Influenza News and Research RSS Feed - Influenza News and Research

Influenza (the flu) is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses. It can cause mild to severe illness, and at times can lead to death. The best way to prevent the flu is by getting a flu vaccination each year. Every year in the United States, on average 5% to 20% of the population gets the flu; more than 200,000 people are hospitalized from flu complications, and; about 36,000 people die from flu-related causes. Some people, such as older people, young children, and people with certain health conditions, are at high risk for serious flu complications.
Scientific insights into flu viruses must not give way to complacency, say researchers

Scientific insights into flu viruses must not give way to complacency, say researchers

As our ability to assess the pandemic risk from strains of influenza virus increases with the latest scientific developments, we must not allow ourselves to become complacent that the most substantial threats have been identified, argue an international consortium of scientists. [More]
Females' natural resistance to bacterial pneumonia is linked to NOS3 enzyme

Females' natural resistance to bacterial pneumonia is linked to NOS3 enzyme

Researchers have linked increased resistance to bacterial pneumonia in female mice to an enzyme activated by the female sex hormone estrogen. [More]
CHLA pediatric specialist discusses how parents can help children prevent Ebola outbreak

CHLA pediatric specialist discusses how parents can help children prevent Ebola outbreak

For many months, the world has witnessed the Ebola virus spread and claim more than 4,400 lives in West African countries. On Oct. 8, the first confirmed adult Ebola patient identified in the United States died. The constant news coverage has heightened concern among parents who fear their children will become infected. Jill Hoffman, MD, a pediatric Infectious diseases specialist at Children's Hospital Los Angeles, discusses the facts about Ebola, how parents can help their children prevent further outbreak by teaching them good hygiene, and how CHLA is prepared to identify and treat suspected Ebola patients. [More]
Myths, misconceptions about seasonal flu and flu vaccine

Myths, misconceptions about seasonal flu and flu vaccine

It's that time of year again. As days shorten, evenings become chilly and the trees start a showy display of color, it's time to roll up your sleeve and get your annual flu vaccine. [More]
Kalorama Information: Experimental vaccine distribution in the UK points to growing flu vaccine market

Kalorama Information: Experimental vaccine distribution in the UK points to growing flu vaccine market

Kalorama Information believes an experimental vaccine distribution in the United Kingdom and other similar developments point to a growing flu vaccine market, as well as a growing market for the production of these vaccines. [More]
Foreign-born residents with low vaccination rates face greater risk of exposure to diseases

Foreign-born residents with low vaccination rates face greater risk of exposure to diseases

Foreign-born residents with low vaccination rates and their relatives in the U.S. are at greater risk of exposure to several vaccine-preventable diseases, e.g. influenza; pneumococcal diseases; tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis; hepatitis A; hepatitis B; shingles; and HPV, the human papilloma virus, which can lead to some types of cancer. [More]
UCSF study: Smoking takes $18.1 billion toll in California

UCSF study: Smoking takes $18.1 billion toll in California

Smoking took an $18.1 billion toll in California – $487 for each resident – and was responsible for more than one in seven deaths in the state, more than from AIDS, influenza, diabetes or many other causes, according to the first comprehensive analysis in more than a decade on the financial and health impacts of tobacco. [More]
Views on Ebola: Try to keep 'an even keel'; who's in charge of fighting a pandemic?

Views on Ebola: Try to keep 'an even keel'; who's in charge of fighting a pandemic?

Understandably, the specter of such a dangerous disease in the United States has bred fear. But it is remarkable how some public figures are inflaming that fear. Commentator Rush Limbaugh took flight on Tuesday, saying on the radio that "I don't think anybody involved with Ebola knows what they're doing. I don't care if it's the WHO or the Centers for Disease Control, I don't think anybody knows what they're doing." This was an unfounded rant that can only deepen public disquiet. [More]
New specialist outpatient vaccinations clinic for at-risk people to be opened at MedUni Vienna

New specialist outpatient vaccinations clinic for at-risk people to be opened at MedUni Vienna

At the Medical University of Vienna, Austria's first specialist vaccinations clinic for at-risk groups will open on 22nd October 2014 with an "Open Doors Day". This clinic specialises in patients who, as a result of illness or disease, require personalised care in relation to vaccinations. [More]
Web-based system could help improve detection of disease outbreaks, say researchers

