Epilepsy News and Research RSS Feed - Epilepsy News and Research Twitter

Epilepsy is a group of disorders marked by problems in the normal functioning of the brain. These problems can produce seizures, unusual body movements, a loss of consciousness or changes in consciousness, as well as mental problems or problems with the senses.
Circular ‘Princess Leia’ oscillations help sleeping brain consolidate memories

Circular ‘Princess Leia’ oscillations help sleeping brain consolidate memories

Every night while you sleep, electrical waves of brain activity circle around each side of your brain, tracing a pattern that, were it on the surface of your head, might look like the twin hair buns of Star Wars' Princess Leia. [More]
CannaCure Florida offers medical cannabis educational conference following legalization of marijuana

CannaCure Florida offers medical cannabis educational conference following legalization of marijuana

CannaCure Florida is proudly offering the most comprehensive medical cannabis educational conference following passage of Florida Amendment 2 legalizing medical marijuana. [More]
Statistical analysis reveals possible scientific misconduct in some bone health studies

Statistical analysis reveals possible scientific misconduct in some bone health studies

A new study suggests probable scientific misconduct in at least some of 33 bone health trials published in various medical journals. [More]
Brain surgery helps remove scar tissue causing seizures in epilepsy patients

Brain surgery helps remove scar tissue causing seizures in epilepsy patients

By the time epilepsy patient Erika Fleck came to Loyola Medicine for a second opinion, she was having three or four seizures a week and hadn't been able to drive her two young children for five years. [More]
Scientists investigate role of mitochondria in Alzheimer's disease pathology

Scientists investigate role of mitochondria in Alzheimer's disease pathology

On Nov. 25, 1901, a 51-year-old woman is admitted to a hospital in Frankfurt, Germany, displaying a bizarre constellation of symptoms. [More]
Poor children with epilepsy have less favorable social outcomes as adults, study finds

Poor children with epilepsy have less favorable social outcomes as adults, study finds

In a population-based Canadian study of children with epilepsy, each of whom had access to universal health care, those from poor families had the same medical course and remission rate as their wealthier counterparts, but they had a less favorable social outcome as adults. [More]
Lack of brain shrinkage may help identify people at risk for dementia with Lewy bodies

Lack of brain shrinkage may help identify people at risk for dementia with Lewy bodies

A lack of shrinkage in the area of the brain responsible for memory may be a sign that people with thinking and memory problems may go on to develop dementia with Lewy bodies rather than Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study published in the November 2, 2016, online issue of Neurology, a medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Scientists develop new model to provide predictions linking brain circuits to brain activity

Scientists develop new model to provide predictions linking brain circuits to brain activity

For as long as scientists have been listening in on the activity of the brain, they have been trying to understand the source of its noisy, apparently random, activity. [More]
Researchers develop novel tool to predict person's chance of survival after gunshot wounds

Researchers develop novel tool to predict person's chance of survival after gunshot wounds

Researchers have developed a first-of-its-kind tool to help predict a person's chance of survival after a gunshot wound in the head or other penetrating injury, according to a new study published in the October 26, 2016, online issue of Neurology, a medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
New bionic hybrid neuro chip records brain cell activity at higher resolution

New bionic hybrid neuro chip records brain cell activity at higher resolution

Brain functions are controlled by millions of brain cells. However, in order to understand how the brain controls functions, such as simple reflexes or learning and memory, we must be able to record the activity of large networks and groups of neurons. [More]
New research underscores problems affecting cognitive development of children in sub-Saharan Africa

New research underscores problems affecting cognitive development of children in sub-Saharan Africa

New research from the University of Liverpool highlights problems impacting on the cognitive development of children in sub-Saharan Africa. [More]
URI researchers design smart gloves to measure tremors and rigidity in Parkinson's patients

URI researchers design smart gloves to measure tremors and rigidity in Parkinson's patients

Prescribing a medication plan for a patient with Parkinson's disease is a big challenge for doctors, but now a University of Rhode Island biomedical engineering professor and his students are making great strides in solving that problem with their groundbreaking research. [More]
Exercise may benefit elderly people with memory and thinking problems

Exercise may benefit elderly people with memory and thinking problems

Exercise may be associated with a small benefit for elderly people who already have memory and thinking problems, according to new research published in the October 19, 2016, online issue of Neurology, a medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Study unravels how caloric restriction provides beneficial effects to the brain

Study unravels how caloric restriction provides beneficial effects to the brain

Studies of different animal species suggest a link between eating less and living longer, but the molecular mechanisms by which caloric restriction affords protection against disease and extends longevity are not well understood. [More]
UAB investigators receive BRAIN Initiative award to study new DBS technology for Parkinson's disease

UAB investigators receive BRAIN Initiative award to study new DBS technology for Parkinson's disease

The University of Alabama at Birmingham has received a BRAIN Initiative grant of $7.3 million over five years from the National Institutes of Health to study new technology that could improve outcomes from deep brain stimulation, an increasingly important treatment for Parkinson's disease and other movement disorders. [More]
People with epilepsy more likely to experience discrimination than general population

People with epilepsy more likely to experience discrimination than general population

In a recent analysis, people with epilepsy were seven-fold more likely to have reported experiencing discrimination due to health problems than the general population. This risk was greater than other chronic health problems such as diabetes, asthma and migraines. [More]
Endocrine Society issues new guidelines on hypopituitarism

Endocrine Society issues new guidelines on hypopituitarism

The Endocrine Society today issued a Clinical Practice Guideline that recommends treating insufficient hormone levels in individuals with hypopituitarism by replacing hormones at levels as close to the body's natural patterns as possible. [More]
Fetal brains use unique amplifier to transmit signals, research shows

Fetal brains use unique amplifier to transmit signals, research shows

Fetal brains use a special amplifier in order to transmit signals, according to research published in the journal eLife by George Washington University's (GW) Matthew Colonnese, Ph.D. and Yasunobu Murata, Ph.D. Early neural connections are sparse, weak, and unreliable. [More]
Researchers discover mass migration of inhibitory neurons into the brain's frontal cortex after birth

Researchers discover mass migration of inhibitory neurons into the brain's frontal cortex after birth

Researchers at UC San Francisco have discovered a previously unknown mass migration of inhibitory neurons into the brain's frontal cortex during the first few months after birth, revealing a stage of brain development that had previously gone unrecognized. [More]
UAB researchers launch first drug study to prevent onset of epilepsy in children with TSC

UAB researchers launch first drug study to prevent onset of epilepsy in children with TSC

Researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham have launched the first drug study aimed at preventing or delaying the onset of epilepsy in children with a genetic condition known as tuberous sclerosis complex. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement