Hepatitis B News and Research RSS Feed - Hepatitis B News and Research

Hepatitis B is one type of hepatitis – a liver disease- caused by the hepatitis B virus (HBV). Hepatitis B spreads by contact with an infected person's blood, semen or other body fluid. An infected woman can give hepatitis B to her baby at birth.

If you get HBV, you may feel as if you have the flu, or you may have no symptoms at all. A blood test can tell if you have it. HBV usually gets better on its own after a few months. If it does not get better, it is called chronic HBV, which lasts a lifetime. Chronic HBV can lead to scarring of the liver, liver failure or liver cancer.

There is a vaccine for HBV. It requires three shots. All babies should get the vaccine, but older children and adults can get it too. If you travel to countries where Hepatitis B is common, you should get the vaccine.
HEPscreen Toolkit seeks to raise awareness on chronic viral hepatitis in Europe

HEPscreen Toolkit seeks to raise awareness on chronic viral hepatitis in Europe

A new toolkit on screening for chronic viral hepatitis seeks to raise awareness, improve knowledge and motivate public health professionals in Europe to take action. Knowledge and understanding of what works in screening for chronic hepatitis B/C has now been translated into practical and relevant tools, including videos and animations, to enable others to replicate successful screening programmes among at risk populations in their area. [More]
Mylan gets tentative approval from FDA for two pediatric dosages of abacavir/lamivudine tablets

Mylan gets tentative approval from FDA for two pediatric dosages of abacavir/lamivudine tablets

Mylan Inc. today announced that its subsidiary Mylan Laboratories Limited has received tentative approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for its New Drug Applications (NDAs) for two dosages of abacavir/lamivudine tablets for oral suspension for the treatment of HIV-1 infection in pediatric patients. [More]
Scientists review HBV-associated tumor microenvironment in hepatocellular carcinoma

Scientists review HBV-associated tumor microenvironment in hepatocellular carcinoma

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the few cancers in which a continued increase in incidence has been observed over recent years. Globally, there are approximately 750,000 new cases of liver cancer reported each year. Importantly, population-based studies show that HCC ranks as the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. [More]
Leading medical experts across the UK call for radical scale up of liver disease treatment

Leading medical experts across the UK call for radical scale up of liver disease treatment

Leading medical experts today [Thursday 27 November] warn that rising numbers of deaths from liver disease - already the UK's third commonest cause of premature death - will be unavoidable without radical improvements in treatment and detection services, and tougher government policies to control the excessive alcohol use and obesity responsible for much of the national burden of liver disease. [More]
New hybrid vehicle to improve delivery of DNA vaccines is under development

New hybrid vehicle to improve delivery of DNA vaccines is under development

Described recently in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the technology is a biomedical advancement that could help unleash the potential of DNA vaccines, which despite two decades of research, have yet to make a significant impact in the treatment of major illnesses. [More]
Study finds that starting ART treatment soon after HIV infection improves immune health

Study finds that starting ART treatment soon after HIV infection improves immune health

HIV-1-infected U.S. military members and beneficiaries treated with antiretroviral therapy (ART) soon after infection were half as likely to develop AIDS and were more likely to reconstitute their immune-fighting CD4+ T-cells to normal levels, researchers reported Nov. 24 in JAMA Internal Medicine. [More]
New study documents health dangers of male sex trade in Mexico City

New study documents health dangers of male sex trade in Mexico City

A new study documents the stark health dangers of the male sex trade in the streets, hotels, and discotheques of Mexico City. Lead author and health economist Omar Galárraga's point in making the grim assessment of the legal but perilous market is to find an incentive that might reduce the spread of HIV and other diseases in the nation's community of men who have sex with men. [More]
Inovio Pharmaceuticals reports Q3 2014 financial results, provides corporate update

Inovio Pharmaceuticals reports Q3 2014 financial results, provides corporate update

Inovio Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today reported financial results for the quarter ended September 30, 2014. [More]
Profectus BioSciences gets funding to develop VesiculoVax Zaire-Ebola virus vaccine

Profectus BioSciences gets funding to develop VesiculoVax Zaire-Ebola virus vaccine

