Hepatitis C News and Research RSS Feed - Hepatitis C News and Research

Hepatitis C is a blood-borne virus that infects the liver, where it causes significant inflammation, damage and disruption of normal liver function. According to estimates by the World Health Organization, around 3 to 4 million people worldwide are infected with hepatitis C every year.

The hepatitis C virus is usually transmitted through contact with the blood of an infected individual and, most commonly, people catch it through sharing contaminated needles when injecting illegal drugs.

Hepatitis C infection is categorized into an acute and a chronic stage. The acute phase describes the first 6 months of infection when there are not necessarily any symptoms. Around one quarter of people manage to clear the infection during this stage before disease progresses to the chronic stage.

People who go on to develop chronic hepatitis C may develop jaundice which turns the skin and whites of the eyes yellow. This is caused by the build-up of a yellow-colored substance in the blood called bilirubin that would usually be broken down by the liver if it was healthy. Chronic infection may eventually cause fibrosis and scarring (cirrhosis) of the liver, liver cancer or end stage liver failure.

Hepatitis C can be treated with antiviral medications that that are designed to disrupt the multiplication of virus particles inside the body and prevent liver damage.
Study on Zika exposure among HIV-infected patients in Ghana

Study on Zika exposure among HIV-infected patients in Ghana

What many may not know is that the Zika virus is a distant cousin of hepatitis C, a blood borne-virus that attacks the liver and often co-infects HIV patients. [More]
WFA+-M2BP levels linked to liver fibrosis, HCC progression in chronic HBV

WFA+-M2BP levels linked to liver fibrosis, HCC progression in chronic HBV

Japanese researchers have found that serum levels of glycosylated Wisteria floribunda agglutinin-positive Mac-2 binding protein are a useful marker of not only the degree of liver fibrosis, but also progression to hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection. [More]
Serum marker may flag liver fibrosis in chronic HBV

Serum marker may flag liver fibrosis in chronic HBV

Serum levels of Wisteria floribunda agglutinin-positive Mac-2-binding protein may reflect the severity of liver fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection, say researchers. [More]
New blood treatment technology could reduce malaria risk following blood transfusions

New blood treatment technology could reduce malaria risk following blood transfusions

Patients, especially children, who undergo blood transfusions in sub-Saharan Africa are at high risk of transfusion-transmitted malaria. A new trial, published in The Lancet today, suggests that treating donated blood with a new technology that combines UV radiation and vitamin B is safe and could minimise the risk of malaria infection following blood transfusions. [More]
Johns Hopkins study suggests updated universal screening for hepatitis C virus

Johns Hopkins study suggests updated universal screening for hepatitis C virus

A review of blood samples for nearly 5,000 patients seen at The Johns Hopkins Hospital Emergency Department suggests that federal guidelines for hepatitis C virus (HCV) screening may be missing up to a quarter of all cases and argues for updated universal screening. [More]
AbbVie's ABT-493 and ABT-530 achieve high SVR rates in GT1 chronic HCV patients who failed previous therapy with DAAs

AbbVie's ABT-493 and ABT-530 achieve high SVR rates in GT1 chronic HCV patients who failed previous therapy with DAAs

AbbVie, a global biopharmaceutical company, today announced that 91 percent (n=20/22) of genotype 1 (GT1) chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infected patients who failed previous therapy with direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) achieved SVR12 with 12 weeks of ABT-493 and ABT-530 with ribavirin (RBV) in the primary intent-to-treat analysis. [More]
VIEKIRAX and EXVIERA achieve high SVR rates in GT1 and GT4 hepatitis C virus infected patients

VIEKIRAX and EXVIERA achieve high SVR rates in GT1 and GT4 hepatitis C virus infected patients

AbbVie, a global biopharmaceutical company, today announced new real-world data showing 96 percent of genotype 1 (GT1) patients (n=486/505 assessable for analysis) and 100 percent (n=53/53) of genotype 4 (GT4) patients achieved sustained virologic response at 12 weeks post-treatment (SVR12). [More]
Patients with genotype 1 chronic HCV infection achieve high SVR rates with VIEKIRAX + EXVIERA

Patients with genotype 1 chronic HCV infection achieve high SVR rates with VIEKIRAX + EXVIERA

