Depression News and Research RSS Feed - Depression News and Research

Depression is a serious medical illness that involves the brain. It's more than just a feeling of being "down in the dumps" or "blue" for a few days. If you are one of the more than 20 million people in the United States who have depression, the feelings do not go away. They persist and interfere with your everyday life.
Children bullied by peers face worse long-term mental health problems than those who are maltreated

Children bullied by peers face worse long-term mental health problems than those who are maltreated

A new study published in The Lancet Psychiatry shows that children who have been bullied by peers suffer worse in the longer term than those who have been maltreated by adults. [More]
OAO report calls for better care for people living with eye disease, vision problems in Ontario

OAO report calls for better care for people living with eye disease, vision problems in Ontario

By 2031, the number of Ontarians living with eye disease and vision problems, already in the millions, is expected to double. This leads to significant costs for Ontario's healthcare system, with vision loss already costing the province $7.3 billion annually. [More]
National survey shows that most women don't know risks or symptoms of stroke

National survey shows that most women don't know risks or symptoms of stroke

A national survey released today by The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center shows that most women don't know the risks or symptoms females face when it comes to having a stroke. [More]
UW develops new app to wirelessly test sleep apnea events using smartphone

UW develops new app to wirelessly test sleep apnea events using smartphone

Determining whether your snoring is merely annoying, or crosses the threshold into a life-threatening problem, isn't convenient or cheap. [More]
Discovery of molecular reset button for internal body clock could help treat different disorders

Discovery of molecular reset button for internal body clock could help treat different disorders

An international team of scientists has discovered what amounts to a molecular reset button for our internal body clock. Their findings reveal a potential target to treat a range of disorders, from sleep disturbances to other behavioral, cognitive, and metabolic abnormalities, commonly associated with jet lag, shift work and exposure to light at night, as well as with neuropsychiatric conditions such as depression and autism. [More]
Neuronetics completes Series F Financing Round

Neuronetics completes Series F Financing Round

Neuronetics, Inc., the established market leader in transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) technology, announced today the completion of its Series F Financing Round, which included investment from GE Ventures, as well as its original investor base totaling $34.3 million. [More]
Depression, suicidal tendency common among teens who are victims of bullying in school

Depression, suicidal tendency common among teens who are victims of bullying in school

High school students subjected to bullying and other forms of harassment are more likely to report being seriously depressed, consider suicide and carry weapons to school, according to findings from a trio of studies reported at the Pediatric Academic Societies meeting in San Diego. [More]
Vanderbilt biologists explore how electrochemical connections form at molecular and cellular level

Vanderbilt biologists explore how electrochemical connections form at molecular and cellular level

Every time you make a memory, somewhere in your brain a tiny filament reaches out from one neuron and forms an electrochemical connection to a neighboring neuron. [More]
Having best friends helps children with disabilities

Having best friends helps children with disabilities

Dropping off a child at kindergarten for the first time can be one of the most memorable yet terrifying experiences of parenthood. Among the many concerns parents face is the worry whether your child will make friends - a key factor, research shows, in reducing anxiety, depression and the likelihood of being bullied. [More]
Researchers identify potential treatment target for fragile X carriers

Researchers identify potential treatment target for fragile X carriers

Fragile X syndrome, an inherited cause of autism and intellectual disability, can have consequences even for carriers of the disorder who don't have full-blown symptoms. [More]
New study reveals that psychiatric disorders don't predict future violent behavior

New study reveals that psychiatric disorders don't predict future violent behavior

Most psychiatric disorders - including depression -- do not predict future violent behavior, according to new Northwestern Medicine longitudinal study of delinquent youth. The only exception is substance abuse and dependence. [More]
Loyola study reports significant increase in major depression during recent Great Recession

Loyola study reports significant increase in major depression during recent Great Recession

The recent Great Recession was accompanied by a significant and sustained increase in major depression in U.S. adults, according to a Loyola study published in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry. [More]
Study: Long-term exposure to air pollution can damage brain structures, impair cognitive function

Study: Long-term exposure to air pollution can damage brain structures, impair cognitive function

Air pollution, even at moderate levels, has long been recognized as a factor in raising the risk of stroke. A new study led by scientists from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine suggests that long-term exposure can cause damage to brain structures and impair cognitive function in middle-aged and older adults. [More]
Johns Hopkins study finds that nearly one-quarter of ICU survivors experience PTSD

Johns Hopkins study finds that nearly one-quarter of ICU survivors experience PTSD

Post-traumatic stress disorder is often thought of as a symptom of warfare, major catastrophes and assault. It’s rarely considered in patients who survive a critical illness and stay in the intensive care unit (ICU). However, in a recent Johns Hopkins study, researchers found that nearly one-quarter of ICU survivors suffer from PTSD. [More]
New study finds high mortality risks from alcohol and drug abuse among ex-prisoners

New study finds high mortality risks from alcohol and drug abuse among ex-prisoners

Alcohol and drug misuse are responsible for around a third of all deaths in former male prisoners and half in female ex-prisoners, a new study of almost 48000 ex-prisoners published in The Lancet Psychiatry journal has found. Moreover, the research shows that a substantial proportion of these deaths are from preventable causes, including accidents and suicide (42% in men and 70% in women). [More]
Gulf Coast residents continue to struggle with the aftermath of Deepwater Horizon oil spill

Gulf Coast residents continue to struggle with the aftermath of Deepwater Horizon oil spill

Five years ago, on April 20, 2010, the BP Deepwater Horizon oil platform exploded; over the next five months, more than 206 million gallons of oil gushed into the Gulf of Mexico, affecting more than 950 miles of shoreline. [More]
New brain mapping model could improve success rate of transcranial magnetic stimulation

New brain mapping model could improve success rate of transcranial magnetic stimulation

Brain researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have developed a new brain mapping model which could improve the success rate of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in treating conditions including depression, neuropathic pain, and stroke. [More]
May issues of AGA's journals highlight important research updates on liver disease

May issues of AGA's journals highlight important research updates on liver disease

The May issues of AGA's journals -- Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology and Gastroenterology -- highlight important research updates on the most deadly forms of liver disease. [More]
Universal prevention programs can help prevent mental health problems in higher education students

Universal prevention programs can help prevent mental health problems in higher education students

Is it possible to prevent mental health problems in higher education students? The answer is "yes" according to a team of psychologists from Loyola University Chicago who conducted a careful, systematic review of 103 universal interventions involving over 10,000 students enrolled in 2- and 4-year colleges and universities and graduate programs. [More]
Neuroscientists identify novel brain circuitry that increases anxiety during nicotine withdrawal

Neuroscientists identify novel brain circuitry that increases anxiety during nicotine withdrawal

In a promising breakthrough for smokers who are trying to quit, neuroscientists at the University of Massachusetts Medical School and The Scripps Research Institute have identified circuitry in the brain responsible for the increased anxiety commonly experienced during withdrawal from nicotine addiction. [More]
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