Web-based system could help improve detection of disease outbreaks, say researchers

A web-based system that allows preschools and child care centers to report illnesses to local public health departments could improve the detection of disease outbreaks and allow resources to be mobilized more quickly, according to University of Michigan research to be presented Saturday, Oct. 11 at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) National Conference & Exhibition in San Diego. [More]
Research roundup: Older consumers' spending on health care; hospital leaders' views of reporting quality

Research roundup: Older consumers' spending on health care; hospital leaders' views of reporting quality

In 2011, households with at least one member between ages 50 and 64 spent 8 percent of their total budget on health items, compared with 19 percent for those age 85 or over. [More]
Views on giving flu shot to younger children

Views on giving flu shot to younger children

It's a common question parents ask themselves this time of year: Does my child really need a flu shot? Though the flu may seem harmless, the truth is on average 20,000 children age 5 and younger are hospitalized due to flu symptoms each year. [More]
First study of promising Ebola vaccine commenced in West Africa

First study of promising Ebola vaccine commenced in West Africa

Professor Myron M. Levine, MD, Director of the Center for Vaccine Development at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, and UM SOM Dean E. Albert Reece MD, PhD, MBA, announced today that the CVD, in conjunction with its sister institution, The Center for Vaccine Development of Mali and the Ministry of Health of Mali, have begun a clinical trial in health care workers (and other front-line workers) to evaluate a promising experimental Ebola vaccine. [More]
MSH mobilizes resources to strengthen Liberia’s health system, limit spread of Ebola

MSH mobilizes resources to strengthen Liberia’s health system, limit spread of Ebola

Management Sciences for Health (MSH), a Massachusetts-based global health nonprofit organization, today announced it is mobilizing its expertise and resources at the epicenter of the Ebola epidemic in Liberia to help the Ministry of Health develop community care centers for Ebola separate from the health facilities; restore essential health services for non-Ebola patients; and, improve the detection and containment of active Ebola cases in Liberian communities. [More]
TGen, NAU awarded patent for genomics-based test to detect H1N1 pandemic flu strain

TGen, NAU awarded patent for genomics-based test to detect H1N1 pandemic flu strain

The federal government has awarded a patent to the Translational Genomics Research Institute and Northern Arizona University for a test that can detect — and assist in the treatment of — the H1N1 pandemic flu strain. [More]
Study: H7N9 flu vaccine combined with adjuvant is essential to promote protective immune response

Study: H7N9 flu vaccine combined with adjuvant is essential to promote protective immune response

A large, NIH-sponsored clinical trial of an experimental H7N9 avian influenza vaccine found an immune response that was believed to be protective in 59 percent of study participants who received two injections of the inactivated vaccine at the lowest dosage tested when mixed with an adjuvant – a component that boosts the body's immune response and enhances the effectiveness of inactivated influenza vaccines. [More]
Montefiore Medical Center experts raise awareness about the importance of flu vaccines

Montefiore Medical Center experts raise awareness about the importance of flu vaccines

Each year, 30,000 people die from influenza infection and its complications. In an effort to get ahead of the upcoming flu season, experts at Montefiore Medical Center are raising awareness about the importance of the flu vaccine, which remains the best option to reduce a person's risk of contracting the virus. The flu season can start as early as late September and usually runs for about 12 to 15 weeks. [More]
Obama administration announces plans to step up airport screening for Ebola virus

Obama administration announces plans to step up airport screening for Ebola virus

Though President Barack Obama did not say exactly how screening procedures would change, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said officials would consider a variety of options. [More]
Two randomized trials examine new vaccination strategies for avian influenza

Two randomized trials examine new vaccination strategies for avian influenza

Two randomized trials in the October 8 issue of JAMA examine new vaccination strategies for the prevention and control of avian influenza, often referred to as "bird flu." This is a theme issue on infectious disease. [More]
UW-Madison's Yoshihiro Kawaoka recognized for efforts to prevent pandemic influenza

UW-Madison's Yoshihiro Kawaoka recognized for efforts to prevent pandemic influenza

The University of Wisconsin-Madison's Yoshihiro Kawaoka has been recognized as a 2014 Popular Mechanics Breakthrough Award recipient for his efforts to understand and prevent pandemic influenza. [More]