Nanoparticle News and Research RSS Feed - Nanoparticle News and Research

In nanotechnology, a particle is defined as a small object that behaves as a whole unit in terms of its transport and properties. It is further classified according to size: in terms of diameter, fine particles cover a range between 100 and 2500 nanometers, while ultrafine particles, on the other hand, are sized between 1 and 100 nanometers.
ZOTEN nanoparticles can help develop natural immunity against genital herpes

ZOTEN nanoparticles can help develop natural immunity against genital herpes

An effective vaccine against the virus that causes genital herpes has evaded researchers for decades. But now, researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago working with scientists from Germany have shown that zinc-oxide nanoparticles shaped like jacks can prevent the virus from entering cells, and help natural immunity to develop. [More]
Exposure to titanium dioxide nanoparticles increases bacterial infection of HeLa cells

Exposure to titanium dioxide nanoparticles increases bacterial infection of HeLa cells

When human cells are exposed to titanium dioxide without the presence of UV light from the sun, the risk for bacterial infection more than doubles. This finding by a Stony Brook University-led research team, published early online in the Journal of Nanobiotechnology, raises concerns about exposure to titanium dioxide, a nanoparticle commonly used in millions of products worldwide ranging from cosmetics to toothpaste, gum, food coloring, and medicines. [More]
Beckman Coulter Life Sciences’ Yong Chen recognized as AIMBE Fellow

Beckman Coulter Life Sciences’ Yong Chen recognized as AIMBE Fellow

One of the world’s leading organizations for medical and engineering innovation and discovery has elected Dr. Yong Chen, the Chief Technology Officer of Beckman Coulter Life Sciences, a Danaher company, to its College of Fellows. The American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering has honored Dr. Yong Chen in recognition of his work in the field of medical and engineering innovation and discovery. [More]
Next generation analytical ultracentrifuge to be launched by Beckman Coulter at Analytica

Next generation analytical ultracentrifuge to be launched by Beckman Coulter at Analytica

Beckman Coulter Life Sciences is to launch the new Optima AUC at this year’s Analytica: 25th International Trade Fair for Laboratory Technology, Analysis, Biotechnology and analytica conference, being held in Munich, Germany, from May 10-13, 2016. This next generation analytical ultracentrifuge has been developed with many enhanced capabilities. [More]
Novel nanoparticle drug delivery system for enhanced tumor penetration of cancer drugs

Novel nanoparticle drug delivery system for enhanced tumor penetration of cancer drugs

For more than a decade, biomedical researchers have been looking for better ways to deliver cancer-killing medication directly to tumors in the body. Tiny capsules, called nanoparticles, are now being used to transport chemotherapy medicine through the bloodstream, to the doorstep of cancerous tumors. [More]
Researchers develop new technique to study blood vessel inflammation

Researchers develop new technique to study blood vessel inflammation

Nanotechnology has led to better diagnostic techniques and more effective treatments for a variety of illnesses. Tiny devices measuring between 1 and 100 micrometers--one micrometer is equal to one millionth of a meter--enable scientists to observe cell activity and deliver drugs to individual cells--a breakthrough that is on the verge of revolutionizing precision medicine for treatment of diseases such as cancer. [More]
Scientists develop triple-stage 'cluster bomb' system to deliver cisplatin drug through nanoparticles

Scientists develop triple-stage 'cluster bomb' system to deliver cisplatin drug through nanoparticles

Scientists have devised a triple-stage "cluster bomb" system for delivering the chemotherapy drug cisplatin, via tiny nanoparticles designed to break up when they reach a tumor. [More]
Researchers demonstrate novel method for imaging engineered nanoparticles in tissues

Researchers demonstrate novel method for imaging engineered nanoparticles in tissues

As a testament to Governor Andrew Cuomo’s leadership in developing an unparalleled research and development ecosystem in New York State, Sara Brenner, MD, MPH and her colleagues at SUNY Polytechnic Institute (SUNY Poly), the George Washington School of Medicine and Health Sciences, and Stony Brook University have demonstrated a novel method for the rapid visualization and identification of engineered nanoparticles in tissues. [More]
Engineered HIV vaccine protein may prevent HIV infection

Engineered HIV vaccine protein may prevent HIV infection

Some people infected with HIV naturally produce antibodies that effectively neutralize many strains of the rapidly mutating virus, and scientists are working to develop a vaccine capable of inducing such "broadly neutralizing" antibodies that can prevent HIV infection. [More]
Researchers develop unique approach to track, label neural stem cells

Researchers develop unique approach to track, label neural stem cells

An overwhelming number of researchers still struggle within the black hole of the effectiveness and safety of stem cell therapy for neurological diseases. While the complexity of understanding how neurons grow, connect and function has long been studied, it remains a mystery, one that graduate student Forrest Goodfellow in the University of Georgia Regenerative Bioscience Center is helping unravel. [More]
Research confirms potential use of iron oxide nanoparticles in biomedical applications

