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Lung cancer is the world's most common cancer and kills more people than any other cancer. In 2008, approximately 1.52 million new cases of lung cancer were diagnosed worldwide, with 1.31 million people dying from the disease.(14) In the United States, an estimated 161,840 deaths, accounting for 29 percent of all cancer deaths, occurred in 2008, according to the American Cancer Society (ACS).
Targeting pericytes and ANG2 signaling may help treat certain breast cancers

Targeting pericytes and ANG2 signaling may help treat certain breast cancers

Tumors require blood to emerge and spread. That is why scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center believe that targeting blood vessel cells known as pericytes may offer a potential new therapeutic approach when combined with vascular growth factors responsible for cell death. [More]
Johns Hopkins study shows value follow-up PET/CT scans in patients with lung cancer

Johns Hopkins study shows value follow-up PET/CT scans in patients with lung cancer

New research from Johns Hopkins School of Medicine reveals a high value of scans which could lead to future change of reimbursement policies for follow-up positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) studies in lung cancer. The study, featured in the February 2015 issue of the Journal of Nuclear Medicine, establishes the value of fourth and subsequent follow-up PET/CT scans in clinical assessment and management change in patients with the disease. [More]
MD Anderson, CATCH Global Foundation partner to lower cancer risk in children

MD Anderson, CATCH Global Foundation partner to lower cancer risk in children

Cancer prevention experts at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have allied with the CATCH Global Foundation, whose comprehensive child health program reaches children and their families in more than 10,000 educational settings nationwide, to promote behavior that will lower children's lifelong risk of developing cancer. [More]
Facts about precision medicine

Facts about precision medicine

President Barack Obama is requesting an increase of $215 million in the 2016 federal budget to launch the Precision Medicine Initiative. This boost in funding for research will give genetic causes of cancer a national focus specifically around precision or "personalized" treatments for cancer in the future. [More]
CTCA presents research on new cancer nutrition therapies at A.S.P.E.N. Clinical Nutrition Week

CTCA presents research on new cancer nutrition therapies at A.S.P.E.N. Clinical Nutrition Week

Several Cancer Treatment Centers of America clinicians presented research from studies evaluating new cancer nutrition techniques and therapies at the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition Clinical Nutrition Week held in Long Beach, Calif., February 14-17, 2015. CTCA clinicians led a plenary session and an oral abstract presentation, and presented eight posters to Clinical Nutrition Week attendees. [More]
Clinical study to evaluate ground-breaking 'breath test' to detect lung cancer

Clinical study to evaluate ground-breaking 'breath test' to detect lung cancer

A clinical trial led by University of Leicester respiratory experts into a potentially ground-breaking 'breath test' to detect lung cancer is set to get underway at the Glenfield Hospital in Leicester. [More]
Eisai announces FDA approval of LENVIMA (lenvatinib) for treatment of RAI-refractory DTC

Eisai announces FDA approval of LENVIMA (lenvatinib) for treatment of RAI-refractory DTC

Eisai Inc. announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the company's receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor LENVIMA (lenvatinib) for the treatment of locally recurrent or metastatic, progressive, radioactive iodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (RAI-R DTC). [More]
Novel image-analysis technique improves breast cancer detection and diagnosis

Novel image-analysis technique improves breast cancer detection and diagnosis

Researchers at the University of Oklahoma have developed an image-analysis technique that is designed to improve breast cancer detection and diagnosis. [More]
Montefiore Einstein Center for Cancer Care receives CoC accreditation

Montefiore Einstein Center for Cancer Care receives CoC accreditation

Montefiore Einstein Center for Cancer Care, a premier cancer center that provides patient-centered care for prevention, diagnosis and treatment of cancer, today announced that it has received Three-Year Accreditation with Silver Level Commendation from the Commission on Cancer of the American College of Surgeons. [More]
Rare and classic EGFR mutations have different impacts on NSCLC outcome

Rare and classic EGFR mutations have different impacts on NSCLC outcome

Certain rare epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations are associated with tobacco smoking, worse prognosis and poor response to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy compared to the more common "classical" EGFR mutations. [More]
Franziska Michor named winner of Creative Promise Prize in Biomedical Science

Franziska Michor named winner of Creative Promise Prize in Biomedical Science

Franziska Michor was picked as the winner of a Creative Promise Prize in Biomedical Science for her research that fuses evolutionary biology, mathematics, and clinical research toward a better understanding of cancer genesis and treatments. [More]
Study finds higher levels of malignant mesothelioma cases in southern Nevada

Study finds higher levels of malignant mesothelioma cases in southern Nevada

Malignant mesothelioma has been found at higher than expected levels in women and in individuals younger than 55 years old in the southern Nevada counties of Clark and Nye, likewise in the same region carcinogenic mineral fibers including actinolite asbestos, erionite, winchite, magnesioriebeckite and richterite were discovered. [More]
Study findings help improve lung cancer screening guidelines

Study findings help improve lung cancer screening guidelines

A set of guidelines developed to help standardized lung cancer screening would have generated considerably fewer false-positives than the National Lung Screening Trial produced, according to a new retrospective study. [More]
Excluding cancer survivors from lung cancer clinical trials may not be justified, study finds

Excluding cancer survivors from lung cancer clinical trials may not be justified, study finds

The common practice of excluding patients with a prior cancer diagnosis from lung cancer clinical trials may not be justified, according to a study by researchers from UT Southwestern Medical Center. [More]
Roche announces acquisition of Signature Diagnostics

Roche announces acquisition of Signature Diagnostics

Roche announced today the acquisition of Signature Diagnostics AG, a privately held company based in Potsdam, Germany. Signature is a translational oncology and genomics company that develops large blood plasma and tissue biobanks in multiple cancers, including colorectal and lung, which are constructed from multicenter prospective clinical studies. [More]
Scientists find that collagen 'cross-links' can determine tumor's ability to grow and spread

Scientists find that collagen 'cross-links' can determine tumor's ability to grow and spread

When skyscrapers go up, contractors rely on an infrastructure of steel beams and braces. Some cancers grow the same way, using a biological matrix from which the tumor can thrive and spread. [More]
Discovery leads to new understanding of cancer metastasis

Discovery leads to new understanding of cancer metastasis

In a breakthrough in the understanding of how cancer spreads, researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have identified a substance secreted by lung cancer cells that enables them to metastasize, beginning their deadly march to other sites in the body. [More]
Combination therapies may overcome resistance to targeted cancer drugs

Combination therapies may overcome resistance to targeted cancer drugs

A protein called YAP, which drives the growth of organs during development and regulates their size in adulthood, plays a key role in the emergence of resistance to targeted cancer therapies, according to a new study led by UC San Francisco researchers. [More]
Physical, psychosocial factors can significantly increase risk of low back pain

Physical, psychosocial factors can significantly increase risk of low back pain

New research reveals the physical and psychosocial factors that significantly increase the risk of low back pain onset. In fact results published in Arthritis Care & Research, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology, show that being engaged in manual tasks involving awkward positions will increase the risk of low back pain by eight times. Those who are distracted during activities or fatigued also significantly increase their risk of acute low back pain. [More]
Study explores cost-effectiveness of targeted treatment for cancer

Study explores cost-effectiveness of targeted treatment for cancer

Health economics helps insurers, health care systems and providers make treatment decisions based on the cost of extra "units" of health arising from a specific treatment. [More]