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Many mHealth applications not fully accessible to blind customers

Many mHealth applications not fully accessible to blind customers

More Americans are using mobile devices and other technologies to track some aspect of their health at home, from diet and exercise to sleep patterns to bloodwork. [More]
Having high blood pressure in midlife can affect cognition many years later

Having high blood pressure in midlife can affect cognition many years later

Having high blood pressure in your 50's may impact your ability to keep track or plan ahead in your 80's. This study reports a connection between high blood pressure at a younger age can affect cognition many years later. It currently appears in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease. [More]
Kessler Foundation, University of Bordeaux team up to study emotional processing deficits in MS people

Kessler Foundation, University of Bordeaux team up to study emotional processing deficits in MS people

Kessler Foundation received $65,500 as part of a two-year $140,000 grant from the ARSEP Foundation of France to the University of Bordeaux, to launch a collaborative study of emotional processing deficits in people with multiple sclerosis (MS). Helen Genova, Ph.D., and Jean Lengenfelder, Ph.D., of Kessler Foundation and Bruno Brochet, M.D., Ph.D., of the University of Bordeaux are the principal investigators. [More]
Changes in body temperature can cause sudden cardiac death, finds SFU research

Changes in body temperature can cause sudden cardiac death, finds SFU research

Scientists, including SFU professor Peter Ruben, have found that sudden death caused by cardiac arrhythmia can be triggered by changes in body temperature. The study is published in the Journal of Physiology. [More]
Major study to assess effectiveness of mindfulness training in UK schools

Major study to assess effectiveness of mindfulness training in UK schools

The three-part study includes the first large randomised control trial of mindfulness training compared with 'teaching as usual' in 76 schools, which will involve nearly six thousand students aged 11 to 14. Other parts of the study are a programme of experimental research to establish whether and how mindfulness improves the mental resilience of teenagers, and an evaluation of the most effective way to train teachers to deliver mindfulness classes to students. [More]
Older adults can boost brain function by raising their fitness level

Older adults can boost brain function by raising their fitness level

New research conducted at the University of Kansas Medical Center indicates that older adults can improve brain function by raising their fitness level. [More]
Stress Doppler echocardiography ‘reliable’ for early PAH detection in systemic sclerosis

Stress Doppler echocardiography ‘reliable’ for early PAH detection in systemic sclerosis

Researchers recommend performing echocardiography at rest and during exercise to screen for pulmonary arterial hypertension in patients with systemic sclerosis. [More]
Study highlights how KLF15 protein affects availability of nutrients in the body

Study highlights how KLF15 protein affects availability of nutrients in the body

Case Western Reserve researchers already demonstrated that a single protein plays a pivotal role in the use of nutrients by major organs that allow for the burning of fat during exercise or regulating the heart's contractile and electrical activity. Now they have found a new benefit of Kruppel-like Factor 15 (KLF15) — keeping the body in metabolic balance. [More]
New study finds that intellectual pursuits can buffer the brain's reward system against drug dependence

New study finds that intellectual pursuits can buffer the brain's reward system against drug dependence

Challenging the idea that addiction is hardwired in the brain, a new UC Berkeley study of mice suggests that even a short time spent in a stimulating learning environment can rewire the brain's reward system and buffer it against drug dependence. [More]
Obesity-promoting behaviors increase among children during the summer break

Obesity-promoting behaviors increase among children during the summer break

Regardless of family income, children on summer break consume more sugar, watch more television, and eat fewer vegetables than the rest of the year, according to researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. [More]
New Healthy Beverage Index may help consumers to make diligent decisions about daily drinking habits

New Healthy Beverage Index may help consumers to make diligent decisions about daily drinking habits

There may be a better way to think about daily drinking habits that impact health conditions such as obesity and diabetes, according to a new study by Virginia Tech researchers. [More]
Alzheimer's disease may be 'at work' years ahead of actual symptoms, say IU researchers

Alzheimer's disease may be 'at work' years ahead of actual symptoms, say IU researchers

The best-known genetic variant linked to Alzheimer's disease may be "at work" promoting deposits of plaque in the brain long before any symptoms of the disease can be measured on tests, according to a national research study led by Indiana University School of Medicine investigators. [More]
UB researchers to study dangers that dehydration poses for U.S. Navy divers

UB researchers to study dangers that dehydration poses for U.S. Navy divers

Researchers at the University at Buffalo School of Public Health and Health Professions will study the dangers that dehydration presents for U.S. Navy divers, examining diver physiology both during and after underwater activities. [More]
Virginia Tech researchers develop new scoring method for assessing overall beverage intake quality

Virginia Tech researchers develop new scoring method for assessing overall beverage intake quality

Researchers at Virginia Tech have developed a new scoring method for assessing beverage intake, the Healthy Beverage Index (HBI). In a report published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics they describe how this tool can be used to more accurately evaluate dietary consumption of all types of fluids. [More]
New guidelines seek to protect athletes from exercise-associated hyponatremia

New guidelines seek to protect athletes from exercise-associated hyponatremia

While the risks of dehydration are well known, new international guidelines seek to protect athletes from the serious health risks associated with drinking too many fluids while exercising. [More]
Study: Brain activity changes after memory retraining in TBI patients

Study: Brain activity changes after memory retraining in TBI patients

Kessler Foundation researchers published results of their TBI-MEM trial, the first study to demonstrate significant changes in cerebral activation after memory retraining in individuals with traumatic brain injury. [More]
Exercise program for older adults with osteoarthritis may soon be covered by Medicare

Exercise program for older adults with osteoarthritis may soon be covered by Medicare

Fit & Strong!, an exercise program tailored to break the cycle of weakening and pain in older adults with osteoarthritis and developed at the University of Illinois at Chicago, may soon be covered by Medicare. [More]
Guidelines on children's exposure to radio frequency electromagnetic fields confusing for parents

Guidelines on children's exposure to radio frequency electromagnetic fields confusing for parents

New research suggests guidelines on children's exposure to radio frequency waves from technology are confusing for parents. [More]
EnteroMedics prices previously announced public offering of 32,000,000 units

EnteroMedics prices previously announced public offering of 32,000,000 units

EnteroMedics Inc., a developer and manufacturer of devices that use neuroblocking technology to treat obesity, metabolic diseases, and other gastrointestinal disorders, announced the pricing of its previously announced public offering of 32,000,000 units. [More]
Cynosure obtains FDA clearance to market SculpSure for non-invasive reduction of fat from the abdomen

Cynosure obtains FDA clearance to market SculpSure for non-invasive reduction of fat from the abdomen

Cynosure, Inc., a leader in laser- and light-based aesthetic treatments, today announced that it has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to market SculpSure for non-invasive lipolysis of the abdomen. In May, the FDA cleared SculpSure for non-invasive lipolysis of the flanks. [More]
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