Irritable Bowel Syndrome News and Research RSS Feed - Irritable Bowel Syndrome News and Research

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common disorder that affects the large intestine, often causing bouts of cramping, abdominal pain, bloating, diarrhea and constipation.

IBS is not curable but, in most cases, people learn to live with and control the condition by managing diet, lifestyle and stress levels. Medications to treat diarrhea, pain killers or drugs that relieve painful bowel spasms may also be used.

The cause of IBS is not yet clear but it is linked to changes in the way food is moved through the bowel. In healthy people, layers of muscle lining the intestinal wall contract and relax in a coordinated manner to move food from the stomach, through the colon and into the rectum. When an individual has IBS, however, the contractions are unusually strong and food is passed through the intestine too quickly which leads to diarrhea and a build up of gas.

Triggers for IBS range from pressure on the intestines to certain foods such as chocolate or carbonated drinks, hormonal changes such as during the menstrual cycle and emotional changes such as an increase in stress.

IBS can be painful and debilitating if not treated appropriately, negatively impacting on a person’s quality of life. However, with appropriate treatment individuals with IBS should be able to live a full and active life.
New research shows independent gut-to-brain and brain-to-gut pathways operate in IBS patients

New research shows independent gut-to-brain and brain-to-gut pathways operate in IBS patients

New research indicates that in patients with irritable bowedistinct brain-to-gut pathway, where psychological symptoms begin first, and separately a distinctl syndrome (IBS) or indigestion, there is a gut-to-brain pathway, where gut symptoms start first. [More]
Low-FODMAP rye bread may reduce symptoms of IBS

Low-FODMAP rye bread may reduce symptoms of IBS

Patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are often concerned that certain foods may trigger or worsen their symptoms, which can include abdominal pain, diarrhea, or constipation. In a new study, patients who ate rye bread that was low in so-called "FODMAPs" (fermentable oligo- di- and mono-saccharides and polyols) experienced milder IBS symptoms than patients who ate normal rye bread. [More]
Treatment for IBS proves difficult, survey reveals

Treatment for IBS proves difficult, survey reveals

A new national survey by Health Union of more than 1,000 individuals with Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) reveals that the condition is difficult to diagnose and often even more difficult to treat. [More]
Scientists find link between makeup of individual's microbiome and head and neck cancer

Scientists find link between makeup of individual's microbiome and head and neck cancer

In a sample study, researchers at Johns Hopkins say they have found an association between the makeup of an individual's microbiome and head and neck cancer, a finding that potentially advances the quest for faster and more accurate cancer diagnosis and therapy. [More]
Researchers play crucial role in crafting diagnostic criteria for functional GI disorders

Researchers play crucial role in crafting diagnostic criteria for functional GI disorders

With no laboratory test available to diagnose functional gastrointestinal disorders, proper diagnostic criteria are critical for clinicians to make an accurate determination of what ails their patients. [More]
Tarantula venom could help provide relief for patients suffering from Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Tarantula venom could help provide relief for patients suffering from Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Researchers from The University of Adelaide in South Australia found that a specific peptide in the spider venom could be used to understand how people sense pain. [More]
Spider venom helps investigate pain signals experienced by irritable bowel syndrome patients

Spider venom helps investigate pain signals experienced by irritable bowel syndrome patients

Spiders have helped researchers from Australia and the US discover a new target for irritable bowel syndrome pain. [More]
Rome IV criteria helps diagnose, treat gastrointestinal conditions in children

Rome IV criteria helps diagnose, treat gastrointestinal conditions in children

A child feels nauseated all the time, but no medical test can find what is wrong. Or a child vomits regularly, but there's no illness or eating disorder to explain it. These, and other stomach and bowel-related problems with no obvious causes, are called functional gastrointestinal disorders. [More]
Diet-based therapy may improve quality of life in IBS patients

Diet-based therapy may improve quality of life in IBS patients

A change in diet can improve the lives of those diagnosed with a common, but hard-to-treat gut disorder. [More]
Gut-directed hypnosis more effective for treating irritable bowel syndrome

