Multiple Sclerosis News and Research RSS Feed - Multiple Sclerosis News and Research

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a severe autoimmune disease of the central nervous system that affects the brain and spinal cord, causing problems with muscle movement, balance and vision.

In MS, the protein coating called myelin, which protects nerves and helps electrical signals travel from the brain to the rest of the body, is damaged. The immune system, which usually fights infection, mistakes myelin for a foreign body and attacks it, stripping it from around the nerves. Exactly what causes this abnormal immune response is unclear, but research suggests a combination of both genetic and environmental factors.

The damaged myelin disrupts the transfer of nerve signals which may slow down, become distorted or stop altogether. This can cause severe symptoms ranging from vision loss through to muscle stiffness, loss of control over muscle movement, difficulties with balance and poor co-ordination.

Around 100,000 people in the UK have MS and it affects about three times as many women as men. The usual age at which diagnosis occurs is around 30, however, symptoms often first develop between the ages of 15 and 45.

Currently, there is no cure for MS but therapeutic approaches such as physiotherapy and steroid injections are used to manage the condition and ease symptoms.
Researchers discover how neurons help learn new motor skills

Researchers discover how neurons help learn new motor skills

It takes a surprisingly small cluster of brain cells deep within the cerebellum to learn how to serve a tennis ball or line up a hockey shot. Researchers at McGill University led by Kathleen Cullen from the Department of Physiology have discovered that to learn new motor skills, neurons within the cerebellum engage in elegant, virtually mathematical, computations to quickly compare expected and actual sensory feedback. They then quickly readjust, changing the strength of connections between other neurons to form new patterns in the brain in order to accomplish the task at hand. [More]
New MS therapies associated with risks and side effects, require active management strategy

New MS therapies associated with risks and side effects, require active management strategy

Advances in the treatment of Multiple Sclerosis have been good news for patients, but side effects and risks mean that an active management strategy and constant monitoring are essential. [More]
New national survey finds lack of COPD knowledge among patients

New national survey finds lack of COPD knowledge among patients

In a new national survey of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, Health Union reveals a surprising lack of awareness of risk factors and knowledge of diagnosis stage among patients. Results demonstrate a severe impact on quality of life, employment, and ability to afford treatment. [More]
Study reveals new way to help medical students learn about Alzheimer's disease

Study reveals new way to help medical students learn about Alzheimer's disease

With the growing number of people with Alzheimer's disease, understanding their care is vital for doctors. Yet medical students often just learn the facts and may only see people with advanced disease who are at the hospital or nursing home. A study shows a new way to help medical students learn about the disease—at the art museum. [More]
Lidocaine benefits breast cancer survivors who experience pain during intercourse

Lidocaine benefits breast cancer survivors who experience pain during intercourse

Scientists at Oregon Health & Science University report that breast cancer survivors who experience pain during sexual intercourse, a common side effect of breast cancer treatment, may achieve comfort when liquid lidocaine is applied strategically to prevent pain. [More]
Multiple sclerosis relapse management: an interview with Gina Remington

Multiple sclerosis relapse management: an interview with Gina Remington

MS relapses are typically reflective of new neurological symptoms. However, it can be a worsening of neurologic symptoms that begins after a patient has been stable (generally for about 30 days), but relapses are persistent and consistent changes in symptoms that occur for more than 24 to 48 hours. [More]
New research shows concussion may affect men and women differently

New research shows concussion may affect men and women differently

New research suggests concussion may not significantly impair symptoms or cognitive skills for one gender over another, however, women may still experience greater symptoms and poorer cognitive performance at preseason testing. [More]
Migraines may increase risk of stroke among smokers

Migraines may increase risk of stroke among smokers

New research suggests older people who experience migraines may have an increased risk of stroke, but only if they are smokers. The study is published in the July 22, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Study examines possible new approaches to improve health and quality of life for people with MS

Study examines possible new approaches to improve health and quality of life for people with MS

The physical symptoms of weakness and fatigue from multiple sclerosis (MS) can rock a person's confidence and ability to engage in what he or she feels is important, from being a good parent and friend to taking up a hobby, according to Matthew Plow, assistant professor from Case Western Reserve University's Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing. [More]

