Depression News and Research RSS Feed - Depression News and Research

Depression is a serious medical illness that involves the brain. It's more than just a feeling of being "down in the dumps" or "blue" for a few days. If you are one of the more than 20 million people in the United States who have depression, the feelings do not go away. They persist and interfere with your everyday life.
Lifestyle tips to lower heart disease risks

Lifestyle tips to lower heart disease risks

With the arrival of American Heart Month in February, it's that time of the year to remind ourselves to take good care of our hearts. [More]
Shire announces FDA approval of Vyvanse Capsules for binge eating disorder

Shire announces FDA approval of Vyvanse Capsules for binge eating disorder

Shire plc announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Vyvanse (lisdexamfetamine dimesylate) Capsules (CII), the first and only medication for the treatment of moderate to severe binge eating disorder (B.E.D.) in adults, shown to significantly reduce the mean number of binge days per week. [More]
Chronic pain common in affective disorders

Chronic pain common in affective disorders

Patients with major depressive disorder or bipolar disorder frequently report chronic pain at multiple sites, research shows. [More]
Leading academics underscore the importance of diet and nutrition for mental Health

Leading academics underscore the importance of diet and nutrition for mental Health

Evidence is rapidly growing showing vital relationships between both diet quality and potential nutritional deficiencies and mental health, a new international collaboration led by the University of Melbourne and Deakin University has revealed. [More]
Researchers receive $2.2M grant to study links between depression and cardiovascular disease in HIV patients

Researchers receive $2.2M grant to study links between depression and cardiovascular disease in HIV patients

Jesse Stewart, Ph.D., associate professor of psychology in the School of Science at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, and two colleagues have received a $2.2 million National Institutes of Health grant to investigate the links between depression, depression treatment and cardiovascular disease in adults with HIV. [More]
electroCore’s non-invasive vagus nerve stimulation therapy safe, effective across a variety of conditions

electroCore’s non-invasive vagus nerve stimulation therapy safe, effective across a variety of conditions

Non-invasive vagus nerve stimulation (nVNS) ‘improves the safety and tolerability of VNS making it more accessible and facilitating further investigations across a wide range of uses when compared with surgically implanted VNS’ according to a review in the European Journal of Neurology. [More]
People who carry longevity gene variant have larger brain region

People who carry longevity gene variant have larger brain region

People who carry a variant of a gene that is associated with longevity also have larger volumes in a front part of the brain involved in planning and decision-making, according to researchers at UC San Francisco. [More]
Online social connectedness promotes weight loss, shows study

Online social connectedness promotes weight loss, shows study

If you want to lose pounds using an online weight management program, don't be a wallflower. A new Northwestern University study shows that online dieters with high social embeddedness -- who logged in regularly, recorded their weigh-ins and 'friended' other members -- lost more than 8 percent of their body weight in six months. [More]
Rogers' regional medical director to address issue of childhood anxiety at NATSAP conference

Rogers' regional medical director to address issue of childhood anxiety at NATSAP conference

Stephanie C. Eken, M.D., F.A.A.P., a regional medical director with Rogers Behavioral Health System, will address the issue of childhood anxiety at the 2015 National Association of Therapeutic Schools and Programs (NATSAP) conference on February 6 in Nashville, TN. [More]
Brain inflammation linked to clinical depression

Brain inflammation linked to clinical depression

A new study by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health found that the measure of brain inflammation in people who were experiencing clinical depression was increased by 30 per cent. The findings, published today in JAMA Psychiatry, have important implications for developing new treatments for depression. [More]
Researchers advance generalized concept for future studies of mental resilience

Researchers advance generalized concept for future studies of mental resilience

Researchers at the Research Center Translational Neurosciences of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz in Germany have advanced a generalized concept as the basis for future studies of mental resilience. Their new approach is based on a mechanistic theory which takes as its starting point the appraisals made by the brain in response to exposure to stressful or threatening situations. [More]
Researchers probe possibility of reversing medications' adverse cognitive effects

Researchers probe possibility of reversing medications' adverse cognitive effects

Whether the adverse cognitive effects of medications can be reversed is of significant importance to an aging population, their caregivers and their families, as well as to an overburdened health care system. [More]
Improving prefrontal cortex activity could help autistic people regulate emotions

Improving prefrontal cortex activity could help autistic people regulate emotions

Tantrums, irritability, self-injury, depression, anxiety. These symptoms are associated with autism, but they're not considered core symptoms of the disorder. Researchers from the UNC School of Medicine are challenging this assertion. They have used functional MRI to show that - when it comes to the ability to regulate emotions - brain activity in autistic people is significantly different than brain activity in people without autism. [More]
New survey finds long-term benefits of brain surgery in patients with epilepsy

New survey finds long-term benefits of brain surgery in patients with epilepsy

Brain surgery for otherwise hard-to-treat epilepsy is effective for up to 15 years, according to a new survey by Henry Ford Hospital physicians. [More]
Kaleo, CHMI partner to reduce prescription drug-related deaths

Kaleo, CHMI partner to reduce prescription drug-related deaths

Kaleo, a privately-held pharmaceutical company, today announced a national strategic partnership with the Clinton Health Matters Initiative, an initiative of the Clinton Foundation, that will help support its goal of cutting prescription drug-related deaths in half, saving approximately 10,000 lives over five years. [More]

Neuromod Devices, Irish Tinnitus Association announce launch of Tinnitus Awareness Week 2015

Saturday 31st of January sees the launch of Tinnitus Awareness Week. This year a public event will take place, hosted by The Neuromod Clinic in conjunction with the Irish Tinnitus Association. This free of charge event will take place at The Hermitage Medical Clinic, Lucan, Dublin at 10.30am on Saturday the 31st January. [More]
Alexza begins Phase 2a study of AZ-002 for ARS-related epilepsy management

Alexza begins Phase 2a study of AZ-002 for ARS-related epilepsy management

Alexza Pharmaceuticals, Inc. announced today that it has initiated a Phase 2a study of AZ-002 (Staccato alprazolam), which is being developed for the management of epilepsy in patients with acute repetitive seizures (ARS). [More]
Twitter can indicate community's psychological well being, predict rates of heart disease

Twitter can indicate community's psychological well being, predict rates of heart disease

Twitter has broken news stories, launched and ended careers, started social movements and toppled governments, all by being an easy, direct and immediate way for people to share what's on their minds. Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania have now shown that the social media platform has another use: Twitter can serve as a dashboard indicator of a community's psychological well being and can predict rates of heart disease. [More]
Hallucinations linked to self-destructive thoughts among adolescents with psychological symptoms

Hallucinations linked to self-destructive thoughts among adolescents with psychological symptoms

Visual distortions and hallucinations related to an elevated risk of psychosis are linked to self-destructive thought processes among adolescents with psychological symptoms, according to a recent Finnish study. Early indications of the risk of psychosis can usually be detected long before the onset of a full-blown disorder. [More]
ENIGMA scientists discover eight genetic mutations that may erode or boost brain tissue

ENIGMA scientists discover eight genetic mutations that may erode or boost brain tissue

In the largest collaborative study of the brain to date, researchers from the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California led a global consortium of 190 institutions to identify eight common genetic mutations that appear to age the brain an average of three years. The discovery could lead to targeted therapies and interventions for Alzheimer's disease, autism and other neurological conditions. [More]