Depression News and Research RSS Feed - Depression News and Research

Depression is a serious medical illness that involves the brain. It's more than just a feeling of being "down in the dumps" or "blue" for a few days. If you are one of the more than 20 million people in the United States who have depression, the feelings do not go away. They persist and interfere with your everyday life.
Increased sleepiness may necessitate cautious PD management

Increased sleepiness may necessitate cautious PD management

Many patients with early Parkinson’s disease develop excessive daytime sleepiness as their condition progresses, a study shows. [More]
Vitamin B12 supplements offer no benefits for neurological or cognitive function in older people

Vitamin B12 supplements offer no benefits for neurological or cognitive function in older people

Vitamin B12 supplements offer no benefits for neurological or cognitive function in older people with moderate vitamin B12 deficiency, according to a new study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. [More]
Study: Genes may not trigger heart disease in people suffering from migraine with aura

Study: Genes may not trigger heart disease in people suffering from migraine with aura

A new study suggests that genes may not be to blame for the increased risk of heart disease some studies have shown in people with migraine, especially those with migraine with aura. The research is published during Headache/Migraine Awareness Month in the inaugural issue of the journal Neurology Genetics, an open access, or free to the public, online-only, peer-reviewed journal from the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Health and social messages cause confusion, stigma that can undermine mother's confidence

Health and social messages cause confusion, stigma that can undermine mother's confidence

Pregnancy and motherhood are both wonderful and worrisome times - could public health campaigns and social stereotypes be contributing to anxiety for mothers? [More]
Study provides insights into the cause of irritable bowel syndrome

Study provides insights into the cause of irritable bowel syndrome

A team comprised of scientists at VIB, KU Leuven and UZ Leuven has made significant progress in uncovering the connection between psychological factors and the immune system. Their findings are based on an investigation of a massive drinking water contamination incident in Belgium in 2010, and are now published in the leading international medical journal Gut. [More]
Educational messages about naloxone's lifesaving benefits can bolster support for its use

Educational messages about naloxone's lifesaving benefits can bolster support for its use

While most Americans do not support policies designed to increase distribution of naloxone - a medication that reverses the effects of a drug overdose - certain types of educational messages about its lifesaving benefits may bolster support for its use, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests. [More]
St John's Wort may cause same adverse reactions as antidepressants

St John's Wort may cause same adverse reactions as antidepressants

St John's Wort can produce the same adverse reactions as antidepressants, and serious side effects can occur when the two are taken together, according to new University of Adelaide research. [More]
Study identifies trends in use of antipsychotic medications in young people in the U.S.

Study identifies trends in use of antipsychotic medications in young people in the U.S.

Despite concerns that use of antipsychotic medications in treating young people has increased, use actually declined between 2006 and 2010 for children ages 12 and under, and increased for adolescents and young adults. [More]
Men referred for borderline testosterone levels have much higher rates of depression than general population

Men referred for borderline testosterone levels have much higher rates of depression than general population

Researchers at the George Washington University, led by Michael S. Irwig, M.D., found that men referred for tertiary care for borderline testosterone levels had much higher rates of depression and depressive symptoms than those of the general population. [More]
Use of antipsychotic drugs more common in boys than girls, research shows

Use of antipsychotic drugs more common in boys than girls, research shows

Boys are more likely than girls to receive a prescription for antipsychotic medication regardless of age, researchers have found. [More]
Brain-imaging studies may help predict promiscuity, problem drinking in young adults

Brain-imaging studies may help predict promiscuity, problem drinking in young adults

A pair of brain-imaging studies suggest researchers may be able to predict how likely young adults are to develop problem drinking or engage in risky sexual behavior in response to stress. [More]
Virtual human helps veterans with PTSD, people with mental illness build job interview skills

Virtual human helps veterans with PTSD, people with mental illness build job interview skills

Finding a job is difficult for veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and individuals with severe mental illness, who have high unemployment rates even though many want to work. [More]
Blue-eyed individuals may have greater chance of becoming alcoholics

Blue-eyed individuals may have greater chance of becoming alcoholics

People with blue eyes might have a greater chance of becoming alcoholics, according to a unique new study by genetic researchers at the University of Vermont. [More]
Study: Osteopathic manipulative therapy decreases low back pain by over 70% in postpartum women

Study: Osteopathic manipulative therapy decreases low back pain by over 70% in postpartum women

German researchers found osteopathic manipulative therapy (OMTh) decreased postpartum low back pain by over 70 percent in women who had given birth at least three months before beginning treatment, according to a new study published in July issue of the Journal of the American Osteopathic Association. [More]
Kessler Foundation receives $3 million to improve cognition and mobility of people with TBI

Kessler Foundation receives $3 million to improve cognition and mobility of people with TBI

The New Jersey Commission on Brain Injury Research awarded $3 million in grants to Kessler Foundation, half of its total grant distribution in 2015, to improve cognition and mobility of individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI). [More]
Poor sleep linked to negative mood in women with bipolar disorder

Poor sleep linked to negative mood in women with bipolar disorder

Poor sleep is associated with negative mood in women with bipolar disorder, according to researchers at Penn State College of Medicine and University of Michigan Medical School. [More]
New York Blue Light Symposium highlights three measures to counter consequences of artificial illumination

New York Blue Light Symposium highlights three measures to counter consequences of artificial illumination

The New York Blue Light Symposium convened in New York from June 26-27, 2015. The event was sponsored by the International Blue Light Society (Senior Representative: Kazuo Tsubota), which was founded to research and release findings on the effects of blue light on the human body. [More]
Three National Laureates selected for 2015 Blavatnik National Awards for Young Scientists

Three National Laureates selected for 2015 Blavatnik National Awards for Young Scientists

A chemist who has made important discoveries in both the human brain and sustainable energy, a neurosurgeon who has done pioneering work mapping the "blueprint" of how humans speak and hear, and a computer scientist who has changed our understanding of the capacity of wireless networks are the three winners of the 2015 Blavatnik National Awards for Young Scientists. [More]
Majority of men who use violence against female partner struggle with serious mental health issues

Majority of men who use violence against female partner struggle with serious mental health issues

The majority of men who use violence towards their partner struggle with serious mental health issues. We need to look at more than just the power relations between the sexes in order to understand and prevent domestic violence, says researcher. [More]
People with recurrent depression have significantly smaller hippocampus than healthy individuals

People with recurrent depression have significantly smaller hippocampus than healthy individuals

The brains of people with recurrent depression have a significantly smaller hippocampus - the part of the brain most associated with forming new memories - than healthy individuals, a new global study of nearly 9,000 people reveals. [More]
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