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When your kidneys are healthy, they clean your blood. They also make hormones that keep your bones strong and your blood healthy. When your kidneys fail, you need treatment to replace the work your kidneys used to do. Unless you have a kidney transplant, you will need a treatment called dialysis.

There are two main types of dialysis: hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis. Both types filter your blood to rid your body of harmful wastes, extra salt and water. Hemodialysis does that with a machine. Peritoneal dialysis uses the lining of your abdomen, called the peritoneal membrane, to filter your blood. Each type has both risks and benefits. They also require that you follow a special diet. Your doctor can help you decide the best type of dialysis for you.
Retained metabolites may contribute to impaired cognitive function in kidney failure patients

Retained metabolites may contribute to impaired cognitive function in kidney failure patients

Retention of certain metabolites in the blood may contribute to cognitive impairment in patients with kidney failure, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. [More]
AJCC article outlines role of LTAC hospitals in health care continuum

AJCC article outlines role of LTAC hospitals in health care continuum

Advances in technology have helped more patients survive acute illness and trauma, and these patients are increasingly transferred to long-term acute care hospitals. [More]
Red meat intake may increase risk of developing end-stage renal disease

Red meat intake may increase risk of developing end-stage renal disease

A new study indicates that red meat intake may increase the risk of kidney failure in the general population, and substituting red meat with alternative sources of protein from time to time may significantly reduce this risk. [More]
Two new studies find potential genetic cause and new treatment method for autoimmune diseases

Two new studies find potential genetic cause and new treatment method for autoimmune diseases

The American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association, Inc. is spotlighting two new research studies originally reported in ScienceDaily. [More]
FDA approves new ExAblate Neuro to treat patients with essential tremor

FDA approves new ExAblate Neuro to treat patients with essential tremor

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved the first focused ultrasound device to treat essential tremor in patients who have not responded to medication. ExAblate Neuro uses magnetic resonance (MR) images taken during the procedure to deliver focused ultrasound to destroy brain tissue in a tiny area thought to be responsible for causing tremors. [More]
Innovative organ donation program allows living donors to donate kidney in advance

Innovative organ donation program allows living donors to donate kidney in advance

Gift certificate, layaway plan or voucher. Call it what you want, but an innovative organ donation program initiated at UCLA has started to spread to other transplant programs across the United States. [More]
New strategy treats fatal autoimmune disease without outward off-target effects

New strategy treats fatal autoimmune disease without outward off-target effects

In a study with potentially major implications for the future treatment of autoimmunity and related conditions, scientists from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have found a way to remove the subset of antibody-making cells that cause an autoimmune disease, without harming the rest of the immune system. [More]
Study links alpha-defensin genes to IgA nephropathy risk

Study links alpha-defensin genes to IgA nephropathy risk

A gene which forms part of our body's first line of defence against infection may be associated with an increased risk with a type of kidney disease, research involving academics at The University of Nottingham has discovered. [More]
Virtual tissue technology helps identify new drug target to combat polycystic kidney disease

Virtual tissue technology helps identify new drug target to combat polycystic kidney disease

Using virtual tissue technology, researchers at Indiana University have identified a potential new drug target in the fight against polycystic kidney disease, an illness with no effective FDA-approved treatment that affects 200,000 people per year in the United States. [More]
Hyde Park artist draws daily creative inspiration from chronic health experience

Hyde Park artist draws daily creative inspiration from chronic health experience

A kidney transplantation means much more than good health to Jason E. Jones. The 53 year-old Hyde Park artist and Loyola Medicine patient draws daily creative inspiration from his chronic health experience. [More]
CD Laboratory at MedUni Vienna explores new therapeutic approaches to enhance peritoneal dialysis

CD Laboratory at MedUni Vienna explores new therapeutic approaches to enhance peritoneal dialysis

One of the main functions of the kidneys is to filter metabolic products out of the blood. If the kidneys are no longer able to do this, the blood has to be artificially purified and drained of excess fluid. [More]
New CAR-based therapy using combined cancer target could be effective for solid tumors

New CAR-based therapy using combined cancer target could be effective for solid tumors

Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs), engineered from a patient's own immune cells, have been successful for treating blood cancers, but using CARs for solid tumors has been limited by side effects to normal tissues containing the protein targeted by the engineered cells. [More]
Kidney transplant recipients with inflammation prior to surgery more likely to develop diabetes

Kidney transplant recipients with inflammation prior to surgery more likely to develop diabetes

Up to 30 percent of people who receive organ transplants will develop diabetes, but researchers are unsure why. Although doctors typically blame immunosuppressive drugs that transplant recipients take to prevent organ rejection, it's unclear why some people develop the lifelong disorder, while others do not. [More]
Study finds nearly half of older Americans spend heavily on end-of-life care

Study finds nearly half of older Americans spend heavily on end-of-life care

Last-ditch, high-tech heroic treatments. Days in the hospital intensive care unit. You might think this is what makes dying in America so expensive - and that it's where we should focus efforts to spend the nation's healthcare dollars more wisely. [More]
New FcMBL-based pathogen-detecting assay could rapidly detect systemic infections

New FcMBL-based pathogen-detecting assay could rapidly detect systemic infections

To date, there are no methods that can quickly and accurately detect pathogens in blood to allow the diagnosis of systemic bloodstream infections that can lead to life-threatening sepsis. [More]
Blood pressure medications can lower stroke, heart attack risk in patients with end-stage renal disease

Blood pressure medications can lower stroke, heart attack risk in patients with end-stage renal disease

Two classes of blood pressure medications, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs), are associated with a 16% lower risk of strokes, heart attacks and death in patients with end-stage renal disease who are undergoing peritoneal dialysis, a new study in the journal, Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation, reports. [More]
New vaccine found safe, effective against Toxic Shock Syndrome

New vaccine found safe, effective against Toxic Shock Syndrome

Toxic Shock Syndrome (TSS) is a severe circulatory and organ failure caused by bacterial toxins, usually triggered by bacteria from the Staphylococcus group. Researchers from MedUni Vienna's Department of Clinical Pharmacology, in collaboration with the company Biomedizinische Forschungsgesellschaft mbH in Vienna, have now developed the world's first safe and effective vaccine against this disease and successfully tested it in a Phase I trial. [More]
New method helps speed up bacterial identification

New method helps speed up bacterial identification

Pinpointing the type of bacteria that are at the root of an infection in clinical samples removed from living tissues, such as blood, urine or joint fluids, to quickly identify the best anti-microbial therapy still poses a formidable challenge. [More]
Post-CABG hospital stays longer in severely obese patients

Post-CABG hospital stays longer in severely obese patients

Severely obese patients have longer hospital stays after coronary artery bypass grafting than patients with normal body mass index, which may be due to their increased infection risk, Canadian researchers report. [More]
Eculizumab drug provides new hope for kidney failure patients

Eculizumab drug provides new hope for kidney failure patients

Surgeons at the University of Illinois Hospital & Health Sciences System have — for the first time — used an orphan drug to prevent rejection of a kidney transplanted from a living donor with a mismatched blood type. [More]
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