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Hepatitis B is one type of hepatitis – a liver disease- caused by the hepatitis B virus (HBV). Hepatitis B spreads by contact with an infected person's blood, semen or other body fluid. An infected woman can give hepatitis B to her baby at birth.

If you get HBV, you may feel as if you have the flu, or you may have no symptoms at all. A blood test can tell if you have it. HBV usually gets better on its own after a few months. If it does not get better, it is called chronic HBV, which lasts a lifetime. Chronic HBV can lead to scarring of the liver, liver failure or liver cancer.

There is a vaccine for HBV. It requires three shots. All babies should get the vaccine, but older children and adults can get it too. If you travel to countries where Hepatitis B is common, you should get the vaccine.
HBV DNA levels guide antiviral treatment in chemotherapy setting

HBV DNA levels guide antiviral treatment in chemotherapy setting

Pretreatment levels of hepatitis B virus DNA could inform the withdrawal of pre-emptive antiviral therapy in chronic HBV patients undergoing cytotoxic chemotherapy for cancer, indicate research findings published in Digestive Diseases and Sciences. [More]
Countrywide variations in chronic HBV burden revealed

Countrywide variations in chronic HBV burden revealed

A systematic review of the worldwide prevalence of chronic hepatitis B virus infection finds wide variation between countries. [More]
Risk score predicts ACLF risk in chronic HBV patients

Risk score predicts ACLF risk in chronic HBV patients

A risk score incorporating routinely collected clinical information can identify patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection at high risk of developing acute-on-chronic liver failure following severe acute exacerbation, research suggests. [More]
World leaders meet at World Hepatitis Summit to discuss prevention strategies for viral hepatitis

World leaders meet at World Hepatitis Summit to discuss prevention strategies for viral hepatitis

Today marks the start of the first-ever World Hepatitis Summit hosted in Glasgow, Scotland, at the Scottish Exhibition and Conference Centre. [More]
World Hepatitis Summit highlights need to develop national programmes that can eliminate viral hepatitis

World Hepatitis Summit highlights need to develop national programmes that can eliminate viral hepatitis

Participants at the first-ever World Hepatitis Summit will urge countries to develop national programmes that can ultimately eliminate viral hepatitis as a problem of public health concern. [More]
Vaccine exemption levels low, vaccination rates high in U.S.

Vaccine exemption levels low, vaccination rates high in U.S.

Vaccine exemption levels for kindergarteners are low for most states and infant vaccination rates are high nationally, according to data from two reports published in this week's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. [More]
Researchers identify new virus that plays role in rare type of liver cancer

Researchers identify new virus that plays role in rare type of liver cancer

More than a cause of a simple infection, viruses are often involved in the development of serious diseases. Such is the case with liver cancer, which often develops in an organ that has been weakened by hepatitis B or C virus. [More]
Antiviral-based therapies have potential to protect humans from deadly Ebola virus

Antiviral-based therapies have potential to protect humans from deadly Ebola virus

For the first time, UK physicians have demonstrated that antiviral-based therapies have the potential to protect humans from the deadly Ebola virus. The report, published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases journal, describes a case-series of eight British health-care workers who were evacuated to the Royal Free Hospital in London, UK after possible accidental exposure to Ebola virus in Sierra Leone between January and March 2015. [More]
New data shows liver cancer has significantly increased in Queensland since the mid-90s

New data shows liver cancer has significantly increased in Queensland since the mid-90s

Incidence rates of the most common type of liver cancer have significantly increased in Queensland since the mid-90s, new data shows. [More]
NYBC, UC Davis Health System partner to manufacture potential stem cell therapies

NYBC, UC Davis Health System partner to manufacture potential stem cell therapies

New York Blood Center today announced a new collaboration with the University of California, Davis, Health System to manufacture specialized lines of stem cells as potential therapies for repair and regeneration of retina, kidney, lung and liver tissue, as well as for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and Huntington's disease. [More]
Hospira announces TGA approval of Inflectra (infliximab) for treatment of eight inflammatory conditions

Hospira announces TGA approval of Inflectra (infliximab) for treatment of eight inflammatory conditions

Hospira today announced that Inflectra (infliximab), the first monoclonal antibody (mAb) biosimilar therapy, has been registered in Australia. This registration paves the way for the Federal Government to reduce the cost of some of the most expensive medicines on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS). [More]
New combination vaccine may reduce number of injections for young children

New combination vaccine may reduce number of injections for young children

A new combination vaccine may reduce the number of injections required to keep infants and toddlers up to date with the United States infant immunization schedule recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In a phase III trial reported in the August 2015 issue of Pediatrics, the vaccine was determined to be effective, safe and well-tolerated. Gary S. Marshall, M.D., professor of pediatrics at the University of Louisville, was the principal investigator of the multi-center trial and first author of the report. [More]
Pennsylvania physicians examine back-to-school health, offer tips for parents and students

Pennsylvania physicians examine back-to-school health, offer tips for parents and students

As students start heading back to classes for the upcoming academic year, Pennsylvania physicians take a close look at back-to-school health and offer some tips for parents and students who strive to stay in class and not home in bed sick. [More]
IP10 levels linked to HBsAg decline during TDF treatment

IP10 levels linked to HBsAg decline during TDF treatment

Baseline serum interferon-inducible protein 10 levels predict hepatitis B surface antigen reduction in patients with hepatitis B e antigen-negative chronic hepatitis B virus infection treated with tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, findings indicate. [More]
Baseline HBsAg, platelet count predict spontaneous HBsAg seroclearance

Baseline HBsAg, platelet count predict spontaneous HBsAg seroclearance

Hepatitis B surface antigen level and platelet count at baseline are significantly associated with spontaneous HBsAg seroclearance in hepatitis B virus carriers and those with chronic infection, research suggests. [More]
Genotype A HBV mapped in acute, chronic Japanese patients

Genotype A HBV mapped in acute, chronic Japanese patients

Not only is genotype A the most common genotype among Japanese patients with acute hepatitis B virus infection, but its prevalence is spreading among young adults with chronic HBV infection, shows a nationwide study. [More]
Breakthroughs against Plasmodium falciparum pave way for latest advancement

Breakthroughs against Plasmodium falciparum pave way for latest advancement

When the highly-influential European Medicines Agency announced its recommendation to approve what could be the world's first licensed vaccine against malaria in infants and children, there was much celebrating in the research community at NYU Langone Medical Center. [More]
First patient enrolled in Contravir‘s FV-100 Phase 3 study to prevent shingles, shingles-associated pain

First patient enrolled in Contravir‘s FV-100 Phase 3 study to prevent shingles, shingles-associated pain

ContraVir Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a biopharmaceutical company focused on the development and commercialization of targeted antiviral therapies, announced today that the first patient has been enrolled in the Company's pivotal Phase 3 clinical study, study 007, of FV-100 to prevent the debilitating shingles-associated pain known as post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN). [More]
Researchers demonstrate direct connection between NOX proteins and liver fibrosis

Researchers demonstrate direct connection between NOX proteins and liver fibrosis

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have demonstrated a direct connection between two signaling proteins and liver fibrosis, a scarring process underlying chronic liver disease, the 12th leading cause of death in the United States. [More]
Study elucidates on global prevalence of chronic hepatitis B infections

Study elucidates on global prevalence of chronic hepatitis B infections

Hepatitis B infections are among the most common infectious diseases worldwide. The disease can become chronic, and is one of the most important causes of severe diseases such as liver cancer. In the scope of an international study funded by the World Health Organization, scientists from the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research in Braunschweig determined how often the chronic infection occurs in different countries and how many people of the general population are affected. They noted strong differences between different countries. [More]
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