Multiple Sclerosis News and Research RSS Feed - Multiple Sclerosis News and Research

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a severe autoimmune disease of the central nervous system that affects the brain and spinal cord, causing problems with muscle movement, balance and vision.

In MS, the protein coating called myelin, which protects nerves and helps electrical signals travel from the brain to the rest of the body, is damaged. The immune system, which usually fights infection, mistakes myelin for a foreign body and attacks it, stripping it from around the nerves. Exactly what causes this abnormal immune response is unclear, but research suggests a combination of both genetic and environmental factors.

The damaged myelin disrupts the transfer of nerve signals which may slow down, become distorted or stop altogether. This can cause severe symptoms ranging from vision loss through to muscle stiffness, loss of control over muscle movement, difficulties with balance and poor co-ordination.

Around 100,000 people in the UK have MS and it affects about three times as many women as men. The usual age at which diagnosis occurs is around 30, however, symptoms often first develop between the ages of 15 and 45.

Currently, there is no cure for MS but therapeutic approaches such as physiotherapy and steroid injections are used to manage the condition and ease symptoms.
Treatment with natalizumab in patients with MS appears linked with JC virus infection

Treatment with natalizumab in patients with MS appears linked with JC virus infection

Treatment with natalizumab in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) appears linked with JC virus (JCV) infection, which can lead to a rare and often fatal demyelinating disease of the central nervous system called progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) that destroys the myelin that protects nerve cells. [More]
Certain drugs in Obamacare plans carry hefty pricetags

Certain drugs in Obamacare plans carry hefty pricetags

Insurers selling Obamacare plans have set drug prices according to a tiered system that in some cases requires consumers to pay as much as 50 percent of the cost, The Associated Press writes. [More]
First Edition: March 24, 2013

First Edition: March 24, 2013

Today's early morning highlights from the major news organizations examine the final week for health law enrollment, the Supreme Court case this week about the law's contraceptive mandate and the fourth anniversary of the enactment of the controversial overhaul. [More]
Antisense Therapeutics enrolls acromegalic patients in ATL1103 Phase II trial

Antisense Therapeutics enrolls acromegalic patients in ATL1103 Phase II trial

Antisense Therapeutics Limited is pleased to report that 24 acromegalic patients have been successfully enrolled and randomized to one of the two treatment regimens of dosing in the Phase II trial of ATL1103 for the growth disorder, acromegaly. This satisfies the necessary patient numbers proposed for the trial. [More]
Biogen Idec's ALPROLIX gets Health Canada approval for hemophilia B

Biogen Idec's ALPROLIX gets Health Canada approval for hemophilia B

Today Biogen Idec announced that Health Canada has approved ALPROLIX [Coagulation Factor IX (Recombinant), Fc Fusion Protein], for the control and prevention of bleeding episodes and routine prophylaxis in adults, and children aged 12 and older, with hemophilia B. [More]
Brazil's ANVISA approves Genzyme's Lemtrada for multiple sclerosis treatment

Brazil's ANVISA approves Genzyme's Lemtrada for multiple sclerosis treatment

Genzyme, a Sanofi company, announced today that Brazil's national health surveillance agency, ANVISA, has approved Lemtrada (alemtuzumab) for the treatment of patients with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS) to slow or reverse the accumulation of physical disability and reduce the frequency of clinical exacerbations. [More]
People who develop diabetes in middle age are more likely to have brain cell loss in old age

People who develop diabetes in middle age are more likely to have brain cell loss in old age

People who develop diabetes and high blood pressure in middle age are more likely to have brain cell loss and other damage to the brain, as well as problems with memory and thinking skills, than people who never have diabetes or high blood pressure or who develop it in old age, according to a new study published in the March 19, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
New weapon against secondary progressive MS

New weapon against secondary progressive MS

Statins may provide doctors with an unlikely new weapon with which to slow the progression of multiple sclerosis (MS). [More]
Scientists to study memory and learning in patients with Parkinson disease

Scientists to study memory and learning in patients with Parkinson disease

Kessler Foundation scientists collaborated with colleagues in Spain to study memory and learning in patients with Parkinson Disease (PD). They found that the Parkinson group's ability to learn new information was significantly poorer when compared with the control group. [More]
Simvastatin may slow progression of multiple sclerosis

Simvastatin may slow progression of multiple sclerosis

Results of a phase 2 study published in The Lancet suggest that simvastatin, a cheap cholesterol lowering drug, might be a potential treatment option for the secondary progressive, or chronic, stage of multiple sclerosis (MS), which is currently untreatable. [More]

Ipsen: Dysport Phase IIa clinical trial effective in treatment of NDO

Ipsen (Paris:IPN) (Euronext: IPN; ADR: IPSEY) today announced positive results from its phase IIa clinical trial assessing Dysport in the treatment of Neurogenic Detrusor Overactivity (NDO) in patients with urinary incontinence not adequately managed by anticholinergics. [More]

Elevated body temperature linked to fatigue in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis

Kessler Foundation researchers have demonstrated for the first time ever that body temperature is elevated endogenously in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) and linked to worse fatigue. The article was published ahead of print on Feb. 21, 2014 in Archives of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation. Sumowski J, Leavitt V: Body temperature is elevated and linked to fatigue in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, even without heat exposure. [More]
Biologists discover WBC moves to inflamed sites by walking in a stepwise manner

Biologists discover WBC moves to inflamed sites by walking in a stepwise manner

A team of biologists and engineers at the University of California, San Diego has discovered that white blood cells, which repair damaged tissue as part of the body's immune response, move to inflamed sites by walking in a stepwise manner. [More]

PD-L1 plays important role in pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis

Experimental allergic encephalomyelitis is a mouse model of human multiple sclerosis with similar pathology and pathogenesis. Th1 cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis. [More]

Viewpoints: 'Middlling news' on enrollment; 'secret mandate exemption;' Obama's surprising appearance between two ferns

By the beginning of the month, 4.2 million people had selected a plan. But that doesn't mean they have insurance. Reporters on a conference call asked about the number who had paid, and the administration's representatives said they don't know. [More]

People with prehypertension more likely to develop stroke

Anyone with blood pressure that's higher than the optimal 120/80 mmHg may be more likely to have a stroke, according to a new meta-analysis published in the March 12, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Gut bacteria and blood cell development relationship helps immune system fight infection

Gut bacteria and blood cell development relationship helps immune system fight infection

The human relationship with microbial life is complicated. At almost any supermarket, you can pick up both antibacterial soap and probiotic yogurt during the same shopping trip. [More]

Perrigo launches methazolamide tablets

Perrigo Company today announced that it has launched, through a distribution and supply agreement, methazolamide tablets, the generic equivalent to Neptazane tablets. This product is a component of the contingent rights Perrigo received in connection with its acquisition of a portfolio of ophthalmic products from Fera Pharmaceuticals, LLC and its affiliates in June of last year. [More]

Aptel Research releases newest report Patient Voices Series Rheumatoid Arthritis

Aptel Research, a specialty marketing research and consulting company that provides actionable strategic insights to the pharmaceutical and biotech industries, released its newest report Patient Voices Series Rheumatoid Arthritis (US). [More]
Neuroscientist hopes to paint fuller picture of minds and bodies in Neuroscape lab

Neuroscientist hopes to paint fuller picture of minds and bodies in Neuroscape lab

How does an autistic child take in information when he sits in a classroom abuzz with social activity? How long does it take someone with multiple sclerosis, which slows activity in the brain, to process the light bouncing off the windshield while she drives? [More]