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Hepatitis B is one type of hepatitis – a liver disease- caused by the hepatitis B virus (HBV). Hepatitis B spreads by contact with an infected person's blood, semen or other body fluid. An infected woman can give hepatitis B to her baby at birth.

If you get HBV, you may feel as if you have the flu, or you may have no symptoms at all. A blood test can tell if you have it. HBV usually gets better on its own after a few months. If it does not get better, it is called chronic HBV, which lasts a lifetime. Chronic HBV can lead to scarring of the liver, liver failure or liver cancer.

There is a vaccine for HBV. It requires three shots. All babies should get the vaccine, but older children and adults can get it too. If you travel to countries where Hepatitis B is common, you should get the vaccine.
New screen-and-treat programme for hepatitis B may thwart deadly complications of disease

New screen-and-treat programme for hepatitis B may thwart deadly complications of disease

Research into Africa's first 'screen-and-treat' programme for hepatitis B suggests the initiative may reduce deadly complications of the virus. [More]
WHO urges countries to take rapid action to reduce new infections, deaths from viral hepatitis

WHO urges countries to take rapid action to reduce new infections, deaths from viral hepatitis

Ahead of World Hepatitis Day, 28 July 2016, WHO is urging countries to take rapid action to improve knowledge about the disease, and to increase access to testing and treatment services. [More]
Mass incarceration of drug users leads to high levels of HIV, tuberculosis and hepatitis among prisoners

Mass incarceration of drug users leads to high levels of HIV, tuberculosis and hepatitis among prisoners

The War on Drugs, mass incarceration of drug users, and the failure to provide proven harm reduction and treatment strategies has led to high levels of HIV, tuberculosis, and hepatitis B and C infection among prisoners—far higher than in the general population. [More]
Research highlights global burden of HIV and other infectious diseases among prisoners and detainees

Research highlights global burden of HIV and other infectious diseases among prisoners and detainees

Prisoners and detainees worldwide have higher burdens of HIV, viral hepatitis and tuberculosis than the communities from which they come, and the regular cycling of infected people in and out of incarceration is worsening the epidemics both inside and outside of prison, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health-led research suggests. [More]
AAPS Foundation announces winner of 2016 New Investigator Grant

AAPS Foundation announces winner of 2016 New Investigator Grant

The AAPS Foundation is pleased to announce the 2016 New Investigator Grant recipient, Yizhou Dong, Ph.D of the Ohio State University, for his research entitled "Development of nonviral gene-engineering delivery systems". [More]

Experts describe pathway to limit blurring of boundaries between medical intelligence, securitisation of health threats

Society must align the overlapping priorities and often clashing interests of medical intelligence, national security agendas and the global health community, according to global health advocates writing in the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. [More]
CNIO study shows proinflammatory molecule IL-17A can be key factor in development of NASH and HCC

CNIO study shows proinflammatory molecule IL-17A can be key factor in development of NASH and HCC

Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a serious hepatic condition that precedes hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and is currently untreatable. [More]
FIB-4 index predicts HBV-related HCC

FIB-4 index predicts HBV-related HCC

Japanese researchers reveal an association between elevated FIB-4 index 24 weeks after the initiation of nucleos(t)ide analogue therapy and the development of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection. [More]
Infant HBV vaccination prevents HCC in children, young adults

Infant HBV vaccination prevents HCC in children, young adults

Immunisation against hepatitis B virus in infants protects against the development of hepatocellular carcinoma in not only children but also young adults, a Taiwanese study finds. [More]
TDF reduces vertical HBV transmission

TDF reduces vertical HBV transmission

The mother-to-child transmission of hepatitis B virus is reduced with tenofovir disoproxil fumarate treatment during the third trimester in pregnant chronic HBV patients with a high viral load, show the findings of a trial conducted in China. [More]
TSRI scientists develop new strategy to design potential HIV vaccine candidates

TSRI scientists develop new strategy to design potential HIV vaccine candidates

Want to catch a criminal? Show a mugshot on the news. Want to stop HIV infections? Get the immune system to recognize and attack the virus's tell-tale structure. That's part of the basic approach behind efforts at The Scripps Research Institute to design an AIDS vaccine. [More]
'Simple' model predicts PegIFN response in chronic HBV

'Simple' model predicts PegIFN response in chronic HBV

Chinese researchers have developed a scoring system based on hepatitis B virus-related clinical parameters to predict response to pegylated-interferon in chronic HBV patients. [More]
HCC predictors identified for chronic HBV patients with newly diagnosed cirrhosis

HCC predictors identified for chronic HBV patients with newly diagnosed cirrhosis

In patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection who have been newly diagnosed with cirrhosis, the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma development can be ascertained using several clinical and molecular factors, study findings indicate. [More]
Maternal HBsAg can serve as HBV vertical transmission marker

Maternal HBsAg can serve as HBV vertical transmission marker

Two studies have independently identified quantitative hepatitis B surface antigen as a marker to identify pregnant women with chronic hepatitis B virus infection whose infants are at high-risk of infection despite immunoprophylaxis. [More]
Unmanned drones could be economical to deliver vaccines quickly in developing countries

Unmanned drones could be economical to deliver vaccines quickly in developing countries

Using unmanned drones to deliver vaccines in low- and middle-income countries may save money and improve vaccination rates, new research led by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center suggests. [More]
Panel of microRNAs can predict patients at risk for developing HBV-driven liver cancer

Panel of microRNAs can predict patients at risk for developing HBV-driven liver cancer

Hepatocellular carcinoma, the most common type of liver cancer, is increasing in incidence in the United States, and infection with the Hepatitis B virus (HBV) causes about 50 percent of cases. [More]
Sixty-ninth World Health Assembly comes to end after approving many new resolutions

Sixty-ninth World Health Assembly comes to end after approving many new resolutions

The Sixty-ninth World Health Assembly closed today after approving new resolutions on WHO's Framework for Engagement with Non-State Actors; the Sustainable Development Goals; the International Health Regulations; tobacco control; road traffic deaths and injuries; nutrition; HIV, hepatitis and STIs; mycetoma; research and development; access to medicines and integrated health services. [More]
Doctor’s access to vaccination data can improve pediatric immunization coverage

Doctor’s access to vaccination data can improve pediatric immunization coverage

Exchange of immunization data between a centralized city immunization registry and provider electronic health records led to significant improvements in pediatric immunization coverage, a reduction in over-immunization for adolescents, and increased completeness of immunization records, according to a study conducted at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University Medical Center, NewYork-Presbyterian, and the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene's Citywide Immunization Registry. [More]
Hepatitis B virus screening for Asian American adults can help prevent onset of liver diseases

Hepatitis B virus screening for Asian American adults can help prevent onset of liver diseases

A community-based hepatitis B virus screening effort led by UC Davis researchers found that targeted outreach to Asian American populations can identify groups at high risk for infection and direct them to appropriate follow-up care to help prevent the onset of liver diseases, including cancer. [More]
HBcrAg may predict HCC development

HBcrAg may predict HCC development

Research suggests a role for hepatitis B core-related antigen in the prediction of hepatocellular carcinoma development in nucleos(t)ide analogue treatment-naïve patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection. [More]
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