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Aptensio XR once-daily treatment for ADHD to be available in Summer 2015

Aptensio XR once-daily treatment for ADHD to be available in Summer 2015

Today, Rhodes Pharmaceuticals L.P. announced that Aptensio XR, a once-daily central nervous system stimulant indicated for the treatment of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) will be available to patients beginning Summer 2015. [More]
Zona Plus isometric handgrip device now available in Canada for patients with high blood pressure

Zona Plus isometric handgrip device now available in Canada for patients with high blood pressure

The Zona Plus isometric handgrip device ("Zona Plus") which combines personalized technology and an easy-to-follow 12 minutes per day, five days per week routine for patients with high blood pressure is now available in Canada. [More]
Study finds that nearly 35% of U.S. adults have metabolic syndrome

Study finds that nearly 35% of U.S. adults have metabolic syndrome

Nearly 35 percent of all U.S. adults and 50 percent of those 60 years of age or older were estimated to have the metabolic syndrome in 2011-2012, according to a study in the May 19 issue of JAMA. [More]
Patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention at higher risk for sleep apnea

Patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention at higher risk for sleep apnea

Patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), a coronary artery widening procedureused to treat heart disease, are at high risk for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), according to new research presented at the 2015 American Thoracic Society International Conference. [More]
Too much or too little sleep may up stroke risk in hypertensive patients

Too much or too little sleep may up stroke risk in hypertensive patients

High blood pressure, or hypertension, affects one third of--or 70 million--US adults, and the healthcare costs associated with treating the disease are approximately $46 billion. [More]

Study shows how organizational factors affect time to bring high BP under control

For medical practices, having more unique doctors on staff and having doctors see more patients doesn't necessarily lead to improved patient outcomes--and in fact, may have the opposite effect, according to a brief report in the June issue of Medical Care. [More]
New study reveals genetic causes of rare syndrome that manifests as high blood pressure

New study reveals genetic causes of rare syndrome that manifests as high blood pressure

The culmination of two decades of research, a new study reveals the genetic causes of a curious, rare syndrome that manifests as hypertension (high blood pressure) accompanied by short fingers (brachydactyly type E). [More]
Scientists find smooth muscle cells as major contributing factor to vascular stiffness

Scientists find smooth muscle cells as major contributing factor to vascular stiffness

Increased vascular stiffness has been identified as an important part of hypertension in aging adults. Previous studies of aortic stiffness have focused on changes in structural proteins that alter the properties of vascular walls causing them to become rigid. [More]
Scientists identify gene that causes hereditary hypertension and brachydactyly type E

Scientists identify gene that causes hereditary hypertension and brachydactyly type E

Individuals with this altered gene have hereditary hypertension (high blood pressure) and at the same time a skeletal malformation called brachydactyly type E, which is characterized by unusually short fingers and toes. The effect on blood pressure is so serious that -- if left untreated -- it most often leads to death before age fifty. [More]
SLU professor reveals why women have higher rates of strokes than men, suggests steps to reduce risk

SLU professor reveals why women have higher rates of strokes than men, suggests steps to reduce risk

Each year, around 55,000 more women than men will have a stroke. Longer lifespans, pregnancies and hormones all contribute to the disparity, as do illnesses that tend to strike women more frequently. Crunch the numbers and the math adds up to more strokes for women, making it important for women monitor their risk. [More]
1 in 5 people to develop heart failure in developed countries

1 in 5 people to develop heart failure in developed countries

One person in five is expected to develop heart failure in developed countries, a disease with no cure but which is largely preventable. [More]
Johns Hopkins researchers develop new strategies to treat depression in children, adolescents

Johns Hopkins researchers develop new strategies to treat depression in children, adolescents

A multidisciplinary team of Johns Hopkins researchers has developed two new strategies to treat depression in young people using the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) class of medications. These strategies, published May 5 in the journal Translational Psychiatry, incorporate a new understanding of how to mitigate the risk of suicide while on SSRI treatment. [More]
New study identifies enzyme that causes obesity-related hypertension

New study identifies enzyme that causes obesity-related hypertension

Obesity is a serious health problem affecting approximately one-third of the adult population in the United States. Obese individuals have an increased risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease, including hypertension. A recent study led by a University of Missouri researcher has identified the enzyme responsible for obesity-related hypertension -- a finding that could lead to new treatment options. [More]
Accelerated brain aging related to cognitive complications observed in people with type 1 diabetes

Accelerated brain aging related to cognitive complications observed in people with type 1 diabetes

The brains of people with type 1 diabetes show signs of accelerated aging that correlate with slower information processing, according to research led by the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. [More]
Study explores non-biological factors that may cause fewer men to seek bariatric surgery

Study explores non-biological factors that may cause fewer men to seek bariatric surgery

A new study by researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine has identified demographic, socioeconomic and cultural factors that contribute to a major gender disparity among U.S. men and women undergoing weight loss surgeries. Men undergo the surgeries in far lower numbers than women. [More]

New clinical guide focuses on use and validity of public blood pressure kiosks

High blood pressure affects one in three adults in the United States, and blood pressure measurement is the first step toward accurate diagnosis and management of the disease. The Food and Drug Administration acknowledges shortcomings of many public blood pressure kiosks (i.e., those found in pharmacies and supermarkets) and recommends the public seek doctors' advice when using blood pressure kiosks. [More]
National survey shows that most women don't know risks or symptoms of stroke

National survey shows that most women don't know risks or symptoms of stroke

A national survey released today by The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center shows that most women don't know the risks or symptoms females face when it comes to having a stroke. [More]
UW develops new app to wirelessly test sleep apnea events using smartphone

UW develops new app to wirelessly test sleep apnea events using smartphone

Determining whether your snoring is merely annoying, or crosses the threshold into a life-threatening problem, isn't convenient or cheap. [More]
Findings could help design tailor-made drugs to treat blood pressure

Findings could help design tailor-made drugs to treat blood pressure

One in three Americans has high blood pressure, a long-term constriction of arteries that can lead to coronary heart disease, heart failure and stroke. [More]
IUPUI researcher awarded NIH grant to study neuroscience underlying obstructive sleep apnea

IUPUI researcher awarded NIH grant to study neuroscience underlying obstructive sleep apnea

Sleep apnea affects an estimated 25 million adults in the United States and is associated with increased risk of hypertension, stroke, health attack and heart failure. [More]
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