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Study provides empirical evidence of decline in stroke incidence, mortality rates in U.S.

Study provides empirical evidence of decline in stroke incidence, mortality rates in U.S.

Despite the significant reduction in the overall incidence and death rates from strokes in the United States over the past twenty years, more attention needs to be paid to specific age groups, a recent study found. [More]
New report outlines cholesterol-targeted approach to treat people at risk for cardiovascular disease

New report outlines cholesterol-targeted approach to treat people at risk for cardiovascular disease

A recent guideline for using statins to reduce atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease has wavered too far from the simple cholesterol goals that have saved thousands of lives in the past decade, and doesn't adequately treat patients as individuals, experts said today in a national report. [More]
Milk consumption and dairy may lower blood pressure, CVD risk

Milk consumption and dairy may lower blood pressure, CVD risk

Globally, cardiovascular disease (CVD) claims 17 million lives each year, while complications from high blood pressure take an additional 9.4 million. New research presented by international scientists at the 12th Euro Fed Lipid Congress in Montpellier, France on September 15, 2014, suggests that milk consumption and dairy may play a beneficial role. [More]
Sharp Rees-Stealy Medical Group named recipient of 2014 AMGA Acclaim Award

Sharp Rees-Stealy Medical Group named recipient of 2014 AMGA Acclaim Award

The American Medical Group Association today announced that the recipient of the 2014 AMGA Acclaim Award is Sharp Rees-Stealy Medical Group for an innovative and integrated method to drive population health using a collaborative, team-based approach. [More]
Study looks at blood type and risk of cognitive impairment

Study looks at blood type and risk of cognitive impairment

People with blood type AB may be more likely to develop memory loss in later years than people with other blood types, according to a study published in the September 10, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Researchers find that people suffering from sleep apnea have weaker brain blood flow

Researchers find that people suffering from sleep apnea have weaker brain blood flow

Employing a measure rarely used in sleep apnea studies, researchers at the UCLA School of Nursing have uncovered evidence of what may be damaging the brain in people with the sleep disorder - weaker brain blood flow. [More]
New potential therapeutic targets for treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension

New potential therapeutic targets for treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension

Two new potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension, a deadly disease marked by high blood pressure in the lungs, have been identified by researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago. [More]
State highlights: Texas lawmaker proposes '3 strikes' for nursing homes

State highlights: Texas lawmaker proposes '3 strikes' for nursing homes

New Yorker Deadra Malloy was diagnosed with HIV in 1988, but she remained healthy for so long she wasn't completely convinced she was positive. [More]
FDA approves Epaned for treatment of symptomatic and asymptomatic heart failure

FDA approves Epaned for treatment of symptomatic and asymptomatic heart failure

Silvergate Pharmaceuticals, Inc., focused on the development and commercialization of innovative and safe medicines for children, today announced that the United States Food and Drug Administration approved Epaned for the treatment of symptomatic heart failure and the treatment of asymptomatic left ventricular dysfunction (to decrease the rate of development of overt heart failure and to reduce hospitalization for heart failure). [More]
Morning hypertension unmasked as risk factor for cardiovascular events

Morning hypertension unmasked as risk factor for cardiovascular events

Patients on antihypertensive medication who have high blood pressure in the morning, as measured with home monitoring kits, are at increased risk of cardiovascular events, even if their clinic measurement is acceptable, researchers have found. [More]
Longer looks: Alzheimer's and a marriage; racism in medicine; abortion restrictions in Texas

Longer looks: Alzheimer's and a marriage; racism in medicine; abortion restrictions in Texas

The US, which has a mostly private health-care system, manages to spend more on its public health-care system than countries where the health-care system is almost entirely public. America's government spends more, as a percentage of the economy, on public health care than Canada, the United Kingdom, Japan or Australia. And then it spends even more than that on private health care. [More]
Abdominal fat more strongly associated with high blood pressure risk

Abdominal fat more strongly associated with high blood pressure risk

People with fat around their abdominal area are at greater risk of developing hypertension when compared to those with similar body mass index but fat concentrations elsewhere on the body, according to a study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. [More]
People from low socio-economic positions in Britain still eat more salt

People from low socio-economic positions in Britain still eat more salt

People from low socio-economic positions in Britain still eat more salt than those from higher socio-economic positions, irrespective of where they live. [More]
At home or in facilities, care for elderly changing rapidly

At home or in facilities, care for elderly changing rapidly

News outlets cover the reliability of nursing home ratings, the growth of home health care aides and the return of the house call. [More]
Endothelial cells can function as cardiac stem cells to produce new heart muscle tissue

Endothelial cells can function as cardiac stem cells to produce new heart muscle tissue

Endothelial cells residing in the coronary arteries can function as cardiac stem cells to produce new heart muscle tissue, Vanderbilt University investigators have discovered. [More]
Study on patients with type 2 diabetes examines fracture risk with antihypertensive treatment

Study on patients with type 2 diabetes examines fracture risk with antihypertensive treatment

It's time to question the common belief that patients receiving intensive blood pressure treatment are prone to falling and breaking bones. A comprehensive study in people ages 40 to 79 with diabetes, led by Karen Margolis, MD, of HealthPartners Institute for Education and Research in the US, found no evidence supporting this belief. [More]
Neo40 nitric oxide supplement helps promote normal blood pressure

Neo40 nitric oxide supplement helps promote normal blood pressure

Nitric oxide supplementation using a Neo40 lozenge significantly helps promote normal blood pressure, as indicated by a 30-day, blinded, placebo-controlled clinical study, conducted at the California Medical Institute by renowned cardiology researcher Dr. Ernst Schwarz. [More]
Patients who rely on pacemakers and defibrillators run risk of serious health complications

Patients who rely on pacemakers and defibrillators run risk of serious health complications

Patients who rely on pacemakers and defibrillators to maintain a normal heart rhythm run the risk of serious health complications if they don't fully understand how the devices work and what to do when they experience an irregular heartbeat. [More]
Women seek hormonal treatments for menopausal symptoms from anti-aging clinicians

Women seek hormonal treatments for menopausal symptoms from anti-aging clinicians

Feeling that conventional doctors did not take their suffering seriously, women instead sought out hormonal treatments for menopausal symptoms from anti-aging clinicians, according to a Case Western Reserve University study that investigated the appeal of anti-aging medicine. [More]
HDAC inhibitors may also be effective against kidney stones

HDAC inhibitors may also be effective against kidney stones

Anyone who has suffered from kidney stones is keenly aware of the lack of drugs to treat the condition, which often causes excruciating pain. [More]