Profectus BioSciences, Inc., a clinical-stage vaccine company developing novel vaccines for the treatment and prevention of infectious diseases, announced today that the Department of Defense through the Medical Countermeasure Systems-Joint Vaccine Acquisition Program, a subordinate command of the Joint Program Executive Office for Chemical and Biological Defense, Edgewood, MD, has contracted the manufacture and IND-enabling preclinical testing of the Profectus trivalent Ebola/Marburg vaccine. [More]
NCI supports further clinical development of next-generation HPV vaccine

NCI supports further clinical development of next-generation HPV vaccine

The National Cancer Institute in the USA is supporting the new vaccine developed at the MedUni Vienna against the human papillomavirus (HPV) with at least US$ 3.5 million. This is a major success for the developers and means that the foundations can now be laid for the clinical trials needed for licensing as a vaccine. [More]
Foreign-born residents with low vaccination rates face greater risk of exposure to diseases

Foreign-born residents with low vaccination rates face greater risk of exposure to diseases

Foreign-born residents with low vaccination rates and their relatives in the U.S. are at greater risk of exposure to several vaccine-preventable diseases, e.g. influenza; pneumococcal diseases; tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis; hepatitis A; hepatitis B; shingles; and HPV, the human papilloma virus, which can lead to some types of cancer. [More]
Molecular diagnostics and blood screening systems: an interview with Dr Bos and Dr Koppelman

Molecular diagnostics and blood screening systems: an interview with Dr Bos and Dr Koppelman

Screening blood donations and molecular diagnostics for patients started in the nineties. At the beginning, the level of automation in molecular diagnostic testing was limited; most of the work had to be done manually. [More]
Revolutionary Hypo-tec Needlestick Injury Prevention Product enters North American market

Revolutionary Hypo-tec Needlestick Injury Prevention Product enters North American market

V3 Healthcare Strategies, a Wisconsin-based Accountable Care Strategies company, announced the North American launch of the revolutionary Hypo-tec Needlestick Injury Prevention Product amidst an environment of infectious catastrophic diseases such as Ebola, Hanta & Hemorrhagic Fevers, while simultaneously protecting against all other infectious diseases such as HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis and more. [More]
Seven NIH research contracts awarded to identify novel adjuvant candidates

Seven NIH research contracts awarded to identify novel adjuvant candidates

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, has awarded seven research contracts to discover and characterize new adjuvants, or substances formulated as part of vaccines to enhance their protective ability. [More]
Study correlates HPV vaccine series completion among young US women

Study correlates HPV vaccine series completion among young US women

According to a recent study in the journal Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics, only 60% of young US women who received the first dose of the human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine went on to complete the three-dose vaccine series. [More]
T-bet protein fights off hepatitis infections

T-bet protein fights off hepatitis infections

A single protein may tip the balance between ridding the body of a dangerous virus and enduring life-long chronic infection, according to a report appearing in The Journal of Experimental Medicine. [More]
AbbVie’s Phase 3 pivotal study shows HUMIRA is effective in reducing symptoms in HS

AbbVie’s Phase 3 pivotal study shows HUMIRA is effective in reducing symptoms in HS

AbbVie today announced results from a Phase 3 pivotal study demonstrating that HUMIRA® (adalimumab) is effective in reducing common clinical signs and symptoms in moderate-to-severe hidradenitis suppurativa (HS), specifically the number of abscesses and inflammatory nodules. [More]

Novira completes Phase 1a clinical study of NVR-1221 for treatment of HBV infection

Novira Therapeutics, Inc., a privately held biopharmaceutical company developing novel therapies for curative treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, today announced successful completion of a Phase 1a clinical study of NVR-1221. [More]
High uptake of US infant vaccination in 2013

High uptake of US infant vaccination in 2013

The recently published National Immunization Survey (NIS) conducted by the CDC, shows that the majority of infants in the US were vaccinated against potentially serious diseases in 2013. Fewer than 1% of children were unvaccinated in 2013. [More]
FDA approves ViiV Healthcare's Triumeq tablets for treatment of HIV-1 infection

FDA approves ViiV Healthcare's Triumeq tablets for treatment of HIV-1 infection

ViiV Healthcare announced today that the US Food and Drug Administration has approved Triumeq (abacavir 600mg, dolutegravir 50mg and lamivudine 300mg) tablets for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. [More]