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Endocrinology is a branch of medicine dealing with disorder of the endocrine system and its specific secretions called hormones, the integration of developmental events such as proliferation, growth, and differentiation (including histogenesis and organogenesis) and the coordination of metabolism, respiration, excretion, movement, reproduction, and sensory perception depend on chemical cues, substances synthesised and secreted by specialized cells.
Effects of BPA on embryos in females undergoing IVF

Effects of BPA on embryos in females undergoing IVF

Bisphenol A (BPA) is an industrial chemical that is used in a variety of consumer products, such as water bottles, metal food and beverage containers, and thermal paper cash register receipts. [More]
Neighbourhood deprivation link to diabetes strengthened

Neighbourhood deprivation link to diabetes strengthened

A large study based on a policy of semi-randomised dispersal of refugees within a country supports the notion that living in a deprived neighbourhood can increase people's risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. [More]
Probiotic supplements may help treat post-menopausal osteoporosis

Probiotic supplements may help treat post-menopausal osteoporosis

Probiotic supplements protected female mice from the loss of bone density that occurs after having their ovaries removed, researchers at Emory University School of Medicine and Georgia State University have shown. [More]
Multidisciplinary experts assess effects of osteoporosis drugs on fracture healing

Multidisciplinary experts assess effects of osteoporosis drugs on fracture healing

In people with osteoporosis, one fracture often leads to more fractures, and potentially a future of pain, disability, and poor quality of life. While studies have shown that such high-risk patients benefit from appropriate medication to reduce future fracture risk, more research is needed on the effect of osteoporosis medications on fracture healing. [More]
Little and often gives exercise benefits in Type 2 diabetes

Little and often gives exercise benefits in Type 2 diabetes

Sedentary, overweight adults with Type 2 diabetes can improve their cardiometabolic profile by engaging in very brief but regular periods of light walking or resistance exercise, research suggests. [More]
Endocrine Society urges physicians to increase screening for primary aldosteronism

Endocrine Society urges physicians to increase screening for primary aldosteronism

The Endocrine Society today issued a Clinical Practice Guideline calling on physicians to ramp up screening for primary aldosteronism, a common cause of high blood pressure. [More]
GLP-1 receptor agonist may benefit high-risk diabetes

GLP-1 receptor agonist may benefit high-risk diabetes

Research shows that using a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist instead of a rapid-acting insulin analogue at mealtimes can reduce glycaemic variability in high-risk patients with Type 2 diabetes. [More]
Scientists uncover molecular identity of previously unknown Glima molecule in Type 1 diabetes

Scientists uncover molecular identity of previously unknown Glima molecule in Type 1 diabetes

Scientists have solved a decades-old medical mystery by finally identifying a previously unknown molecule which is attacked by the immune system in people with Type 1 diabetes. [More]
Infant BMI better predicts early childhood obesity

Infant BMI better predicts early childhood obesity

Babies with a high body mass index (BMI) at age two months are at risk for obesity at age two years, say pediatric researchers. The authors, in an online study published today in Pediatrics, say that BMI better predicts early childhood obesity than weight-for-length, the current standard measurement. [More]
Assessing body composition may help predict cardiovascular and total mortality

Assessing body composition may help predict cardiovascular and total mortality

Researchers from the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA found that cardiovascular disease patients who have high muscle mass and low fat mass have a lower mortality risk than those with other body compositions. The findings also suggest that regardless of a person's level of fat mass, a higher level of muscle mass helps reduce the risk of death. [More]
Low levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D highly prevalent among children with type 1 diabetes

Low levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D highly prevalent among children with type 1 diabetes

During the past two decades, vitamin D status, defined as serum concentration of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, has emerged as a predictor of key clinical outcomes including bone health, glucose metabolism, cardiovascular health, immune health and survival. [More]
Study offers clearer understanding of how obese people can sustain weight loss

Study offers clearer understanding of how obese people can sustain weight loss

Maintaining a stable weight loss is the biggest struggle for obese individuals, yet new research from University of Copenhagen have allowed researchers new insights into the complex processes involved in obesity and especially weight loss in obesity. It is now possible to offer overweight people a clearer understanding of how to sustain weight loss. [More]
VIEKIRAX and EXVIERA achieve high SVR rates in GT1 and GT4 hepatitis C virus infected patients

VIEKIRAX and EXVIERA achieve high SVR rates in GT1 and GT4 hepatitis C virus infected patients

AbbVie, a global biopharmaceutical company, today announced new real-world data showing 96 percent of genotype 1 (GT1) patients (n=486/505 assessable for analysis) and 100 percent (n=53/53) of genotype 4 (GT4) patients achieved sustained virologic response at 12 weeks post-treatment (SVR12). [More]
WHO global diabetes report shows Australia must lift its game

WHO global diabetes report shows Australia must lift its game

Australia should do more to prevent diabetes and provide better care for those living with the disease, according to an author of the World Health Organisation’s (WHO) first ever global diabetes report. [More]
Research looks at effects of traumatic childbirth on midwives and obstetricians

Research looks at effects of traumatic childbirth on midwives and obstetricians

When complications arise in the delivery room that lead to traumatic childbirth, clinicians providing care may feel upset and experience secondary traumatic stress. [More]
Traumatic childbirth may impact healthcare professionals' mental health

Traumatic childbirth may impact healthcare professionals' mental health

When complications arise in the delivery room that lead to traumatic childbirth, clinicians providing care may feel upset and experience secondary traumatic stress. A new study published in Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, a journal of the Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology, found that feelings of blame and guilt dominate when midwives and obstetricians struggle to cope with the aftermath of a traumatic childbirth, but such events also made them think more about the meaning of life and helped them become better midwives and doctors. [More]
Infant daughters may show early signs of PCOS from mothers

Infant daughters may show early signs of PCOS from mothers

The infant daughters of women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) show a higher level of an enzyme that activates testosterone and may be an early sign of developing the complex genetic disease, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study. [More]
Liraglutide drug makes highly desirable foods less appealing to people

Liraglutide drug makes highly desirable foods less appealing to people

Understanding the motivations that drive humans to eat is an important consideration in the development of weight loss therapies. Now a study led by researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center helps explain how the diabetes and weight loss drug liraglutide acts on brain receptors to make enticing foods seems less desirable. [More]
Adding liraglutide to diet and exercise plan may help people lose weight, reduce diabetes risk

Adding liraglutide to diet and exercise plan may help people lose weight, reduce diabetes risk

For people with prediabetes who are overweight or obese, adding 3.0 mg of liraglutide for three years to a diet and exercise plan may lead to major health improvements, new industry-sponsored research suggests. The results will be presented Monday, April 4, at ENDO 2016, the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society, in Boston. [More]
Very few patients use FDA-approved medications for weight loss, new study suggests

Very few patients use FDA-approved medications for weight loss, new study suggests

Despite guidelines that advocate the use of weight loss medications to treat obesity, and the availability of FDA approved medications, very few patients use this treatment option, a new study suggests. The results will be presented Sunday, April 3, at ENDO 2016, the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society, in Boston. [More]
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