Multiple Sclerosis News and Research RSS Feed - Multiple Sclerosis News and Research

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a severe autoimmune disease of the central nervous system that affects the brain and spinal cord, causing problems with muscle movement, balance and vision.

In MS, the protein coating called myelin, which protects nerves and helps electrical signals travel from the brain to the rest of the body, is damaged. The immune system, which usually fights infection, mistakes myelin for a foreign body and attacks it, stripping it from around the nerves. Exactly what causes this abnormal immune response is unclear, but research suggests a combination of both genetic and environmental factors.

The damaged myelin disrupts the transfer of nerve signals which may slow down, become distorted or stop altogether. This can cause severe symptoms ranging from vision loss through to muscle stiffness, loss of control over muscle movement, difficulties with balance and poor co-ordination.

Around 100,000 people in the UK have MS and it affects about three times as many women as men. The usual age at which diagnosis occurs is around 30, however, symptoms often first develop between the ages of 15 and 45.

Currently, there is no cure for MS but therapeutic approaches such as physiotherapy and steroid injections are used to manage the condition and ease symptoms.
Study sheds light on brain mechanisms that make schizophrenia patients misinterpret what they see

Study sheds light on brain mechanisms that make schizophrenia patients misinterpret what they see

People with schizophrenia often misinterpret what they see and experience in the world. New research provides insight into the brain mechanisms that might be responsible for this misinterpretation. [More]
Young adults participated in cardio fitness activities may preserve memory, thinking skills in middle age

Young adults participated in cardio fitness activities may preserve memory, thinking skills in middle age

Young adults who run or participate in other cardio fitness activities may preserve their memory and thinking skills in middle age, according to a new study published in the April 2, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Middle age was defined as ages 43 to 55. [More]
Kessler Foundation receives grant to study effect of speed of processing training on cognitive performance in MS

Kessler Foundation receives grant to study effect of speed of processing training on cognitive performance in MS

​Kessler Foundation received a four-year $750,000 grant from the National Multiple Sclerosis Society to conduct a randomized controlled trial of speed of processing training to improve cognition in multiple sclerosis (MS). [More]
ANP reports positive results from chronic toxicity study of ATL1102 in multiple sclerosis

ANP reports positive results from chronic toxicity study of ATL1102 in multiple sclerosis

Antisense Therapeutics Limited is pleased to advise that results from a chronic toxicity study in monkeys indicate that ATL1102, an antisense oligonucleotide currently under development for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS), was well-tolerated when given subcutaneously for a 6-month dosing period at the 2 dose levels tested (1.5 and 3mg/kg/dose). [More]

U.S. Supreme Court agrees to hear Teva Pharmaceutical's appeal related to COPAXONE patent

Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. (NYSE: TEVA) today announced that the U.S. Supreme Court has granted the Company's COPAXONE® certiorari petition and will hear its appeal of a decision from the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit that invalidated the claim of U.S. Patent 5,800,808 (the "'808 patent"). [More]

Kessler Foundation receives Collaborative MS Research Center Award

Kessler Foundation is the recipient of a MS Research Center Award from the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. John DeLuca, PhD, is principal investigator for the five-year $821,000 grant, which will fund the MS Collaborative Network of New Jersey. The MSCNNJ will bring together the Foundation's experts in mobility and cognitive research to advance understanding of cognitive-motor interaction in MS. Dr. DeLuca is Senior Vice President of Research and Training at the Foundation. [More]
Biogen Idec's ALPROLIX receives FDA approval for hemophilia B treatment

Biogen Idec's ALPROLIX receives FDA approval for hemophilia B treatment

Today Biogen Idec announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved ALPROLIX [Coagulation Factor IX (Recombinant), Fc Fusion Protein], the first recombinant, DNA derived hemophilia B therapy with prolonged circulation in the body. [More]

