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Study explores non-biological factors that may cause fewer men to seek bariatric surgery

Study explores non-biological factors that may cause fewer men to seek bariatric surgery

A new study by researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine has identified demographic, socioeconomic and cultural factors that contribute to a major gender disparity among U.S. men and women undergoing weight loss surgeries. Men undergo the surgeries in far lower numbers than women. [More]
New clinical guide focuses on use and validity of public blood pressure kiosks

New clinical guide focuses on use and validity of public blood pressure kiosks

High blood pressure affects one in three adults in the United States, and blood pressure measurement is the first step toward accurate diagnosis and management of the disease. The Food and Drug Administration acknowledges shortcomings of many public blood pressure kiosks (i.e., those found in pharmacies and supermarkets) and recommends the public seek doctors' advice when using blood pressure kiosks. [More]
National survey shows that most women don't know risks or symptoms of stroke

National survey shows that most women don't know risks or symptoms of stroke

A national survey released today by The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center shows that most women don't know the risks or symptoms females face when it comes to having a stroke. [More]
UW develops new app to wirelessly test sleep apnea events using smartphone

UW develops new app to wirelessly test sleep apnea events using smartphone

Determining whether your snoring is merely annoying, or crosses the threshold into a life-threatening problem, isn't convenient or cheap. [More]
Findings could help design tailor-made drugs to treat blood pressure

Findings could help design tailor-made drugs to treat blood pressure

One in three Americans has high blood pressure, a long-term constriction of arteries that can lead to coronary heart disease, heart failure and stroke. [More]
IUPUI researcher awarded NIH grant to study neuroscience underlying obstructive sleep apnea

IUPUI researcher awarded NIH grant to study neuroscience underlying obstructive sleep apnea

Sleep apnea affects an estimated 25 million adults in the United States and is associated with increased risk of hypertension, stroke, health attack and heart failure. [More]
New CUMC study finds DNA anomalies in kids with chronic kidney disease

New CUMC study finds DNA anomalies in kids with chronic kidney disease

A significant proportion of children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have unsuspected chromosomal imbalances, including DNA anomalies that have been linked to neurocognitive disorders, according to a new Columbia University Medical Center study. [More]
MSU researchers receive $7 million NIH grant to study link between belly fat and high blood pressure

MSU researchers receive $7 million NIH grant to study link between belly fat and high blood pressure

Michigan State University researchers, who were the first to suggest that high blood pressure could be caused by belly fat hormones "talking" with blood vessels in the abdomen, have received a nearly $7 million National Institutes of Health grant to further their work. [More]
New UM SOM study reveals why thiazide drugs not effective in some patients

New UM SOM study reveals why thiazide drugs not effective in some patients

Every year, more than 120 million prescriptions are written worldwide for thiazide drugs, a group of salt-lowering medicines used to treat high blood pressure. These drugs are often work very well, and over decades have saved hundreds of thousands of lives. [More]
AHA selects UAB to take part in $15 million study on high blood pressure

AHA selects UAB to take part in $15 million study on high blood pressure

The University of Alabama at Birmingham is one of four institutions selected to study high blood pressure as part of the American Heart Association's new Strategically Focused Research Network on hypertension. [More]
Majority of patients who survive cardiac arrest experience cognitive problems

Majority of patients who survive cardiac arrest experience cognitive problems

Half of all patients who survive a cardiac arrest experience problems with cognitive functions such as memory and attention. [More]
Genetic study may help identify novel targets for treatment of high blood pressure

Genetic study may help identify novel targets for treatment of high blood pressure

A genetic investigation of individuals in the Framingham Heart Study may prove useful to identify novel targets for the prevention or treatment of high blood pressure. The study, which takes a close look at networks of blood pressure-related genes, is published in the journal Molecular Systems Biology. [More]
Aspirin use continues to surge among older adults in US

Aspirin use continues to surge among older adults in US

A national survey suggests that slightly more than half of the older adults in the United States are now taking a daily dose of aspirin, even though its use is not recommended by the Food and Drug Administration for most people who have not yet had a heart attack or stroke. [More]
Children who experience multiple traumatic events face risk of being hypertensive adults

Children who experience multiple traumatic events face risk of being hypertensive adults

Children who experience multiple traumatic events, from emotional and sexual abuse to neglect, have higher blood pressures as young adults than their peers, researchers report. [More]
Studies examine positive and negative outcomes of using health apps

Studies examine positive and negative outcomes of using health apps

Health apps have the potential to make a broad impact on the health of the general population, argues one expert in The BMJ this week. But another explains that there is not enough evidence to support such claims and suggests that health apps may even be harmful. [More]
NIH-supported clinical trial to test statin use in patients with HIV-related cardiovascular disease

NIH-supported clinical trial to test statin use in patients with HIV-related cardiovascular disease

Researchers have begun enrolling participants in a multicenter international clinical trial to test whether statin administration can reduce the risk for major adverse cardiovascular events, such as heart attacks, strokes, and heart disease, in people with HIV infection. The trial is supported by the National Institutes of Health's National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. [More]
Ancient natural compound can protect the heart from hypertrophy

Ancient natural compound can protect the heart from hypertrophy

A natural compound derived from the bark of the magnolia tree, can protect the heart from hypertrophy, a thickening of cardiac muscle often caused by chronic high blood pressure that can lead to heart failure, researchers report in the April 14 issue of the online journal Nature Communications. [More]
Eisai, Arena complete two Phase 1 registrational trials for once-daily formulation of lorcaserin

Eisai, Arena complete two Phase 1 registrational trials for once-daily formulation of lorcaserin

Eisai Inc. and Arena Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced the completion of two Phase 1 registrational clinical trials that Eisai and Arena believe demonstrate bioequivalence of an investigational once-daily extended release formulation of lorcaserin, as compared to the twice-daily immediate release formulation approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and marketed as BELVIQ. [More]
Duke-NUS study shows association between eating out and high blood pressure

Duke-NUS study shows association between eating out and high blood pressure

A recent study on university-going young adults, by researchers from the Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore, is the first ever to show an association between meals eaten away from home and high blood pressure. [More]
Changing the size and number of pores in processed foods can reduce salt intake

Changing the size and number of pores in processed foods can reduce salt intake

Two University of Illinois food scientists have learned that understanding and manipulating porosity during food manufacturing can affect a food's health benefits. [More]
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