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Dermatology is the branch of medicine dealing with the skin and its diseases. Dermatologists take care of diseases and cancers of the skin, scalp, hair, and nails.
Researchers develop new drugs for melanoma

Researchers develop new drugs for melanoma

Finding new, more effective and personalised treatments for cancer is the challenge of many researchers. A challenge that has been successfully met by a team from Inserm led by Stéphane Rocchi, which has just synthesised and developed new drugs for melanoma. [More]
Novel photonics device that listens to light can accurately detect skin cancer

Novel photonics device that listens to light can accurately detect skin cancer

Scientists are developing a new photonics device that listens to light and could be capable of detecting skin cancer and other diseases more accurately than ever before, eliminating the need for unnecessary and invasive biopsies. [More]
Small lipid nanocarrier may deliver chemotherapeutic drug more efficiently to brain tumor cells

Small lipid nanocarrier may deliver chemotherapeutic drug more efficiently to brain tumor cells

Great discoveries do come in small packages. Few know that better than Ann-Marie Broome, Ph.D., who feels nanotechnology holds the future of medicine with its ability to deliver powerful drugs in tiny, designer packages. [More]
Incorrect use of sunscreens could increase skin cancer risk

Incorrect use of sunscreens could increase skin cancer risk

How well do you understand sunscreen? For many consumers, the answer is not so well. According to new research, many people are still puzzled by the wide range of SPF numbers on product labels, and some may not be using sunscreen properly, which could increase their skin cancer risk. [More]
Domestic water hardness linked to eczema risk in children

Domestic water hardness linked to eczema risk in children

High levels of water hardness in the home may be linked to the development of eczema early in life, according to a new study led by King's College London. [More]
Soluble factors from white blood cells may improve tissue healing after skin grafting

Soluble factors from white blood cells may improve tissue healing after skin grafting

Extensive burn injuries are usually treated by transplanting layers of skin from other parts of the body. Although this is a commonly used method, the wounds do not always heal completely. [More]

Teledermatology improves patients' access to dermatologists

Teledermatology significantly improved access to specialized skin care for a group of patients that traditionally has limited options, according to an independent study led by researchers at the RAND Corporation and Harvard Medical School's Department of Health. The findings appear in a JAMA Dermatology article published online May 4. [More]
Men need to brush up on their knowledge of skin cancer

Men need to brush up on their knowledge of skin cancer

Skin cancer can affect anyone, regardless of age, race or gender. When it comes to skin cancer prevention and detection, however, it seems that men need to brush up on their knowledge. [More]
New research on EdnrB, Wnt signaling pathways could lead to therapies for skin pigment disorders

New research on EdnrB, Wnt signaling pathways could lead to therapies for skin pigment disorders

A pair of molecular signals controls skin and hair color in mice and humans — and could be targeted by new drugs to treat skin pigment disorders like vitiligo, according to a report by scientists at NYU Langone Medical Center. [More]
Particle Metrix reports on use of Zetaview particle characterization system at University Hospital of Erlangen

Particle Metrix reports on use of Zetaview particle characterization system at University Hospital of Erlangen

Particle Metrix, developers of versatile particle characterization solutions for the life sciences, report on the work of the Baur Laboratory in the Department of Dermatology at the University Hospital of Erlangen. The Group, which is part of the Translational Research Center at the University, is working to quantify extracellular vesicles in plasma of patients. [More]
Study links age-related changes in human pancreas to diabetes development

Study links age-related changes in human pancreas to diabetes development

A Stanford-led national collaboration to procure and analyze human pancreatic tissue from deceased donors illustrates how the organ's function changes as we age, and could point the way toward new diabetes treatments. [More]
Lilly's ixekizumab (Taltz) granted EC marketing authorisation for treatment of plaque psoriasis

Lilly's ixekizumab (Taltz) granted EC marketing authorisation for treatment of plaque psoriasis

Eli Lilly and Company announced today that the European Commission has granted marketing authorisation for ixekizumab (Taltz) for the treatment of moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis in adults in the European Union (EU) who are candidates for systemic therapy. [More]
Protea signs license agreement with Yale to develop new technology for detecting malignant melanoma

Protea signs license agreement with Yale to develop new technology for detecting malignant melanoma

Protea Biosciences Group, Inc. announced today that it had entered into an exclusive license agreement with Yale University for new technology to improve the differential diagnosis of malignant melanoma. [More]
Derivatives of female sex hormones can influence natural melanin production, study suggests

Derivatives of female sex hormones can influence natural melanin production, study suggests

When skin cells responsible for pigmentation are exposed to estrogen or progesterone, the cells respond by adjusting their melanin production, resulting in either skin darkening or lightening. Although pregnant women often experience alterations in skin pigmentation, the reason for the changes has long puzzled physicians. [More]
New study explores factors that affect Medicare patient’s adherence to psoriasis biologic therapies

New study explores factors that affect Medicare patient’s adherence to psoriasis biologic therapies

About half of Medicare patients who start taking biologic therapies for moderate to severe plaque psoriasis stop within a year, according to a new study led by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Study shows canine AD shares significant features of human version

Study shows canine AD shares significant features of human version

Atopic dermatitis (AD), a chronic inflammatory skin condition and the most common form of eczema, is estimated to afflict as much as 10 percent of the U.S. population, and is much more common now than it was 50 years ago. Veterinary clinical estimates also show that approximately 10 percent of dogs have atopic dermatitis. [More]
EADV's Global Call to Action urges policy makers to protect Europe’s outdoor workers from UV-induced skin cancer

EADV's Global Call to Action urges policy makers to protect Europe’s outdoor workers from UV-induced skin cancer

The European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology launched a Global Call to Action urging policy makers, employers, workers’ organisations and physicians to protect Europe’s outdoor workers from skin cancer caused by solar UV-radiation. [More]
Immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab shrinks tumors in patients with Merkel cell carcinoma

Immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab shrinks tumors in patients with Merkel cell carcinoma

In a clinical trial of the immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab, half of 25 patients with a rare type of virus-linked skin cancer called Merkel cell carcinoma experienced substantial tumor shrinkage lasting nearly three times as long, on average, than with conventional chemotherapy. [More]
Tips to help treat corns and calluses

Tips to help treat corns and calluses

Ever wonder what causes corns and calluses? According to dermatologists from the American Academy of Dermatology, these hard, thickened areas of skin form as a result of friction or pressure on the skin. In fact, they say, corns and calluses develop naturally to help protect the skin underneath them. [More]
Increased expression of VEGF-A promotes three common aging-related eye conditions

Increased expression of VEGF-A promotes three common aging-related eye conditions

A Massachusetts General Hospital investigator has found that increased expression of the angiogenic factor VEGF-A promotes three common aging-related eye conditions - both versions of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and also cataracts - in an animal model. [More]
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