Depression News and Research RSS Feed - Depression News and Research

Depression is a serious medical illness that involves the brain. It's more than just a feeling of being "down in the dumps" or "blue" for a few days. If you are one of the more than 20 million people in the United States who have depression, the feelings do not go away. They persist and interfere with your everyday life.
Healthcare providers can help parents understand sleep patterns of newborn infant

Healthcare providers can help parents understand sleep patterns of newborn infant

Most parents are not surprised by the irregularity of a newborn infant's sleep patterns, but by six months or so many parents wonder if something is wrong with their baby or their sleeping arrangements if the baby is not sleeping through the night. Healthcare providers, specifically nurse practitioners, can help parents understand what "normal" sleep patterns are for their child, according to researchers. [More]
Certain complementary medicines may cause side effects, warns NPS MedicineWise

Certain complementary medicines may cause side effects, warns NPS MedicineWise

With new information from Melbourne’s Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre revealing that some complementary medicines can interact with cancer treatment, NPS MedicineWise reminds all Australians that complementary medicines can cause side effects, and interact with other over-the-counter and prescription medicines. [More]
Columbia University researchers analyze results of Oregon Health Experiment

Columbia University researchers analyze results of Oregon Health Experiment

Researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health analyzed the results of the Oregon Health Experiment, where eligible uninsured individuals were randomly assigned Medicaid or to stay with their current care. Considered controversial because the experiment found no measurable gains for physical health it did reveal benefits for mental health, financial wellbeing, and preventive screening. [More]
New research finds that more frequent hugs protect people from stress, infection

New research finds that more frequent hugs protect people from stress, infection

Instead of an apple, could a hug-a-day keep the doctor away? According to new research from Carnegie Mellon University, that may not be that far-fetched of an idea. [More]
UC Davis study finds that firearm suicides on the rise among whites

UC Davis study finds that firearm suicides on the rise among whites

While the overall death rate from firearm violence has remained unchanged for more than a decade, the patterns for suicide and homicide have changed dramatically, a UC Davis study on the epidemiology of gun violence from 2003 to 2012 has found. [More]
New study finds high suicide rates among transgender veterans

New study finds high suicide rates among transgender veterans

Veterans of the U.S. armed forces who have received a diagnosis consistent with transgender status are more likely to have serious suicidal thoughts and plans and to attempt suicide. [More]
Researchers identify 53 existing drugs that may block Ebola virus from entering human cells

Researchers identify 53 existing drugs that may block Ebola virus from entering human cells

Researchers found 53 existing drugs that may keep the Ebola virus from entering human cells, a key step in the process of infection, according to a study led by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and the National Institutes of Health, and published today in the Nature Press journal Emerging Microbes and Infections. [More]
Bipolar brain changes both state- and trait-dependent

Bipolar brain changes both state- and trait-dependent

Some of the alterations in brain activation in patients with bipolar disorder are dependent on their current mood, study findings show. [More]
People with severe dementia who live in community settings show more signs of depression

People with severe dementia who live in community settings show more signs of depression

Researchers studied 414 people with severe dementia along with their carers in England, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Spain and Sweden. The study gathered information on quality of life, activities of daily living such as bathing, feeding and dressing and presence of depressive symptoms using standardised measures. [More]
Landmark GRACE study helps shape the practice of geriatric medicine

Landmark GRACE study helps shape the practice of geriatric medicine

The seminal 2007 GRACE study from the Indiana University Center for Aging Research and the Regenstrief Institute has been identified as one of 27 studies conducted over the past quarter century that have helped shape the practice of geriatric medicine. The GRACE study involved community-dwelling seniors and their primary-care physicians in a team approach to optimize health and decrease cost of care. [More]
Sensitive toxicity test aims to detect dangerous side effects in pharmaceutical development

Sensitive toxicity test aims to detect dangerous side effects in pharmaceutical development

Because of undetected toxicity problems, about a third of prescription drugs approved in the U.S. are withdrawn from the market or require added warning labels limiting their use. An exceptionally sensitive toxicity test invented at the University of Utah could make it possible to uncover more of these dangerous side effects early in pharmaceutical development so that fewer patients are given unsafe drugs. [More]
People need to watch distinct warning signs of holiday depression

People need to watch distinct warning signs of holiday depression

While the holidays are a time of merriment and festivities for many, some people struggle with depression during this time of year. [More]
New evidence shows how personality affects health and wellbeing

New evidence shows how personality affects health and wellbeing

Researchers have found new evidence that explains how some aspects of our personality may affect our health and wellbeing, supporting long-observed associations between aspects of human character, physical health and longevity. [More]
ECT improves general neurocognitive function in bipolar patients

ECT improves general neurocognitive function in bipolar patients

A randomised trial shows that electroconvulsive therapy improves overall neurocognition in patients with treatment-resistant bipolar depression. [More]
UTHealth opens Trauma and Grief Center for Youth

UTHealth opens Trauma and Grief Center for Youth

Children who are having difficulty processing trauma or loss can now turn to the Trauma and Grief Center for Youth at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. [More]
Cancer Council urges partners of men diagnosed with prostate cancer to reach out for support

Cancer Council urges partners of men diagnosed with prostate cancer to reach out for support

Cancer Council is calling on partners of men with prostate cancer to reach out for support, with research showing partners experience high levels of distress related to the diagnosis of their loved one. [More]
Report supports potential of focused ultrasound to treat certain OCD patients

Report supports potential of focused ultrasound to treat certain OCD patients

A recently published report in the Journal of Molecular Psychiatry supports the potential of focused ultrasound to treat certain patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). [More]
Laughing gas could be used as treatment for severe depression

Laughing gas could be used as treatment for severe depression

Nitrous oxide, or laughing gas, has shown early promise as a potential treatment for severe depression in patients whose symptoms don't respond to standard therapies. The pilot study, at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, is believed to be the first research in which patients with depression were given laughing gas. [More]
McMaster University researchers identify hormone that contributes to obesity, diabetes

McMaster University researchers identify hormone that contributes to obesity, diabetes

Researchers from McMaster University have identified an important hormone that is elevated in obese people and contributes to obesity and diabetes by inhibiting brown fat activity. [More]
Study highlights causes of postpartum disorders in new mothers

Study highlights causes of postpartum disorders in new mothers

In the days shortly after giving birth, most mothers experience a period of increased calmness and decreased stress responses, but around 20% of mothers experience anxiety. Some women may become depressed, and around one in a thousand can develop psychosis. The latest evidence indicates that these distressing responses to motherhood are still poorly understood, but that animal research could provide valuable clues to their causes. [More]