Perrigo signs agreement to acquire Naturwohl Pharma

Perrigo Company plc today announced that it has entered into an agreement to acquire Naturwohl Pharma GmbH with its leading German dietary supplement brand, Yokebe. The brand is expected to generate approximately €30 million in full year 2015 net sales. [More]
ICER’s drug assessment program to provide trusted source of information about new drugs

ICER’s drug assessment program to provide trusted source of information about new drugs

With drug prices for cancer and many other conditions soaring to new highs amid questions about their true value to patients, the Institute for Clinical and Economic Review today launched a program to transform the way new drugs are evaluated and priced in the United States. [More]
Children recover well from acute central nervous system demyelination

Children recover well from acute central nervous system demyelination

Most children can expect a good and quick physical recovery following acute central nervous system demyelination, study findings suggest. [More]
New study shows cannabinoid cannabidiol can help heal bone fractures

New study shows cannabinoid cannabidiol can help heal bone fractures

Cannabis -- marijuana, hashish -- was used as a go-to medical remedy by societies around the world for centuries. But the therapeutic use of marijuana was banned in most countries in the 1930s and '40s due to a growing awareness of the dangers of addiction. The significant medical benefits of marijuana in alleviating symptoms of such diseases as Parkinson's, cancer, and multiple sclerosis have only recently been reinvestigated. [More]
Transcranial magnetic stimulation holds promise for tinnitus patients

Transcranial magnetic stimulation holds promise for tinnitus patients

In the largest U.S. clinical trial of its kind funded by the Veterans Affairs Rehabilitation Research and Development Service, researchers at the VA Portland Medical Center and Oregon Health & Science University found that transcranial magnetic stimulation significantly improved tinnitus symptoms for more than half of study participants. [More]
Kessler Foundation, University of Bordeaux team up to study emotional processing deficits in MS people

Kessler Foundation, University of Bordeaux team up to study emotional processing deficits in MS people

Kessler Foundation received $65,500 as part of a two-year $140,000 grant from the ARSEP Foundation of France to the University of Bordeaux, to launch a collaborative study of emotional processing deficits in people with multiple sclerosis (MS). Helen Genova, Ph.D., and Jean Lengenfelder, Ph.D., of Kessler Foundation and Bruno Brochet, M.D., Ph.D., of the University of Bordeaux are the principal investigators. [More]
Psychosocial factors linked to pain in multiple sclerosis

Psychosocial factors linked to pain in multiple sclerosis

Psychosocial factors are important and potentially modifiable determinants of persistent pain in patients with multiple sclerosis who are taking pain medication, research shows. [More]
Research breakthrough opens door to a world of regenerative medicine for treating mitochondrial disease

Research breakthrough opens door to a world of regenerative medicine for treating mitochondrial disease

A study led by Shoukhrat Mitalipov, Ph.D., and Hong Ma, M.D., Ph.D., at the Center for Embryonic Cell and Gene Therapy at Oregon Health & Science University and the Oregon National Primate Research Center has revealed the first critical step in developing novel gene and stem cell therapy treatments for patients with mitochondrial disease. [More]
UAB researchers find therapeutic target for treatment of acute spinal cord injuries

UAB researchers find therapeutic target for treatment of acute spinal cord injuries

UAB researchers have identified a therapeutic target for the treatment of acute spinal cord injuries. According to this research, conducted on mice, the administration of a drug that prevents loss of myelin - the insulating sheath around nerve fibres that allows signals to be transmitted - increases the mobility of the mice after an injury. [More]
Following restrictive sun exposure advice may be harmful to health

Following restrictive sun exposure advice may be harmful to health

Following restrictive sun exposure advice in countries with low solar intensity like Canada might in fact be harmful to your health, says the co-author of a new study on sunlight and vitamin D. [More]
Hiroshima University researchers reveal molecular mechanisms involved in neuropathic pain

Hiroshima University researchers reveal molecular mechanisms involved in neuropathic pain

A research group from Hiroshima University demonstrated that the downregulation of spinal astrocyte connexin43 (Cx43) expression causes sustained neuropathic pain following peripheral nerve injury. Controlling the Cx43 expression using pharmacological approaches or gene therapy might serve as novel therapeutic strategies ameliorate neurological disorders in general and neuropathic pain in particular. [More]
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