Multiple Sclerosis News and Research RSS Feed - Multiple Sclerosis News and Research

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a severe autoimmune disease of the central nervous system that affects the brain and spinal cord, causing problems with muscle movement, balance and vision.

In MS, the protein coating called myelin, which protects nerves and helps electrical signals travel from the brain to the rest of the body, is damaged. The immune system, which usually fights infection, mistakes myelin for a foreign body and attacks it, stripping it from around the nerves. Exactly what causes this abnormal immune response is unclear, but research suggests a combination of both genetic and environmental factors.

The damaged myelin disrupts the transfer of nerve signals which may slow down, become distorted or stop altogether. This can cause severe symptoms ranging from vision loss through to muscle stiffness, loss of control over muscle movement, difficulties with balance and poor co-ordination.

Around 100,000 people in the UK have MS and it affects about three times as many women as men. The usual age at which diagnosis occurs is around 30, however, symptoms often first develop between the ages of 15 and 45.

Currently, there is no cure for MS but therapeutic approaches such as physiotherapy and steroid injections are used to manage the condition and ease symptoms.
Phase IIa clinical trial data of ATL1102 in MS patients published in journal Neurology

Phase IIa clinical trial data of ATL1102 in MS patients published in journal Neurology

Antisense Therapeutics is pleased to report the publication of previously generated Phase IIa clinical trial data on ATL1102 in the medical journal Neurology. [More]
People who experience migraine in middle age may develop movement disorders later in life

People who experience migraine in middle age may develop movement disorders later in life

A new study suggests that people who experience migraine in middle age may be more likely to develop Parkinson's disease, or other movement disorders later in life. Those who have migraine with aura may be at double the risk of developing Parkinson's, according to the study published in the September 17, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Study links slowed processing speed with executive deficits in individuals with multiple sclerosis

Study links slowed processing speed with executive deficits in individuals with multiple sclerosis

Kessler Foundation researchers have published a study supporting the role of slowed processing speed in the executive deficits found in individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS). [More]

Johns Hopkins Multiple Sclerosis Center receives MS research grant from Progressive Alliance

The Johns Hopkins Multiple Sclerosis Center is the recipient of one of 22 research grants offered to investigators in nine countries by the International Progressive MS Alliance, a worldwide collaborative focused on finding solutions to progressive forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). [More]
UC Irvine study sheds light on cognitive losses

UC Irvine study sheds light on cognitive losses

Brain inflammation can rapidly disrupt our ability to retrieve complex memories of similar but distinct experiences, according to UC Irvine neuroscientists Jennifer Czerniawski and John Guzowski. [More]
Synthetic Biologics' SYN-005 antibody gets FDA Orphan Drug designation for Pertussis treatment

Synthetic Biologics' SYN-005 antibody gets FDA Orphan Drug designation for Pertussis treatment

Synthetic Biologics, Inc., a biotechnology company developing novel anti-infective biologic and drug programs targeting specific pathogens that cause serious infections and diseases, announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted Orphan Drug designation to the Company's proprietary SYN-005 monoclonal antibody (mAb) combination for the treatment of Pertussis, more commonly known as whooping cough. [More]
Research gives scientists new insight into evolution of gibbon genome

Research gives scientists new insight into evolution of gibbon genome

A team led by an Oregon Health & Science University researcher has sequenced and annotated the genome of the only ape whose DNA had yet to be sequenced - the gibbon, an endangered small ape that inhabits the tropical forests of Southeast Asia. [More]
Study looks at blood type and risk of cognitive impairment

Study looks at blood type and risk of cognitive impairment

People with blood type AB may be more likely to develop memory loss in later years than people with other blood types, according to a study published in the September 10, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Pollution in many cities threatens brain development in children

Pollution in many cities threatens brain development in children

Pollution in many cities threatens the brain development in children. Findings by University of Montana Professor Dr. Lilian Calder-n-Garcidue-as, MA, MD, Ph.D., and her team of researchers reveal that children living in megacities are at increased risk for brain inflammation and neurodegenerative changes, including Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease. [More]
Working memory may be underlying mechanism of cognitive reserve in MS

Working memory may be underlying mechanism of cognitive reserve in MS

Kessler Foundation scientists have shown that working memory may be an underlying mechanism of cognitive reserve in multiple sclerosis (MS). [More]
People with multiple sclerosis lose myelin in gray matter

People with multiple sclerosis lose myelin in gray matter

People with multiple sclerosis (MS) lose myelin in the gray matter of their brains and the loss is closely correlated with the severity of the disease, according to a new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study. [More]
Transparency Life receives SBIR program grant to fund Phase 2a proof-of-concept study for MS

Transparency Life receives SBIR program grant to fund Phase 2a proof-of-concept study for MS

Transparency Life Sciences, LLC (TLS), the world's first clinical-stage drug development company based on open innovation, today announced that it has received a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program grant to fund a Phase 2a proof-of-concept study testing the utility of the ACE inhibitor lisinopril as an adjunctive therapy for multiple sclerosis (MS). [More]
Findings may help develop biomarkers to identify HIV patients at risk of dementia

Findings may help develop biomarkers to identify HIV patients at risk of dementia

Since the introduction of the combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART) in the mid-90s, the life expectancy of HIV patients has significantly improved. As a result, long-term complications are becoming more relevant: almost every second HIV patient is affected by neurocognitive disorders, which can lead to dementia. [More]
Study investigates whether function of intestines attacked in MS

Study investigates whether function of intestines attacked in MS

The present study investigates whether the function of the intestines is also attacked in MS. The results, obtained from a disease model of MS in mice, shows inflammation and changes in the barrier function of the intestines early in the course of the disease. [More]
Researchers examine link between sleep difficulties and brain volume

Researchers examine link between sleep difficulties and brain volume

Sleep difficulties may be linked to faster rates of decline in brain volume, according to a study published in the September 3, 2014, online issue of Neurology-, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Scientists make important breakthrough in fight against debilitating autoimmune diseases

Scientists make important breakthrough in fight against debilitating autoimmune diseases

Scientists have made an important breakthrough in the fight against debilitating autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis by revealing how to stop cells attacking healthy body tissue. [More]
Yoga program for MS patients improves physical and mental well-being

Yoga program for MS patients improves physical and mental well-being

Paula Meltzer was only 38 when out of nowhere everything she looked at was blurry. For the single mother, who had a lucrative career as a gemologist and spent hours examining valuable pieces of jewelry, it seemed as if - in a split second - her life changed. [More]
ANP reports primary efficacy results from ATL1103 Phase II trial in patients with acromegaly

ANP reports primary efficacy results from ATL1103 Phase II trial in patients with acromegaly

Antisense Therapeutics Limited is pleased to report the primary efficacy results from its Phase II clinical trial of ATL1103 in patients with the potentially life threatening growth disorder, acromegaly. [More]
Synthetic announces positive results from final preclinical toxicology study of SYN-004

Synthetic announces positive results from final preclinical toxicology study of SYN-004

Synthetic Biologics, Inc., a developer of novel anti-infective biologic and drug candidates targeting specific pathogens that cause serious infections and diseases, announced today positive results from its final preclinical toxicology study of SYN-004. [More]
MS study uses fNIRS to examine brain activation during working memory task

MS study uses fNIRS to examine brain activation during working memory task

Using functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), Kessler Foundation researchers have shown differential brain activation patterns between people with multiple sclerosis (MS) and healthy controls. [More]