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Endocrinology is a branch of medicine dealing with disorder of the endocrine system and its specific secretions called hormones, the integration of developmental events such as proliferation, growth, and differentiation (including histogenesis and organogenesis) and the coordination of metabolism, respiration, excretion, movement, reproduction, and sensory perception depend on chemical cues, substances synthesised and secreted by specialized cells.
Skin phenotype of pediatric eczema opens door for personalized treatment of AD in infants

Skin phenotype of pediatric eczema opens door for personalized treatment of AD in infants

Researchers for the first time have identified the skin phenotype of pediatric eczema or atopic dermatitis (AD) in infants, opening the door for personalized treatment approaches for young children with eczema. [More]
Mount Sinai and TJU researchers awarded grant for UM research

Mount Sinai and TJU researchers awarded grant for UM research

Uveal melanoma (UM) is the second most common type of skin cancer. Approximately 50 percent of patients will develop metastasis or spread of their cancer, most commonly to the liver. [More]
ATA announces winner of John B. Stanbury Thyroid Pathophysiology Medal

ATA announces winner of John B. Stanbury Thyroid Pathophysiology Medal

The American Thyroid Association will present the John B. Stanbury Thyroid Pathophysiology Medal to Kenneth D. Burman, M.D. at the ATA's 86th Annual Meeting, September 21-25, 2016, in Denver, Colorado. [More]
Study finds link between gut flora and fat distribution in children and teenagers

Study finds link between gut flora and fat distribution in children and teenagers

Children and teenagers who are obese have different microorganisms living in the digestive tract than their lean counterparts, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
Exposure to EDCs may reduce vitamin D levels in the bloodstream

Exposure to EDCs may reduce vitamin D levels in the bloodstream

Exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) and other endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) may reduce levels of vitamin D in the bloodstream, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
Desalination can increase prevalence of inadequate iodine intake

Desalination can increase prevalence of inadequate iodine intake

Hebrew University study suggests that desalination can dramatically increase the prevalence of inadequate iodine intake. [More]
BIDMC scientists shed light on how hunger affects the brain’s response to visual food cues

BIDMC scientists shed light on how hunger affects the brain’s response to visual food cues

Our brain pays more attention to food when we are hungry than when we are sated. Now a team of scientists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center has shed light on how the needs of the body affect the way the brain processes visual food cues. [More]
Social, emotional factors may raise risk of postpartum depression in mothers of preterm infants

Social, emotional factors may raise risk of postpartum depression in mothers of preterm infants

Postpartum depression is the most common complication of pregnancy and childbirth, affecting up to 15 percent of all women within the first three months following delivery. [More]
Study provides insight into how weight-loss drug acts in the brain

Study provides insight into how weight-loss drug acts in the brain

A weight-loss drug dampened the response to food cues in regions of the brain associated with attention and emotion, leading to decreases in caloric intake, weight and body mass index (BMI), a team led by scientists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center reported. [More]
Measuring blood levels of newly identified hormone may improve diagnosis of PCOS in teenagers

Measuring blood levels of newly identified hormone may improve diagnosis of PCOS in teenagers

Measuring blood levels of the recently discovered hormone irisin may improve diagnosis rates of teenagers with polycystic ovary syndrome, according to research presented today at the 55th Annual European Society for Paediatric Endocrinology Meeting. [More]
Study opens door to new class of therapies for Ras-dependent cancers

Study opens door to new class of therapies for Ras-dependent cancers

New research from The Tisch Cancer Institute at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai identifies a protein that may be an unexplored target to develop new cancer therapies. [More]
CHORI scientists reveal improved protective antibody responses to new meningococcal vaccine

CHORI scientists reveal improved protective antibody responses to new meningococcal vaccine

A study conducted by UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute scientists shows greatly improved protective antibody responses to a new mutant vaccine antigen for prevention of disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis - also known as meningococcus - that has the potential to improve the current vaccines for meningitis. [More]
Smartphone application may be feasible, effective sexual health education tool for teenage girls

Smartphone application may be feasible, effective sexual health education tool for teenage girls

Across the globe, there is increased focus on developing interventions related to comprehensive sexual health education for adolescents, with the ultimate goal of combatting unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections. [More]
Researchers unlock genetic code that disrupts response to breast cancer therapy

Researchers unlock genetic code that disrupts response to breast cancer therapy

Scientists may have unlocked the genetic code that determines why many patients with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer fail to respond to the widely used drug tamoxifen. [More]
Targeting specific neurons in the brain may provide effective treatment for anxiety

Targeting specific neurons in the brain may provide effective treatment for anxiety

Clinical anxiety affects up to 30 percent of Americans who are in great need of better treatments with fewer side effects. [More]
Selenium status linked to cancer risk

Selenium status linked to cancer risk

As a nutritional trace element, selenium forms an essential part of our diet. In collaboration with the International Agency for Research on Cancer, researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin have been able to show that high blood selenium levels are associated with a decreased risk of developing liver cancer. [More]
New stem-cell model of heart tissue unravels mechanisms linked to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

New stem-cell model of heart tissue unravels mechanisms linked to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

Using advanced stem cell technology, scientists from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have created a model of a heart condition called hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) — an excessive thickening of the heart that is associated with a number of rare and common illnesses, some of which have a strong genetic component. [More]
MRI-guided focused ultrasound treatment improves quality of life in patients with essential tremor

MRI-guided focused ultrasound treatment improves quality of life in patients with essential tremor

Treatment with MRI-guided focused ultrasound significantly improves tremors and quality of life in patients with essential tremor (ET), the most common movement disorder, according to a study published in the August 25 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
UT Southwestern researchers identify protein that can kick-start more efficient, healthful breakdown of fat

UT Southwestern researchers identify protein that can kick-start more efficient, healthful breakdown of fat

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have found that a protein often located on the surface of fat droplets within cells - and especially abundant in the muscles of endurance athletes - can kick-start the more efficient and healthful breakdown of fat. [More]
Developmental exposure to fracking chemicals may pose threat to fertility

Developmental exposure to fracking chemicals may pose threat to fertility

More than 15 million Americans live within a one-mile radius of unconventional oil and gas operations. UOGs combine directional drilling and hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking," to release natural gas from underground rock. [More]
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