. The brain is heterogeneous, probably more so than any other organ in our body, and many of its functions depend on the unique characteristics of these cells. [More]
Stop smoking services may improve mental health of smokers with depression

Stop smoking services may improve mental health of smokers with depression

Smokers with depression who successfully quit smoking using stop smoking services may see an improvement in their mental health, according to new research, funded by Cancer Research UK and published in Annals of Behavioural Medicine. [More]
Mutations in gene that enables memories, sense of direction can contribute to schizophrenia symptoms

Mutations in gene that enables memories, sense of direction can contribute to schizophrenia symptoms

Mutations in a gene that should enable memories and a sense of direction instead can result in imprecise communication between neurons that contributes to symptoms of schizophrenia, scientists report. [More]
UC biologists use frog models to study how early stressors may play role in onset of adult diseases

UC biologists use frog models to study how early stressors may play role in onset of adult diseases

UC biologists have turned to amphibian sources -- specifically frogs and tadpoles -- to help shed light on how early stressors in the womb and shortly after birth may play a part in the onset of adult diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. [More]
Antidepressant use during pregnancy could increase risk of birth defects in baby, study reveals

Antidepressant use during pregnancy could increase risk of birth defects in baby, study reveals

A new Université de Montréal study in the British Medical Journal reveals that antidepressants prescribed to pregnant women could increase the chance of having a baby with birth defects. [More]
New guidelines provide evidence-based recommendations for family-centered care in ICU

New guidelines provide evidence-based recommendations for family-centered care in ICU

Critical illness is a stressful and traumatic experience that may have lasting effects on the health of patients and families, even months after discharge from the intensive care unit. [More]
Gestational diabetes raises postpartum depression risk in first-time mothers

Gestational diabetes raises postpartum depression risk in first-time mothers

Researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and the Karolinska Institutet have found that gestational diabetes raises the risk of postpartum depression (PPD) in first-time mothers. [More]
Device to help physicians assess the pain experienced by patients released by Medasense

Device to help physicians assess the pain experienced by patients released by Medasense

Medasense Biometrics Ltd. announced today that it has received CE mark approval for its novel Pain Monitoring Device, PMD200™. This new technology is now available to help physicians objectively assess a patient’s pain in critical care situations, where patients are unable to communicate. This allows physicians to ensure pain is properly managed. [More]
Scientists discover new molecular information on how the brain regulates depression and anxiety

Scientists discover new molecular information on how the brain regulates depression and anxiety

Researchers have made a ground-breaking discovery revealing new molecular information on how the brain regulates depression and anxiety. [More]
BetterYou magnesium can raise cellular mineral levels faster than traditional tablets

BetterYou magnesium can raise cellular mineral levels faster than traditional tablets

Low magnesium levels are leading to a worrying level of undissolved calcium and increased heavy metal toxicity which can severely impact on our health and wellbeing, say mineral analysis experts. [More]
Study challenges concept of gender differences in the human brain

Study challenges concept of gender differences in the human brain

How different are men and women's brains? The latest evidence to address this controversy comes from a study at Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, where a meta-analysis of human amygdala volumes found no significant difference between the sexes. [More]
Heavy adolescent drinking alters cortical excitability and functional connectivity in the brain

Heavy adolescent drinking alters cortical excitability and functional connectivity in the brain

Long-term heavy use of alcohol in adolescence alters cortical excitability and functional connectivity in the brain, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland and Kuopio University Hospital. [More]
Study shows clinical and psychosocial consequences following survival of Ebola infection

Study shows clinical and psychosocial consequences following survival of Ebola infection

The long-term clinical and social sequelae following survival of Ebola infection are unknown. [More]
More people with mental illness, substance use disorders have insurance coverage, research suggests

More people with mental illness, substance use disorders have insurance coverage, research suggests

Significantly more people with mental illness and substance use disorders had insurance coverage in 2014 due to the expansion of health insurance under the Affordable Care Act, but many barriers to treatment remain, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests. [More]
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