AbbVie, a global biopharmaceutical company, today announced data showing that patients with genotype 1 (GT1) chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection who received the recommended regimen of VIEKIRAX (ombitasvir/paritaprevir/ritonavir tablets) + EXVIERA (dasabuvir tablets), with or without ribavirin (RBV), achieved high sustained virologic response rates at 48 weeks post-treatment (SVR48), regardless of the presence of baseline resistance-associated variants (RAVs). [More]
Hepatitis C treatment can be provided safely, effectively within community-based setting

Hepatitis C treatment can be provided safely, effectively within community-based setting

A new study, presented today, demonstrates treatment for Hepatitis C can be provided safely and effectively within a community-based and non-specialist setting. This illustrates the potential for alternative providers to ease pressure on currently overburdened specialists. The study, sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, was presented at The International Liver Congress 2016 in Barcelona, Spain. [More]
HCV patients with hepatocellular carcinoma history could re-develop illness during or after taking DAAs

HCV patients with hepatocellular carcinoma history could re-develop illness during or after taking DAAs

Data from a new study show that patients with Hepatitis C virus (HCV) taking direct-acting antiviral treatments (DAAs), who have previously fought off hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common form of liver cancer,1 had a 'high rate' of re-developing their illness. [More]
Studies offer alternative conclusions on efficacy of DAAs for HIV and HCV co-infected patients

Studies offer alternative conclusions on efficacy of DAAs for HIV and HCV co-infected patients

Two separate studies presented today at The International Liver Congress 2016 in Barcelona, Spain have offered alternative conclusions regarding the efficacy of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) among patients co-infected with HIV and Hepatitis C virus (HCV). [More]
Prime boost approach can increase possibility of combined HCV and HIV vaccination

Prime boost approach can increase possibility of combined HCV and HIV vaccination

A combined vaccination against Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and HIV moved a step closer, with the results of a study presented at The International Liver Congress 2016 in Barcelona, Spain today. [More]
Inactivation of protein-coding gene promotes liver tissue regeneration in mammals

Inactivation of protein-coding gene promotes liver tissue regeneration in mammals

Scientists at the Children's Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern (CRI) report that inactivating a certain protein-coding gene promotes liver tissue regeneration in mammals. [More]
Lancet experts call for evidence-based approach to drug policy

Lancet experts call for evidence-based approach to drug policy

Fifty years of drug policies aimed at restricting and criminalizing drug use and minor possession have had serious detrimental effects on the health, wellbeing and human rights of drug users and the wider public, according to a major new report by The Lancet and Johns Hopkins University in the US [More]
DAA medication could lead to revolution in hepatitis C treatment

DAA medication could lead to revolution in hepatitis C treatment

The cost of treating hepatitis C virus (HCV) could be cut up to 50 percent if mathematical models are used to predict when patients can safely stop taking direct-acting antiviral (DAA) medication, according to a new study by researchers at Loyola University Health System and Loyola University Chicago [More]
MUSC surgeon awarded $3.8 million grant to evaluate transplant drug

MUSC surgeon awarded $3.8 million grant to evaluate transplant drug

Seldom can one say $3.8 million is just the tip of the iceberg, but a newly awarded grant from Gilead Sciences, Inc. is just that. MUSC transplant surgeon Kenneth Chavin, M.D., Ph.D., says the true value of the multi-center drug trial is closer to $26 million, including $22 million in free drugs provided by the pharmaceutical company. [More]
Novel nanoparticle technology can decipher protein structures and help access drug targets

Novel nanoparticle technology can decipher protein structures and help access drug targets

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet, Sweden, have developed a nanoparticle technology that can be used to stabilise membrane proteins so that their structure can be studied in a lipid environment. The method, described in Nature Methods, makes it possible to access drug targets that previously could not be investigated and therefore potentially allows for the development of novel drugs, therapeutic antibodies and vaccines. [More]
Study: 2.3 million people living with HIV co-infected with HCV

Study: 2.3 million people living with HIV co-infected with HCV

An estimated 2.3 million people living with HIV are co-infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) globally, a new study by the University of Bristol and the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine has found. [More]
Inherited gene after black plague may help treat HIV patients co-infected with hepatitis C

Inherited gene after black plague may help treat HIV patients co-infected with hepatitis C

The Black Death swept Europe in the 14th century eliminating up to half of the population but it left genetic clues that now may aid a University of Cincinnati researcher in treating HIV patients co-infected with hepatitis C using an anti-retroviral drug therapy. [More]
Study identifies new mechanism for controlling HIV replication

Study identifies new mechanism for controlling HIV replication

Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered that HIV infection of human immune cells triggers a massive increase in methylation, a chemical modification, to both human and viral RNA, aiding replication of the virus. [More]
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