Depression News and Research RSS Feed - Depression News and Research

Depression is a serious medical illness that involves the brain. It's more than just a feeling of being "down in the dumps" or "blue" for a few days. If you are one of the more than 20 million people in the United States who have depression, the feelings do not go away. They persist and interfere with your everyday life.
SAGA funding initiative aims to advance understanding of potential sex differences in Alzheimer's

SAGA funding initiative aims to advance understanding of potential sex differences in Alzheimer's

The first-ever Alzheimer's Association Sex and Gender in Alzheimer's research grant awards will provide $2.2 million to nine projects to advance understanding of the disproportionate effect of Alzheimer's disease on women. [More]
New study assesses biological impact of meditation and vacation

New study assesses biological impact of meditation and vacation

Scientists from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, the University of California, San Francisco, and Harvard Medical School used a rigorous study design to assess the biological impact of meditation compared to vacation. [More]
Multi-purpose protein may offer clues for successful treatment of Alzheimer's disease

Multi-purpose protein may offer clues for successful treatment of Alzheimer's disease

The tidal wave approaches. In the coming decades, Alzheimer's disease is projected to exact a devastating economic and emotional toll on society, with patient numbers in the US alone expected to reach 13.5 million by mid-century at a projected cost of over a trillion dollars. [More]
Novel compound provides safe, effective pain relief with zero abuse potential in animal model

Novel compound provides safe, effective pain relief with zero abuse potential in animal model

Since the isolation of morphine from opium in the 19th century, scientists have hoped to find a potent opioid analgesic that isn't addictive and doesn't cause respiratory arrest with increased doses. [More]
Study examines link between PTSD and cognitive impairment in WTC responders without head injury

Study examines link between PTSD and cognitive impairment in WTC responders without head injury

New research published by the journal Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring confirms the connection between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and cognitive impairment - in this case, among those who helped with search, rescue and cleanup efforts following the 2001 World Trade Center (WTC) attacks. [More]
Integrating mental and physical healthcare leads to better clinical outcomes, lower costs

Integrating mental and physical healthcare leads to better clinical outcomes, lower costs

A major new study shows that delivering integrated mental and physical healthcare in team-based primary care settings at Intermountain Healthcare results in better clinical outcomes for patients, lower rates of healthcare utilization, and lower costs. [More]
Study shows many older jail inmates experience health-related distressing symptoms

Study shows many older jail inmates experience health-related distressing symptoms

More than 550,000 adults 55-years-old and older are arrested and detained every year--and that number is increasing rapidly. [More]
New study suggests most American adults with depression receive no treatment

New study suggests most American adults with depression receive no treatment

New findings suggest that most Americans with depression receive no treatment, while raising the possibility that overtreatment of depression is also widespread. [More]
Penn State dermatologist clarifies common myths about psoriasis

Penn State dermatologist clarifies common myths about psoriasis

Psoriasis is a much-misunderstood disease, often kept under wraps by sufferers who want to hide their skin lesions. [More]
UW-Madison joins with Madison Police Department to study impact of mindfulness practices on officers' well-being

UW-Madison joins with Madison Police Department to study impact of mindfulness practices on officers' well-being

The Center for Healthy Minds at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the Madison Police Department are launching a pilot study to better understand the impact of mindfulness-based practices on police officers' physical and mental well-being. [More]
Arab uprising linked to detrimental effects on health and life expectancy in several countries

Arab uprising linked to detrimental effects on health and life expectancy in several countries

The Arab uprising in 2010 and subsequent wars in the eastern Mediterranean region have had serious detrimental effects on the health and life expectancy of the people living in many of the 22 countries in the region, according to a major new analysis from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 (GBD 2013), published in The Lancet Global Health journal. [More]
Study explores relationship between moderate-vigorous exercise and psychotic symptoms

Study explores relationship between moderate-vigorous exercise and psychotic symptoms

Physical activity can help reduce cardiovascular disease and premature mortality in people with psychological problems. [More]
Study suggests structural changes in the brain help cope with stressful situations

Study suggests structural changes in the brain help cope with stressful situations

People who experience job loss, divorce, death of a loved one or any number of life's upheavals often adopt coping mechanisms to make the situation less traumatic. [More]
UNC researchers map anxiety circuit in the brain that may explain side effects of antidepressants

UNC researchers map anxiety circuit in the brain that may explain side effects of antidepressants

More than 100 million people worldwide take selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), such as Prozac and Zoloft, to treat depression, anxiety and related conditions, but these drugs have a common and mysterious side effect: they can worsen anxiety in the first few weeks of use, which leads many patients to stop treatment. [More]
Medical students developing smart helmet to help diagnose concussions

Medical students developing smart helmet to help diagnose concussions

A smart helmet that can help diagnose concussions in football players is being developed by medical students at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center El Paso. [More]
Atomic level analysis reveals how two classes of calcium channel blockers produce different effects

Atomic level analysis reveals how two classes of calcium channel blockers produce different effects

An atomic level analysis has revealed how two classes of calcium channel blockers, widely prescribed for heart disease patients, produce separate therapeutic effects through their actions at different sites on the calcium channel molecule. [More]
Crohn's disease sufferers experience slower cognitive response times, study shows

Crohn's disease sufferers experience slower cognitive response times, study shows

New research published in the UEG Journal1 has found that Crohn's disease sufferers experience slower response times than matched individuals that do not have the disease. [More]
Researchers find better mental health in older adults despite more physical ailments

Researchers find better mental health in older adults despite more physical ailments

While even the best wines eventually peak and turn to vinegar, a new study by researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine suggests a paradoxical trend in the mental health of aging adults: They seem to consistently get better over time. [More]
People with psychosis engage in low levels of physical activity, study reveals

People with psychosis engage in low levels of physical activity, study reveals

A large international study of more than 200,000 people in nearly 50 countries has revealed that people with psychosis engage in low levels of physical activity, and men with psychosis are over two times more likely to miss global activity targets compared to people without the illness. [More]
Research supports potential role for cognitive activity in prevention of Alzheimer's disease

Research supports potential role for cognitive activity in prevention of Alzheimer's disease

Are there any ways of preventing or delaying the development of Alzheimer's disease or other forms of age-associated dementia? While several previously published studies have suggested a protective effect for cognitive activities such as reading, playing games or attending cultural events, questions have been raised about whether these studies reveal a real cause-and-effect relationship or if the associations could result from unmeasured factors. [More]
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