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When your kidneys are healthy, they clean your blood. They also make hormones that keep your bones strong and your blood healthy. When your kidneys fail, you need treatment to replace the work your kidneys used to do. Unless you have a kidney transplant, you will need a treatment called dialysis.

There are two main types of dialysis: hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis. Both types filter your blood to rid your body of harmful wastes, extra salt and water. Hemodialysis does that with a machine. Peritoneal dialysis uses the lining of your abdomen, called the peritoneal membrane, to filter your blood. Each type has both risks and benefits. They also require that you follow a special diet. Your doctor can help you decide the best type of dialysis for you.
Dynamic nuclear polarization: an interview with Professor Robert Griffin, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Dynamic nuclear polarization: an interview with Professor Robert Griffin, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

DNP, or dynamic nuclear polarization, is an NMR technique which transfers polarization from the electron spins onto the nuclear spins, using constant microwave irradiation to enable the transfer. [More]
Freedom portable driver receives FDA approval for use with SynCardia Total Artificial Heart

Freedom portable driver receives FDA approval for use with SynCardia Total Artificial Heart

The Freedom portable driver received FDA approval on June 26, 2014 for use with the SynCardia temporary Total Artificial Heart as a bridge to transplantation in cardiac transplant candidates who are clinically stable. [More]
NxStage Freedom Tour launched to educate dialysis patients

NxStage Freedom Tour launched to educate dialysis patients

NxStage Medical, Inc., a leading manufacturer of innovative dialysis products, announced today the launch of the NxStage Freedom Tour, a two week road trip in a recreational vehicle to promote and educate dialysis patients on the benefits of home hemodialysis with the NxStage System One. [More]
Pharmalink’s core patents for Nefecon issued in United States, Europe, China and Hong Kong

Pharmalink’s core patents for Nefecon issued in United States, Europe, China and Hong Kong

Pharmalink AB, a specialty pharma company focused on orphan and niche products, has had core patents for its late-stage clinical candidate Nefecon® issued in the key markets United States, Europe, China and Hong Kong. A patent is pending in Japan. [More]
Older kidney donors enjoy similar life expectancy as people who did not donate their kidneys

Older kidney donors enjoy similar life expectancy as people who did not donate their kidneys

Previous studies linking older age with kidney and heart disease have raised concerns about the safety of living kidney donation among older adults. [More]
Study: Older kidney donors enjoy similar longevity, cardiovascular health as other healthy individuals

Study: Older kidney donors enjoy similar longevity, cardiovascular health as other healthy individuals

Older kidney donors enjoy similar longevity and cardiovascular health as other healthy mature individuals, according to a new study published in the American Journal of Transplantation. [More]
Fabry disease awareness: an interview with Dr. Hartmann Wellhoefer, Head of Medical Affairs, Rare Disease, Shire

Fabry disease awareness: an interview with Dr. Hartmann Wellhoefer, Head of Medical Affairs, Rare Disease, Shire

Lysosomes are subcellular organelles that are present in most cells, with the major exception of red blood cells. [More]
Medicare proposes to slightly raise kidney care payments

Medicare proposes to slightly raise kidney care payments

The CMS is proposing changes to payment policies for the treatment of end-stage renal disease that the agency estimates would increase payments by about 0.3 percent, or $30 million, in 2015. [More]
Acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease are interconnected, say GW researchers

Acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease are interconnected, say GW researchers

For more than 40 years, physicians have treated diminished kidney function as two distinct syndromes: acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, recent epidemiologic and mechanistic studies suggest the two syndromes are not distinct entities, but interconnected. [More]
Cordis launches SABER Catheter for treatment of patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease

Cordis launches SABER Catheter for treatment of patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease

Cordis Corporation announced today the launch of its SABER PTA Dilatation Catheter ("SABER Catheter") for the treatment of patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD). [More]

PuriCore International acquired by Cantel Medical

Cantel Medical Corp., today announced that the company has successfully completed the acquisition of PuriCore International Limited., a wholly-owned subsidiary of PuriCore plc. [More]

Researcher develops protector belt for patients receiving peritoneal dialysis

A lack of comfortable products for the safety of the patient requiring peritoneal dialysis-indicated to clean waste products from the blood when the kidneys fail- drove a student of the Higher Technological Institute of Choapas, Veracruz in the east coast of México, to develop an ergonomic support, allowing that the catheter inserted through the abdominal wall to remain in place and be protected from the invasion of microorganisms. [More]
Improved physical fitness reduces risk of CKD in patients with Type 2 diabetes

Improved physical fitness reduces risk of CKD in patients with Type 2 diabetes

Adults with Type 2 diabetes who improve their physical fitness lower their chances of getting chronic kidney disease (CKD), and if they already have kidney damage, they can improve their kidney function. [More]
Research roundup: Improving colon cancer screening; disparities in heart care; Medicaid expansion's effect on cities

Research roundup: Improving colon cancer screening; disparities in heart care; Medicaid expansion's effect on cities

This report estimated the effect of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) on 14 large and diverse cities: Los Angeles, Chicago, Houston, Philadelphia, Phoenix, Indianapolis, Columbus, Charlotte, Detroit, Memphis, Seattle, Denver, Atlanta, and Miami. [More]
UC Irvine Health to use $3.4 million NIH grant to examine "Transition of Care in CKD"

UC Irvine Health to use $3.4 million NIH grant to examine "Transition of Care in CKD"

UC Irvine Health will use a $3.4 million grant from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases of the National Institutes of Health to examine the "Transition of Care in Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)." [More]
Kareo and Falcon HER help nephrology practices leverage cloud-based technology

Kareo and Falcon HER help nephrology practices leverage cloud-based technology

Kareo Inc., the leading cloud-based medical office software and services provider for small medical practices, today announced the launch of a new cooperative relationship with Falcon EHR, a division of DaVita HealthCare Partners Inc.. [More]
State highlights: New La. abortion restrictions; new Mass. hospital deal; Medicare and ambulances in N.J.

State highlights: New La. abortion restrictions; new Mass. hospital deal; Medicare and ambulances in N.J.

A selection of health policy stories from Louisiana, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Georgia, Missouri, Maryland, New York, Kansas and Washington state. [More]
First Edition: June 13, 2014

First Edition: June 13, 2014

Today's headlines include various updates on what Virginia lawmakers did in an attempt to resolve the state's budget impasse and Medicaid expansion debate. [More]
Aetna partners with Fresenius Medical Care to improve lives of people with end stage renal disease

Aetna partners with Fresenius Medical Care to improve lives of people with end stage renal disease

Fresenius Medical Care announced today a collaborative care model designed to improve the quality of care for Aetna's Medicare Advantage members who have end stage renal disease, while lowering health care costs. [More]
U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends hepatitis B screening for high risk individuals

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends hepatitis B screening for high risk individuals

A simple blood test can detect if a person is one of the two billion people worldwide infected with hepatitis B. And now the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends that all teens and adults who are high risk for hepatitis B get screened for the infection. [More]