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Influenza (the flu) is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses. It can cause mild to severe illness, and at times can lead to death. The best way to prevent the flu is by getting a flu vaccination each year. Every year in the United States, on average 5% to 20% of the population gets the flu; more than 200,000 people are hospitalized from flu complications, and; about 36,000 people die from flu-related causes. Some people, such as older people, young children, and people with certain health conditions, are at high risk for serious flu complications.
New synthetic methods facilitate development of bioactive and chemical compounds

New synthetic methods facilitate development of bioactive and chemical compounds

A new research, affiliated with UNIST has been highlighted on the inside front cover of the June issue of the prestigious journal Chemical Communications. [More]
Sick animals disconnect from social groups leading to decrease in disease transmission, study shows

Sick animals disconnect from social groups leading to decrease in disease transmission, study shows

Sick wild house mice spend time away from their social groups, leading to a decrease in their potential for disease transmission according to a new study by evolutionary biologists from the University of Zurich in collaboration with the ETH Zurich. [More]
Genekam develops first therapeutic molecule candidate for Zika viruses

Genekam develops first therapeutic molecule candidate for Zika viruses

GenekamBiotechnology AG, which developed the first test for Zika virus detection in January 2016, has developed as one of first company in the world the therapeutic molecule candidate for Zika viruses, which is likely to be the first potential candidate for Zika-virus therapy. [More]
Early-life infections may be risk factor for developmental disorders later in life

Early-life infections may be risk factor for developmental disorders later in life

The Zika virus now active in numerous countries, and the severe birth defects associated with it, makes it clear that infection in pregnant women can have immediate and devastating effects on the developing baby. [More]
Mice study finds new approach to halt cycle of chronic inflammation in lupus

Mice study finds new approach to halt cycle of chronic inflammation in lupus

Molecules that scavenge debris from dying cells appear to halt the cycle of chronic inflammation in lupus, while also enhancing the body's ability to combat flu, according to Duke Health studies in mice. [More]
Researchers explain why secondary infection with MRSA kills influenza patients

Researchers explain why secondary infection with MRSA kills influenza patients

Researchers have discovered that secondary infection with the Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacterium (or "superbug") often kills influenza patients because the flu virus alters the antibacterial response of white blood cells, causing them to damage the patients' lungs instead of destroying the bacterium. [More]
Study estimates health care costs of gastrointestinal illnesses in Switzerland

Study estimates health care costs of gastrointestinal illnesses in Switzerland

In Switzerland, between 300,000 and 700,000 patients per year visit a doctor due to acute diarrhoea. Until now, the financial burden on the Swiss health care system had been completely unclear. [More]
St. Jude scientists identify key innate immune sensor that attacks influenza virus

St. Jude scientists identify key innate immune sensor that attacks influenza virus

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital immunologists have identified the protein trigger in the body's quick-reaction innate immune system that specifically recognizes the influenza virus in infected cells and triggers their death. [More]
Hygiene hypothesis: a misleading misnomer? An interview with Professor Sally Bloomfield

Hygiene hypothesis: a misleading misnomer? An interview with Professor Sally Bloomfield

Professor Strachan first proposed the hygiene hypothesis back in 1989. Reviewing the evidence, he suggested that one of the causes of the recent rapid rise in allergic diseases in children was lack of exposure to childhood infections [More]
Distraction techniques can help calm children from shot-related anxiety during flu season

Distraction techniques can help calm children from shot-related anxiety during flu season

A typical visit to the pediatrician when it is time for a child to get a shot can include tears, tantrums and might not seem worth the trouble. [More]
UM SOM selected as study site for human safety trial of new Zika vaccine

UM SOM selected as study site for human safety trial of new Zika vaccine

As world leaders increasingly recognize the Zika virus as an international public health threat, the Center for Vaccine Development at the University of Maryland School of Medicine's Institute for Global Health has been chosen as one of three study sites in a human safety trial of a new Zika vaccine. [More]

Replacing sick front-line workers with healthy ones can accelerate outbreaks of disease

When disease outbreaks occur, people with essential roles - healthcare workers, first responders, and teachers, for example - are typically up close and personal with infected people. As these front-line workers become infected, healthy individuals take their places. [More]
Vaccines unsuccessful in protecting obese mice against influenza infections, study finds

Vaccines unsuccessful in protecting obese mice against influenza infections, study finds

A study led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital found that obese mice are not protected against influenza infections by vaccines that include adjuvants, raising concerns about vaccine effectiveness in obese humans who are known to be at an increased risk for severe flu. The findings appear today in the scientific journal mBio. [More]
Valley fever diagnosis often overlooked by primary care physicians

Valley fever diagnosis often overlooked by primary care physicians

For patients with pneumonia or ongoing influenza-like symptoms who live in or have visited the west or southwest United States, especially Arizona and central California, infectious diseases experts recommend physicians suspect valley fever, an often-overlooked fungal infection. [More]
Scientists discover vaccine-induced antibodies that can counteract varied strains of influenza virus

Scientists discover vaccine-induced antibodies that can counteract varied strains of influenza virus

Scientists have identified three types of vaccine-induced antibodies that can neutralize diverse strains of influenza virus that infect humans. [More]
New on-line resource allows user to virtually test effectiveness, specificity of potential drug

New on-line resource allows user to virtually test effectiveness, specificity of potential drug

Inside the human body, the same drug can interact with multiple molecules. This phenomenon is known as 'polypharmacology' and, according to the interaction, a drug can cure a disease or cause side effects in the patient. [More]
Penn researchers construct model to examine how immune system may evolve to conquer HIV

Penn researchers construct model to examine how immune system may evolve to conquer HIV

It has remained frustratingly difficult to develop a vaccine for HIV/AIDS, in part because the virus, once in our bodies, rapidly reproduces and evolves to escape being killed by the immune system. [More]
First clinical study for Zika vaccine to begin in Canada

First clinical study for Zika vaccine to begin in Canada

Université Laval's Infectious Disease Research Centre and Centre de recherche du CHU de Québec-Université Laval are proud to announce that the first clinical study for a Zika vaccine in Canada is set to begin in Quebec City. [More]
Intranasal vaccine may provide long-term protection against multiple flu strains

Intranasal vaccine may provide long-term protection against multiple flu strains

Intranasal flu vaccines may be able to provide long-lasting protection against pandemic flu strains, according to a new study from immunologists at Columbia University Medical Center. [More]
Preventing zoonotic diseases from pets to people: an interview with Dr Monique Éloit, OIE Director General

Preventing zoonotic diseases from pets to people: an interview with Dr Monique Éloit, OIE Director General

Zoonotic diseases are diseases or infections which are naturally transmissible from animals to humans, as defined in the OIE Terrestrial Animal Health Code. [More]
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