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CVD risk assessment still important in severely obese adolescents

CVD risk assessment still important in severely obese adolescents

Researchers report a dose–response relationship between body mass index and cardiovascular risk even in severely obese adolescents, making its assessment important to limit further disease progression. [More]
EnteroMedics, American HealthCare Lending partner to support patient access to vBloc Therapy

EnteroMedics, American HealthCare Lending partner to support patient access to vBloc Therapy

EnteroMedics Inc., the developer of medical devices using neuroblocking technology to treat obesity, metabolic diseases and other gastrointestinal disorders, today announced that the Company has entered into a partnership with American HealthCare Lending to provide funding for patient access to vBloc Therapy, delivered via the Maestro Rechargeable System, for the treatment of obesity. [More]
Veterans with PTSD at higher risk of developing heart failure

Veterans with PTSD at higher risk of developing heart failure

In a study of more than 8,000 veterans living in Hawaii and the Pacific Islands, those with posttraumatic stress disorder had a nearly 50 percent greater risk of developing heart failure over about a seven-year follow-up period, compared with their non-PTSD peers. [More]
Non-invasive imaging tests may predict healthy adults' future risk of heart attack, stroke or death

Non-invasive imaging tests may predict healthy adults' future risk of heart attack, stroke or death

Adding two non-invasive imaging tests to traditional cardiovascular disease risk factor assessment more precisely predicts a healthy patient's future risk of heart attack, stroke, or premature death, according to a study led by Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published in the March 24 edition of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. [More]
Research suggests genetic predisposition to spontaneous coronary artery disease

Research suggests genetic predisposition to spontaneous coronary artery disease

A Mayo Clinic study has identified a familial association in spontaneous coronary artery dissection, a type of heart attack that most commonly affects younger women, suggesting a genetic predisposition to the condition, researchers say. [More]
Plexin D1 gene determines body fat distribution in humans

Plexin D1 gene determines body fat distribution in humans

Scientists have known for some time that people who carry a lot of weight around their bellies are more likely to develop diabetes and heart disease than those who have bigger hips and thighs. [More]
Study: Blood test can predict postoperative stroke risk following cardiac surgery

Study: Blood test can predict postoperative stroke risk following cardiac surgery

The results of a blood test done immediately after heart surgery can be a meaningful indicator of postoperative stroke risk, a study by researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center has found. [More]
Study provide new insights into why childhood CKD may worsen to kidney failure

Study provide new insights into why childhood CKD may worsen to kidney failure

Study results published today in the National Kidney Foundation's American Journal of Kidney Diseases provide new insights into why a child's chronic kidney disease (CKD) may worsen to kidney failure. [More]
Neurology Times features special coverage of MS in observance of MS Awareness Month

Neurology Times features special coverage of MS in observance of MS Awareness Month

UBM Medica US announces that Neurology Times, a leading online community and information resource for neurologists and other healthcare providers, is featuring special coverage of multiple sclerosis in observance of MS Awareness Month. [More]
Scientists identify mystery behind cell-signaling breakdown that causes heart failure

Scientists identify mystery behind cell-signaling breakdown that causes heart failure

Working with lab animals and human heart cells, scientists from Johns Hopkins and other institutions have identified what they describe as "the long-sought culprit" in the mystery behind a cell-signaling breakdown that triggers heart failure. The condition, which affects nearly 6 million Americans and 23 million people worldwide, is marked by progressive weakening and stiffening of the heart muscle and the organ's gradual loss of blood-pumping ability. [More]
Spironolactone drug reduces side effects of corticosteroid-based dermatological creams

Spironolactone drug reduces side effects of corticosteroid-based dermatological creams

Basic research on blood pressure has led researchers from Inserm (Inserm Unit 1138, "Cordeliers Research Centre") to obtain unexpected results: drugs used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure) reduce side effects from corticosteroid-based creams used to treat certain skin diseases. [More]
Health care system-level factors may increase likelihood of medication adherence among seniors

Health care system-level factors may increase likelihood of medication adherence among seniors

Specific system-level factors controlled by health care systems - including prescriptions with a medication supply greater than 90 days, mail-order pharmacy use, and lower copayments and out-of-pocket maximums - nearly doubled the likelihood that patients adhered to prescribed heart and diabetes medications, according to a new study published in the journal Medical Care. [More]
Increasing diet soda intake linked to greater abdominal obesity in older adults

Increasing diet soda intake linked to greater abdominal obesity in older adults

A new study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society shows that increasing diet soda intake is directly linked to greater abdominal obesity in adults 65 years of age and older. Findings raise concerns about the safety of chronic diet soda consumption, which may increase belly fat and contribute to greater risk of metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases. [More]
Study tracks long-term effects of weight loss on atrial fibrillation burden

Study tracks long-term effects of weight loss on atrial fibrillation burden

Obese patients with atrial fibrillation who lost at least 10 percent of their body weight were six times more likely to achieve long-term freedom from this common heart rhythm disorder compared to those who did not lose weight, according to a study presented at the American College of Cardiology's 64th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
NYU Langone Medical Center researchers find that air pollution may pose significant stroke risk

NYU Langone Medical Center researchers find that air pollution may pose significant stroke risk

Air pollution has been linked to a dangerous narrowing of neck arteries that occurs prior to strokes, according to researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center. [More]
Lancet study: Most people lack access to life-saving treatments for kidney failure

Lancet study: Most people lack access to life-saving treatments for kidney failure

New estimates published in The Lancet indicate that at best only half of people worldwide needing kidney dialysis or transplantation to treat kidney failure in 2010 received it. This suggests that at least 2.3 million people may have died prematurely from kidney failure because they could not access this life-saving treatment. [More]
Combined use of enalapril and folic acid can significantly reduce risk of first stroke

Combined use of enalapril and folic acid can significantly reduce risk of first stroke

In a study that included more than 20,000 adults in China with high blood pressure but without a history of stroke or heart attack, the combined use of the hypertension medication enalapril and folic acid, compared with enalapril alone, significantly reduced the risk of first stroke, according to a study appearing in JAMA. The study is being released to coincide with its presentation at the American College of Cardiology Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Guanabenz drug prevents myelin loss, alleviates symptoms of MS in animal models

Guanabenz drug prevents myelin loss, alleviates symptoms of MS in animal models

An FDA-approved drug for high blood pressure, guanabenz, prevents myelin loss and alleviates clinical symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS) in animal models, according to a new study. [More]
Good night, sleep tight...or will you?

Good night, sleep tight...or will you?

World Sleep Day is organized by the World Association of Sleep Medicine (WASM) to spread awareness of important sleep-related issues through a series of special events. This year it is focussing on insomnia with the theme “When Sleep is Sound, Health and Happiness Abound”. [More]
New statin guidelines may be too generic, shows study

New statin guidelines may be too generic, shows study

The newest guidelines for the use of cholesterol-lowering statins in people at risk of heart disease may be too generic, excluding middle-aged adults who could benefit from the drugs, and over-prescribing in older adults, according to a new study from the Duke Clinical Research Institute. [More]
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