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Study links slowed processing speed with executive deficits in individuals with multiple sclerosis

Study links slowed processing speed with executive deficits in individuals with multiple sclerosis

Kessler Foundation researchers have published a study supporting the role of slowed processing speed in the executive deficits found in individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS). [More]
UTMB researchers analyze whether monitors reflect practices used by health care providers

UTMB researchers analyze whether monitors reflect practices used by health care providers

Wearable electronic activity monitors hold great promise in helping people to reach their fitness and health goals. These increasingly sophisticated devices help the wearers improve their wellness by constantly monitoring their activities and bodily responses. This information is organized into companion computer programs and mobile apps. [More]
New report outlines cholesterol-targeted approach to treat people at risk for cardiovascular disease

New report outlines cholesterol-targeted approach to treat people at risk for cardiovascular disease

A recent guideline for using statins to reduce atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease has wavered too far from the simple cholesterol goals that have saved thousands of lives in the past decade, and doesn't adequately treat patients as individuals, experts said today in a national report. [More]
Brain stimulation increases cravings for high-calorie foods, shows study

Brain stimulation increases cravings for high-calorie foods, shows study

Magnetic stimulation of a brain area involved in "executive function" affects cravings for and consumption of calorie-dense snack foods, reports a study in the September issue of Psychosomatic Medicine: Journal of Biobehavioral Medicine, the official journal of the American Psychosomatic Society. [More]
Benefits of blood pressure lowering drugs for low risk patients 'still open to question'

Benefits of blood pressure lowering drugs for low risk patients 'still open to question'

Dr Stephen Martin and colleagues argue that this strategy is failing patients and wasting healthcare resources. They call for a re-examination of the threshold and urge clinicians to be cautious about treating low risk patients with blood pressure lowering drugs. [More]
FDA approves Contrave extended-release tablets for chronic weight management

FDA approves Contrave extended-release tablets for chronic weight management

Takeda Pharmaceuticals U.S.A., Inc. and Orexigen® Therapeutics, Inc. jointly announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved Contrave® extended-release tablets as an adjunct to a reduced-calorie diet and increased physical activity for chronic weight management in adults with an initial body mass index of 30 kg/m2 or greater (obese), or 27 kg/m2 or greater (overweight) in the presence of at least one weight-related comorbid condition. [More]
More research needed to prevent brains of sportspeople from injury

More research needed to prevent brains of sportspeople from injury

Two University of Birmingham academics are calling for more research to be carried out looking at how the brains of sportspeople - including children - react when they receive a blow to the head. [More]
High levels of physical activity are associated with better reading and arithmetic skills in boys

High levels of physical activity are associated with better reading and arithmetic skills in boys

A recent Finnish study shows that higher levels of physical activity are related to better academic achievement during the first three school years particularly in boys. [More]
High sodium intake linked with more than doubled risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis

High sodium intake linked with more than doubled risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis

A new study published online in the journal Rheumatology today indicates that the interaction between high sodium intake and smoking is associated with a more than doubled risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA). [More]
Working memory may be underlying mechanism of cognitive reserve in MS

Working memory may be underlying mechanism of cognitive reserve in MS

Kessler Foundation scientists have shown that working memory may be an underlying mechanism of cognitive reserve in multiple sclerosis (MS). [More]
Beta-O2 receives grant from JDRF to study ßAir bio-artificial pancreas for treatment of T1D

Beta-O2 receives grant from JDRF to study ßAir bio-artificial pancreas for treatment of T1D

Beta-O2 announced today that it has received a $500K grant from JDRF. The grant will be used to help fund a $1M pilot human study of Beta-O2's ßAir bio-artificial pancreas, in development as a treatment and potential cure for type 1 diabetes (T1D). [More]
Weekly text message reminder can help many people to make healthy food choices

Weekly text message reminder can help many people to make healthy food choices

Many people are unaware that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's mandated nutrition labels are based on a 2,000-calorie-a-day diet, but a simple weekly text message reminder can greatly improve that awareness, according to a new study from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. [More]
Regular participation in physical activity may help reduce weight and treat diabetes

Regular participation in physical activity may help reduce weight and treat diabetes

A study of exercise habits in people with diabetes finds that women with diabetes who are trying to lose weight are far more physically active than women with diabetes who are not trying to control their weight. [More]
Aerobic activities before school help reduce symptoms of ADHD in children

Aerobic activities before school help reduce symptoms of ADHD in children

Paying attention all day in school as a kid isn't easy, especially for those who are at a higher risk of ADHD, or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. [More]
Public-private partnership funds $11.5M for transformational biophysics cancer research

Public-private partnership funds $11.5M for transformational biophysics cancer research

A new public-private partnership between the National Science Foundation (NSF), National Cancer Institute (NCI), Stand Up To Cancer (SU2C) and The V Foundation for Cancer Research is committing $11.5 million towards transformational, theoretical biophysics that could have a significant impact on cancer research and treatment. [More]
5-minute walks can reverse harm caused to leg arteries from prolonged sitting

5-minute walks can reverse harm caused to leg arteries from prolonged sitting

An Indiana University study has found that three easy -- one could even say slow -- 5-minute walks can reverse harm caused to leg arteries during three hours of prolonged sitting. [More]
New potential therapeutic targets for treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension

New potential therapeutic targets for treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension

Two new potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension, a deadly disease marked by high blood pressure in the lungs, have been identified by researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago. [More]
Regular consumption of mango by obese adults may lower blood sugar levels

Regular consumption of mango by obese adults may lower blood sugar levels

Research published in the journal Nutrition and Metabolic Insights found that regular consumption of mango by obese adults may lower blood sugar levels and does not negatively impact body weight. [More]
Canada funds 22 inventive ideas for improving health in low-resource countries

Canada funds 22 inventive ideas for improving health in low-resource countries

Grand Challenges Canada, funded by the Government of Canada, today announced $2.4 million in seed funds shared between 22 projects from Canada and nine developing nations, to pursue inventive new ideas for improving health in low-resource countries. [More]
USF receives FEMA grant to reduce risk of low back pain, disability in firefighters

USF receives FEMA grant to reduce risk of low back pain, disability in firefighters

The University of South Florida's John Mayer, DC, PhD, recently received a $1.3 million Department of Homeland Security/Federal Emergency Management Agency Assistance of Firefighters grant - a three-year award that will help build upon cumulative research evaluating the effectiveness of targeted exercise programs to reduce the risk of low back pain and disability in firefighters. [More]