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Lung cancer is the world's most common cancer and kills more people than any other cancer. In 2008, approximately 1.52 million new cases of lung cancer were diagnosed worldwide, with 1.31 million people dying from the disease.(14) In the United States, an estimated 161,840 deaths, accounting for 29 percent of all cancer deaths, occurred in 2008, according to the American Cancer Society (ACS).
Bielefeld University chemists develop copper molecule that could help prevent spread of cancer

Bielefeld University chemists develop copper molecule that could help prevent spread of cancer

Chemists at Bielefeld University have developed a molecule containing copper that binds specifically with DNA and prevents the spread of cancer. First results show that it kills the cancer cells more quickly than cisplatin - a widely used anti-cancer drug that is frequently administered in chemotherapy. [More]
New online tool helps educate practicing oncologists with therapeutic decision-making for NSCLC

New online tool helps educate practicing oncologists with therapeutic decision-making for NSCLC

A new interactive online tool helps educate practicing oncologists worldwide with therapeutic decision-making for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) based on a patient's molecular and clinical characteristics by providing feedback from an expert panel. [More]
Scientists discover DNA vaccine that alleviates chronic inflammation in the body

Scientists discover DNA vaccine that alleviates chronic inflammation in the body

An international team of scientists including CureLab Oncology, Inc. (Boston), University of Camerino (Italy), and Boston University have serendipitously discovered a DNA vaccine, which systemically alleviates chronic inflammation in the body. Since osteoporosis is an inflammatory disease, preventive and therapeutic effects of the new vaccine were demonstrated on mouse models with osteoporosis. [More]
Smokers who quit early does not qualify for lung cancer screening, say Mayo Clinic researchers

Smokers who quit early does not qualify for lung cancer screening, say Mayo Clinic researchers

A decline in smoking rates may mean that many people who could have benefited from early detection of lung cancer are dying because they don't qualify for low-dose CT scans, according to a group of Mayo Clinic researchers. [More]
PCORI funds five patient-centered comparative effectiveness research studies

PCORI funds five patient-centered comparative effectiveness research studies

The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute Board of Governors today approved awards totaling more than $64 million to fund five large patient-centered comparative effectiveness research (CER) studies that will answer critical clinical questions about care for cancer, back pain, and stroke. [More]
Agena releases MassARRAY 24-Well System for mass spectrometry-based genetic testing

Agena releases MassARRAY 24-Well System for mass spectrometry-based genetic testing

Agena Bioscience today released the MassARRAY 24-Well System for mass spectrometry-based genetic analysis, adding to its existing MassARRAY portfolio. The new 24-well format is tailored to smaller clinical testing laboratories requiring modest sample throughput, reduced initial hardware costs, and reduced time to result. [More]
New NCCN Guidelines for treating Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

New NCCN Guidelines for treating Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

According to the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL), the treatment approach to ALL is one of the most complex and intensive programs in cancer therapy. [More]
MD Anderson awarded more than $22 million in research grants from CPRIT

MD Anderson awarded more than $22 million in research grants from CPRIT

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center has received more than $22 million in research grants this week from the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas. Approximately half of the funds awarded for Individual Investigator Research Awards went to MD Anderson faculty as well as 40 percent of total IIRA awards that include those for children's and adolescent cancer and early detection and prevention. [More]
Rush University Medical Center earns three-star rating for lung cancer surgery program

Rush University Medical Center earns three-star rating for lung cancer surgery program

Surgery to remove localized tumors is the only reliable way to cure lung cancer, the most prevalent cause of cancer-related deaths in both men and women. The most common operation performed to remove these cancers is a lobectomy (removal of an anatomic portion of lung). Thoracic surgeons at Rush University Medical Center perform the largest number of these operations of any surgical group in Chicago and in most cases use minimally invasive techniques that speed recovery. [More]
Proximity Ligation Assay helps detect effectiveness of cancer vaccines