Gut-directed hypnosis more effective for treating irritable bowel syndrome

Therapeutic hypnosis is an effective and safe complementary technique in surgery and the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome. This is the conclusion of a systematic review by Winfried Häuser and his co-authors in the latest issue of Deutsches Ärzteblatt International. [More]
Set of 16 different substances in the breath can help identify IBS patients

Set of 16 different substances in the breath can help identify IBS patients

There is currently no specific diagnostic test for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), but now researchers have identified a combination of 16 different substances in the breath that, when measured together, can accurately distinguish IBS patients from people without the condition. [More]
RedHill Biopharma initiates phase II study of BEKINDA for irritable bowel syndrome

RedHill Biopharma initiates phase II study of BEKINDA for irritable bowel syndrome

RedHill Biopharma Ltd. (NASDAQ; RDHL) (TASE: RDHL) (“RedHill” or the “Company”), a biopharmaceutical company primarily focused on development and commercialization of late clinical-stage, proprietary, orally-administered, small molecule drugs for inflammatory and gastrointestinal diseases, including cancer, today announced that it has initiated a randomized, double-blind, 2-arm parallel group Phase II clinical study in the U.S. evaluating the safety and efficacy of BEKINDA™ 12 mg in patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D). [More]
Fecal transplants transfer bacterial viruses that appear to be harmless to humans

Fecal transplants transfer bacterial viruses that appear to be harmless to humans

Communities of viruses can be transferred during fecal transplants, according to a study published this week in mBio, an online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. Fortunately for patients who use this procedure, the viruses found to be transmitted in this study appear to be harmless to humans. [More]
Psychological difficulties of ovarian cancer: an interview with Katherine Taylor

Psychological difficulties of ovarian cancer: an interview with Katherine Taylor

Ovarian cancer affects around 7000 thousand women in the UK every year and very sadly the outcomes are not great. A women dies every 2 hours of ovarian cancer. If I am diagnosed today, I’ve only got a 40% chance of being alive in 5 years’ time. [More]
Potential link between PLCD and ALL could offer new targets for cancer prevention research

Potential link between PLCD and ALL could offer new targets for cancer prevention research

A potential correlation between pre-labor cesarean delivery (PLCD) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) could offer new targets for cancer prevention research, according to new research from the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota. [More]
Study: Migraine, tension-type headaches may share genetic links with IBS

Study: Migraine, tension-type headaches may share genetic links with IBS

Migraine and tension-type headaches may share genetic links with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), according to a preliminary study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 68th Annual Meeting in Vancouver, Canada, April 15 to 21, 2016. [More]
Electronic health records could help identify people who have undiagnosed type 2 diabetes

Electronic health records could help identify people who have undiagnosed type 2 diabetes

In 2012, a group of UCLA researchers set out to mine thousands of electronic health records for a more accurate and less expensive way to identify people who have undiagnosed type 2 diabetes. The researchers got much more than they bargained for. [More]
10 million of us lack sunshine vitamin

10 million of us lack sunshine vitamin

Health pioneers BetterYou have welcomed the views of Nutritionist Marilyn Glenville, that ‘oil based supplements can help you get your recommended dose of vitamin D’. [More]
Neurons protect intestinal tissue from over-inflammation

Neurons protect intestinal tissue from over-inflammation

The immune system exercises constant vigilance to protect the body from external threats--including what we eat and drink. A careful balancing act plays out as digested food travels through the intestine. Immune cells must remain alert to protect against harmful pathogens like Salmonella, but their activity also needs to be tempered since an overreaction can lead to too much inflammation and permanent tissue damage. [More]
Allergan announces publication of VIBERZI Phase III trial results in The New England Journal of Medicine

Allergan announces publication of VIBERZI Phase III trial results in The New England Journal of Medicine

Allergan plc announced today the publication of the positive results of the Phase III trials of VIBERZITM C IV (eluxadoline) for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea (IBS-D) in the January 21 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
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