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Hepatitis B is one type of hepatitis – a liver disease- caused by the hepatitis B virus (HBV). Hepatitis B spreads by contact with an infected person's blood, semen or other body fluid. An infected woman can give hepatitis B to her baby at birth.

If you get HBV, you may feel as if you have the flu, or you may have no symptoms at all. A blood test can tell if you have it. HBV usually gets better on its own after a few months. If it does not get better, it is called chronic HBV, which lasts a lifetime. Chronic HBV can lead to scarring of the liver, liver failure or liver cancer.

There is a vaccine for HBV. It requires three shots. All babies should get the vaccine, but older children and adults can get it too. If you travel to countries where Hepatitis B is common, you should get the vaccine.
HBcrAg may predict HCC development

HBcrAg may predict HCC development

Research suggests a role for hepatitis B core-related antigen in the prediction of hepatocellular carcinoma development in nucleos(t)ide analogue treatment-naïve patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection. [More]
WFA+-M2BP levels linked to liver fibrosis, HCC progression in chronic HBV

WFA+-M2BP levels linked to liver fibrosis, HCC progression in chronic HBV

Japanese researchers have found that serum levels of glycosylated Wisteria floribunda agglutinin-positive Mac-2 binding protein are a useful marker of not only the degree of liver fibrosis, but also progression to hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection. [More]
Serum marker may flag liver fibrosis in chronic HBV

Serum marker may flag liver fibrosis in chronic HBV

Serum levels of Wisteria floribunda agglutinin-positive Mac-2-binding protein may reflect the severity of liver fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection, say researchers. [More]
Regular aspirin use may help reduce risk of bile duct cancer

Regular aspirin use may help reduce risk of bile duct cancer

Regular use of aspirin was linked with a significantly reduced risk of developing bile duct cancer, also called cholangiocarcinoma, in a recent study. The findings, which are published in the journal Hepatology, indicate that additional research on the potential of aspirin for preventing bile duct cancer is warranted. [More]
New blood treatment technology could reduce malaria risk following blood transfusions

New blood treatment technology could reduce malaria risk following blood transfusions

Patients, especially children, who undergo blood transfusions in sub-Saharan Africa are at high risk of transfusion-transmitted malaria. A new trial, published in The Lancet today, suggests that treating donated blood with a new technology that combines UV radiation and vitamin B is safe and could minimise the risk of malaria infection following blood transfusions. [More]
Resolving HBV infection does not reduce liver cancer risk

Resolving HBV infection does not reduce liver cancer risk

Long-term infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) can cause liver inflammation and increase the risk of liver cancer. Researchers from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, however, found that resolving HBV infection was not associated with reduced rates of liver cancer. [More]
TDF, entecavir duo 'highly effective' for difficult-to-treat chronic HBV

TDF, entecavir duo 'highly effective' for difficult-to-treat chronic HBV

The combination of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate and entecavir induces a high rate of viral suppression in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection who have failed multiple nucleos(t)ide analogue regimens, phase IIIb results indicate. [More]
Dynamic HBsAg measurements predict HBV inactivity

Dynamic HBsAg measurements predict HBV inactivity

In patients with hepatitis B e antigen-negative chronic hepatitis B virus infection, repeated measurement of hepatitis B surface antigen during long-term follow-up can help identify those with inactive virus, suggests a chart review. [More]
HLA-C/KIR genotype linked to HBeAg-positive HBV interferon response

HLA-C/KIR genotype linked to HBeAg-positive HBV interferon response

The human leucocyte antigen-C and killer immunoglobin-like receptor genotypes are associated with response to interferon-based therapy in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection positive for hepatitis B e antigen, say researchers. [More]
Study shows 37% of outpatient healthcare staff fail to follow hand hygiene recommendations

Study shows 37% of outpatient healthcare staff fail to follow hand hygiene recommendations

Despite having policies in place to prevent infections, staff at outpatient care facilities fail to follow recommendations for hand hygiene 37 percent of the time, and for safe injection practices 33 percent of the time, according to a study published in the April issue of the American Journal of Infection Control, the official publication of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology. [More]
Analysis reveals improved survivorship for acute liver failure patients

