Multiple Sclerosis News and Research RSS Feed - Multiple Sclerosis News and Research

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a severe autoimmune disease of the central nervous system that affects the brain and spinal cord, causing problems with muscle movement, balance and vision.

In MS, the protein coating called myelin, which protects nerves and helps electrical signals travel from the brain to the rest of the body, is damaged. The immune system, which usually fights infection, mistakes myelin for a foreign body and attacks it, stripping it from around the nerves. Exactly what causes this abnormal immune response is unclear, but research suggests a combination of both genetic and environmental factors.

The damaged myelin disrupts the transfer of nerve signals which may slow down, become distorted or stop altogether. This can cause severe symptoms ranging from vision loss through to muscle stiffness, loss of control over muscle movement, difficulties with balance and poor co-ordination.

Around 100,000 people in the UK have MS and it affects about three times as many women as men. The usual age at which diagnosis occurs is around 30, however, symptoms often first develop between the ages of 15 and 45.

Currently, there is no cure for MS but therapeutic approaches such as physiotherapy and steroid injections are used to manage the condition and ease symptoms.
Hepatitis C virus linked to increased risk of developing Parkinson's disease

Hepatitis C virus linked to increased risk of developing Parkinson's disease

The hepatitis C virus may be associated with an increased risk of developing Parkinson's disease, according to a study published in the December 23, 2015, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Novoron Bioscience receives NIH grant to study novel therapeutic approach for multiple sclerosis

Novoron Bioscience receives NIH grant to study novel therapeutic approach for multiple sclerosis

Novoron Bioscience, Inc., a private biotech company dedicated to developing new therapeutics for disorders of the central nervous system, today announced that the company has been awarded a National Institutes of Health grant under the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program. [More]
GeNeuro initiates GNbAC1 Phase IIb study in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

GeNeuro initiates GNbAC1 Phase IIb study in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

GeNeuro SA, a pioneer of new therapies for neurology and autoimmune disorders, announced today that it has initiated its planned Phase IIb study “CHANGE-MS” (Clinical trial assessing the HERV-W Env ANtagonist GNbAC1 for Efficacy in Multiple Sclerosis) with its lead antibody GNbAC1 in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis (RRMS). [More]
Perrigo to acquire generic Retin-A portfolio from Matawan Pharmaceuticals

Perrigo to acquire generic Retin-A portfolio from Matawan Pharmaceuticals

Perrigo Company plc announced today that it will acquire a portfolio of generic dosage forms and strengths of Retin-A (tretinoin) from Matawan Pharmaceuticals, LLC. Perrigo was the authorized generic distributor of these products from 2005 to 2013 before the agreement was terminated. [More]
Epilepsy deaths should be considered a public health priority, say doctors

Epilepsy deaths should be considered a public health priority, say doctors

Epilepsy is not a public health priority, yet it takes more lives than sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) or fires, according to an article reviewing the topic. Doctors say epilepsy deaths should be a focus of research and education to understand and prevent those deaths, according to the "Views and Reviews" article published in the December 16, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Researchers identify how immune cells triggered by recurrent Strep A infections affect the brain

Researchers identify how immune cells triggered by recurrent Strep A infections affect the brain

Researchers have discovered how immune cells triggered by recurrent Strep A infections enter the brain, causing inflammation that may lead to autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders in children. [More]
U of T researchers find another clue in understanding the cause of MS

U of T researchers find another clue in understanding the cause of MS

Researchers at the University of Toronto have found another clue in understanding the cause of what drives Multiple Sclerosis (MS) disease. Their findings were published today in Immunity. [More]
Study: Brain cell death may trigger multiple sclerosis

Study: Brain cell death may trigger multiple sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis (MS) may be triggered by the death of brain cells that make myelin, the insulation around nerve fibers, according to research on a novel mouse model developed by scientists from the University of Chicago and Northwestern Medicine. The death of these cells initiates an autoimmune response against myelin, the main characteristic of the disease, which leads to MS-like symptoms in mice. [More]
United Spinal denounces Uber's new Washington, D.C. TAXI WHEELCHAIR option as inadequate, unsustainable

United Spinal denounces Uber's new Washington, D.C. TAXI WHEELCHAIR option as inadequate, unsustainable

