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Epilepsy is a group of disorders marked by problems in the normal functioning of the brain. These problems can produce seizures, unusual body movements, a loss of consciousness or changes in consciousness, as well as mental problems or problems with the senses.
Researchers working on new tool for diagnosing concussions in young Canadians

Researchers working on new tool for diagnosing concussions in young Canadians

Researchers at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital -The Neuro, at McGill University and the MUHC, are working to develop a much needed tool for helping diagnose concussions or mild traumatic brain injuries suffered by thousands of young Canadians ---hockey and football players among them. [More]
European scientists identify gene linked with certain types of early-onset epilepsy

European scientists identify gene linked with certain types of early-onset epilepsy

Certain types of early-onset epilepsy are caused by previously unknown mutations of a potassium channel gene, KCNA2. The mutations disrupt the electrical balance in the brain in two ways. In some patients, the flow of potassium is greatly reduced; while in others, it is raised enormously. Both states can lead to hard-to-treat epileptic seizures. Mental and motor development can come to a stop, or even to regress. [More]
Existing epilepsy drug reverses aMCI in elderly patients at risk for Alzheimer's disease

Existing epilepsy drug reverses aMCI in elderly patients at risk for Alzheimer's disease

A novel therapeutic approach for an existing drug reverses a condition in elderly patients who are at high risk for dementia due to Alzheimer's disease, researchers at Johns Hopkins University found. [More]
Physical activity may protect older people from effects of brain damage

Physical activity may protect older people from effects of brain damage

Older people who are physically active may be protecting themselves from the effects of small areas of brain damage that can affect their movement abilities, according to a new study published in the March 11, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Two researchers to receive Potamkin Prize for research on Alzheimer's disease

Two researchers to receive Potamkin Prize for research on Alzheimer's disease

The American Academy of Neurology and the American Brain Foundation are awarding the 2015 Potamkin Prize for Research in Pick's, Alzheimer's and Related Diseases to Peter Davies, PhD, of the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research in Manhasset, NY, and Reisa A. Sperling, MD, of the Brigham and Women's Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. [More]
University of Cambridge's Alastair Compston wins 2015 John Dystel Prize for MS Research

University of Cambridge's Alastair Compston wins 2015 John Dystel Prize for MS Research

The American Academy of Neurology and the National Multiple Sclerosis Society are awarding the 2015 John Dystel Prize for MS Research to Alastair Compston, MBBS, PhD, Professor of Neurology at the University of Cambridge. [More]
Quest Diagnostics to provide whole exome sequencing service to diagnose neurological disorders

Quest Diagnostics to provide whole exome sequencing service to diagnose neurological disorders

Quest Diagnostics, the world's leading provider of diagnostic information services, today announced the availability of Neurome, a whole exome sequencing service designed to aid the diagnosis of rare neurological disorders in pediatric populations. [More]
Neuroscientists reveal how olfaction is encoded in the brain

Neuroscientists reveal how olfaction is encoded in the brain

In a study that helps to deconstruct how olfaction is encoded in the brain, neuroscientists at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have identified a type of neuron that appears to help tune, amplify and dampen neuronal responses to chemosensory inputs from the nasal cavity. [More]
FDA approves Astellas' CRESEMBA for treatment of invasive aspergillosis, invasive mucormycosis

FDA approves Astellas' CRESEMBA for treatment of invasive aspergillosis, invasive mucormycosis

Astellas today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved its New Drug Application (NDA) for the use of CRESEMBA (isavuconazonium sulfate), the prodrug for isavuconazole, for patients 18 years of age and older in the treatment of invasive aspergillosis and invasive mucormycosis (also known as zygomycosis). [More]
One-third of US population can't be transported by ambulance to stroke center within one hour

One-third of US population can't be transported by ambulance to stroke center within one hour

One-third of the US population does not have access to a primary stroke center within one hour by ambulance, and even under optimal conditions, a large proportion of the US would be unable to access a stroke center within this window, according to a new study published in the March 4, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Anxiety and déjà vu: an interview with Dr Christine Wells, Sheffield Hallam University

Anxiety and déjà vu: an interview with Dr Christine Wells, Sheffield Hallam University

It’s thought that the neural basis of déjà vu is located in the temporal lobes, a region of the brain strongly associated with the storage and retrieval of memories. One source of support for this is evidence from individuals with temporal lobe epilepsy, some of whom experience déjà vu episodes as part of seizure-related auras... [More]

New study challenges scientific theory about role of hippocampus in unconscious memory

A new study by a UT Dallas researcher challenges a long-accepted scientific theory about the role the hippocampus plays in our unconscious memory. [More]
Drinking coffee may lower risk of developing multiple sclerosis

Drinking coffee may lower risk of developing multiple sclerosis

Drinking coffee may be associated with a lower risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 67th Annual Meeting in Washington, DC, April 18 to 25, 2015. [More]
Sleeping more than eight hours a night could increase risk of stroke

Sleeping more than eight hours a night could increase risk of stroke

People who sleep more than eight hours a night may have an increased risk of stroke, according to a new study published in the February 25, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Direct brain responsive neurostimulator reduces seizures, improves quality of life

Direct brain responsive neurostimulator reduces seizures, improves quality of life

Piotr Olejniczak, MD, PhD, LSU Health New Orleans Professor of Neurology and Director of the Epilepsy Center, contributed to a study of the long-term effectiveness of the first direct brain responsive neurostimulator for partial onset, or focal, seizures that cannot be controlled with medication. [More]
New skin test may help detect abnormal proteins in patients with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases

New skin test may help detect abnormal proteins in patients with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases

Scientists have discovered a skin test that may shed new light on Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, according to a study released today will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 67th Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C., April 18 to 25, 2015. [More]
People who exhibit resistance to aspirin may be at risk of more severe strokes

People who exhibit resistance to aspirin may be at risk of more severe strokes

People who exhibit a resistance to aspirin may be more likely to have more severe strokes than people who still respond to the drug, according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 67th Annual Meeting in Washington, DC, April 18 to 25, 2015. [More]
Saluda Medical receives $10 million in Series B financing

Saluda Medical receives $10 million in Series B financing

Saluda Medical has today announced that it has received $10 million in Series B financing bringing a breakthrough treatment for chronic pain one step closer to reality. [More]
Virus that causes chicken pox and shingles linked to giant cell arteritis

Virus that causes chicken pox and shingles linked to giant cell arteritis

A new study developed at the University of Colorado School of Medicine at the Anschutz Medical Campus links the virus that causes chicken pox and shingles to a condition that inflames blood vessels on the temples and scalp in the elderly, called giant cell arteritis. [More]
Women with multiple sclerosis may have lower levels of antioxidant, anti-inflammatory nutrients

Women with multiple sclerosis may have lower levels of antioxidant, anti-inflammatory nutrients

Women with multiple sclerosis (MS) may have lower levels of important antioxidant and anti-inflammatory nutrients, such as folate from food and vitamin E, than healthy people, according to a new study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 67th Annual Meeting in Washington, DC, April 18 to 25, 2015. [More]
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