Proximity Ligation Assay helps detect effectiveness of cancer vaccines

Cancer vaccines are designed to turn the body's own immune system specifically against tumor cells. Particularly promising are vaccines that are directed against so-called neoantigens: These are proteins that have undergone a genetic mutation in tumor cells and, therefore, differ from their counterparts in healthy cells. [More]
Scientists identify promising new therapeutic target for prostate cancer

Scientists identify promising new therapeutic target for prostate cancer

Keck Medicine of the University of Southern California scientists have found a promising new therapeutic target for prostate cancer. The findings offer evidence that a newly discovered member of a family of cell surface proteins called G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) promotes prostate cancer cell growth. The protein, GPR158, was found while the researchers were looking for new drug targets for glaucoma. [More]
Targeting pericytes and ANG2 signaling may help treat certain breast cancers

Targeting pericytes and ANG2 signaling may help treat certain breast cancers

Tumors require blood to emerge and spread. That is why scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center believe that targeting blood vessel cells known as pericytes may offer a potential new therapeutic approach when combined with vascular growth factors responsible for cell death. [More]
Johns Hopkins study shows value follow-up PET/CT scans in patients with lung cancer

Johns Hopkins study shows value follow-up PET/CT scans in patients with lung cancer

New research from Johns Hopkins School of Medicine reveals a high value of scans which could lead to future change of reimbursement policies for follow-up positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) studies in lung cancer. The study, featured in the February 2015 issue of the Journal of Nuclear Medicine, establishes the value of fourth and subsequent follow-up PET/CT scans in clinical assessment and management change in patients with the disease. [More]
MD Anderson, CATCH Global Foundation partner to lower cancer risk in children

MD Anderson, CATCH Global Foundation partner to lower cancer risk in children

Cancer prevention experts at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have allied with the CATCH Global Foundation, whose comprehensive child health program reaches children and their families in more than 10,000 educational settings nationwide, to promote behavior that will lower children's lifelong risk of developing cancer. [More]
Facts about precision medicine

Facts about precision medicine

President Barack Obama is requesting an increase of $215 million in the 2016 federal budget to launch the Precision Medicine Initiative. This boost in funding for research will give genetic causes of cancer a national focus specifically around precision or "personalized" treatments for cancer in the future. [More]
CTCA presents research on new cancer nutrition therapies at A.S.P.E.N. Clinical Nutrition Week

CTCA presents research on new cancer nutrition therapies at A.S.P.E.N. Clinical Nutrition Week

Several Cancer Treatment Centers of America clinicians presented research from studies evaluating new cancer nutrition techniques and therapies at the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition Clinical Nutrition Week held in Long Beach, Calif., February 14-17, 2015. CTCA clinicians led a plenary session and an oral abstract presentation, and presented eight posters to Clinical Nutrition Week attendees. [More]
Clinical study to evaluate ground-breaking 'breath test' to detect lung cancer

Clinical study to evaluate ground-breaking 'breath test' to detect lung cancer

A clinical trial led by University of Leicester respiratory experts into a potentially ground-breaking 'breath test' to detect lung cancer is set to get underway at the Glenfield Hospital in Leicester. [More]
Eisai announces FDA approval of LENVIMA (lenvatinib) for treatment of RAI-refractory DTC

Eisai announces FDA approval of LENVIMA (lenvatinib) for treatment of RAI-refractory DTC

Eisai Inc. announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the company's receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor LENVIMA (lenvatinib) for the treatment of locally recurrent or metastatic, progressive, radioactive iodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (RAI-R DTC). [More]
Novel image-analysis technique improves breast cancer detection and diagnosis

Novel image-analysis technique improves breast cancer detection and diagnosis

Researchers at the University of Oklahoma have developed an image-analysis technique that is designed to improve breast cancer detection and diagnosis. [More]
Montefiore Einstein Center for Cancer Care receives CoC accreditation

Montefiore Einstein Center for Cancer Care receives CoC accreditation

Montefiore Einstein Center for Cancer Care, a premier cancer center that provides patient-centered care for prevention, diagnosis and treatment of cancer, today announced that it has received Three-Year Accreditation with Silver Level Commendation from the Commission on Cancer of the American College of Surgeons. [More]