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Maternal diet during pregnancy and lactation leads to epigenetic changes in offspring

Maternal diet during pregnancy and lactation leads to epigenetic changes in offspring

As the study shows, a high-fat diet during pregnancy and lactation leads to epigenetic changes in the offspring. These changes affect metabolic pathways regulated by the gut hormone GIP, whereby the adult offspring are more susceptible to obesity and insulin resistance, the precursor to type 2 diabetes. Similar mechanisms cannot be ruled out in humans, according to Pfeiffer. [More]
Study reveals increased mortality risk following hypertensive disease of pregnancy

Study reveals increased mortality risk following hypertensive disease of pregnancy

In a study to be presented on Feb. 5 at 8 a.m. EST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting, in Atlanta, researchers will present findings from a study titled, Long-term mortality risk following hypertensive disease of pregnancy (HDP). [More]
Higher aerobic fitness levels may improve chances of survival after first heart attack

Higher aerobic fitness levels may improve chances of survival after first heart attack

People who are fit are more likely to survive their first heart attack, according to a study of nearly 70,000 patients of Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. [More]
HealthMine survey: 74% of people say activity trackers help them cope with heart condition

HealthMine survey: 74% of people say activity trackers help them cope with heart condition

Consumers are beginning to embrace mobile tools for heart health—but not enough. A January HealthMine survey of 501 consumers with known heart disease and/or risk found that just 27% of people are using an activity tracker. Only 16% say they are using their tracker to manage their heart condition/risk. Yet 74% of those who do use an activity tracker report the device is helping them cope with their heart condition. [More]
Researchers develop new sensor for continuous monitoring of blood flow in vascular diseases patients

Researchers develop new sensor for continuous monitoring of blood flow in vascular diseases patients

Frequent measurement of blood flow changes could improve the ability of health care providers to diagnose and treat patients with vascular conditions, such as those associated with diabetes and high blood pressure. [More]
FDA-approved blood pressure drug reduces cell damage linked to Alzheimer's disease

FDA-approved blood pressure drug reduces cell damage linked to Alzheimer's disease

In laboratory neuronal cultures, an FDA-approved drug used to treat high blood pressure reduced cell damage often linked to Alzheimer's disease, say researchers at Georgetown University Medical Center and the National Institutes of Health. [More]
New SBP research may lead to novel approach to treat heart failure

New SBP research may lead to novel approach to treat heart failure

More than 5 million people in the United States suffer from heart failure, according to the American Heart Association. Less than half of those with heart failure live five years after diagnosis. [More]
Study finds ethnic differences in coronary heart disease risk within diverse population

Study finds ethnic differences in coronary heart disease risk within diverse population

In a study of more than 1.3 million Kaiser Permanente members in Northern California that stretched over 10 years, researchers found that blacks, Latinos and Asians generally had lower risk of coronary heart disease compared to whites. [More]
Research provides new molecular insight into heart failure

Research provides new molecular insight into heart failure

More than 5 million people in the United States suffer from heart failure, according to the American Heart Association. Less than half of those with heart failure live five years after diagnosis. [More]
Simple blood test could help predict emergence of pre-eclampsia in pregnant women

Simple blood test could help predict emergence of pre-eclampsia in pregnant women

Pre-eclampsia is a serious illness associated with pregnancy, which develops after twenty weeks and is associated with defective ingrowing of the placenta within the mother. The dangerous illness is both the second most frequent cause of death in pregnant women, and the reason for severe complications for mother and child, especially during premature births. [More]
CNIC researchers identify how two proteins control heart growth and adaptation to hypertension

CNIC researchers identify how two proteins control heart growth and adaptation to hypertension

Researchers at the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares Carlos III have identified how two proteins control the growth of the heart and its adaptation to high blood pressure (hypertension). [More]
Bariatric surgery prior to knee replacement benefits morbidly obese patients with end-stage osteoarthritis

Bariatric surgery prior to knee replacement benefits morbidly obese patients with end-stage osteoarthritis

Previous research studies have linked obesity to adverse outcomes and increased costs following total knee replacement surgery (TKR). A new, computer model-based evaluation appearing in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, supports bariatric surgery in morbidly obese patients with end-stage osteoarthritis (loss of cartilage and joint pain, caused by aging and use) prior to TKR. [More]
Young blacks at three times greater risk of first stroke than white counterparts

Young blacks at three times greater risk of first stroke than white counterparts

A first-of-its-kind study found that young blacks, age 45, are at a three times greater risk of having a first stroke than their white counterparts. However, they may not be at a higher risk for the second stroke. [More]
Study shows African-Americans may not be at higher risk for second stroke

Study shows African-Americans may not be at higher risk for second stroke

Even though young African-Americans are at three times greater risk of a first stroke than their white counterparts, they may not be at a higher risk for a second stroke, according to a study published in the January 20, 2016, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study is one of the first of its kind to look at race and second stroke risk. [More]
Text message reminders may help reduce people’s blood pressure

Text message reminders may help reduce people’s blood pressure

The study, of over 1300 adults with high blood pressure in the Cape Town area, compared text message reminders and interactive text messaging to a control group receiving standard care. The results appear online in the American Heart Association journal Circulation. [More]
Age-related macular degeneration: an interview with Cathy Yelf, Macular Society

Age-related macular degeneration: an interview with Cathy Yelf, Macular Society

Age-related macular degeneration is a condition of the macula, a tiny area of the retina at the back of the eye. Your macula is only about the size of the grain of rice, that’s about four millimeters across. [More]
Extended weekend sleep can counteract increased risk of diabetes associated with sleep loss

Extended weekend sleep can counteract increased risk of diabetes associated with sleep loss

Two consecutive nights of extended sleep, a typical weekend occurrence, appears to counteract the increased risk of diabetes associated with short-term sleep restriction during the work week, at least in lean, healthy, young men eating a controlled diet. [More]
New sites opened across the South West for Alzheimer’s disease clinical trial

New sites opened across the South West for Alzheimer’s disease clinical trial

People with Alzheimer’s disease are helping with a ground-breaking government-funded trial but with new sites recently opened in the South West more people are being asked to take part in the study led by academics from the Universities of Bristol, Cambridge, Queen’s University Belfast and University College London, and hosted by North Bristol NHS Trust. [More]
USRDS report shows positive and negative trends in kidney disease in the U.S.

USRDS report shows positive and negative trends in kidney disease in the U.S.

The annual data report from the United States Renal Data System reveals both positive and negative trends in kidney disease in the U.S. [More]
PK molecule could be a target for vascular complications linked to type 1 diabetes

PK molecule could be a target for vascular complications linked to type 1 diabetes

In an article published ahead of print on November 24, 2015 in the journal Diabetes (available at http://dx.doi.org/10.2337/db15-0930), researchers from the Medical University of South Carolina, the American University of Beirut, and Case Western Reserve University report that a molecule called pre-kallikrein (PK) could be a target for the vascular complications associated with type 1 diabetes. [More]
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