Lower levels of vitamin D predict extent of coronary artery disease

Vitamin D deficiency is an independent risk factor for heart disease with lower levels of vitamin D being associated with a higher presence and severity of coronary artery disease, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session. [More]
National MS Society invests $29M to support new MS research projects, training awards

National MS Society invests $29M to support new MS research projects, training awards

The National Multiple Sclerosis Society has committed another $29 million to support an expected 83 new MS research projects and training awards. [More]
Researchers discover novel population of neutrophils that exhibit enhanced microbial killing activity

Researchers discover novel population of neutrophils that exhibit enhanced microbial killing activity

​Case Western Reserve University researchers have discovered a novel population of neutrophils, which are the body's infection control workhorses. These cells have an enhanced microbial killing ability and are thereby better able to control infection. [More]
Treatment with natalizumab in patients with MS appears linked with JC virus infection

Treatment with natalizumab in patients with MS appears linked with JC virus infection

Treatment with natalizumab in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) appears linked with JC virus (JCV) infection, which can lead to a rare and often fatal demyelinating disease of the central nervous system called progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) that destroys the myelin that protects nerve cells. [More]
Certain drugs in Obamacare plans carry hefty pricetags

Certain drugs in Obamacare plans carry hefty pricetags

Insurers selling Obamacare plans have set drug prices according to a tiered system that in some cases requires consumers to pay as much as 50 percent of the cost, The Associated Press writes. [More]
First Edition: March 24, 2013

First Edition: March 24, 2013

Today's early morning highlights from the major news organizations examine the final week for health law enrollment, the Supreme Court case this week about the law's contraceptive mandate and the fourth anniversary of the enactment of the controversial overhaul. [More]
Antisense Therapeutics enrolls acromegalic patients in ATL1103 Phase II trial

Antisense Therapeutics enrolls acromegalic patients in ATL1103 Phase II trial

Antisense Therapeutics Limited is pleased to report that 24 acromegalic patients have been successfully enrolled and randomized to one of the two treatment regimens of dosing in the Phase II trial of ATL1103 for the growth disorder, acromegaly. This satisfies the necessary patient numbers proposed for the trial. [More]

Biogen Idec's ALPROLIX gets Health Canada approval for hemophilia B

Today Biogen Idec announced that Health Canada has approved ALPROLIX [Coagulation Factor IX (Recombinant), Fc Fusion Protein], for the control and prevention of bleeding episodes and routine prophylaxis in adults, and children aged 12 and older, with hemophilia B. [More]

Brazil's ANVISA approves Genzyme's Lemtrada for multiple sclerosis treatment

Genzyme, a Sanofi company, announced today that Brazil's national health surveillance agency, ANVISA, has approved Lemtrada (alemtuzumab) for the treatment of patients with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS) to slow or reverse the accumulation of physical disability and reduce the frequency of clinical exacerbations. [More]
People who develop diabetes in middle age are more likely to have brain cell loss in old age

People who develop diabetes in middle age are more likely to have brain cell loss in old age

People who develop diabetes and high blood pressure in middle age are more likely to have brain cell loss and other damage to the brain, as well as problems with memory and thinking skills, than people who never have diabetes or high blood pressure or who develop it in old age, according to a new study published in the March 19, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
New weapon against secondary progressive MS

New weapon against secondary progressive MS

Statins may provide doctors with an unlikely new weapon with which to slow the progression of multiple sclerosis (MS). [More]

Scientists to study memory and learning in patients with Parkinson disease

Kessler Foundation scientists collaborated with colleagues in Spain to study memory and learning in patients with Parkinson Disease (PD). They found that the Parkinson group's ability to learn new information was significantly poorer when compared with the control group. [More]

Simvastatin may slow progression of multiple sclerosis

Results of a phase 2 study published in The Lancet suggest that simvastatin, a cheap cholesterol lowering drug, might be a potential treatment option for the secondary progressive, or chronic, stage of multiple sclerosis (MS), which is currently untreatable. [More]