Depression News and Research RSS Feed - Depression News and Research

Depression is a serious medical illness that involves the brain. It's more than just a feeling of being "down in the dumps" or "blue" for a few days. If you are one of the more than 20 million people in the United States who have depression, the feelings do not go away. They persist and interfere with your everyday life.
Ex-prisoners with common psychiatric disorders more likely to commit violent crimes after release

Ex-prisoners with common psychiatric disorders more likely to commit violent crimes after release

Ex-prisoners with common psychiatric disorders such as bipolar disorder (manic-depressive disorder) and alcohol and drug abuse are substantially more likely to commit a violent crime after release than other prisoners, according to new research published in The Lancet Psychiatry journal. [More]
Depressive symptoms remain high in coastal areas affected by the Great East Japan Earthquake

Depressive symptoms remain high in coastal areas affected by the Great East Japan Earthquake

A second round of aggregate findings from a study by Tohoku University's Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization (ToMMo) has revealed that depressive symptoms continue to be higher in coastal areas than in inland areas affected by the Great East Japan Earthquake and the tsunami that followed. [More]
Ventura Recovery Center introduces new young adult addiction treatment program

Ventura Recovery Center introduces new young adult addiction treatment program

Ventura Recovery Center, a residential rehab facility in Thousand Oaks, California, has just launched their new young adult addiction treatment program. As a spokesperson for the treatment facility noted, Ventura Recovery Center realizes that their community based model will also be very successful for young adults. [More]
Research findings may help explain why drug treatments for addiction, depression are not always effective

Research findings may help explain why drug treatments for addiction, depression are not always effective

New research may help explain why drug treatments for addiction and depression don't work for some patients. The conditions are linked to reward and aversion responses in the brain. Working in mice, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have discovered brain pathways linked to reward and aversion behaviors are in such close proximity that they unintentionally could be activated at the same time. [More]
Bedwetting symptom may help identify OSA in post-menopausal women

Bedwetting symptom may help identify OSA in post-menopausal women

The results of a new study suggest that nocturnal enuresis, or bedwetting, may be an additional symptom that doctors can look for when assessing post-menopausal women for obstructive sleep apnea. That condition left untreated can lead to serious medical problems, such as cardiovascular disease, as organs are undersupplied with oxygen. [More]
Huntington’s disease prevention breakthrough? An interview with Professor Lesley Jones

Huntington’s disease prevention breakthrough? An interview with Professor Lesley Jones

Huntington’s disease is an inherited disease which, whilst quite rare, is one of the more common inherited neurodegenerative diseases. About 1 in 6,000 people in the UK are at risk and what’s horrible about this disease is that if one of your parents has it, then you have a fifty-fifty chance of inheriting it. [More]
University of Maryland Medicine offers MRI-guided focused ultrasound treatment to Parkinson's patients

University of Maryland Medicine offers MRI-guided focused ultrasound treatment to Parkinson's patients

University of Maryland Medicine (the University of Maryland Medical Center and the University of Maryland School of Medicine) and its Center for Metabolic Imaging and Image-Guided Therapeutics (CMIT) has begun to use MRI-guided focused ultrasound on a deep structure within the brain related to Parkinson's disease - the globus pallidus. [More]
Available cognitive information has no impact on patient's cognitive decline

Available cognitive information has no impact on patient's cognitive decline

Does knowing whether older adults are cognitively impaired affect the treatment they receive from their primary care physician? Does it impact the rate of the patient's cognitive decline? [More]

Researchers explore how different facets of forgiveness affect feelings of depression in aging adults

Forgiveness is a complex process, one often fraught with difficulty and angst. Now, researchers in the University of Missouri College of Human Environmental Sciences studied how different facets of forgiveness affected aging adults' feelings of depression. [More]

ACP urges health professionals to speak out on mass deportation of immigrants

The American College of Physicians (ACP) today called on physicians, individually and collectively, to speak out against proposals to deport the 12 million U.S. residents who lack documentation of legal residency status, citing the adverse impact that mass deportation would have on individual and the health of the public. [More]
SKA2 gene may play a role in development of PTSD

SKA2 gene may play a role in development of PTSD

A gene linked in previous research, appears to predict more severe post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms as well as a thinner cortex in regions of the brain critical for regulating strong emotions and coping with stressful experiences. This study is believed to be the first to show that the spindle and kinetochore-associated complex subunit 2 (SKA2) gene may play a role in the development of PTSD. [More]
Survey: Mental health care inaccessible to many Americans

Survey: Mental health care inaccessible to many Americans

Nearly 90 percent of Americans value mental health and physical health equally, yet about one-third find mental health care inaccessible, and more than four in 10 see cost as a barrier to treatment for most people, according to the results of a new survey released today by the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention and the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention. [More]
New report highlights need for accurate diagnosis and management of bipolar I disorder

New report highlights need for accurate diagnosis and management of bipolar I disorder

A new report launched today, ‘Paying the ultimate price’, highlights the urgent need for accurate diagnosis and management of bipolar I disorder in order to address a significant burden on society, patients and carers. [More]

New way to understand how transcranial magnetic stimulation can give relief for severe depression

A group of UK scientists have found a way of understanding how transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can give relief to severely depressed patients. TMS is used as an alternative to Electro-Convulsive Therapy (ECT), but it is not known how it achieves its therapeutic effect. Understanding how it works may open the door to better, more targeted treatment for depression and other conditions. [More]

Multi-national study identifies behaviour patterns that precede suicide attempts

A major multi-national study of suicides has identified the behaviour patterns which precede many suicide attempts. This may lead to changes in clinical practice in the care of patients affected with depression, as it shows the clinical factors which confer major risk of suicide attempts. [More]
Study: Depressed patients three times more likely to experience frequent chest pain

Study: Depressed patients three times more likely to experience frequent chest pain

Depressed patients have more frequent chest pain even in the absence of coronary artery disease, according to results from the Emory Cardiovascular Biobank presented at ESC Congress today by Dr Salim Hayek, a cardiologist at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, Georgia, US. [More]
Depression, blood pressure predict harmful vascular events in patients with heart disease, diabetes or stroke

Depression, blood pressure predict harmful vascular events in patients with heart disease, diabetes or stroke

Depressive symptoms and extremes of blood pressure predict the highest rates of harmful vascular events in patients with existing heart disease, diabetes or stroke, according to research presented at ESC Congress today by Dr Bhautesh Jani, clinical academic fellow in the Institute of Health and Wellbeing, University of Glasgow, UK. [More]
Depression and self-harm risk increased among goth teenagers

Depression and self-harm risk increased among goth teenagers

New research published in the Lancet indicates that young people who consider themselves to be part of the goth subculture might be at increased risk of depression and self-harm. [More]
Close and supportive friendships in adolescence linked to better health in early adulthood

Close and supportive friendships in adolescence linked to better health in early adulthood

Teens are often warned to beware the undue influence of peer pressure, but new research suggests that following the pack in adolescence may have some unexpected benefits for physical health in early adulthood. [More]
Single dose of cocaine can impair ability to recognise negative emotions

Single dose of cocaine can impair ability to recognise negative emotions

A single dose of cocaine can interfere with the ability to recognise negative emotions, according to new research presented at the ECNP conference in Amsterdam. [More]
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