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Hepatitis B is one type of hepatitis – a liver disease- caused by the hepatitis B virus (HBV). Hepatitis B spreads by contact with an infected person's blood, semen or other body fluid. An infected woman can give hepatitis B to her baby at birth.

If you get HBV, you may feel as if you have the flu, or you may have no symptoms at all. A blood test can tell if you have it. HBV usually gets better on its own after a few months. If it does not get better, it is called chronic HBV, which lasts a lifetime. Chronic HBV can lead to scarring of the liver, liver failure or liver cancer.

There is a vaccine for HBV. It requires three shots. All babies should get the vaccine, but older children and adults can get it too. If you travel to countries where Hepatitis B is common, you should get the vaccine.
'Simple' model predicts PegIFN response in chronic HBV

'Simple' model predicts PegIFN response in chronic HBV

Chinese researchers have developed a scoring system based on hepatitis B virus-related clinical parameters to predict response to pegylated-interferon in chronic HBV patients. [More]
HCC predictors identified for chronic HBV patients with newly diagnosed cirrhosis

HCC predictors identified for chronic HBV patients with newly diagnosed cirrhosis

In patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection who have been newly diagnosed with cirrhosis, the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma development can be ascertained using several clinical and molecular factors, study findings indicate. [More]
Maternal HBsAg can serve as HBV vertical transmission marker

Maternal HBsAg can serve as HBV vertical transmission marker

Two studies have independently identified quantitative hepatitis B surface antigen as a marker to identify pregnant women with chronic hepatitis B virus infection whose infants are at high-risk of infection despite immunoprophylaxis. [More]
Unmanned drones could be economical to deliver vaccines quickly in developing countries

Unmanned drones could be economical to deliver vaccines quickly in developing countries

Using unmanned drones to deliver vaccines in low- and middle-income countries may save money and improve vaccination rates, new research led by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center suggests. [More]
Panel of microRNAs can predict patients at risk for developing HBV-driven liver cancer

Panel of microRNAs can predict patients at risk for developing HBV-driven liver cancer

Hepatocellular carcinoma, the most common type of liver cancer, is increasing in incidence in the United States, and infection with the Hepatitis B virus (HBV) causes about 50 percent of cases. [More]
Sixty-ninth World Health Assembly comes to end after approving many new resolutions

Sixty-ninth World Health Assembly comes to end after approving many new resolutions

The Sixty-ninth World Health Assembly closed today after approving new resolutions on WHO's Framework for Engagement with Non-State Actors; the Sustainable Development Goals; the International Health Regulations; tobacco control; road traffic deaths and injuries; nutrition; HIV, hepatitis and STIs; mycetoma; research and development; access to medicines and integrated health services. [More]
Doctor’s access to vaccination data can improve pediatric immunization coverage

Doctor’s access to vaccination data can improve pediatric immunization coverage

Exchange of immunization data between a centralized city immunization registry and provider electronic health records led to significant improvements in pediatric immunization coverage, a reduction in over-immunization for adolescents, and increased completeness of immunization records, according to a study conducted at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University Medical Center, NewYork-Presbyterian, and the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene's Citywide Immunization Registry. [More]
Hepatitis B virus screening for Asian American adults can help prevent onset of liver diseases

Hepatitis B virus screening for Asian American adults can help prevent onset of liver diseases

A community-based hepatitis B virus screening effort led by UC Davis researchers found that targeted outreach to Asian American populations can identify groups at high risk for infection and direct them to appropriate follow-up care to help prevent the onset of liver diseases, including cancer. [More]
HBcrAg may predict HCC development

HBcrAg may predict HCC development

Research suggests a role for hepatitis B core-related antigen in the prediction of hepatocellular carcinoma development in nucleos(t)ide analogue treatment-naïve patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection. [More]
WFA+-M2BP levels linked to liver fibrosis, HCC progression in chronic HBV

WFA+-M2BP levels linked to liver fibrosis, HCC progression in chronic HBV

Japanese researchers have found that serum levels of glycosylated Wisteria floribunda agglutinin-positive Mac-2 binding protein are a useful marker of not only the degree of liver fibrosis, but also progression to hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection. [More]
Serum marker may flag liver fibrosis in chronic HBV

Serum marker may flag liver fibrosis in chronic HBV

Serum levels of Wisteria floribunda agglutinin-positive Mac-2-binding protein may reflect the severity of liver fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection, say researchers. [More]
Regular aspirin use may help reduce risk of bile duct cancer

Regular aspirin use may help reduce risk of bile duct cancer

Regular use of aspirin was linked with a significantly reduced risk of developing bile duct cancer, also called cholangiocarcinoma, in a recent study. The findings, which are published in the journal Hepatology, indicate that additional research on the potential of aspirin for preventing bile duct cancer is warranted. [More]
New blood treatment technology could reduce malaria risk following blood transfusions

New blood treatment technology could reduce malaria risk following blood transfusions

Patients, especially children, who undergo blood transfusions in sub-Saharan Africa are at high risk of transfusion-transmitted malaria. A new trial, published in The Lancet today, suggests that treating donated blood with a new technology that combines UV radiation and vitamin B is safe and could minimise the risk of malaria infection following blood transfusions. [More]
Resolving HBV infection does not reduce liver cancer risk

Resolving HBV infection does not reduce liver cancer risk

Long-term infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) can cause liver inflammation and increase the risk of liver cancer. Researchers from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, however, found that resolving HBV infection was not associated with reduced rates of liver cancer. [More]
TDF, entecavir duo 'highly effective' for difficult-to-treat chronic HBV

TDF, entecavir duo 'highly effective' for difficult-to-treat chronic HBV

The combination of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate and entecavir induces a high rate of viral suppression in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection who have failed multiple nucleos(t)ide analogue regimens, phase IIIb results indicate. [More]
Dynamic HBsAg measurements predict HBV inactivity

Dynamic HBsAg measurements predict HBV inactivity

In patients with hepatitis B e antigen-negative chronic hepatitis B virus infection, repeated measurement of hepatitis B surface antigen during long-term follow-up can help identify those with inactive virus, suggests a chart review. [More]
HLA-C/KIR genotype linked to HBeAg-positive HBV interferon response

HLA-C/KIR genotype linked to HBeAg-positive HBV interferon response

The human leucocyte antigen-C and killer immunoglobin-like receptor genotypes are associated with response to interferon-based therapy in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection positive for hepatitis B e antigen, say researchers. [More]
Study shows 37% of outpatient healthcare staff fail to follow hand hygiene recommendations

Study shows 37% of outpatient healthcare staff fail to follow hand hygiene recommendations

Despite having policies in place to prevent infections, staff at outpatient care facilities fail to follow recommendations for hand hygiene 37 percent of the time, and for safe injection practices 33 percent of the time, according to a study published in the April issue of the American Journal of Infection Control, the official publication of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology. [More]
Analysis reveals improved survivorship for acute liver failure patients

Analysis reveals improved survivorship for acute liver failure patients

More patients hospitalized with acute liver failure - often the result of acetaminophen overdose - are surviving, including those who receive a liver transplant and those who don't, an analysis led by a UT Southwestern Medical Center researcher showed. [More]
DAA medication could lead to revolution in hepatitis C treatment

DAA medication could lead to revolution in hepatitis C treatment

The cost of treating hepatitis C virus (HCV) could be cut up to 50 percent if mathematical models are used to predict when patients can safely stop taking direct-acting antiviral (DAA) medication, according to a new study by researchers at Loyola University Health System and Loyola University Chicago [More]
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