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Researchers demonstrate how Parkinson's disease spreads in the human brain

Researchers demonstrate how Parkinson's disease spreads in the human brain

An international, interdisciplinary group of researchers led by Gabor G. Kovacs from the Clinical Institute of Neurology at the MedUni Vienna has demonstrated, through the use of a new antibody, how Parkinson's disease spreads from cell to cell in the human brain. [More]
New study sheds light on longstanding question about role of mitochondria in motor neuron diseases

New study sheds light on longstanding question about role of mitochondria in motor neuron diseases

A new study by researchers at the University of Utah School of Medicine sheds light on a longstanding question about the role of mitochondria in debilitating and fatal motor neuron diseases and resulted in a new mouse model to study such illnesses. [More]
GWU researcher receives AHA grant to study diffuse brain swelling, injury in ICH patients

GWU researcher receives AHA grant to study diffuse brain swelling, injury in ICH patients

Shahram Majidi, M.D., a second-year resident in the Department of Neurology at the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, received at $154K grant from the American Heart Association to study the presence of diffuse brain swelling and injury in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). [More]
People who experience migraine in middle age may develop movement disorders later in life

People who experience migraine in middle age may develop movement disorders later in life

A new study suggests that people who experience migraine in middle age may be more likely to develop Parkinson's disease, or other movement disorders later in life. Those who have migraine with aura may be at double the risk of developing Parkinson's, according to the study published in the September 17, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Study suggests potential treatment for cardiovascular disease in people with apoE4 gene variant

Study suggests potential treatment for cardiovascular disease in people with apoE4 gene variant

Researchers at UT-Southwestern Medical Center have found that the most common variant of the circulating protein apolipoprotein E, called apoE3, helps repair the lining of blood vessels. Individuals with another variant, called apoE4, do not get the benefit of this repair, putting them at higher risk for cardiovascular disease. [More]
The Miriam Hospital receives Primary Stroke Center certification for fifth consecutive year

The Miriam Hospital receives Primary Stroke Center certification for fifth consecutive year

The Miriam Hospital has for the fifth time been designated by the Joint Commission as a Primary Stroke Center. [More]
Bayer, Orion begin patient enrollment in ODM-201 Phase III trial for castration-resistant prostate cancer

Bayer, Orion begin patient enrollment in ODM-201 Phase III trial for castration-resistant prostate cancer

Bayer HealthCare and Orion Corporation, a pharmaceutical company based in Espoo, Finland, have begun to enroll patients in a Phase III trial with ODM-201, an investigational oral androgen receptor inhibitor in clinical development. [More]
New class of compounds protect brain cells from traumatic brain injury

New class of compounds protect brain cells from traumatic brain injury

A new class of compounds has now been shown to protect brain cells from the type of damage caused by blast-mediated traumatic brain injury (TBI). [More]
FDA approves Contrave extended-release tablets for chronic weight management

FDA approves Contrave extended-release tablets for chronic weight management

Takeda Pharmaceuticals U.S.A., Inc. and Orexigen® Therapeutics, Inc. jointly announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved Contrave® extended-release tablets as an adjunct to a reduced-calorie diet and increased physical activity for chronic weight management in adults with an initial body mass index of 30 kg/m2 or greater (obese), or 27 kg/m2 or greater (overweight) in the presence of at least one weight-related comorbid condition. [More]
Study looks at blood type and risk of cognitive impairment

Study looks at blood type and risk of cognitive impairment

People with blood type AB may be more likely to develop memory loss in later years than people with other blood types, according to a study published in the September 10, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Researchers create new vestibular test to add to comprehensive concussion evaluation

Researchers create new vestibular test to add to comprehensive concussion evaluation

Researchers at UPMC and the University of Pittsburgh have created a new, 5- to 10-minute test that could be added to a clinician's concussion evaluation toolkit for a more comprehensive assessment of the injury. [More]
Pollution in many cities threatens brain development in children

Pollution in many cities threatens brain development in children

Pollution in many cities threatens the brain development in children. Findings by University of Montana Professor Dr. Lilian Calder-n-Garcidue-as, MA, MD, Ph.D., and her team of researchers reveal that children living in megacities are at increased risk for brain inflammation and neurodegenerative changes, including Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease. [More]
Neurologists implant neurostimulator in brain to control seizures

Neurologists implant neurostimulator in brain to control seizures

It has been 30 days since neurologists at the University of Alabama at Birmingham turned on the neurostimulator implanted in Sarah Conner's brain to control her seizures. [More]
Alzheimer's disease report success in harnessing mouse's immune system to attack toxic proteins

Alzheimer's disease report success in harnessing mouse's immune system to attack toxic proteins

Alzheimer's disease experts at NYU Langone Medical Center and elsewhere are reporting success in specifically harnessing a mouse's immune system to attack and remove the buildup of toxic proteins in the brain that are markers of the deadly neurodegenerative disease. [More]
Transparency Life receives SBIR program grant to fund Phase 2a proof-of-concept study for MS

Transparency Life receives SBIR program grant to fund Phase 2a proof-of-concept study for MS

Transparency Life Sciences, LLC (TLS), the world's first clinical-stage drug development company based on open innovation, today announced that it has received a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program grant to fund a Phase 2a proof-of-concept study testing the utility of the ACE inhibitor lisinopril as an adjunctive therapy for multiple sclerosis (MS). [More]
Findings may help develop biomarkers to identify HIV patients at risk of dementia

Findings may help develop biomarkers to identify HIV patients at risk of dementia

Since the introduction of the combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART) in the mid-90s, the life expectancy of HIV patients has significantly improved. As a result, long-term complications are becoming more relevant: almost every second HIV patient is affected by neurocognitive disorders, which can lead to dementia. [More]
Researchers examine link between sleep difficulties and brain volume

Researchers examine link between sleep difficulties and brain volume

Sleep difficulties may be linked to faster rates of decline in brain volume, according to a study published in the September 3, 2014, online issue of Neurology-, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Robotics engineers demonstrate viability of direct brain-to-brain communication in humans

Robotics engineers demonstrate viability of direct brain-to-brain communication in humans

In a first-of-its-kind study, an international team of neuroscientists and robotics engineers have demonstrated the viability of direct brain-to-brain communication in humans. [More]
Transplantation of B10 cells helps inhibit development of bladder fibrosis post SCI

Transplantation of B10 cells helps inhibit development of bladder fibrosis post SCI

A team of researchers from Korea and Canada have found that transplantation of B10 cells (a stable immortalized human bone marrow derived -mesenchymal stem cell line; B10 hMSC) directly into the bladder wall of mice modeled with spinal cord injury (SCI) helped inhibit the development of bladder fibrosis and improved bladder function by promoting the growth of smooth muscle cells in the bladder. [More]
Using iPS technology researchers develop new therapies for Parkinson's disease and ALS

Using iPS technology researchers develop new therapies for Parkinson's disease and ALS

Dresden. Dr. Jared Sterneckert is entering the research area "Neurodegenerative Diseases" of the DFG Research Center and Cluster of Excellence at the TU Dresden as a new junior group leader. Since 2006, he has led a team working at the "Max Planck Institute for Molecular Biomedicine" in Münster to develop models of Parkinson's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. [More]