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Epilepsy is a group of disorders marked by problems in the normal functioning of the brain. These problems can produce seizures, unusual body movements, a loss of consciousness or changes in consciousness, as well as mental problems or problems with the senses.
Eisai pleased to support CEA comic book that educates kids and parents about epilepsy

Eisai pleased to support CEA comic book that educates kids and parents about epilepsy

Eisai Limited is pleased to support the Canadian Epilepsy Alliance (CEA) in the introduction of the first-of-its-kind comic book available in Canada. [More]

IMRIS receives licensing to incorporate MRI core technology into VISIUS Surgical Theatre in Canada

IMRIS Inc. today announced that the Company has received Health Canada licensing to incorporate next generation MRI core technology into the VISIUS Surgical Theatre for sales and marketing in the country. [More]
CEA launches new epilepsy comic book for children

CEA launches new epilepsy comic book for children

The Canadian Epilepsy Alliance is thrilled to announce the launch of a new comic series designed to educate children about the most common neurological disorder in Canada, epilepsy. The Medikidz Explain Epilepsy comic series tells a fictional story based on the experiences of 14-year-old Jack, who is navigating middle school while living with epilepsy. [More]
Researchers reveal important clue for treating absence seizures

Researchers reveal important clue for treating absence seizures

A group of Korean researchers have succeeded in revealing a principle mechanism of a neural network in the human brain, which will provide an important clue to potential treatments for absence seizures. [More]
Study suggests that colds may temporarily increase stroke risk in kids

Study suggests that colds may temporarily increase stroke risk in kids

A new study suggests that colds and other minor infections may temporarily increase stroke risk in children. The study is published in the August 20, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Deep sequencing technique opens up new possibilities for finding genetic causes for brain disorder

Deep sequencing technique opens up new possibilities for finding genetic causes for brain disorder

Not every cell in the body is the same genetically, and disease-causing mutations don't necessarily affect every cell—making these mutations easy to miss even with next-generation genomic sequencing. [More]
Stimulating nerves in ear could improve heart health

Stimulating nerves in ear could improve heart health

Stimulating nerves in your ear could improve the health of your heart, researchers have discovered. A team at the University of Leeds used a standard TENS machine like those designed to relieve labour pains to apply electrical pulses to the tragus, the small raised flap at the front of the ear immediately in front of the ear canal. [More]

Perampanel does not offer added benefit for patients with Epilepsy

The drug perampanel (trade name Fycompa) has been approved since July 2012 as adjunctive ("add-on") therapy for adults and children aged 12 years and older with epileptic fits (seizures). [More]
Decision Resources expands disease-level coverage of Treatment Algorithms Insight Series

Decision Resources expands disease-level coverage of Treatment Algorithms Insight Series

Decision Resources has expanded its disease-level coverage of the Treatment Algorithms Insight Series, which examines U.S. physicians' prescribing behavior, to provide a quantitative analysis of an agent's penetration into each line of therapy. [More]
NIH-funded study explores how thalamic reticular nucleus influences consciousness

NIH-funded study explores how thalamic reticular nucleus influences consciousness

Ever wonder why it's hard to focus after a bad night's sleep? Using mice and flashes of light, scientists show that just a few nerve cells in the brain may control the switch between internal thoughts and external distractions. [More]
HDAC inhibitors may also be effective against kidney stones

HDAC inhibitors may also be effective against kidney stones

Anyone who has suffered from kidney stones is keenly aware of the lack of drugs to treat the condition, which often causes excruciating pain. [More]
Reducing brain levels of tau protein effectively blocks development of childhood epilepsy

Reducing brain levels of tau protein effectively blocks development of childhood epilepsy

Researchers at the Gladstone Institutes have shown that reducing brain levels of the protein tau effectively blocks the development of disease in a mouse model of Dravet syndrome, a severe intractable form of childhood epilepsy. [More]
Physical illness may add to schizophrenia risk

Physical illness may add to schizophrenia risk

A wide range of physical ailments that require hospital contact may contribute to an increased risk of schizophrenia, a study suggests. [More]
Biomedical engineering professor wins prestigious 2014 Early Career Achievement Award

Biomedical engineering professor wins prestigious 2014 Early Career Achievement Award

Qi Wang, assistant professor of biomedical engineering, recently won the prestigious 2014 Early Career Achievement Award from the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBS). [More]
Low levels of vitamin D may double dementia, Alzheimer's risks

Low levels of vitamin D may double dementia, Alzheimer's risks

In the largest study of its kind, researchers suggests that in older people, not getting enough vitamin D may double the risk of developing dementia and Alzheimer's disease. The study is published in the August 6, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Researchers take major step forward in developing real ALS treatments

Researchers take major step forward in developing real ALS treatments

A series of studies begun by Harvard Stem Cell Institute scientists eight years ago has lead to a report published today that may be a major step forward in the quest to develop real treatments for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, ALS, or Lou Gehrig's disease. [More]
Researchers at NIH-FEI Living Lab for Structural Biology achieve breakthrough biological results using FEI’s Titan Krios™ transmission electron microscope

Researchers at NIH-FEI Living Lab for Structural Biology achieve breakthrough biological results using FEI’s Titan Krios™ transmission electron microscope

FEI is pleased to announce that researchers at the NIH-FEI Living Lab for Structural Biology have achieved breakthrough biological results, using FEI’s Titan Krios™ transmission electron microscope (TEM), to elucidate the structural mechanism by which glutamate receptors participate in the transmission of signals between neurons in the brain. Their work is described in Nature, “Structural Mechanism of Glutamate Receptor Activation and Desensitization,” by Meyerson, et al., (DOI: 10.1038/nature13603), http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nature13603.html . [More]
Research reveals that seizures linked to feelings of anxiety

Research reveals that seizures linked to feelings of anxiety

New research by clinical psychologists from the UK and US has revealed psychogenic seizures which could be mistaken for epilepsy are linked to feelings of anxiety. [More]
Computational biologists develop program for easy diagnosis of hereditary illnesses

Computational biologists develop program for easy diagnosis of hereditary illnesses

In the case of a cough or a sore throat, the doctor can usually diagnose a common cold immediately. However, the diagnosis of hereditary illnesses like cystic fibrosis, which affects the metabolism, or Huntington's disease, which leads to cognitive decline, is much more complex. [More]
Little-known supportive cells in brain may play major role in cognitive function

Little-known supportive cells in brain may play major role in cognitive function

When you're expecting something-like the meal you've ordered at a restaurant-or when something captures your interest, unique electrical rhythms sweep through your brain. [More]