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Epilepsy is a group of disorders marked by problems in the normal functioning of the brain. These problems can produce seizures, unusual body movements, a loss of consciousness or changes in consciousness, as well as mental problems or problems with the senses.
Sea lions exposed to toxin in algae develop form of epilepsy that is similar to humans

Sea lions exposed to toxin in algae develop form of epilepsy that is similar to humans

California sea lions exposed to a toxin in algae develop a form of epilepsy that is similar to one in humans, according to a new study led by Stanford University School of Medicine researchers. [More]

CorTechs secures new Series B financing

Medical software developer CorTechs Labs, Inc. is pleased to announce it has secured new Series B financing to support the company's rapid growth. The round was led by Genting Berhad via its indirect wholly-owned subsidiary, Dragasac Limited, a company incorporated in the Isle of Man. [More]
Researchers discover USP9X gene that sheds new light on mysteries of brain development, disability

Researchers discover USP9X gene that sheds new light on mysteries of brain development, disability

Research from the University of Adelaide has confirmed that a gene linked to intellectual disability is critical to the earliest stages of the development of human brains. [More]

Researcher detects higher rate of seizures among children with autism who were fed soy formula

A University of Wisconsin-Madison researcher has detected a higher rate of seizures among children with autism who were fed infant formula containing soy protein rather than milk protein. [More]

Children with ASD and ADHD are more likely to exhibit gender variance

John F. Strang, PsyD, a pediatric neuropsychologist at Children's National Health System, and colleagues, found that children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) were more likely to exhibit gender variance, the wish to be the other gender, than children with no neurodevelopmental disorder, or a medical neurodevelopmental disorder such as epilepsy or neurofibromatosis. [More]

Knopp and NIAID collaborate to investigate eosinophil-lowering effects of dexpramipexole

Knopp Biosciences LLC today announced a second collaboration with the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), to investigate the eosinophil-lowering effects of the investigational drug dexpramipexole. [More]
People with prehypertension more likely to develop stroke

People with prehypertension more likely to develop stroke

Anyone with blood pressure that's higher than the optimal 120/80 mmHg may be more likely to have a stroke, according to a new meta-analysis published in the March 12, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Teenagers with autism spectrum disorder are more likely to wish to be another gender

Teenagers with autism spectrum disorder are more likely to wish to be another gender

Children and teenagers with an autism spectrum disorder or those who have attention deficit and hyperactivity problems are much more likely to wish to be another gender. [More]
Three innovative tools to detect, test and initiate personalized drug treatment for seizures

Three innovative tools to detect, test and initiate personalized drug treatment for seizures

A team of researchers from the National Institutes of Health, Emory University and Cedars-Sinai - specialists in identifying and treating very rare diseases - used three innovative tools to detect a previously unknown gene mutation, test potential therapies in the lab, and initiate personalized drug treatment for a boy with a lifelong history of uncontrollable seizures that caused significant impact on his cognitive and social development. [More]
Damage to brain cells plays role in development of epilepsy after traumatic brain injury

Damage to brain cells plays role in development of epilepsy after traumatic brain injury

Traumatic brain injury is a risk factor for epilepsy, though the relationship is not understood. A new study in mice, published in Cerebral Cortex, identifies increased levels of a specific neurotransmitter as a contributing factor connecting traumatic brain injury (TBI) to post-traumatic epilepsy. The findings suggest that damage to brain cells called interneurons disrupts neurotransmitter levels and plays a role in the development of epilepsy after a traumatic brain injury. [More]

Genetic basis of hereditary disease causes severe brain atrophy in Jews of Moroccan ancestry

Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) researchers have unraveled the genetic basis of a hereditary disease that causes severe brain atrophy, mental retardation and epilepsy in Jews of Moroccan ancestry, according to a study published this week online in the Journal of Medical Genetics. [More]
FDA accepts Lundbeck's carbamazepine NDA for review

FDA accepts Lundbeck's carbamazepine NDA for review

Lundbeck LLC today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has accepted for review a New Drug Application (NDA) for its investigational therapy intravenous carbamazepine, an intravenous formulation of the anti-epileptic drug (AED) carbamazepine. An action letter is anticipated before the end of 2014. Carbella is the proposed U.S. trade name for intravenous carbamazepine. [More]
People with type 2 diabetes have epigenetic changes on DNA

People with type 2 diabetes have epigenetic changes on DNA

People with type 2 diabetes have epigenetic changes on their DNA that healthy individuals do not have. This has been shown in a major study by researchers at Lund University. The researchers also found epigenetic changes in a large number of genes that contribute to reduced insulin production. [More]

National clinical trial to test new avenue for tinnitus treatment

UT Southwestern Medical Center will take part in a national clinical trial to test a device that could provide relief for people suffering from tinnitus, a persistent buzzing or ringing sound in the ears. The device uses nervous system stimuli to rewire parts of the brain, in hopes of significantly reducing or removing tinnitus. [More]
Alzheimer's disease may contribute to close to as many deaths as heart disease

Alzheimer's disease may contribute to close to as many deaths as heart disease

A new study suggests that Alzheimer's disease may contribute to close to as many deaths in the United States as heart disease or cancer. The research is published in the March 5, 2014, print issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Minimally invasive surgery outcomes show favorable results in low back pain patients

Minimally invasive surgery outcomes show favorable results in low back pain patients

Beaumont research findings published in the February online issue of Spine shows that patients who have a low back surgery called minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, end up better off in many ways than patients who have more invasive surgery to alleviate debilitating pain. [More]
Study: Thickness of brain's cortex linked with person's change in IQ

Study: Thickness of brain's cortex linked with person's change in IQ

Rate of change in the thickness of the brain's cortex is an important factor associated with a person's change in IQ, according to a collaborative study by scientists in five countries including researchers at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital - The Neuro, at McGill University and the McGill University Health Centre. [More]

New uses of imaging technologies could help scientists uncover brain's mysteries

Combining two imagine technologies, such as MRI for structure and MEG for activity, could provide a new understanding of our how our brain works. [More]
Biostatistics provides clues to understanding autism: an interview with Dr Knut M. Wittkowski, The Rockefeller University

Biostatistics provides clues to understanding autism: an interview with Dr Knut M. Wittkowski, The Rockefeller University

The incidence of autism spectrum disorders has increased sharply since it was first described 60 years ago. Today, ASD affects more than 1% of all children in the U.S. and about half of them develop a life-long disability. [More]
Photoreactive compounds open new routes to treatment of neurological diseases

Photoreactive compounds open new routes to treatment of neurological diseases

Photoreactive compounds developed by scientists of Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich directly modulate nerve-cell function, and open new routes to the treatment of neurological diseases, including chronic pain and certain types of visual impairment. [More]