Analysis reveals improved survivorship for acute liver failure patients

More patients hospitalized with acute liver failure - often the result of acetaminophen overdose - are surviving, including those who receive a liver transplant and those who don't, an analysis led by a UT Southwestern Medical Center researcher showed. [More]

DAA medication could lead to revolution in hepatitis C treatment

The cost of treating hepatitis C virus (HCV) could be cut up to 50 percent if mathematical models are used to predict when patients can safely stop taking direct-acting antiviral (DAA) medication, according to a new study by researchers at Loyola University Health System and Loyola University Chicago [More]
Renal risk factors for NA-treated HBV patients identified

Renal risk factors for NA-treated HBV patients identified

A South Korean research team has identified several clinical and medical factors associated with renal function decline in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection treated with oral nucleos(t)ide analogues. [More]
Real-world data confirm TDF efficacy for HBV

Real-world data confirm TDF efficacy for HBV

Treatment with tenofovir disoproxil fumarate elicits sustained virological responses and exhibits a favourable safety profile in a diverse population of patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection, shows a French routine clinical practice study. [More]
Resistance to prior antiviral agents impacts TDF response

Resistance to prior antiviral agents impacts TDF response

Taiwanese researchers find that virological response to tenofovir disoproxil fumarate in treatment-experienced patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection can vary depending on the nucleos(t)ide analogue the patient is resistant to. [More]
Lewin-Cameron Laboratory at Doherty Institute selects OpenSpecimen system to manage biospecimens inventory

Lewin-Cameron Laboratory at Doherty Institute selects OpenSpecimen system to manage biospecimens inventory

In the short time that AXT have been promoting OpenSpecimen, the bioinformatics platform for managing biospecimens inventory developed by Krishagni Solutions in conjunction with the National Cancer Institute, it has generated large amounts of interest in Australia. [More]
Novartis announces FDA approval of Afinitor for progressive, nonfunctional neuroendocrine tumors of GI

Novartis announces FDA approval of Afinitor for progressive, nonfunctional neuroendocrine tumors of GI

Novartis today announced that the United States Food and Drug Administration approved Afinitor (everolimus) tablets for the treatment of adult patients with progressive, well-differentiated, nonfunctional neuroendocrine tumors (NET) of gastrointestinal (GI) or lung origin that are unresectable, locally advanced or metastatic. [More]
Researchers launch clinical trials to test novel cellular-immunotherapy to treat three types of blood cancer

Researchers launch clinical trials to test novel cellular-immunotherapy to treat three types of blood cancer

Cancer immunology is based upon boosting the body's own immune system to vanquish malignancies. It is among the fastest growing areas of oncology research. Researchers at UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center have launched three clinical trials to test the safety and efficacy of a novel cellular-immunotherapy that uses modified T cells - one of the immune system's primary weapons - to treat three different types of blood cancer that often defy existing therapies. [More]
PharmaEssentia to present results of P1101 + ribavirin phase II trial in HCV patients at APASL 2016

PharmaEssentia to present results of P1101 + ribavirin phase II trial in HCV patients at APASL 2016

PharmaEssentia Corporation announces presentation of the results of the phase II trial for P1101 + ribavirin in patients with chronic HCV genotype 1 infection at the 25th Conference of the Asian Pacific Association for the Study of the Liver, taking place in Tokyo, Japan from February 20 to 24, 2016 (APASL 2016). Data will be presented by the study coordinating investigator Prof. Wan-Long Chuang (Taiwan) at the HCV parallel oral session on Feb 22nd (15:45-17:45). [More]
Distinctive gene 'signature' may lead to new way to diagnose Lyme disease

Distinctive gene 'signature' may lead to new way to diagnose Lyme disease

Researchers at UC San Francisco and Johns Hopkins may have found a new way to diagnose Lyme disease, based on a distinctive gene "signature" they discovered in white blood cells of patients infected with the tick-borne bacteria. [More]
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