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CannaCure Florida offers medical cannabis educational conference following legalization of marijuana

CannaCure Florida offers medical cannabis educational conference following legalization of marijuana

CannaCure Florida is proudly offering the most comprehensive medical cannabis educational conference following passage of Florida Amendment 2 legalizing medical marijuana. [More]
Statistical analysis reveals possible scientific misconduct in some bone health studies

Statistical analysis reveals possible scientific misconduct in some bone health studies

A new study suggests probable scientific misconduct in at least some of 33 bone health trials published in various medical journals. [More]
New, practical tool may help doctors to easily diagnose cachexia in cancer patients

New, practical tool may help doctors to easily diagnose cachexia in cancer patients

About one third of cancer patients die because of cachexia - an involuntary weight loss, characterized primarily by muscle wasting and metabolic changes, which cannot be addressed or treated solely with increased food intake. [More]
FDA approves expanded use of systemic therapy for treating chronic moderate-to-severe pediatric psoriasis

FDA approves expanded use of systemic therapy for treating chronic moderate-to-severe pediatric psoriasis

Amgen today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the supplemental Biologics License Application for the expanded use of ENBREL (etanercept), making it the first and only systemic therapy to treat pediatric patients (ages 4-17) with chronic moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis. [More]
Lack of brain shrinkage may help identify people at risk for dementia with Lewy bodies

Lack of brain shrinkage may help identify people at risk for dementia with Lewy bodies

A lack of shrinkage in the area of the brain responsible for memory may be a sign that people with thinking and memory problems may go on to develop dementia with Lewy bodies rather than Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study published in the November 2, 2016, online issue of Neurology, a medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust sees huge increase in clinical research

Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust sees huge increase in clinical research

Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust has seen one of the biggest rises in the number of research studies it is offering to its patients, according to a national league table of NHS research activity published by the National Institute for Health Research Clinical Research Network today (Tuesday 26 October). [More]
Researchers develop novel tool to predict person's chance of survival after gunshot wounds

Researchers develop novel tool to predict person's chance of survival after gunshot wounds

Researchers have developed a first-of-its-kind tool to help predict a person's chance of survival after a gunshot wound in the head or other penetrating injury, according to a new study published in the October 26, 2016, online issue of Neurology, a medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
New technique shows promise for therapeutic reversal of food allergies

New technique shows promise for therapeutic reversal of food allergies

"This discovery reverses food allergies in mice, and we have many people with allergies volunteering their own cells for us to use in lab testing to move this research forward," said professor John Gordon, lead scientist behind the discovery just published in the current issue of the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. [More]
Salk researchers develop new computer program to measure blepharosplasm severity

Salk researchers develop new computer program to measure blepharosplasm severity

If two clinicians observe the same patient with blepharospasm -- uncontrollable muscle contractions around the eye -- they'll often come away with two different conclusions on the severity of the patient's symptoms. [More]
Oligodendrocytes selectively myelinate specific set of neuronal axons, research shows

Oligodendrocytes selectively myelinate specific set of neuronal axons, research shows

There are three kinds of glial cells in the brain, oligodendrocyte, astrocyte and microglia. Oligodendrocytes myelinate neuronal axons to increase conduction velocity of neuronal impulses. [More]
Two leading non-profit organizations sign strategic affiliation to hasten drug development

Two leading non-profit organizations sign strategic affiliation to hasten drug development

The Scripps Research Institute and the California Institute for Biomedical Research - two leading non-profit research organizations - today announced the signing of a strategic affiliation that combines the two organizations into a new biomedical research entity with the tools and know-how to rapidly translate its scientific discoveries into life-saving medicines for the public benefit. [More]
TUM scientists uncover novel mechanisms of action for skin disease medication

TUM scientists uncover novel mechanisms of action for skin disease medication

Imiquimod is a medication successfully used in the treatment of skin diseases. In addition to its known mechanism of action, it also triggers other processes in the body. [More]
Einstein researchers awarded $2.6 million NIH grant to develop effective cancer immunotherapies

Einstein researchers awarded $2.6 million NIH grant to develop effective cancer immunotherapies

The National Institutes of Health has awarded two co-investigators at Albert Einstein College of Medicine a five-year, $2.6 million grant to make immunotherapy agents that more precisely and effectively treat a variety of cancers while causing far fewer side effects than current immunotherapies. [More]
Exercise may benefit elderly people with memory and thinking problems

Exercise may benefit elderly people with memory and thinking problems

Exercise may be associated with a small benefit for elderly people who already have memory and thinking problems, according to new research published in the October 19, 2016, online issue of Neurology, a medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
PathMaker Neurosystems receives 2016 Universal Biotech Innovation Prize

PathMaker Neurosystems receives 2016 Universal Biotech Innovation Prize

PathMaker Neurosystems, a clinical-stage neurotechnology company developing non-invasive neurotherapy systems to treat neuromotor disorders, has been named as the Recipient of the Universal Biotech Innovation Prize 2016 in the global competition that offers "a glimpse of the future of life sciences." [More]
Portsmouth scientist wins major award to develop treatments for MS patients

Portsmouth scientist wins major award to develop treatments for MS patients

A University of Portsmouth scientist has won almost £180,000 to fund research that could help develop treatments for multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. [More]
First comprehensive center opened in Tri-State area to mark new era in care of DMD patients

First comprehensive center opened in Tri-State area to mark new era in care of DMD patients

Nearly 1,000 boys in the New York Tri-State area have been diagnosed with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) and, until now, had to travel out of the state for comprehensive care. [More]
Adapta Medical receives FDA market clearance for touchless urinary catheter

Adapta Medical receives FDA market clearance for touchless urinary catheter

Adapta Medical, Inc. has received FDA market release for the PerfIC Cath intermittent touchless urinary catheter. The sterile catheter system was designed by J. Glen House, MD, a C7 quadriplegic with limited finger dexterity. [More]
Women may have better verbal memory skills than men during early stages of Alzheimer's disease

Women may have better verbal memory skills than men during early stages of Alzheimer's disease

Women may have better verbal memory skills than men even when their brains show the same level of problems metabolizing glucose, which occurs in people with Alzheimer's disease, according to research published in the October 5, 2016, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Structural instability in myelin membranes may instigate multiple sclerosis

Structural instability in myelin membranes may instigate multiple sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis is one of the most devastating neurodegenerative diseases. It affects some 2.5 million people worldwide. It has no known cure. [More]
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