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Obese people experience silent cardiac damage that fuels risk for heart failure

Obese people experience silent cardiac damage that fuels risk for heart failure

Using an ultrasensitive blood test to detect the presence of a protein that heralds heart muscle injury, researchers from Johns Hopkins and elsewhere have found that obese people without overt heart disease experience silent cardiac damage that fuels their risk for heart failure down the road. [More]
Personalized dietary advice based on person's genetic makeup improves eating habits

Personalized dietary advice based on person's genetic makeup improves eating habits

Personalized dietary advice based on a person's genetic makeup improves eating habits compared to current "one-size-fits-all" dietary recommendations, says a University of Toronto researcher. [More]
Auxilium Pharmaceuticals presents STENDRA clinical data for ED treatment at SMSNA Scientific Meeting

Auxilium Pharmaceuticals presents STENDRA clinical data for ED treatment at SMSNA Scientific Meeting

Auxilium Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a specialty biopharmaceutical company, today announced that data were presented regarding the use of STENDRA® (avanafil) tablets for the treatment of erectile dysfunction (ED) at the 20th Annual Fall Scientific Meeting of the Sexual Medicine Society of North America (SMSNA) held in Miami from November 20-23, 2014. [More]
Investigational treatment shows promise against Marfan syndrome

Investigational treatment shows promise against Marfan syndrome

An investigational treatment for Marfan syndrome is as effective as the standard therapy at slowing enlargement of the aorta, the large artery of the heart that delivers blood to the body, new research shows. The findings indicate a second treatment option for Marfan patients, who are at high risk of sudden death from tears in the aorta. [More]
Findings illustrate need to monitor all races of heart failure patients for atrial fibrillation

Findings illustrate need to monitor all races of heart failure patients for atrial fibrillation

Black patients who have been diagnosed with heart failure are no less likely than white patients to get atrial fibrillation (an irregular heartbeat, or arrhythmia), according to a new study led by researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, which was presented today at the 2014 Scientific Sessions of the American Heart Association. [More]
People who frequently cook meals at home eat healthier than those who cook less

People who frequently cook meals at home eat healthier than those who cook less

People who frequently cook meals at home eat healthier and consume fewer calories than those who cook less, according to new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research. [More]
Study suggests that beta blockers may benefit patients suffering from HFPEF

Study suggests that beta blockers may benefit patients suffering from HFPEF

A novel registry study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden suggests that beta blockers may benefit also patients suffering from a relatively unknown form of heart failure called HFPEF, which today lacks well-established treatment. [More]
NIH study finds limited kidney benefit from more rigorous blood pressure treatment

NIH study finds limited kidney benefit from more rigorous blood pressure treatment

Using two drugs was no more effective than a single drug in slowing disease progression in people with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), according to two studies funded by the National Institutes of Health. One of the studies also showed that rigorous blood pressure treatment slowed growth of kidney cysts, a marker of ADPKD, but had little effect on kidney function compared to standard blood pressure treatment. [More]
Preterm birth becomes world's number one killer of young children

Preterm birth becomes world's number one killer of young children

For the first time in history, the complications of preterm birth outrank all other causes as the world's number one killer of young children. [More]
Exposure to tobacco smoke, roadway air pollution can contribute to obesity

Exposure to tobacco smoke, roadway air pollution can contribute to obesity

New research from Keck Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC) bolsters evidence that exposure to tobacco smoke and near-roadway air pollution contributes to the development of obesity. [More]
Effective health interventions needed to increase life expectancy of older people

Effective health interventions needed to increase life expectancy of older people

A major new Series on health and ageing, published in "The Lancet", warns that unless health systems find effective strategies to address the problems faced by an ageing world population, the growing burden of chronic disease will greatly affect the quality of life of older people. As people across the world live longer, soaring levels of chronic illness and diminished wellbeing are poised to become a major global public health challenge. [More]
Chikungunya outbreak in Caribbean, Central and South America continues to spread

Chikungunya outbreak in Caribbean, Central and South America continues to spread

Fall in the United States means residents in most of the country will see fewer mosquitoes and less risk of the diseases they spread. However, the chikungunya outbreak in Caribbean and Central and South American countries continues to spread with no sign of slowing down. Experts at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are warning that the painful mosquito-borne disease will likely continue to infect travelers to the region during the rest of this year and beyond. [More]
Researchers find independent predictors of end stage renal disease in teens

Researchers find independent predictors of end stage renal disease in teens

Researchers at örebro University found that high blood pressure, being overweight, elevation of a blood marker indicating inflammation, or the presence of protein in the urine in otherwise healthy teenage males were all independent predictors of end stage renal disease (ESRD) in later in life. [More]
Krembil researchers potentially discover major cause of dementia

Krembil researchers potentially discover major cause of dementia

Researchers at the Krembil Neuroscience Centre have potentially discovered a major cause of dementia. In this type of dementia, there is damage to the white matter (nerve fibres) of the brain apparent on computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of older individuals. [More]
University Medical Center's first atrial fibrillation unit opens in Germany

University Medical Center's first atrial fibrillation unit opens in Germany

Nearly 1.8 million people in Germany suffer from atrial fibrillation. This is the most common and clinically significant form of heart rhythm disorder. Shortness of breath, a sudden sense of dizziness, a feeling of pressure in the chest, and palpitations or thumping of the heart so extreme it can be felt beating rapidly and irregularly - this is how many patients describe their first episode of atrial fibrillation. [More]
Mediterranean-style diets, physical activity can lower risk of first-time stroke

Mediterranean-style diets, physical activity can lower risk of first-time stroke

Eating Mediterranean or DASH-style diets, regularly engaging in physical activity and keeping your blood pressure under control can lower your risk of a first-time stroke, according to updated AHA/ASA guideline published in the American Heart Association's journal Stroke. [More]
MinuteClinic enters into clinical collaboration agreement with Lifespan

MinuteClinic enters into clinical collaboration agreement with Lifespan

MinuteClinic, the retail medical clinic of CVS Health, and Lifespan, Rhode Island's largest health system, which includes five partner hospitals and multiple physician groups, announced today that they have entered into a clinical collaboration agreement. [More]
Preeclampsia study provides pathways for new therapeutic treatments

Preeclampsia study provides pathways for new therapeutic treatments

A team of researchers led by a Wayne State University School of Medicine associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology has published findings that provide novel insight into the cause of preeclampsia, the leading cause of maternal and infant death worldwide, a discovery that could lead to the development of new therapeutic treatments. [More]
Early brain imaging studies may help prevent vascular diseases

Early brain imaging studies may help prevent vascular diseases

Future prevention and treatment strategies for vascular diseases may lie in the evaluation of early brain imaging tests long before heart attacks or strokes occur, according to a systematic review conducted by a team of cardiologists, neuroscientists, and psychiatrists from Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published in the October issue of JACC Cardiovascular Imaging. [More]
Monash University research explores long-term costs for two main causes of stroke

Monash University research explores long-term costs for two main causes of stroke

New data shows that healthcare and personal costs to support survivors of stroke remains high 10 years on. [More]