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Natus Medical reports revenue of $85.6 million in first quarter 2014

Natus Medical Incorporated today announced financial results for the three months ended March 31, 2014. [More]

tPA therapy improves outcomes for patients suffering acute ischemic stroke

Administering a clot-dissolving drug to stroke victims quickly — ideally within the first 60 minutes after they arrive at a hospital emergency room — is crucial to saving their lives, preserving their brain function and reducing disability. [More]
Glaucoma drug may help reverse obesity-related vision loss in women

Glaucoma drug may help reverse obesity-related vision loss in women

An inexpensive glaucoma drug, when added to a weight loss plan, can improve vision for women with a disorder called idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), according to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. [More]
UT Southwestern researchers identify potential new treatment for depression

UT Southwestern researchers identify potential new treatment for depression

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center are making breakthroughs that could benefit people suffering from depression. [More]
Drug used to treat hypertension prevents post-traumatic epilepsy in rodent model

Drug used to treat hypertension prevents post-traumatic epilepsy in rodent model

Between 10 and 20 percent of all cases of epilepsy result from severe head injury, but a new drug promises to prevent post-traumatic seizures and may forestall further brain damage caused by seizures in those who already have epilepsy. [More]
New studies may offer hope for people with migraine

New studies may offer hope for people with migraine

Two new studies may offer hope for people with migraine. The two studies released today will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 66th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, April 26 to May 3, 2014. [More]
NeuroPhage engineers series of molecules with potential to treat most neurodegenerative diseases

NeuroPhage engineers series of molecules with potential to treat most neurodegenerative diseases

​Researchers from NeuroPhage Pharmaceuticals, Inc. have engineered a series of molecules with the potential to treat most neurodegenerative diseases that are characterized by misfolded proteins, such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases. [More]
New FDA-approved device reduces seizures in patients with medication-resistant epilepsy

New FDA-approved device reduces seizures in patients with medication-resistant epilepsy

A recently FDA-approved device has been shown to reduce seizures in patients with medication-resistant epilepsy by as much as 50 percent. When coupled with an innovative electrode placement planning system developed by physicians at Rush, the device facilitated the complete elimination of seizures in nearly half of the implanted Rush patients enrolled in the decade-long clinical trials. [More]
Bayer's Ciprofloxacin DPI receives FDA orphan drug designation for NCFB treatment

Bayer's Ciprofloxacin DPI receives FDA orphan drug designation for NCFB treatment

Bayer HealthCare today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Office of Orphan Products Development has granted orphan drug designation for its investigational Ciprofloxacin Dry Powder for Inhalation (Ciprofloxacin DPI) for the treatment of non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis (NCFB). [More]

Cedars-Sinai researchers to receive $8M grant to fund Phase II clinical trial of experimental drug for stroke

​Cedars-Sinai stroke intervention researchers have been informed that the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, part of the National Institutes of Health, will award an $8 million grant to fund a multicenter Phase II clinical trial of an experimental drug for stroke. [More]
Narrowing of carotid artery in neck without any symptoms may be linked to memory problems

Narrowing of carotid artery in neck without any symptoms may be linked to memory problems

For the first time, researchers have demonstrated that narrowing of the carotid artery in the neck without any symptoms may be linked to problems in learning, memory, thinking and decision-making, compared to people with similar risk factors but no narrowing in the neck artery, according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 66th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, April 26 to May 3, 2014. [More]
New hypothesis about emergence of Parkinson's disease

New hypothesis about emergence of Parkinson's disease

The cause of neuronal death in Parkinson's disease is still unknown, but a new study proposes that neurons may be mistaken for foreign invaders and killed by the person's own immune system, similar to the way autoimmune diseases like type I diabetes, celiac disease, and multiple sclerosis attack the body's cells. [More]
FDA and EC grant Orphan Drug Designation to Boehringer’s volasertib for acute myeloid leukemia

FDA and EC grant Orphan Drug Designation to Boehringer’s volasertib for acute myeloid leukemia

Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Commission (EC) have granted Orphan Drug Designation to volasertib for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). [More]
Genmab/GSK receive FDA sBLA approval for Arzerra in combination with chlorambucil for treatment of CLL

Genmab/GSK receive FDA sBLA approval for Arzerra in combination with chlorambucil for treatment of CLL

GlaxoSmithKline plc and Genmab A/S announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a Supplemental Biologic License Application (sBLA) for the use of Arzerra® (ofatumumab), a CD20-directed cytolytic monoclonal antibody, in combination with chlorambucil for the treatment of previously untreated patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) for whom fludarabine-based therapy is considered inappropriate. [More]
Researchers identify key genes linked to pain perception

Researchers identify key genes linked to pain perception

Researchers may have identified key genes linked to why some people have a higher tolerance for pain than others, according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 66th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, April 26 to May 3, 2014. [More]
Researchers devise new approach to treatment of Alzheimer's disease

Researchers devise new approach to treatment of Alzheimer's disease

A team of researchers from Columbia University Medical Center, Weill Cornell Medical College, and Brandeis University has devised a wholly new approach to the treatment of Alzheimer's disease involving the so-called retromer protein complex. Retromer plays a vital role in neurons, steering amyloid precursor protein (APP) away from a region of the cell where APP is cleaved, creating the potentially toxic byproduct amyloid-beta, which is thought to contribute to the development of Alzheimer's. [More]
U.Va. researchers named recipients of 2013 Hartwell Individual Biomedical Research Awards

U.Va. researchers named recipients of 2013 Hartwell Individual Biomedical Research Awards

University of Virginia neurologist Dr. Erin Pennock Foff, biologist Sarah Kucenas and biomedical engineer Shayn Peirce-Cotter have been named recipients of 2013 Hartwell Individual Biomedical Research Awards to benefit children of the United States. Each scientist will receive $100,000 in direct annual research support from The Hartwell Foundation for three years. [More]
Apathy signals brain shrinkage in old people

Apathy signals brain shrinkage in old people

Launer's team used brain volume as a measure of accelerated brain aging. Brain volume losses occur during normal aging, but in this study, larger amounts of brain volume loss could indicate brain diseases. [More]
Researchers coax human embryonic stem cells to turn into working spinal cord cells

Researchers coax human embryonic stem cells to turn into working spinal cord cells

The sponginess of the environment where human embryonic stem cells are growing affects the type of specialized cells they eventually become, a University of Michigan study shows. [More]
Community efforts boost people for HIV testing and reduce new infections

Community efforts boost people for HIV testing and reduce new infections

Communities in Africa and Thailand that worked together on HIV-prevention efforts saw not only a rise in HIV screening but a drop in new infections, according to a new study in the peer-reviewed journal The Lancet Global Health. [More]