High Blood Pressure News and Research RSS Feed - High Blood Pressure News and Research

Regular park visits for 30 minutes may help prevent high blood pressure and mental health problems

Regular park visits for 30 minutes may help prevent high blood pressure and mental health problems

People who visit parks for 30 minutes or more each week are much less likely to have high blood pressure or poor mental health than those who don't, according to new research by Australian and UK environmental scientists. [More]
Latest online version of German Diabetes Risk Score optimized for mobile devices

Latest online version of German Diabetes Risk Score optimized for mobile devices

The German Institute of Human Nutrition has updated the online version of its German Diabetes Risk Score and has optimized it for mobile devices. [More]
Study helps identify traits that may cause elders to need help with medications

Study helps identify traits that may cause elders to need help with medications

As age increases, older adults can develop problems taking their medications. But until now, few studies have examined the traits that might cause elders to need help with their medications, or how widespread a problem this might be. [More]
New blood test could help predict severity of pulmonary arterial hypertension

New blood test could help predict severity of pulmonary arterial hypertension

Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report that rising blood levels of a protein called hematoma derived growth factor (HDGF) are linked to the increasing severity of pulmonary arterial hypertension, a form of damaging high blood pressure in the lungs. [More]
People with higher levels of IgG/IgM antibodies less likely to have heart attack

People with higher levels of IgG/IgM antibodies less likely to have heart attack

Measuring antibody levels in the blood could be used to detect a person's heart attack risk after researchers, part-funded by the British Heart Foundation, discovered that higher levels of these antibodies are linked to a lower heart attack risk. [More]
Diabetic mothers three times more likely to have anti-fetal brain autoantibodies

Diabetic mothers three times more likely to have anti-fetal brain autoantibodies

Mothers of children with autism and were diagnosed with metabolic conditions during pregnancy, particularly gestational and type 2 diabetes, were more likely to have anti-fetal brain autoantibodies in their blood compared to healthy women of children with autism. [More]
Cells grown from pluripotent stem cells can pair with heart muscle cells to stimulate contractions

Cells grown from pluripotent stem cells can pair with heart muscle cells to stimulate contractions

Researchers at Johns Hopkins report that a type of lab-grown human nerve cells can partner with heart muscle cells to stimulate contractions. [More]
Caribbean, African-born women more likely to be admitted at ICU during delivery

Caribbean, African-born women more likely to be admitted at ICU during delivery

Women born in the Caribbean or Africa are two times more likely to be admitted to an intensive care unit at the time of their delivery than Canadian-born women, a new study has found. [More]
Women working long hours may be working themselves sick

Women working long hours may be working themselves sick

Research published this week shows that women working long hours for many years are at increased risk of developing life-threatening illnesses. Diabetes, cancer, heart trouble and arthritis were three times more common among women who worked an average of 60 hours or more per week for 30 years compared with women working fewer hours. [More]
Long work hours may triple risk of life-threatening illnesses in women

Long work hours may triple risk of life-threatening illnesses in women

Women who put in long hours for the bulk of their careers may pay a steep price: life-threatening illnesses, including heart disease and cancer. [More]
Portal vein hypertension diminishes after hepatitis C recovery

Portal vein hypertension diminishes after hepatitis C recovery

This inflammatory viral infection of the liver causes inflexible scar tissue to form. This in turn impedes blood flow through the organ, with resulting hypertension in the portal vein. [More]
CHD rates decrease significantly in the U.S.

CHD rates decrease significantly in the U.S.

Significant improvements seen across multiple sociodemographic groups, according to a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine [More]
Liraglutide drug effectively decreases cardiovascular disease risk in type 2 diabetes patients

Liraglutide drug effectively decreases cardiovascular disease risk in type 2 diabetes patients

Researchers have shown that the glucose-lowering drug liraglutide safely and effectively decreases the overall risk of heart attack, stroke, or cardiovascular death for people with type 2 diabetes. [More]
'Hypertensive urgency' may cause unnecessary alarm

'Hypertensive urgency' may cause unnecessary alarm

Patients with a very high blood pressure reading in the absence of other symptoms are highly unlikely to have a major adverse cardiovascular event within the next 6 months, researchers report. [More]
Air pollution becomes leading risk factor for stroke worldwide

Air pollution becomes leading risk factor for stroke worldwide

Air pollution – including environmental and household air pollution - has emerged as a leading risk factor for stroke worldwide, associated with about a third of the global burden of stroke in 2013, according to a new study published in The Lancet Neurology journal. [More]
New, implantable device offers promise for patients with OSA

New, implantable device offers promise for patients with OSA

Since the 1980s, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) - in which positive pressure is pushed through the nasal airways to help users breathe while sleeping - has been by far the most widely used treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). [More]
U.S. study shows adults with diabetes born in 1940s living longer with less disability

U.S. study shows adults with diabetes born in 1940s living longer with less disability

Older Americans with diabetes born in the 1940s are living longer and with less disability performing day to day tasks than those born 10 years earlier, according to new research published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology journal. [More]
Standard and intensive blood pressure treatments equally effective in controlling acute intracerebral hemorrhage

Standard and intensive blood pressure treatments equally effective in controlling acute intracerebral hemorrhage

An international stroke study found that standard and intensive blood pressure treatments were equally effective in the emergency treatment of acute intracerebral hemorrhage, a type of stroke caused by bleeding into the brain. [More]
NMR-based metabolomics: an interview with Prof. Claudio Luchinat

NMR-based metabolomics: an interview with Prof. Claudio Luchinat

We started from theoretical inorganic to bioinorganic chemistry, so looking at metals in proteins, enzymes and so on. About 30% of all the proteins that we have are metalloproteins, so it’s a huge contribution that inorganic chemistry is providing for life. [More]
Cabozantinib drug can extend lives of patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma

Cabozantinib drug can extend lives of patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma

Data presented today at the American Society of Clinical Oncology congress showed that cabozantinib, a next generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) can extend the lives of patients by nearly two years following failure of one or more anti-angiogenic therapies almost five months longer than everolimus, a current standard of care therapy. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement