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Scientists confirm relation between levels of certain pollutants in the body and levels of obesity

Scientists confirm relation between levels of certain pollutants in the body and levels of obesity

A team of Spanish scientists, which includes several researchers from the University of Granada, has confirmed that there is a relation between the levels of certain environmental pollutants that a person accumulates in his or her body and their level of obesity. Subjects with more pollutants in their organisms present besides higher levels of cholesterol and triglycerides, which are important risk factors for cardiovascular disease. [More]
Children watching TV for more than two hours a day at greater risk of blood pressure

Children watching TV for more than two hours a day at greater risk of blood pressure

A study on European children concludes that spending more than two hours a day in front of a screen increases the probability of high blood pressure by 30%. The article also points out that doing no daily physical activity or doing less than an hour a day increases this risk by 50%. [More]
Loyola physician reveals top five health concerns for men, offers tips to prevent them

Loyola physician reveals top five health concerns for men, offers tips to prevent them

Men lead women in the likelihood to die from nearly all the most common causes of death. Still, men are less likely to go to the doctor than women and often try to ignore symptoms of health problems. [More]
Sleeping more than eight hours a night could increase risk of stroke

Sleeping more than eight hours a night could increase risk of stroke

People who sleep more than eight hours a night may have an increased risk of stroke, according to a new study published in the February 25, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Penn State researchers explore hydrogen sulfide's probable role in regulating blood pressure

Penn State researchers explore hydrogen sulfide's probable role in regulating blood pressure

Widely considered simply a malodorous toxic gas, hydrogen sulfide is now being studied for its probable role in regulating blood pressure, according to researchers. [More]
New research finds that synthetic flame retardants can cause metabolic and liver problems

New research finds that synthetic flame retardants can cause metabolic and liver problems

Chemicals used as synthetic flame retardants that are found in common household items such as couches, carpet padding, and electronics have been found to cause metabolic and liver problems that can lead to insulin resistance, which is a major cause of obesity, according to new research from the University of New Hampshire. [More]
Adult survivors of childhood cancer at risk for pituitary hormone deficiencies

Adult survivors of childhood cancer at risk for pituitary hormone deficiencies

Decades after undergoing cranial irradiation for childhood cancer, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital investigators found that adult survivors of pediatric cancer remain at risk for pituitary hormone deficiencies that may diminish their health and quality of life. [More]
Despite growing shortage of donor hearts, surgeons, transplant centers reject marginal hearts

Despite growing shortage of donor hearts, surgeons, transplant centers reject marginal hearts

Surgeons and transplant centers nationwide increasingly have rejected hearts donated for transplantation despite a growing need for them, according to a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. [More]
Short nap can reverse hormonal impact of poor night's sleep

Short nap can reverse hormonal impact of poor night's sleep

A short nap can help relieve stress and bolster the immune systems of men who slept only two hours the previous night, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
Chili peppers show promise as diet-based supplement

Chili peppers show promise as diet-based supplement

Don't go chomping on a handful of chili peppers just yet, but there may be help for hopeful dieters in those fiery little Native American fruits. [More]
Study shows preeclampsia and low birth weight reoccur in the next generation

Study shows preeclampsia and low birth weight reoccur in the next generation

In a study to be presented on Feb. 6 in an oral concurrent session at 1:15 p.m. PST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting™, in San Diego, researchers will present findings on a study of mothers and daughters where low birth weight and preeclampsia were found to reoccur in the next generation. [More]
February is American Heart Month

February is American Heart Month

February is American Heart Month, the perfect time to be reminded to take care of your heart. "Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women," says Gerald Sotsky, M.D., Chair of Cardiac Services, Valley Medical Group. [More]
Researchers pinpoint key moments at which intervening decreases risk of death in hypertension patients

Researchers pinpoint key moments at which intervening decreases risk of death in hypertension patients

High blood pressure is the most common risk factor for heart disease and death worldwide, and yet the answers to some of the most basic questions about how to manage it - when to introduce new medications, intensify treatment or re-evaluate a patient - remain unclear. In a new study published this week in the British Medical Journal, researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital examined the outcomes of 88,000 adults with hypertension to pinpoint the precise high-blood-pressure level and critical time points at which intervening was tied to a decrease in the risk of death. [More]
Deaf people have high levels of risk factors for common conditions

Deaf people have high levels of risk factors for common conditions

Deaf people who sign have poorer health than the general population, according to a study led by researchers from the School for Social and Community Medicine at the University of Bristol, UK. [More]
40% of prison and jail inmates have chronic medical problems, shows BJS survey

40% of prison and jail inmates have chronic medical problems, shows BJS survey

An estimated 40 percent of state and federal prisoners and jail inmates reported having a current chronic medical condition in the 2011–12 National Inmate Survey, the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) announced today. [More]
Decades of progress save countless lives, but biggest research challenges lie ahead

Decades of progress save countless lives, but biggest research challenges lie ahead

The 2015 Heart and Stroke Foundation Report on the Health of Canadians looks back on 60 years of life-saving, ground-breaking research, revealing astonishing improvements in diagnosis, treatments, and outcomes. [More]
Newly found peptide may reduce desire for food

Newly found peptide may reduce desire for food

Researchers have identified a peptide and hormone that when administered to a specific area of the brain may reduce the desire for food. The study, which appears in the journal Neuropsychopharmacology, may one day lead to medications that treat obesity and binge eating disorders. [More]
Retigabine drug could reduce debilitating impact of strokes

Retigabine drug could reduce debilitating impact of strokes

New research suggests that an already-approved drug could dramatically reduce the debilitating impact of strokes, which affect nearly a million Americans every year. [More]
Images reveal new insights into how kidney develops into a complex organ

Images reveal new insights into how kidney develops into a complex organ

Striking images reveal new insights into how the kidney develops from a group of cells into a complex organ. [More]
Women’s risk factors for heart disease

Women’s risk factors for heart disease

Heart disease is often thought of as a health problem for men, but more and more women die of heart disease each year than men, and from any other disease including breast cancer. [More]