Research confirms potential use of iron oxide nanoparticles in biomedical applications

Iron oxides are widespread in nature and can be readily synthesized in the laboratory. Among them, hematite, magnetite and maghemite nanoparticles have particularly promising properties for biomedical applications. [More]
New drug could transform treatment of metastatic triple negative breast cancer

New drug could transform treatment of metastatic triple negative breast cancer

A team of investigators from Houston Methodist Research Institute may have transformed the treatment of metastatic triple negative breast cancer by creating the first drug to successfully eliminate lung metastases in mice. [More]
Synthetic nanoparticle can light up and treat atherosclerotic plaques

Synthetic nanoparticle can light up and treat atherosclerotic plaques

Atherosclerosis, a disease in which plaque builds up inside arteries, is a prolific and invisible killer, but it may soon lose its ability to hide in the body and wreak havoc. Scientists have now developed a nanoparticle that functionally mimics nature's own high-density lipoprotein (HDL). The nanoparticle can simultaneously light up and treat atherosclerotic plaques that clog arteries. Therapy with this approach could someday help prevent deadly heart attacks and strokes. [More]
Delivering microRNAs in cancer treatment: an interview with Dr Conde and Prof Artzi

Delivering microRNAs in cancer treatment: an interview with Dr Conde and Prof Artzi

microRNAs (miRs) are small endogenous noncoding RNA molecules (20–23 nucleotides) derived from imperfectly paired hairpin RNA structures naturally encoded in the genome that act specifically as triggering molecules to control translational repression or mRNA degradation. [More]
Novel nanoparticle technology can decipher protein structures and help access drug targets

Novel nanoparticle technology can decipher protein structures and help access drug targets

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet, Sweden, have developed a nanoparticle technology that can be used to stabilise membrane proteins so that their structure can be studied in a lipid environment. The method, described in Nature Methods, makes it possible to access drug targets that previously could not be investigated and therefore potentially allows for the development of novel drugs, therapeutic antibodies and vaccines. [More]
Drug-incorporated nanoparticle platforms allow for selective targeting of cancer cells

Drug-incorporated nanoparticle platforms allow for selective targeting of cancer cells

Cancer is a group of diseases characterized by the uncontrolled growth and spread of abnormal cells. It is a leading cause of death and the burden is expected to grow worldwide due to the growth and aging of the population, mainly in less developed countries, in which about 82% of the world's population resides. By 2030, the global burden is expected to grow to 21.7 million new cancer cases and 13 million cancer deaths simply due to the growth and aging of the population. Current cancer therapy approaches are based in surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, being the chemotherapy the one that shows the greater efficiency for cancer treatment, mainly in more advanced stages. A major problem with this conventional chemotherapy is its toxicity and it also destroys healthy tissues resulting in systemic toxicity besides beneficial characteristics of killing cancer cells. Anticancer drugs also destroy healthy tissues resulting in systemic toxicity. [More]
Johns Hopkins Greenberg Bladder Cancer Institute awards grants for 10 bladder cancer research projects

Johns Hopkins Greenberg Bladder Cancer Institute awards grants for 10 bladder cancer research projects

A study of obesity and related metabolic changes on bladder cancer incidence and deaths, and a plan to use stem cells to grow novel urinary tubes are among 10 research projects awarded funding by the Johns Hopkins Greenberg Bladder Cancer Institute. [More]
Advances in the field of MPI: an interview with Professor Kannan Krishnan

Advances in the field of MPI: an interview with Professor Kannan Krishnan

In around 2004, there was a Phillips paper that discussed a new imaging technique called MPI. At that time, I had an eager, promising graduate student named Matt Ferguson who wanted a project, so I asked him to take a look. [More]
Novel mitochondria-specific ceria nanoparticles can effectively suppress neuronal cell death

Novel mitochondria-specific ceria nanoparticles can effectively suppress neuronal cell death

The brain is an enormous network of communication, containing over 100 billion nerve cells, or neurons, with branches that connect at more than 100 trillion points. They are constantly sending signals through a vast neuron forest that forms memories, thoughts and feelings; these patterns of activity form the essence of each person. [More]
New TAU study suggests potential therapeutic pathway to keep osteosarcoma lesions dormant

New TAU study suggests potential therapeutic pathway to keep osteosarcoma lesions dormant

Osteosarcoma is a cancer that develops in the bones of children and adolescents. It is one of the most aggressive cancers, with only a 15 per cent, five-year survival rate when diagnosed in an advanced metastatic stage. There are approximately 800 new cases diagnosed each year in the US, and no viable treatments. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement