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Eisai, Halozyme partner to evaluate eribulin and PEGPH20 in HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer

Eisai, Halozyme partner to evaluate eribulin and PEGPH20 in HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer

Eisai Inc. announced today that its parent company Eisai Co., Ltd. (Headquarters: Tokyo, President and CEO: Haruo Naito) and Halozyme Therapeutics, Inc. (Headquarters: San Diego, California, President and CEO: Dr. Helen Torley) have signed a clinical collaboration agreement to evaluate Eisai's agent eribulin mesylate (brand name: Halaven, "eribulin") in combination with Halozyme's investigational drug PEGPH20 (PEGylated recombinant human hyaluronidase) in first line HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer. [More]
Study reveals new way to help medical students learn about Alzheimer's disease

Study reveals new way to help medical students learn about Alzheimer's disease

With the growing number of people with Alzheimer's disease, understanding their care is vital for doctors. Yet medical students often just learn the facts and may only see people with advanced disease who are at the hospital or nursing home. A study shows a new way to help medical students learn about the disease—at the art museum. [More]
Natural protein fragment produced in the brain can inhibit enzyme implicated in Alzheimer's disease

Natural protein fragment produced in the brain can inhibit enzyme implicated in Alzheimer's disease

For the first time, UCLA researchers have shown that a natural protein fragment produced in the brain can act as an inhibitor of a key enzyme implicated in the onset of Alzheimer's disease, a finding that could lead to the development of new drugs to treat the disease. [More]
AAN's Behavioral Neurology Section Group provides recommendations for improving clinical cognitive testing

AAN's Behavioral Neurology Section Group provides recommendations for improving clinical cognitive testing

Recommendations for improving clinical cognitive testing were reported by the American Academy of Neurology's Behavioral Neurology Section Group, led by Kirk R. Daffner, MD, of Boston, Mass. The Group focused on the Neurobehavioral Status Exam (NBSE), conducting evidence-based reviews of testing used for five domains - attention, language, memory, spatial cognition, and executive function). [More]
Despite efforts to improve stroke treatment, delays in emergency transport still prevalent

Despite efforts to improve stroke treatment, delays in emergency transport still prevalent

Despite efforts to close the time gap between symptom onset and stroke treatment - including improvements in public education, 911 dispatch operations, pre-hospital detection and triage, hospital stroke system development, and stroke unit management - a new study presented today at the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery (SNIS) 12th Annual Meeting suggests that delays in emergency transport are still prevalent and that improvements are needed to ensure patients can be treated within the optimal time window. [More]
Study suggests potential way to predict autism or psychosis risk in children with genetic abnormality

Study suggests potential way to predict autism or psychosis risk in children with genetic abnormality

Doctors and researchers have long known that children who are missing about 60 genes on a certain chromosome are at a significantly elevated risk for developing either a disorder on the autism spectrum or psychosis — that is, any mental disorder characterized by delusions and hallucinations, including schizophrenia. But there has been no way to predict which child with the abnormality might be at risk for which disorder. [More]
New Iowa State study finds strong link between insulin resistance and increased Alzheimer's disease risk

New Iowa State study finds strong link between insulin resistance and increased Alzheimer's disease risk

The fact that obesity increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and some cancers is well known. But a new Iowa State University study adds to the growing evidence that memory loss should also be a top concern. [More]
Low-dose lithium lowers involuntary motor movements in mouse model of Parkinson's disease

Low-dose lithium lowers involuntary motor movements in mouse model of Parkinson's disease

Low-dose lithium reduced involuntary motor movements - the troubling side effect of the medication most commonly used to treat Parkinson's disease (PD) - in a mouse model of the condition that is diagnosed in about 60,000 Americans each year. The third in a series of studies from the Andersen lab involving PD and low-dose lithium, the results add to mounting evidence that low-doses of the psychotropic drug could benefit patients suffering from the incurable, degenerative condition. [More]
Necrotising autoimmune myopathy requires early, aggressive treatment

