Depression News and Research RSS Feed - Depression News and Research

Depression is a serious medical illness that involves the brain. It's more than just a feeling of being "down in the dumps" or "blue" for a few days. If you are one of the more than 20 million people in the United States who have depression, the feelings do not go away. They persist and interfere with your everyday life.
Rehabilitation programme for heart disease could help bowel cancer patients

Rehabilitation programme for heart disease could help bowel cancer patients

Could rehabilitation programmes for heart disease patients be used to help people recovering from bowel cancer get back on their feet? That's the question cancer care experts at the University of Stirling have been exploring. [More]
Review highlights urgent demand for tool to identify stroke survivors with visual impairments

Review highlights urgent demand for tool to identify stroke survivors with visual impairments

A University of Liverpool led review of the methods available to screen for post-stroke visual impairments has found there is an urgent demand for the development of a tool. [More]
New ABT approach results in greater weight loss than gold standard treatment, study shows

New ABT approach results in greater weight loss than gold standard treatment, study shows

A new approach to weight loss called Acceptance-Based Behavioral Treatment (ABT) helped people lose more weight and keep it off longer than those who received only Standard Behavioral Treatment (SBT) - a typical treatment plan encouraging reduced caloric intake and increased physical activity - according to a new randomized controlled clinical trial. [More]
Adolescent girls with family breast cancer history do not experience negative psychological effects

Adolescent girls with family breast cancer history do not experience negative psychological effects

More and more girls are expected to have to confront breast cancer fears as modern genomics technology makes it easier to detect strong risk factors such as inherited BRCA1/2 mutations. [More]
Group psychoeducation could be effective in treating patients in early stages of bipolar disorder

Group psychoeducation could be effective in treating patients in early stages of bipolar disorder

Structured group psychoeducation sessions could be more successful in treating patients in the early stages of bipolar disorder than standard peer-support offered by the NHS and the voluntary sector, research has found. [More]
Research urges people to start planning early for retirement

Research urges people to start planning early for retirement

The University of Alicante presents the results of a project to establish European guidelines for preparing the population for life after full-time employment. The results urge people to start planning as soon as 50. [More]
UVM names medical school in honor of Dr. Robert Larner

UVM names medical school in honor of Dr. Robert Larner

The University of Vermont announced today an estate commitment with an estimated current market value of $66 million from UVM dual-degree alum and Vermont native Robert Larner '39, M.D. '42, and his wife, Helen. [More]
New study reveals doctors less likely to seek help for their own mental health issues

New study reveals doctors less likely to seek help for their own mental health issues

Even as doctors across America encourage their patients to share concerns about depression, anxiety and other concerns, so they can get help from modern treatments, a new study suggests the doctors may be less likely to seek help for those same concerns about themselves. [More]
Scientist develops way to detect BoNT in biological samples

Scientist develops way to detect BoNT in biological samples

Many know Botox as a trendy way to get rid of wrinkles, but the popular drug — made from botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) — can do more than just fill lines. [More]
SLU receives HRSA grant for training family physicians and medical family therapists in behavioral health

SLU receives HRSA grant for training family physicians and medical family therapists in behavioral health

Saint Louis University has received a $1.87 million grant to strengthen behavioral health training for family physicians, who often are the primary physician seen by many adults and children, and for medical family therapists who practice alongside them. [More]
Review highlights anxiety may lead to serious health consequences in dialysis patients

Review highlights anxiety may lead to serious health consequences in dialysis patients

A new review looks at the potential effects of anxiety on a vulnerable patient population: individuals undergoing hemodialysis for the treatment of kidney failure. [More]
Decrease in physical activity and concentration of fish oil linked to depressed mood among veterans

Decrease in physical activity and concentration of fish oil linked to depressed mood among veterans

Low concentration of fish oil in the blood and lack of physical activity may contribute to the high levels of depressed mood among soldiers returning from combat, according to researchers, including a Texas A&M University professor and his former doctoral student. [More]
Pediatrician advises parents to identify depression and suicidal tendencies among teens

Pediatrician advises parents to identify depression and suicidal tendencies among teens

The teen years can be a time of stress, confusion and uncertainty. There is pressure to fit in, to stand out and to succeed. So you can hardly blame adolescents for sometimes being moody, down, or wanting to be left alone. [More]
Stressful event appears to erase benefits linked to healthy fat choices

Stressful event appears to erase benefits linked to healthy fat choices

The type of fat you eat matters, but a new study suggests that the benefits of good fats vanish when stress enters the picture. [More]
High occupational levels may be risk factor for poor response to depression treatment

High occupational levels may be risk factor for poor response to depression treatment

An international study has found that having a high status job means that you are less likely to respond to standard treatment with medications for depression. [More]
Mice study explains why antidepressants don't work in some patients

Mice study explains why antidepressants don't work in some patients

SSRI antidepressants (Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors, the best known being Prozactm) are amongst the most commonly taken medicines. [More]
New intervention improves health, wellness outcomes in adolescents with persistent concussion

New intervention improves health, wellness outcomes in adolescents with persistent concussion

Concussions can create a host of symptoms—headache, dizziness, moodiness, upset stomach and other issues. [More]
Study identifies promising, cost-effective treatment for depressed adolescents

Study identifies promising, cost-effective treatment for depressed adolescents

Depression is one of the most common mental health issues a teenager can face. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, an estimated 2.8 million adolescents ages 12 to 17 in the U.S. had at least one major depressive episode in 2014, or 11.4% of adolescents that age. [More]
Review provides insights into principles of neurofeedback technique

Review provides insights into principles of neurofeedback technique

Neurofeedback is a technique used for the treatment of clinical disorders (like depression, anxiety, chronic pain, ADHD and schizophrenia etc.) and enhancement of brain performance. [More]
Sleep paralysis can be strange and frightening experience but not harmful

Sleep paralysis can be strange and frightening experience but not harmful

Your eyes begin to open after a good night of sleep, but something feels weird. You try to rub the tiredness out of your face but can't lift your arms. In a panic you try to take a deep breath but can't draw air. [More]
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