High Blood Pressure News and Research RSS Feed - High Blood Pressure News and Research

Drug used to treat hypertension prevents post-traumatic epilepsy in rodent model

Drug used to treat hypertension prevents post-traumatic epilepsy in rodent model

Between 10 and 20 percent of all cases of epilepsy result from severe head injury, but a new drug promises to prevent post-traumatic seizures and may forestall further brain damage caused by seizures in those who already have epilepsy. [More]

FDA approves Cyramza to treat patients with advanced stomach cancer

Based on results of a clinical trial led by Dana-Farber Cancer Institute scientists, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a molecularly targeted drug as second-line treatment in advanced stomach cancer that has progressed after standard chemotherapy has failed. [More]
Narrowing of carotid artery in neck without any symptoms may be linked to memory problems

Narrowing of carotid artery in neck without any symptoms may be linked to memory problems

For the first time, researchers have demonstrated that narrowing of the carotid artery in the neck without any symptoms may be linked to problems in learning, memory, thinking and decision-making, compared to people with similar risk factors but no narrowing in the neck artery, according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 66th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, April 26 to May 3, 2014. [More]

FDA approves molecularly targeted drug as second-line treatment for advanced stomach cancer

Based on results of a clinical trial led by Dana-Farber Cancer Institute scientists, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved a molecularly targeted drug as second-line treatment in advanced stomach cancer that has progressed after standard chemotherapy has failed. [More]
FDA approves GSK's Tanzeum as once-weekly treatment for type 2 diabetes

FDA approves GSK's Tanzeum as once-weekly treatment for type 2 diabetes

GlaxoSmithKline plc today announced that the US Food and Drug Administration has approved Tanzeum (albiglutide) for injection, for subcutaneous use, as a once-weekly treatment for type 2 diabetes. Tanzeum has been approved as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. [More]
RWJUH offers new alternative to open up blocked arteries

RWJUH offers new alternative to open up blocked arteries

Treatment options for high-risk heart patients with severely calcified coronary artery disease (CAD) have been limited for more than 20 years. Now, Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital offers a new alternative to open up blocked arteries. [More]
Mayo Clinic research shows RA patients more likely to develop chronic kidney disease

Mayo Clinic research shows RA patients more likely to develop chronic kidney disease

Rheumatoid arthritis patients are likelier than the average person to develop chronic kidney disease, and more severe inflammation in the first year of rheumatoid arthritis, corticosteroid use, high blood pressure and obesity are among the risk factors, new Mayo Clinic research shows. [More]

Siemens, NKF form new alliance to improve screening for kidney disease in high-risk individuals

Siemens Healthcare and the National Kidney Foundation (NKF) announced today a new strategic alliance focusing on education, awareness and screening for kidney disease in high-risk individuals. This important collaboration will leverage the latest testing recommendations from the NKF to improve detection among the 73 million Americans at risk for kidney disease. [More]
Research shows that rheumatoid arthritis patients are at higher risk of kidney disease

Research shows that rheumatoid arthritis patients are at higher risk of kidney disease

Rheumatoid arthritis patients are likelier than the average person to develop chronic kidney disease, and more severe inflammation in the first year of rheumatoid arthritis, corticosteroid use, high blood pressure and obesity are among the risk factors, new Mayo Clinic research shows. [More]
Childhood obesity rates stabilize in recent years, study finds

Childhood obesity rates stabilize in recent years, study finds

Childhood obesity rates leveled off during a 14-year period between 1999 and 2012, according to research published Monday in the Journal of the American Medical Association: Pediatrics. But the rate of severe obesity increased, especially in Hispanic girls and black boys, according to the study. [More]

Children exposed to 'green exercise' more likely to experience health-enhancing effects after activity

​Children who are exposed to scenes of nature while exercising are more likely to experience health-enhancing effects after activity, according to a Coventry University study published this week in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. [More]
Eating watermelon reduces blood pressure in overweight individuals

Eating watermelon reduces blood pressure in overweight individuals

Be sure to pick up a watermelon - or two - at your neighborhood farmers' market. It could save your life. [More]
Northwestern University awarded NIH grant to conduct phase III Parkinson's neuroprotective study

Northwestern University awarded NIH grant to conduct phase III Parkinson's neuroprotective study

Tanya Simuni, M.D., medical director of Northwestern University's Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders Center, was awarded a grant from the National Institutes of Health to conduct a $16 million phase III study of the safety and efficacy of the drug isradipine as a potential neuroprotective agent in Parkinson's disease. [More]
High levels of GDNF protein could help body resist weight gain despite high-fat diet

High levels of GDNF protein could help body resist weight gain despite high-fat diet

​More than one-third of people in the US are obese. Obesity and its related health problems-including high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, insulin resistance, and belly fat-affect so many, yet effective treatments are very few. [More]

Bayer’s Adempas now available in the UK to treat patients with CTEPH

Adempas (riociguat) is available in the UK today as the first drug treatment for CTEPH, to treat adult patients with WHO Functional Class (FC) II to III with inoperable or persistent disease to improve exercise capacity. [More]

Research uncovers link between diet and blood cell markers of heart attack associated inflammation

New research further illuminates the heart-healthy benefits of the Mediterranean diet, tying the eating plan to lower levels of platelets and white blood cells, two markers of inflammation. Inflammation has an association with greater risk of heart attack and stroke. [More]
Men with long-term HIV infections at higher risk of developing plaque in their coronary arteries

Men with long-term HIV infections at higher risk of developing plaque in their coronary arteries

Men with long-term HIV infections are at higher risk than uninfected men of developing plaque in their coronary arteries, regardless of their other risk factors for coronary artery disease, according to results of a study led by Johns Hopkins researchers. A report on the research appears in the April 1 issue of Annals of Internal Medicine. [More]
Young adults with cardiac risk factors have worse cognitive function in middle age

Young adults with cardiac risk factors have worse cognitive function in middle age

Young adults with such cardiac risk factors as high blood pressure and elevated glucose levels have significantly worse cognitive function in middle age, according to a new study by dementia researchers at UC San Francisco. [More]

Genetic markers could help predict heart attack in patients with heart disease

Researchers at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City have identified a biological process that may help physicians predict when someone with heart disease is likely to have a heart attack in the near future. [More]

Researchers quantify proportion of adults potentially affected by updated 2014 BP recommendations

Applying the updated 2014 blood pressure (BP) guideline to the U.S. population suggests that nearly 6 million adults are no longer classified as needing hypertension medication, and that an estimated 13.5 million adults would now be considered as having achieved goal blood pressure, primarily older adults, according to a JAMA study released online to coincide with the 2014 American College of Cardiology Scientific Sessions. [More]