Necrotising autoimmune myopathy requires early, aggressive treatment

Researchers call for the prompt recognition of necrotising autoimmune myopathy and aggressive early treatment with a combination of intravenous immune globulin, corticosteroids and a steroid-sparing agent for 3 months. [More]
Iron supplementation may increase risk of neurodegeneration, shows research

Iron supplementation may increase risk of neurodegeneration, shows research

Is it possible that too much iron in infant formula may potentially increase risk for neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's in adulthood -- and are teeth the window into the past that can help us tell? T [More]
Organ donor honored at Reagan UCLA Medical Center

Organ donor honored at Reagan UCLA Medical Center

Two years ago, Rachel Greenberg went out to run a few errands. While she was gone, her husband Glenn suffered a massive brain hemorrhage. He was immediately taken to Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center where physicians explained he had suffered the worst kind of brain bleed. [More]
New research shows concussion may affect men and women differently

New research shows concussion may affect men and women differently

New research suggests concussion may not significantly impair symptoms or cognitive skills for one gender over another, however, women may still experience greater symptoms and poorer cognitive performance at preseason testing. [More]
Extremes of stroke symptoms attract misdiagnoses

Extremes of stroke symptoms attract misdiagnoses

Patients with very mild or very severe stroke symptoms are at the greatest risk of being misdiagnosed in the emergency department, research suggests. [More]
Focal symptoms may be prognostic in generalised epilepsies

Focal symptoms may be prognostic in generalised epilepsies

Symptoms consistent with focal seizures are often reported by patients who have idiopathic generalised epilepsies and are associated with a short duration of freedom from seizures, say researchers. [More]
Migraines may increase risk of stroke among smokers

Migraines may increase risk of stroke among smokers

New research suggests older people who experience migraines may have an increased risk of stroke, but only if they are smokers. The study is published in the July 22, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Mild cognitive impairment occurs more often in people diagnosed with lower ankle brachial index

Mild cognitive impairment occurs more often in people diagnosed with lower ankle brachial index

In a large population-based study of randomly selected participants in Germany, researchers found that mild cognitive impairment (MCI) occurred significantly more often in individuals diagnosed with a lower ankle brachial index (ABI), which is a marker of generalized atherosclerosis and thus cumulative exposure to cardiovascular risk factors during lifetime. [More]
Mercy Medical Center named third best hospital in Maryland

Mercy Medical Center named third best hospital in Maryland

U.S. News & World Report has released its annual "Best Hospital" rankings. This 26th annual edition includes information on nearly 5,000 hospitals nationwide. U.S. News & World Report named Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore as the third best hospital in Maryland, behind only the academic medical centers at Johns Hopkins and the University of Maryland. Mercy also retained its status from last year as the state's top-ranked community hospital. [More]
UCLA Health's hospitals named among nation's best in U.S. News and World Report

UCLA Health's hospitals named among nation's best in U.S. News and World Report

UCLA Health's hospitals in Westwood and Santa Monica have been named to U.S. News and World Report's 2015-2016 Best Hospitals Honor Roll. UCLA, which previously ranked No. 5 in the country, tied for No. 3 this year. [More]
Study reveals potential new therapeutic target for depression treatment

Study reveals potential new therapeutic target for depression treatment

Increasing the levels of a signaling molecule found in the brain can positively alter response to stress, revealing a potential new therapeutic target for treatment of depression, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers said. [More]
Alzheimer's Association recognizes Li Gan with Inge Grundke-Iqbal Award for Alzheimer's Research

Alzheimer's Association recognizes Li Gan with Inge Grundke-Iqbal Award for Alzheimer's Research

The Alzheimer's Association is recognizing Li Gan, Ph.D., for publishing influential research on the biology of Alzheimer's disease with the Inge Grundke-Iqbal Award for Alzheimer's Research. The Award was presented today during a plenary session at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference 2015 in Washington, D.C. [More]
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