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Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), also called lupus, is an autoimmune disorder characterized by the immune system attacking the body's own tissues and organs, leading to inflammation and damage. The severity of the disease varies, from mild cases only involving the skin to severe cases affecting multiple organs, including the brain. Lupus sufferers experience flares, or intervals of active disease, and remissions in disease. The disease most predominantly occurs in women of childbearing age, but also affects children, adolescents, and men. While the cause of lupus is still unknown, various genetic, environmental, and infectious causes have been associated with its development. Current treatments for lupus vary depending on the extent of the disease, and may change over time. Some medications used to ease symptoms include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antimalarial drugs, corticosteroids, and immunosuppressive medications, though many of these drugs carry their own risks.
Researchers confirm for the first time that achalasia is autoimmune in origin

Researchers confirm for the first time that achalasia is autoimmune in origin

Achalasia is a rare disease - it affects 1 in 100,000 people - characterized by a loss of nerve cells in the esophageal wall. [More]
New version of drug successfully treats lupus in mice

New version of drug successfully treats lupus in mice

Expanding on his work with a new drug that successfully treated lupus in mice, a biomedical engineer at the University of Houston has received a $250,000 grant to expand his research to a new version of the drug in an effort to treat a wider range of autoimmune diseases. [More]
Brain network measures placebo effects in Parkinson's disease patients

Brain network measures placebo effects in Parkinson's disease patients

Investigators at The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research have utilized a new image-based strategy to identify and measure placebo effects in randomized clinical trials for brain disorders. The findings are published in the August issue of The Journal of Clinical Investigation. [More]
Investigators identify gene that underlies devastating autoinflammatory condition in children

Investigators identify gene that underlies devastating autoinflammatory condition in children

Investigators have identified a gene that underlies a very rare but devastating autoinflammatory condition in children. Several existing drugs have shown therapeutic potential in laboratory studies, and one is currently being studied in children with the disease, which the researchers named STING-associated vasculopathy with onset in infancy (SAVI). [More]
Researchers reveal molecular interplay between Roquin and RNA

Researchers reveal molecular interplay between Roquin and RNA

The Roquin protein, discovered in 2005, controls T-cell activation and differentiation by regulating the expression of certain mRNAs. In doing so, it helps to guarantee immunological tolerance and prevents immune responses against the body's own structures that can lead to autoimmune disease. [More]
Study to understand molecular interplay between Roquin and RNA to treat autoimmune diseases

Study to understand molecular interplay between Roquin and RNA to treat autoimmune diseases

Scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München, the Ludwig-Maximilians University of Munich (LMU) and the Technische Universität München (TUM) have moved an important step closer to understanding molecular mechanisms of autoimmune diseases. [More]
UCB, Dermira enter into licensing agreement for development, commercialization of Cimzia

UCB, Dermira enter into licensing agreement for development, commercialization of Cimzia

UCB, a global biopharmaceutical leader, and Dermira, Inc., a privately held US-based dermatology company, announced today that they have entered into an exclusive licensing agreement for the development and future commercialization of Cimzia (certolizumab pegol) in dermatology. [More]
Researchers find unique cell type that can protect against uveitis

Researchers find unique cell type that can protect against uveitis

Researchers at the National Eye Institute (NEI) have found a unique cell type that, in tests on mice, can protect against uveitis—a group of inflammatory diseases that affect the eye and can cause vision loss. [More]
Study shows significantly increased risk of heart attack in patients with Sj-gren's syndrome

Study shows significantly increased risk of heart attack in patients with Sj-gren's syndrome

A new study presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress (EULAR 2014) showed a significantly increased risk of heart attack in patients with Sj-gren's syndrome (SjS), particularly in the first year following diagnosis. [More]
New research collaboration aims to develop better therapies for autoimmune diseases

New research collaboration aims to develop better therapies for autoimmune diseases