United Spinal Association, today denounced Uber's new Washington, D.C. TAXI 'WHEELCHAIR' option that enables riders to request a wheelchair accessible taxi on-demand as "inadequate and unsustainable." [More]
Identifying and avoiding wasteful or unnecessary medical tests

Identifying and avoiding wasteful or unnecessary medical tests

Too many tests at the doctor's office could cost you more than just dollars. In addition to the huge hit to your wallet, there's also the potential harm of false positives, and just because a test has traditionally been done for a condition doesn't mean it's the best way to treat it. [More]
Designing epidemiologic study for multiple sclerosis and other neurologic diseases in Gulf War Vets

Designing epidemiologic study for multiple sclerosis and other neurologic diseases in Gulf War Vets

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs requested that the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine conduct a study to respond to Public Law 110-389 to determine the incidence, prevalence, and risk of developing multiple sclerosis and other neurologic diseases -- including migraines, Parkinson's disease, brain cancers, and central nervous system abnormalities difficult to diagnose precisely -- as a result of service in the 1990-1991 Persian Gulf and post 9/11 Global Operations theaters. [More]

Understanding different forms of MS may lead to better therapeutic approaches, treatments

Understanding the boundaries between relapsing and progressive multiple sclerosis is essential to finding better therapeutic approaches and treatments for patients living with MS, according to Jerry S. Wolinsky, M.D., of the University of Texas in Houston. [More]
NEK7 enzyme acts as on-off switch in innate immune system

NEK7 enzyme acts as on-off switch in innate immune system

UT Southwestern Medical Center and California researchers today provide the first report that an enzyme previously known solely for its role in cell division also acts as an on-off switch in the innate immune system -- the body's first defense against infection. [More]
Phase II study hints at oestriol effect in multiple sclerosis

Phase II study hints at oestriol effect in multiple sclerosis

Oestriol, given in combination with glatiramer acetate, may reduce the risk of relapse in women with relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis, suggest findings from a phase II trial. [More]
Synthetic Biologics announces positive results from first SYN-004 Phase 2a study for prevention of CDI, AAD

Synthetic Biologics announces positive results from first SYN-004 Phase 2a study for prevention of CDI, AAD

Synthetic Biologics, Inc.), a clinical stage company focused on developing therapeutics to protect the gut microbiome while targeting pathogen specific diseases, announced positive topline results from the first Phase 2a study of SYN-004, the Company's candidate designed to protect the gut microbiome from the unintended effects of certain commonly used intravenous (IV) beta-lactam antibiotics for the prevention C. difficile infection (CDI) and antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD). [More]
Taking estriol along with conventional medications helps RRMS patients avoid relapses

Taking estriol along with conventional medications helps RRMS patients avoid relapses

Taking the pregnancy hormone estriol along with their conventional medications helped patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) avoid relapses, according to results of a Phase II randomized, placebo-controlled study led by UCLA researchers. [More]
Johns Hopkins researchers develop method to turn stem cells into retinal ganglion cells

Johns Hopkins researchers develop method to turn stem cells into retinal ganglion cells

Johns Hopkins researchers have developed a method to efficiently turn human stem cells into retinal ganglion cells, the type of nerve cells located within the retina that transmit visual signals from the eye to the brain. Death and dysfunction of these cells cause vision loss in conditions like glaucoma and multiple sclerosis. [More]
Medical professionals compare different treatment methods for Neuromyelitis optica

Medical professionals compare different treatment methods for Neuromyelitis optica

In the course of a study conducted throughout Germany, medical professionals have compared different treatment methods for Neuromyelitis optica, an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system. It turned out that the best results were not achieved with conventional steroid therapy. Under the auspices of the Ruhr-Universität Bochum and the Hannover Medical School, the team published their findings in the journal Annals of Neurology. [More]
Medical professionals compare different treatment options for Neuromyelitis optica

Medical professionals compare different treatment options for Neuromyelitis optica

In the course of a study conducted throughout Germany, medical professionals have compared different treatment methods for Neuromyelitis optica, an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system. It turned out that the best results were not achieved with conventional steroid therapy. [More]
Chikungunya may cause severe brain infection

Chikungunya may cause severe brain infection

The mosquito-borne virus chikungunya may lead to severe brain infection and even death in infants and people over 65, according to a new study that reviewed a chikungunya outbreak on Reunion Island off the coast of Madagascar in 2005-2006. [More]
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