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Moderate exercise on a regular basis may improve cancer treatments

Moderate exercise on a regular basis may improve cancer treatments

Kansas State University kinesiology research offers encouraging information for cancer patients: A brisk walk or a slow jog on a regular basis may be the key to improved cancer treatments. [More]
Green tea compound, voluntary exercise slow Alzheimer's disease progression in mice

Green tea compound, voluntary exercise slow Alzheimer's disease progression in mice

According to the National Institutes of Health, Alzheimer's disease (AD) may affect as many as 5.5 million Americans. Scientists currently are seeking treatments and therapies found in common foods that will help stave off the disease or prevent it completely. [More]
IQWiG finds minor added benefit of dulaglutide in combination with short-acting insulin for type 2 diabetes

IQWiG finds minor added benefit of dulaglutide in combination with short-acting insulin for type 2 diabetes

Since 2014 dulaglutide has been approved alone or in combination with other drugs for the treatment of adults with type 2 diabetes. The German Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care examined in a dossier assessment whether this new drug offers an added benefit over the appropriate comparator therapies. [More]
University of Adelaide research shows that doping decreases athletes' performances

University of Adelaide research shows that doping decreases athletes' performances

Doping is damaging the image of sport without benefitting athletes' results, according to University of Adelaide research. [More]
Novel method predicts risk of sudden cardiac death in hemodialysis patients

Novel method predicts risk of sudden cardiac death in hemodialysis patients

A new test has been developed to predict sudden cardiac death in hemodialysis patients in whom such forecasts were previously impossible. The novel method was presented at ICNC 12 by Dr Akiyoshi Hashimoto, a cardiologist at Sapporo Medical University in Japan. The test uses a combination of nuclear medicine, C-reactive protein and electrocardiogram (ECG). [More]
Lung volume reduction surgery could improve lung function in emphysema patients

Lung volume reduction surgery could improve lung function in emphysema patients

Emphysema is a chronic, progressive, obstructive lung disease in which the small sacs of the lung (alveoli) are destroyed, leading to air pockets and severe breathing difficulties. In 2011, 4.7 million Americans reported being diagnosed with emphysema, and in 2013 more than 8200 patients died from emphysema. [More]
Type 2 diabetics can eat more protein at breakfast to reduce glucose spikes at breakfast and lunch

Type 2 diabetics can eat more protein at breakfast to reduce glucose spikes at breakfast and lunch

Individuals with Type 2 Diabetes have difficulty regulating their glucose -- or blood sugar -- levels, particularly after meals. Now, University of Missouri researchers have found that Type 2 diabetics can eat more protein at breakfast to help reduce glucose spikes at both breakfast and lunch. [More]
Adult survivors of preterm births at higher risk of developing COPD

Adult survivors of preterm births at higher risk of developing COPD

Adult survivors of preterm births may have a lung capacity that resembles the healthy elderly or casual smokers by the time they reach their early 20s, according to a University of Oregon study. [More]
UI orthopedics researchers working on injectable, bioactive gel that can repair cartilage damage

UI orthopedics researchers working on injectable, bioactive gel that can repair cartilage damage

Knee injuries are the bane of athletes everywhere, from professionals and college stars to weekend warriors. Current surgical options for repairing damaged cartilage caused by knee injuries are costly, can have complications, and often are not very effective in the long run. Even after surgery, cartilage degeneration can progress leading to painful arthritis. [More]
Church-based education program improves diet, exercise habits among Latino adults with diabetes

Church-based education program improves diet, exercise habits among Latino adults with diabetes

Latino adults with diabetes who participated in a church-based education program reported eating less high-fat food and exercising more following a trial intervention program run by researchers from University of Chicago's Department of Medicine. [More]
Young age and small body weight predispose pediatric CHD patients toward re-intervention

Young age and small body weight predispose pediatric CHD patients toward re-intervention

A retrospective review of 633 adults and children who underwent bioprosthetic pulmonary valve replacement (PVR) for congenital heart disease between 1996 and 2014 indicated that the risk of re-intervention was five times greater for children than adults, with the likelihood of re-intervention decreasing by 10% for each increasing year of age at surgery. [More]
Teen-LABS research study reveals musculoskeletal disease outcomes among obese adolescents

Teen-LABS research study reveals musculoskeletal disease outcomes among obese adolescents

Outcomes regarding musculoskeletal disease among severely obese adolescents participating in the "Teen Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery" (Teen-LABS) study were published this week in JAMA Pediatrics. Teen-LABS is a multi-center clinical study funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases at the National Institutes of Health that is examining the safety and health effects of surgical weight loss procedures. [More]
Research findings could offer new way to test for chemo brain in patients

Research findings could offer new way to test for chemo brain in patients

UBC research shows that chemotherapy can lead to excessive mind wandering and an inability to concentrate. Dubbed 'chemo-brain,' the negative cognitive effects of the cancer treatment have long been suspected, but the UBC study is the first to explain why patients have difficulty paying attention. [More]
New study suggests that exercise type may be less important in fight against obesity

New study suggests that exercise type may be less important in fight against obesity

Medical experts widely recommended a combined program of diet and fitness to fight obesity. But when it comes to the type of exercise most effective a reducing weight and body mass—strength training, endurance exercise or a combination of both—opinions vary widely on which exercise regimen is best. [More]
Health food stores promote adult-only dietary supplements to minors

Health food stores promote adult-only dietary supplements to minors

Fifteen year olds are not only able to buy over-the-counter dietary supplements from a sampling of health food stores across the country, the staff at those stores actually went so far as to recommend certain products, despite labels reading "for adult use only." [More]
EuroPRevent congress to focus on cardiovascular disease

EuroPRevent congress to focus on cardiovascular disease

While death rates from heart disease in Europe have more than halved in many countries and in most population groups since the early 1980s, heart disease remains by far the leading cause of death. [More]
Two Louisville heart physicians to host symposium on cardiovascular disease in women

Two Louisville heart physicians to host symposium on cardiovascular disease in women

Two of Louisville's leading heart physicians will host a one-day symposium designed to provide the community, physicians, nurses and health professionals up-to-date information on the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular disease in women. [More]
Joseph Roche receives grant to develop improved exercise programs for people with dysferlinopathies

Joseph Roche receives grant to develop improved exercise programs for people with dysferlinopathies

The Wayne State University Eugene Applebaum College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences today announced that Joseph Roche, assistant professor for the physical therapy program in the Department of Health Care Sciences, received a one-year, $100,000 grant from the Jain Foundation for "Developing a Multi-Pronged Strategy for the Clinical Management of Dysferlinopathies," a project that seeks to develop better exercise programs for people with dysferlinopathies, or dysferlin-linked muscular dystrophies. [More]
Insulin signaling pathway has significant influence on the growth of glioblastomas

Insulin signaling pathway has significant influence on the growth of glioblastomas

Drugs that target insulin pathways to slow or stop the growth of brain tumors are going in the right direction but appear to be on the wrong track, according to new research at Rice University. [More]

New research shows that squirming helps ADHD children learn

For decades, frustrated parents and teachers have barked at fidgety children with ADHD to "Sit still and concentrate!" But new research shows that if you want ADHD kids to learn, you have to let them squirm. The foot-tapping, leg-swinging and chair-scooting movements of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder are actually vital to how they remember information and work out complex cognitive tasks, according to a study published in an early online release of the Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology. [More]
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