High Blood Pressure News and Research RSS Feed - High Blood Pressure News and Research

Depression, blood pressure predict harmful vascular events in patients with heart disease, diabetes or stroke

Depression, blood pressure predict harmful vascular events in patients with heart disease, diabetes or stroke

Depressive symptoms and extremes of blood pressure predict the highest rates of harmful vascular events in patients with existing heart disease, diabetes or stroke, according to research presented at ESC Congress today by Dr Bhautesh Jani, clinical academic fellow in the Institute of Health and Wellbeing, University of Glasgow, UK. [More]
ATTEMPT-CVD trial results show that ARBs may have better impact on CVD biomarkers

ATTEMPT-CVD trial results show that ARBs may have better impact on CVD biomarkers

When it comes to treating high blood pressure, not all anti-hypertensive medications are equal, and results of the ATTEMPT-CVD trial suggest that telmisartan, an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) might have benefits over non-ARB treatment. [More]
Midday naps linked to reduced blood pressure levels, fewer antihypertensive medications

Midday naps linked to reduced blood pressure levels, fewer antihypertensive medications

Midday naps are associated with reduced blood pressure levels and prescription of fewer antihypertensive medications, according to research presented at ESC Congress today by Dr Manolis Kallistratos, a cardiologist at Asklepieion Voula General Hospital in Athens, Greece. [More]
National award presented to seven community health centers for innovation in diabetes care

National award presented to seven community health centers for innovation in diabetes care

BD, Direct Relief, and the National Association of Community Health Centers (NACHC) honored seven of the nation's 1,200 community health centers with the Innovations in Care Award at this week's Community Health Institute and EXPO in Orlando, Florida. [More]
People who eat high protein foods have lower blood pressure and arterial stiffness

People who eat high protein foods have lower blood pressure and arterial stiffness

Eating foods rich in amino acids could be as good for your heart as stopping smoking or getting more exercise - according to new research from the University of East Anglia. [More]
New Pitt analysis reveals causes of stillbirth among obese women

New Pitt analysis reveals causes of stillbirth among obese women

Obese women are nearly twice as likely as their lean counterparts to have stillborn babies for several specific, potentially preventable medical reasons, a new University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health analysis reveals. [More]
Commonly used heart attack blood test may identify people at risk for hypertension

Commonly used heart attack blood test may identify people at risk for hypertension

Analysis of blood samples from more than 5,000 people suggests that a more sensitive version of a blood test long used to verify heart muscle damage from heart attacks could also identify people on their way to developing hypertension well before the so-called silent killer shows up on a blood pressure machine. [More]
Optimal aerobic exercise training may benefit patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension

Optimal aerobic exercise training may benefit patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension

A physical therapy researcher with the IU School of Health and Rehabilitation Services at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis has been awarded a $465,000 National Institutes of Health grant to optimize aerobic exercise training for patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension, a goal data suggests could reduce morbidity and mortality among those with the disease. [More]
Primary care physicians' starring role key to weight loss, find Johns Hopkins researchers

Primary care physicians' starring role key to weight loss, find Johns Hopkins researchers

A review of survey data from more than 300 obese people who participated in a federally funded weight loss clinical trial found that although the overall weight loss rates were modest, those who rated their primary care doctor's support as particularly helpful lost about twice as many pounds as those who didn't. [More]
Number of dementia patients stabilizing experts claim

Number of dementia patients stabilizing experts claim

Risk of dementia may be falling due to improved education and living conditions, and better prevention and treatment of vascular diseases, highlighting the need for policies to improve health across the life course. [More]
New study offers first clinical recommendations for headache diagnosis in pregnant women

New study offers first clinical recommendations for headache diagnosis in pregnant women

If a pregnant woman with high blood pressure and no history of headache suddenly develops a headache that quickly gets worse, she could be at risk for pregnancy complications, including preeclampsia, which put both the mother and fetus at risk. [More]
UT Arlington, UNTHSC researchers develop user-friendly system alerts for people with sleep apnea

UT Arlington, UNTHSC researchers develop user-friendly system alerts for people with sleep apnea

Masks worn by those with sleep apnea can leak at night and be so uncomfortable that they often drive users away from treatment. But a new system being developed by researchers at UNT Health Science Center and The University of Texas at Arlington could make it easier for the estimated 18 million people with sleep apnea to get a good night's rest. [More]
Women's Medicine Collaborative awarded NIH grant to study link between placenta and sleep abnormalities

Women's Medicine Collaborative awarded NIH grant to study link between placenta and sleep abnormalities

The National Institutes of Health has awarded $2.7 million to the Women's Medicine Collaborative to study the placenta and its function to determine whether changes in the placenta are linked to sleep abnormalities. [More]
Opioids produced by yeast; revealing the potential for cheaper pain relief

Opioids produced by yeast; revealing the potential for cheaper pain relief

Researchers at Stanford University have genetically engineered yeast so it produces hydrocodone, a semi-synthetic opioid analgesic used in the United States for relief of moderate to severe pain. [More]
USC kidney researcher named recipient of ASN-AHA Young Investigator Award

USC kidney researcher named recipient of ASN-AHA Young Investigator Award

Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California kidney researcher Janos Peti-Peterdi is the 2015 recipient of the ASN-AHA Young Investigator Award. [More]
Low birth weight, preterm birth increase schizophrenia risk in individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

Low birth weight, preterm birth increase schizophrenia risk in individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

Low birth weight and preterm birth appear to increase the risk of schizophrenia among individuals with a genetic condition called the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, a new study from the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) shows. [More]
Penn Medicine experts say that health care innovation is about testing new ideas to promote better patient care

Penn Medicine experts say that health care innovation is about testing new ideas to promote better patient care

Health care has much to learn from innovative high-tech companies, but not in the way most people think, according to a Perspective published today in the New England Journal of Medicine and authored by innovation experts from the Perelman School of Medicine and the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. Innovation, they say, can most effectively achieve meaningful outcomes by testing many new ideas quickly, cheaply, and contextually. [More]
Johns Hopkins study finds substantial increase in rate, costs of hospitalizations for pediatric pulmonary hypertension

Johns Hopkins study finds substantial increase in rate, costs of hospitalizations for pediatric pulmonary hypertension

A review of 15 years’ worth of data in a national pediatric medical database has documented a substantial increase in the rate of hospitalizations for children with a form of high blood pressure once most common in those with congenital heart disease. [More]
New research could help develop precision medicine for primary aldosteronism

New research could help develop precision medicine for primary aldosteronism

Each of your kidneys wears a little yellow cap that helps keep your blood pressure in check, and much more. But in some people, it starts running amok, pumping out a hormone that sends blood pressure sky-high. [More]
Researchers elucidate mechanism that induces skeletal muscle atrophy in patients with congestive heart failure

Researchers elucidate mechanism that induces skeletal muscle atrophy in patients with congestive heart failure

It is a paradox: Patients with advanced congestive heart failure lose skeletal muscle mass, but their heart muscles become enlarged to provide the body with an adequate supply of blood and thus with oxygen. It has long been known that the protein angiotensin II plays a villainous role in this process, but the exact mechanism has remained unclear. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement