Multiple Sclerosis News and Research RSS Feed - Multiple Sclerosis News and Research

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a severe autoimmune disease of the central nervous system that affects the brain and spinal cord, causing problems with muscle movement, balance and vision.

In MS, the protein coating called myelin, which protects nerves and helps electrical signals travel from the brain to the rest of the body, is damaged. The immune system, which usually fights infection, mistakes myelin for a foreign body and attacks it, stripping it from around the nerves. Exactly what causes this abnormal immune response is unclear, but research suggests a combination of both genetic and environmental factors.

The damaged myelin disrupts the transfer of nerve signals which may slow down, become distorted or stop altogether. This can cause severe symptoms ranging from vision loss through to muscle stiffness, loss of control over muscle movement, difficulties with balance and poor co-ordination.

Around 100,000 people in the UK have MS and it affects about three times as many women as men. The usual age at which diagnosis occurs is around 30, however, symptoms often first develop between the ages of 15 and 45.

Currently, there is no cure for MS but therapeutic approaches such as physiotherapy and steroid injections are used to manage the condition and ease symptoms.
Researchers give new, unprecedented 3-D view of most important brain receptors

Researchers give new, unprecedented 3-D view of most important brain receptors

Researchers with Oregon Health & Science University's Vollum Institute have given science a new and unprecedented 3-D view of one of the most important receptors in the brain - a receptor that allows us to learn and remember, and whose dysfunction is involved in a wide range of neurological diseases and conditions, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, schizophrenia and depression. [More]
Veterans with traumatic brain injury more likely to develop dementia in later life

Veterans with traumatic brain injury more likely to develop dementia in later life

Older veterans who have experienced a traumatic brain injury (TBI) are 60 percent more likely to later develop dementia than veterans without TBI, according to a study published in the June 25, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
SLU researchers discover pain pathway and potential way to block it

SLU researchers discover pain pathway and potential way to block it

In a recently published study in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, Saint Louis University professor of pharmacological and physiological sciences Daniela Salvemini, Ph.D. describes two discoveries: a molecular pathway by which a painful chemotherapy side effect happens and a drug that may be able to stop it. [More]
XenoPort initiates XP23829 Phase 2 clinical trial in patients with psoriasis

XenoPort initiates XP23829 Phase 2 clinical trial in patients with psoriasis

XenoPort, Inc. announced today that it has initiated a Phase 2 clinical trial of XP23829, its proprietary investigational next-generation fumaric acid product candidate. The trial is a multi-center, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study designed to assess the efficacy and safety of XP23829 as a potential treatment of patients with moderate-to-severe chronic plaque-type psoriasis. [More]
Perrigo, Catalent settle Proair HFA patent case with Teva

Perrigo, Catalent settle Proair HFA patent case with Teva

Perrigo Company plc and its partner, Catalent, announced today that they have settled their first to file Hatch Waxman litigation with Teva with respect to a generic version of Proair HFA. [More]
N.Y. lawmakers reach medical marijuana deal

N.Y. lawmakers reach medical marijuana deal

The agreement would allow doctors to prescribe it for a half-dozen medical conditions, but some lawmakers say the deal was more limited than they had hoped. [More]
First Edition: June 20, 2014

First Edition: June 20, 2014

Today's early morning highlights from the major news organizations, including reports about a new poll of showing a majority of those signing up for marketplace plans had been uninsured before and the Obama administration's decision to extend marriage benefits, including family leave, to same-sex couples. [More]
New research reveals gene's role in type 1 diabetes

New research reveals gene's role in type 1 diabetes

New research describes details of how a diabetes-related gene functions on a biological pathway that affects the release of insulin. The study authors say that finding drugs that act on that pathway may eventually lead to a new treatment for type 1 diabetes. [More]
Apitope starts preclinical development of ATX-GD-459 for Graves' disease treatment

Apitope starts preclinical development of ATX-GD-459 for Graves' disease treatment

Apitope, the drug discovery and development company focused on disease-modifying treatments for patients with autoimmune and allergic diseases, announced today that it has started preclinical development of its novel peptide therapy ATX-GD-459 for the treatment of Graves' disease. [More]
People with muscle diseases may benefit more from group doctor visits

People with muscle diseases may benefit more from group doctor visits

A new study suggests that people with muscle diseases such as muscular dystrophies may benefit more from group doctor visits than individual appointments. The study is published in the June 18, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
A new approach to treating whipworm infections

A new approach to treating whipworm infections

Researchers have deduced essential biological and genetic information from the genome sequence of the whipworm, an intestinal parasitic worm that infects hundreds of millions of people in developing countries. [More]
Pig whipworm genome could lead to new treatment options for human diseases

Pig whipworm genome could lead to new treatment options for human diseases

New treatments for inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, diabetes and autism could be on the horizon, after a global University of Melbourne - lead study successfully mapped the genes of a parasitic worm in pigs. [More]
Evolution of multiple sclerosis treatments: an interview with Mike Panzara, Head of MS & Neurology Clinical Development, Genzyme

Evolution of multiple sclerosis treatments: an interview with Mike Panzara, Head of MS & Neurology Clinical Development, Genzyme

The last 20 years have been defined by progress and innovation in the multiple sclerosis (MS) field, with now 10 approved treatment options available for people living with relapsing MS, the most common form of the disease. [More]
International researchers discover genetic component of Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy

International researchers discover genetic component of Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy

An international team of researchers has discovered a significant genetic component of Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy (IGE), the most common form of epilepsy. [More]
Type I interferons can block development of allergy- and asthma-driving Th2 cells

Type I interferons can block development of allergy- and asthma-driving Th2 cells

A mechanism that could underlie the development of cells that drive asthma and allergies has been uncovered by immunology researchers at UT-Southwestern Medical Center. [More]
Scientists identify novel approach to treating multiple sclerosis

Scientists identify novel approach to treating multiple sclerosis

Scientists in the University of Connecticut's Technology Incubation Program have identified a novel approach to treating multiple sclerosis (MS) using human embryonic stem cells, offering a promising new therapy for more than 2.3 million people suffering from the debilitating disease. [More]
High-protein diets lower stroke risk

High-protein diets lower stroke risk

People with diets higher in protein, especially from fish, may be less likely to have a stroke than those with diets lower in protein, according to a meta-analysis published in the June 11, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
New research collaboration aims to develop better therapies for autoimmune diseases

New research collaboration aims to develop better therapies for autoimmune diseases

Seattle Children's Research Institute and biotechnology company Kineta, Inc. today launched the Alliance for Children's Therapeutics (ACT), a first-of-its-kind pediatric research and funding collaboration designed to speed development of new medications for children and teens with lupus nephritis and other autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis, Type 1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis. [More]
Synthetic, Enterome partner to study effects of beta-lactam antibiotics on gastrointestinal microflora

Synthetic, Enterome partner to study effects of beta-lactam antibiotics on gastrointestinal microflora

Synthetic Biologics, Inc., a developer of novel anti-infective biologic and drug candidates targeting specific pathogens that cause serious infections and diseases, and Enterome Bioscience SA, a pioneer in the development of innovative disease management solutions based on a deep understanding of the gut microbiome, today announced that they have entered into an agreement to conduct metagenomic research on the effects of beta-lactam antibiotics on the gastrointestinal microflora (microbiome) of human patients. [More]
Urinary symptom screening tool validated for female OAB

Urinary symptom screening tool validated for female OAB

The Actionable Bladder Symptom Screening Tool is a reliable, valid and sensitive instrument in women with incontinence due to non-neurogenic overactive bladder, researchers report. [More]