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Commercial weight-loss programs can make significant difference in overall health

Commercial weight-loss programs can make significant difference in overall health

New research published in the Annals of Internal Medicine finds that commercial weight-loss programs can offer significant weight loss after one year of participation when compared to a control group. Researchers led by Kimberly A. Gudzune, M D, MPH, found that participants achieved up to 4.9% mean total weight loss following one year of participation, which could be medically significant for many people with obesity or excess weight. [More]
Simple dietary intervention can help reduce weight gain

Simple dietary intervention can help reduce weight gain

A University of Calgary study has found that rats fed a fibre supplement while on a high fat and high sugar diet show a much lower weight gain than those who did not eat the fibre. A team of researchers from the university's Cumming School of Medicine and the Faculty of Kinesiology says the study helps scientists better understand the mechanisms of weight control and energy balance. [More]
Short-term balance program can reduce risk of falling in older population

Short-term balance program can reduce risk of falling in older population

Falling is bad news for senior citizens—oftentimes resulting in life-changing injuries, such as hip fractures and head traumas, and an increased risk of early death. New research findings at University of the Sciences into how and why seniors fall may provide healthcare providers with insight on improved balance and strength-training strategies to prevent tumbles by the elderly. [More]
Jersey Shore achieves Joint Commission certification for Hip and Knee Joint Replacement Program

Jersey Shore achieves Joint Commission certification for Hip and Knee Joint Replacement Program

Jersey Shore has earned The Joint Commission's Gold Seal of Approval for its Hip and Knee Joint Replacement Program by demonstrating compliance with The Joint Commission's national standards for health care quality and safety in disease-specific care. The certification award recognizes the hospital's dedication to continuous compliance with The Joint Commission's rigorous standards. [More]
Exercise benefits obese, overweight people with NAFLD

Exercise benefits obese, overweight people with NAFLD

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in the western world. A new study published in the Journal of Hepatology shows that exercise, regardless of frequency or intensity, benefits obese and overweight adults with NAFLD. [More]
New study analyses physical, psychological consequences of bariatric surgery

New study analyses physical, psychological consequences of bariatric surgery

Bariatric surgery, or reduction of gastric capacity, is one of the longer lasting options to achieve considerable weight loss in obese people. A Spanish researcher has participated in a study that confirms that the effects of this relatively complex medical surgery are not only physical, but also psychological. [More]
CUMC researchers identify cellular defect that could lead to potential new treatment for diabetes

CUMC researchers identify cellular defect that could lead to potential new treatment for diabetes

A cellular defect that can impair the body's ability to handle high glucose levels and could point the way to a potential new treatment for diabetes has been identified by Columbia University Medical Center researchers. [More]
New study could point to potential ways to address defects in learning, memory

New study could point to potential ways to address defects in learning, memory

Just as some people seem built to run marathons and have an easier time going for miles without tiring, others are born with a knack for memorizing things, from times tables to trivia facts. These two skills—running and memorizing—are not so different as it turns out. [More]
Study identifies gut immune system as new, effective target for diabetes

Study identifies gut immune system as new, effective target for diabetes

A commonly-used drug to treat inflammatory bowel disease, such as Crohn's disease, has been shown to lower blood sugar levels in obese mice, potentially identifying the gut immune system as a new and effective target in treating diabetes in humans. [More]
American Oil Chemists' Society honors UMass Amherst food scientist

American Oil Chemists' Society honors UMass Amherst food scientist

The American Oil Chemists' Society has honored University of Massachusetts Amherst food scientist Yeonhwa Park with the Timothy L. Mounts Award for her "significant and important contributions in the area of bioactive lipids and their impact on health conditions such as obesity, osteoporosis, arthritis and cardiovascular disease." [More]
New model can help predict how humans adapt to high- and low-altitude hypoxia

New model can help predict how humans adapt to high- and low-altitude hypoxia

There are few times in life when one should aim for suboptimal performance, but new research at Rice University suggests scientists who study metabolism and its role in evolution should look for signs of just that. [More]
Regular consumption of nuts reduce mortality by more than 20%

Regular consumption of nuts reduce mortality by more than 20%

Nuts are a key element of a healthy diet. According to The World Health Organization (WHO), a healthy diet including nuts, regular exercise, the maintenance of ideal weight and staying away from tobacco and alcohol could be sufficient to prevent cancer cases. [More]
Exercise and physical activity improve lung cancer outcomes

Exercise and physical activity improve lung cancer outcomes

Exercise and physical activity should be considered as therapeutic options for lung cancer as they have been shown to reduce symptoms, increase exercise tolerance, improve quality of life, and potentially reduce length of hospital stay and complications following surgery for lung cancer. [More]
Egg consumption may lower type 2 diabetes risk

Egg consumption may lower type 2 diabetes risk

Egg consumption may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes, according to new research from the University of Eastern Finland. The findings were published in American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. [More]
Older mothers who exercise during pregnancy can reduce baby's risk of congenital heart defects

Older mothers who exercise during pregnancy can reduce baby's risk of congenital heart defects

In people, a baby's risk of congenital heart defects is associated with the age of the mother. Risk goes up with increasing age. Newborn mice predisposed to heart defects because of genetic mutations show the same age association. [More]
CABG surgery improves long-term survival in diabetic patients with severe heart disease

CABG surgery improves long-term survival in diabetic patients with severe heart disease

Among diabetic patients with severe heart disease, coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery is better than stenting (percutaneous coronary intervention; PCI) at improving long-term survival and reducing the risk of adverse complications, according to an article in the April 2015 issue of The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. [More]
New research reveals effects of physician advice on weight loss

New research reveals effects of physician advice on weight loss

Patients advised to lose weight by their physicians dropped more pounds on average than those who didn't receive a recommendation, according to new research from the University of Georgia published in the journal Economics & Human Biology. [More]
GEBN makes meaningful contributions to improve public health

GEBN makes meaningful contributions to improve public health

As the scientific community gathers at Experimental Biology 2015, the Global Energy Balance Network is poised to make meaningful contributions to the broader community's efforts to improve public health. GEBN is a network of scientists from North America, Latin America and the Caribbean, Europe, Africa, Asia and Oceania who have banded together to further the understanding of the regulation of energy utilization by the body (energy balance) and apply this understanding to develop novel approaches to health and wellness. [More]
Phone counseling can boost recovery, reduce pain in patients after spinal surgery

Phone counseling can boost recovery, reduce pain in patients after spinal surgery

Research by Johns Hopkins scientists suggests that having a short series of phone conversations with trained counselors can substantially boost recovery and reduce pain in patients after spinal surgery. [More]
Outdoor safety tips from American Chiropractic Association

Outdoor safety tips from American Chiropractic Association

The warmer weather brings more chances for parents to get outdoors and ramp up physical activity with their little ones. From biking and hiking to walking and jogging, today's parents are keeping fit and bonding with their babies in the process. [More]
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