Depression News and Research RSS Feed - Depression News and Research

Depression is a serious medical illness that involves the brain. It's more than just a feeling of being "down in the dumps" or "blue" for a few days. If you are one of the more than 20 million people in the United States who have depression, the feelings do not go away. They persist and interfere with your everyday life.
Exposure to violence may lead to PTSD symptoms in underserved women

Exposure to violence may lead to PTSD symptoms in underserved women

The violence that women in disadvantaged neighborhoods experience and witness can result in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and full diagnoses, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study that examined a disadvantaged Chicago neighborhood. [More]
Woman’s history of drug use can help predict risk of postpartum stress and anxiety

Woman’s history of drug use can help predict risk of postpartum stress and anxiety

New research from North Carolina State University and the University of British Columbia finds that a woman's lifetime history of drug use can help predict whether the woman will suffer from problems with stress and anxiety after childbirth. [More]
New biomarker in cell-free blood plasma linked to overactive stress system in suicidal individuals

New biomarker in cell-free blood plasma linked to overactive stress system in suicidal individuals

Researchers at Lund and Malmö universities in Sweden have measured a biomarker in cell-free blood plasma which can be linked to an overactive stress system in suicidal individuals. This biomarker can hopefully be used in future psychiatric studies. [More]
Alkaloid in ayahuasca beverage triggers neurogenesis in human neural cells

Alkaloid in ayahuasca beverage triggers neurogenesis in human neural cells

Ayahuasca is a beverage that has been used for centuries by Native South-Americans. Studies suggest that it exhibits anxiolytic and antidepressant effects in humans. [More]
Study finds 19% of Ontario adults experience problematic use of electronic devices

Study finds 19% of Ontario adults experience problematic use of electronic devices

As many as 19 per cent of Ontario adults aged 18 to 29 experience moderate to severe problematic use of electronic devices, which includes smartphones and tablets as well as computers and video game consoles, according to the latest CAMH Monitor survey. [More]
Church and spirituality could help in treating mothers of color with PPD symptoms

Church and spirituality could help in treating mothers of color with PPD symptoms

Churches and other faith-based communities are an untapped resource that health-care providers should consider when suggesting treatment options for African-American and Latina mothers who have histories of postpartum depression (PPD), according to the findings of a newly published study by a University at Buffalo-led research team. [More]
Researchers develop new microfluidic device to study brain inflammation

Researchers develop new microfluidic device to study brain inflammation

The blood-brain barrier is a network of specialized cells that surrounds the arteries and veins within the brain. It forms a unique gateway that both provides brain cells with the nutrients they require and protects them from potentially harmful compounds. [More]
Latina women with breast cancer likely to experience many gaps in survivorship care, research suggests

Latina women with breast cancer likely to experience many gaps in survivorship care, research suggests

Breast cancer patients in one of the United States' largest and fastest-growing ethnic minority groups are likely to experience numerous gaps in care following their primary treatment, research from Oregon State University suggests. [More]
Older adults with cataracts more likely to have depressive symptoms, study shows

Older adults with cataracts more likely to have depressive symptoms, study shows

Older adults with cataracts are more likely to have symptoms of depression, reports a study in the December issue of Optometry and Vision Science, official journal of the American Academy of Optometry. [More]
Hallucinogenic drug offers relief for people with cancer-related anxiety or depression

Hallucinogenic drug offers relief for people with cancer-related anxiety or depression

In a small double-blind study, Johns Hopkins researchers report that a substantial majority of people suffering cancer-related anxiety or depression found considerable relief for up to six months from a single large dose of psilocybin -- the active compound in hallucinogenic "magic mushrooms." [More]
Many women dissatisfied with length of time for diagnosis of PCOS, survey finds

Many women dissatisfied with length of time for diagnosis of PCOS, survey finds

A large international survey of women with a common condition called polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), which is characterized by reproductive and metabolic problems, found nearly two in three were dissatisfied with the length of time they waited and the number of healthcare professionals they had to see before they received a diagnosis, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
Transcranial magnetic stimulation could bring back abandoned memories

Transcranial magnetic stimulation could bring back abandoned memories

It's clear that your working memory -- which holds attention on small things of short-term importance -- works, or you wouldn't be able to remember a new phone number long enough to dial it. [More]
Researcher explores link between PTSD and repeated alcohol use

Researcher explores link between PTSD and repeated alcohol use

As families gather for the holidays this year, many will reminisce, sharing fond memories as they break bread and pass the cranberry sauce. [More]
Overweight adolescents with bipolar disorder show signs of increased illness severity, study finds

Overweight adolescents with bipolar disorder show signs of increased illness severity, study finds

Bipolar disorder is one of the most disabling medical conditions among adolescents worldwide. Similarly, being overweight or obese is common in adolescents and is known to confer risk for cardiovascular disease and other poor health outcomes in adulthood. [More]
Type 2 diabetes linked to long list of complications that can affect health and quality of life

Type 2 diabetes linked to long list of complications that can affect health and quality of life

T2D Lifestyle, a national survey by Health Union of more than 400 individuals living with type 2 diabetes (T2D), reveals that patients not only struggle with commonly understood complications, but also numerous lesser known ones that people do not associate with diabetes. [More]
Symptom trends may help predict recovery of patients suffering from post-concussion syndrome

Symptom trends may help predict recovery of patients suffering from post-concussion syndrome

Researchers at the Krembil Neuroscience Centre's Canadian Concussion Centre have identified symptom trends that may not only help predict how soon patients suffering from post-concussion syndrome (PCS) will recover, but also provide insight on how to treat those who experience persistent concussion symptoms. [More]
Enzyme research provides new insights into pathophysiology of depression

Enzyme research provides new insights into pathophysiology of depression

Despite the fact that more than four percent of the world's population suffer from depression, and even though approximately 1,500 individuals commit suicide each year in Sweden, the understanding of the pathophysiology of depression remains unclear and only a few new discoveries of mechanisms behind it have been made in recent years. [More]
Acne: when to seek help?

Acne: when to seek help?

Acne develops due to an interplay between genetic factors (so people often have a family history) and hormonal factors that can increase the size and activity of the sebaceous or oil gland. [More]
Electro-acupuncture may be effective in treating sleep disturbances in women with breast cancer

Electro-acupuncture may be effective in treating sleep disturbances in women with breast cancer

It's somewhat of a little-known adverse effect of having breast cancer, but studies suggest that approximately 30% to 40% of women with breast cancer report persistent hot flashes. Nocturnal hot flashes are among the most problematic because they can contribute to poor sleep. [More]
Research aims to incorporate cardiorespiratory fitness measurements into clinical practice

Research aims to incorporate cardiorespiratory fitness measurements into clinical practice

A new Scientific Statement from the American Heart Association led by Queen's University professor Robert Ross provides unequivocal evidence to confirm that cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), a reflection of overall cardiovascular health, should be measured in clinical practice to provide additional information for patient management. [More]
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