Seattle Children's Research Institute and biotechnology company Kineta, Inc. today launched the Alliance for Children's Therapeutics (ACT), a first-of-its-kind pediatric research and funding collaboration designed to speed development of new medications for children and teens with lupus nephritis and other autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis, Type 1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis. [More]
Researchers find standard heart disease risk assessment tools for rheumatoid arthritis patients

Researchers find standard heart disease risk assessment tools for rheumatoid arthritis patients

Rheumatoid arthritis patients overall are twice as likely as the average person to develop heart problems. Pinpointing which rheumatoid arthritis patients need stepped-up heart disease prevention efforts has been a challenge; research by Mayo Clinic and others has found that standard heart disease risk assessment tools may underrate the danger a particular person faces. [More]
Wistar findings suggest means of boosting initial immune response

Wistar findings suggest means of boosting initial immune response

Your first response to an infectious agent or antigen ordinarily takes about a week, and is relatively weak. However, if your immune system encounters that antigen a second time, the so-called memory response is rapid, powerful, and very effective. [More]
Interferon Type I immune proteins key drivers of human hemorrhagic fevers

Interferon Type I immune proteins key drivers of human hemorrhagic fevers

Hemorrhagic fevers caused by Lassa, dengue and other viruses affect more than one million people annually and are often fatal, yet scientists have never understood why only some virus-infected people come down with the disease and others do not. [More]
Study uncovers marijuana's potential to treat autoimmune diseases

Study uncovers marijuana's potential to treat autoimmune diseases

A team of University of South Carolina researchers led by Mitzi Nagarkatti, Prakash Nagarkatti and Xiaoming Yang have discovered a novel pathway through which marijuana can suppress the body's immune functions. Their research has been published online in the Journal of Biological Chemistry. [More]
AbbVie receives HUMIRA orphan drug designation from FDA for treatment of non-infectious uveitis

AbbVie receives HUMIRA orphan drug designation from FDA for treatment of non-infectious uveitis

AbbVie announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted HUMIRA orphan drug designation for the treatment of non-infectious intermediate, posterior, or pan-uveitis, or chronic non-infectious anterior uveitis, a group of rare but serious inflammatory diseases of the eye. [More]
Study finds increased risk of hospitalization for heart failure in IBD patients

Study finds increased risk of hospitalization for heart failure in IBD patients

Heart failure hospitalisation more than doubles during inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) flares, according to a study of more than 5 million Danish people. The research was presented today at the Heart Failure Congress 2014, held 17-20 May, in Athens, Greece. [More]
Scientists reveal how and why immune system's B cells respond only to true threats

Scientists reveal how and why immune system's B cells respond only to true threats

The immune system's B cells protect us from disease by producing antibodies, or "smart bullets," that specifically target invaders such as pathogens and viruses while leaving harmless molecules alone. [More]
Autoimmune epilepsy diagnostics: an interview with Dr. Joseph J. Higgins, Medical Director, Neurology, Athena Diagnostics, a business of Quest Diagnostics

Autoimmune epilepsy diagnostics: an interview with Dr. Joseph J. Higgins, Medical Director, Neurology, Athena Diagnostics, a business of Quest Diagnostics

Epilepsy is a group of neurological disorders often characterized by seizures and cognitive impairment due to electrical disturbances in the brain. [More]
UNF Professor discovers 2 Lyme disease bacterial species that infect human patients

UNF Professor discovers 2 Lyme disease bacterial species that infect human patients

Dr. Kerry Clark, associate professor of public health at the University of North Florida in Jacksonville, and his colleagues have found additional cases of Lyme disease in patients from several states in the southeastern U.S. These cases include two additional Lyme disease Borrelia species recently identified in patients in Florida and Georgia. [More]
Baylor receives $3.3M grant from NIAMS to advance research in autoimmune diseases

Baylor receives $3.3M grant from NIAMS to advance research in autoimmune diseases

Baylor Research Institute has received a $3.3 million grant from the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), one of the National Institutes of Health, to fund its Autoimmunity Center of Excellence. [More]