Lung Cancer News and Research RSS Feed - Lung Cancer News and Research Twitter

Lung cancer is the world's most common cancer and kills more people than any other cancer. In 2008, approximately 1.52 million new cases of lung cancer were diagnosed worldwide, with 1.31 million people dying from the disease.(14) In the United States, an estimated 161,840 deaths, accounting for 29 percent of all cancer deaths, occurred in 2008, according to the American Cancer Society (ACS).
ALK fusion variants could influence NSCLC crizotinib response

ALK fusion variants could influence NSCLC crizotinib response

In non-small-cell lung cancer patients with anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearrangement treated with crizotinib, progression-free survival varies according to the ALK fusion variant. [More]
Immunotherapy-treated cancer patients may develop rheumatic disorders

Immunotherapy-treated cancer patients may develop rheumatic disorders

Oncologists need to be aware of the potential for rheumatological diseases in patients with cancer following treatment with immune checkpoint inhibitors, say US investigators. [More]
Siemens Healthineers' new CT and MRI technologies to aid research across various common clinical pathways

Siemens Healthineers' new CT and MRI technologies to aid research across various common clinical pathways

The Transforming Outcomes and Health Economics Through Imaging (TOHETI) programme is looking to change the way medical imaging works by undertaking a range of pioneering research. [More]
Yale-led study shows how EGFR silences tumor suppressor genes

Yale-led study shows how EGFR silences tumor suppressor genes

A Yale-led study describes how a known cancer gene, EGFR, silences genes that typically suppress tumors. The finding, published in Cell Reports, may lead to the development of more effective, individualized treatment for patients with lung cancer and other cancer types. [More]
Taking ipilimumab, nivolumab drugs may increase risk of developing rheumatologic diseases

Taking ipilimumab, nivolumab drugs may increase risk of developing rheumatologic diseases

Case reports on 13 cancer patients suggest that a small number of cancer patients taking the immunotherapy drugs ipilimumab and nivolumab may be at some higher-than-normal risk of developing autoimmune joint and tissue diseases, including inflammatory arthritis, according to a preliminary study by Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers. [More]
Adherence to cancer prevention guidelines on diet and physical activity may reduce disease incidence

Adherence to cancer prevention guidelines on diet and physical activity may reduce disease incidence

"Behaviors such as poor diet choices, physical inactivity, excess alcohol consumption and unhealthy body weight could account for more than 20 percent of cancer cases, and could, therefore, be prevented with lifestyle modifications," Kohler said, adding that when tobacco exposure is considered, these modifiable issues are believed to be factors in two-thirds of U.S. cancer deaths. [More]
Novel combination therapy slows cancer growth in patients with advanced solid tumors

Novel combination therapy slows cancer growth in patients with advanced solid tumors

A phase 1 clinical trial testing a novel combination therapy developed by scientists at VCU Massey Cancer Center slowed the growth of cancer in the majority of trial participants, which were patients with advanced solid tumors. [More]
Researchers seek to develop novel antibody to treat glioblastoma

Researchers seek to develop novel antibody to treat glioblastoma

Scientists of Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Munich University Hospital are developing a novel antibody to treat brain tumors. [More]
Study ignores possibility that drugs, chemicals affect sexes differently

Study ignores possibility that drugs, chemicals affect sexes differently

Many of the medicines we take were only ever tested on men during clinical studies. This poses a distinct danger that females are receiving suboptimal care—and that treatments specifically benefiting women are going undiscovered. [More]
Immunotherapy drugs given after chemotherapy may benefit ovarian cancer patients

Immunotherapy drugs given after chemotherapy may benefit ovarian cancer patients

Women with advanced ovarian cancer may benefit more from immunotherapy drug treatments if they are given straight after chemotherapy, according to a new study published in Clinical Cancer Research today. [More]
Interdisciplinary approach to improve cancer treatments

Interdisciplinary approach to improve cancer treatments

Whether it focuses on determining why certain cancers develop drug resistance, finding a way to improve individual's immune systems or better understanding cancer cell evolution, fundamental scientific research will "stand up to cancer" with three new awards from the National Science Foundation. [More]
Veterinarian conducts clinical trials to improve cancer treatment for animals, humans

Veterinarian conducts clinical trials to improve cancer treatment for animals, humans

Raelene Wouda's passion for improving cancer treatment starts with our four-legged friends. [More]
FDG-PET imaging tracks ability of atezolizumab to bolster immunity against NSCLC

FDG-PET imaging tracks ability of atezolizumab to bolster immunity against NSCLC

Non-small cell lung cancers have a collective reputation for not responding very well to chemotherapy. Researchers at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) are presenting a means of evaluating an immunotherapy that fights off NSCLC by strengthening a patient's own immune system. [More]
Adjuvant chemotherapy use benefits early-stage NSCLC patients

Adjuvant chemotherapy use benefits early-stage NSCLC patients

The use of adjuvant chemotherapy in early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients improves overall survival (OS) and 5-year OS in patients with tumor sizes ranging from 3 - 7 cm. [More]
Younger patients more likely to be diagnosed with late stage lung cancer than older adults, say researchers

Younger patients more likely to be diagnosed with late stage lung cancer than older adults, say researchers

Younger patients - aged 50 to 64 - are more likely to be diagnosed with late stage lung cancer than older patients according to new data being presented at the Cancer Outcomes and Data Conference in Manchester today (Tuesday). [More]
Many family doctors have poor knowledge about LDCT lung cancer screening

Many family doctors have poor knowledge about LDCT lung cancer screening

Although clinical trials have shown that lung cancer screening using low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) can detect lung cancers early and reduce lung cancer mortality, less than half of family physicians in a recent survey agreed that screening reduces lung cancer–related deaths. [More]
NCCN educational resources provide insight for patients with Mycosis Fungoides

NCCN educational resources provide insight for patients with Mycosis Fungoides

Mycosis Fungoides is a very rare form of lymphoma affecting approximately 1,000 people per year in the United States. [More]
Air pollution exposure may have direct role in triggering lupus among children and adolescents

Air pollution exposure may have direct role in triggering lupus among children and adolescents

The results of a study presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress show for the first time that an individual's exposure to air pollution may have a direct role in triggering disease activity as well as airway inflammation in children and adolescents with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). [More]
Surgery improves survival in late-stage NSCLC patients

Surgery improves survival in late-stage NSCLC patients

Patients with late-stage, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have surgery have better survival rates than those who don't, but fewer of these patients are undergoing surgery, UC Davis researchers have found. [More]
Simple breath test shows promise in identifying lung cancer recurrence after surgery

Simple breath test shows promise in identifying lung cancer recurrence after surgery

A single breath may be all it takes to identify the return of lung cancer after surgery, according to a study posted online today by The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. [More]
Advertisement