Hepatitis C News and Research RSS Feed - Hepatitis C News and Research

Hepatitis C is a blood-borne virus that infects the liver, where it causes significant inflammation, damage and disruption of normal liver function. According to estimates by the World Health Organization, around 3 to 4 million people worldwide are infected with hepatitis C every year.

The hepatitis C virus is usually transmitted through contact with the blood of an infected individual and, most commonly, people catch it through sharing contaminated needles when injecting illegal drugs.

Hepatitis C infection is categorized into an acute and a chronic stage. The acute phase describes the first 6 months of infection when there are not necessarily any symptoms. Around one quarter of people manage to clear the infection during this stage before disease progresses to the chronic stage.

People who go on to develop chronic hepatitis C may develop jaundice which turns the skin and whites of the eyes yellow. This is caused by the build-up of a yellow-colored substance in the blood called bilirubin that would usually be broken down by the liver if it was healthy. Chronic infection may eventually cause fibrosis and scarring (cirrhosis) of the liver, liver cancer or end stage liver failure.

Hepatitis C can be treated with antiviral medications that that are designed to disrupt the multiplication of virus particles inside the body and prevent liver damage.
First Edition: August 5, 2014

First Edition: August 5, 2014

Today's headlines include coverage of a partnership between two of California's largest insurers in which they will join forces to create a database of patient medical records. [More]
Computer simulation forecasts favorable trends in eradicating hepatitis C

Computer simulation forecasts favorable trends in eradicating hepatitis C

Effective new drugs and screening would make hepatitis C a rare disease by 2036, according to a computer simulation conducted by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. [More]
Hepatitis C could become a rare disease by 2036

Hepatitis C could become a rare disease by 2036

Effective new drugs and screening would make hepatitis C a rare disease by 2036, according to a computer simulation conducted by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. The results of the simulation are reported in the August 5 edition of the journal Annals of Internal Medicine. [More]
New technique for studying lifecycle of hepatitis B virus can help develop cure for disease

New technique for studying lifecycle of hepatitis B virus can help develop cure for disease

A new technique for studying the lifecycle of the hepatitis B virus could help researchers develop a cure for the disease. [More]
Viewpoints: Ignagni on prices of new drugs; Sen. Johnson on the difficulty of suing a president

Viewpoints: Ignagni on prices of new drugs; Sen. Johnson on the difficulty of suing a president

Lately, there has been considerable debate about the soaring prices of specialty drugs, which are aimed at difficult-to-treat diseases. [More]

Medicaid roundup: Florida receives 3-year renewal for managed care program; Illinois limits Sovaldi

About 3 million Floridians are enrolled in the privatized program. Meanwhile, Illinois Medicaid puts limits on who is eligible for Sovaldi, an expensive hepatitis C drug, and Kansas recoups more than $28 million in Medicaid fraud. [More]
First Edition: August 4, 2014

First Edition: August 4, 2014

Today's headlines include a variety of health policy stories reflecting developments on the state level. [More]
State highlights: Time of turmoil for Georgia hospitals; Oregon Medicaid takes aim at expensive heptatitis C drug

State highlights: Time of turmoil for Georgia hospitals; Oregon Medicaid takes aim at expensive heptatitis C drug

A selection of health policy stories from Gerogia, Wisconsin, Texas, Oregon, Florida, Michigan, Massachusetts, Connecticut and North Carolina. [More]
Medicare drug premiums to rise $1 a month in 2015

Medicare drug premiums to rise $1 a month in 2015

The modest increase of the monthly premium to $32 comes even as officials are concerned about the impact of expensive specialty drugs, such as Sovaldi, which cures hepatitis C but costs $1,000 a pill. [More]
Researchers one step closer to finding treatment for dengue fever

Researchers one step closer to finding treatment for dengue fever

There have been several news reports that the world's first dengue vaccine will be available next year. However, the latest clinical trials show that the vaccine only provides a protection of around 50 per cent for DENV-2 and DENV-1, which are commonly found in Singapore. [More]
State highlights: Maryland's top health official leaving for Johns Hopkins; Minnesota lawmakers to propose legislation to require contraception coverage

State highlights: Maryland's top health official leaving for Johns Hopkins; Minnesota lawmakers to propose legislation to require contraception coverage

Maryland's top health official, Joshua M. Sharfstein, announced Wednesday that he will leave at the end of Gov. Martin O'Malley's term in January to become an associate dean at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health (Johnson, 7/30). [More]

Cigna's quarterly earnings up

Gains driven largely by global benefits operation after Cigna reported earlier that its business on the health law marketplaces was soft. News outlets also examine Humana and WellPoint's earnings. [More]

First Edition: July 31, 2014

Today's headlines include reports about the possible hazards that the future might hold for healthcare.gov. [More]
Several insurers report lower profits

Several insurers report lower profits

WellPoint Inc. on Wednesday said its second-quarter profit slipped as the health insurer recorded higher expenses, masking a boost in revenue and enrollment. [More]
First Edition: July 30, 2014

First Edition: July 30, 2014

Today's headlines include a range of health policy headines, including news from Capitol Hill on the Senate confirmation of Robert McDonald to head the VA. [More]
Conjoint Analysis method can show how important different treatment goals are for respondents

Conjoint Analysis method can show how important different treatment goals are for respondents

The Conjoint Analysis (CA) method is in principle suitable to find out which preferences patients have regarding treatment goals. However, to widely use it in health economic evaluations, some (primarily methodological) issues still need to be clarified. [More]
New pill-only antiviral drug regimens could cure hardest-to-treat hepatitis C

New pill-only antiviral drug regimens could cure hardest-to-treat hepatitis C

Two new pill-only antiviral drug regimens could provide shorter, more effective treatment options with fewer side effects for the majority of patients infected with hepatitis C, even those most difficult to treat, according to the results of two studies published in The Lancet. [More]

New study in recognition of World Hepatitis Day released on Life Sciences Connect

The Intellectual Property and Science business of Thomson Reuters, the world's leading source of intelligent information for businesses and professionals, today released a new study in recognition of World Hepatitis Day on Life Sciences Connect, a blog exploring the latest news and trends in Life Sciences and updates on the drug pipeline identifying multiple treatments in development that may serve as potential alternatives to Gilead's Sovaldi, currently priced in the United States at $84,000 for 12 weeks of treatment - $1000 per pill. [More]
First Edition: July 28, 2014

First Edition: July 28, 2014

Today's headlines include reports about the deal reached by House and Senate negotiators regarding veterans' health care. [More]
Researchers provide global genotype prevalence estimates for HCV

Researchers provide global genotype prevalence estimates for HCV

In one of the largest prevalence studies to date, researchers from the U.K. provide national, regional, and global genotype prevalence estimates for the hepatitis C virus (HCV). Findings published in Hepatology, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, indicate that genotype 1 is the most prevalent worldwide, with over 83 million patients infected of which one-third reside in East Asia. [More]