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Newly discovered prion causes Multiple System Atrophy

Newly discovered prion causes Multiple System Atrophy

Multiple System Atrophy (MSA), a neurodegenerative disorder with similarities to Parkinson's disease, is caused by a newly discovered type of prion, akin to the misfolded proteins involved in incurable progressive brain diseases such Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD), according to two new research papers led by scientists at UC San Francisco. [More]
Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation can alleviate FOG, improve motor skills in PD patients

Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation can alleviate FOG, improve motor skills in PD patients

About 50% of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) experience freezing of gait (FOG), an inability to move forward while walking. This can affect not only mobility but also balance. In a new study published in Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience, researchers report that repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can reduce FOG and improve other motor skills in PD patients. [More]
September tip sheet from Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

September tip sheet from Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

A computer algorithm did a better job than doctors at documenting "red flag" symptoms among patients with gastrointestinal disorders, a Cedars-Sinai study has found, underscoring the potential of the technology to improve patient care. [More]
Robert Wood Johnson Medical Group physicians selected for Best Doctors in America List for 2015-2016

Robert Wood Johnson Medical Group physicians selected for Best Doctors in America List for 2015-2016

Sixty-one physicians affiliated with Robert Wood Johnson Medical Group, the faculty practice of Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, were selected for the Best Doctors in America® List for 2015-2016. Only 5 percent of physicians in the United States earn this prestigious honor, determined by impartial peer review. [More]
FDA approves MagVenture MagVita TMS Therapy system for treatment of Major Depressive Disorder

FDA approves MagVenture MagVita TMS Therapy system for treatment of Major Depressive Disorder

On July 31, 2015 the US Food and Drug Administration cleared the MagVita TMS Therapy system for the treatment of Major Depressive Disorder in adult patients who have failed to receive satisfactory improvement from prior antidepressant medication in the current episode. [More]
Experimental gene therapy may prevent neuronal degeneration in patients with Alzheimer's disease

Experimental gene therapy may prevent neuronal degeneration in patients with Alzheimer's disease

Degenerating neurons in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) measurably responded to an experimental gene therapy in which nerve growth factor (NGF) was injected into their brains, report researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine in the current issue of JAMA Neurology. [More]
Key modifiable Alzheimer’s risk factors pinpointed

Key modifiable Alzheimer’s risk factors pinpointed

A meta-analysis has identified the key modifiable factors associated with an increased or decreased risk of Alzheimer’s disease. [More]
Isolated tauopathy ‘surprisingly common’ in AD dementia

Isolated tauopathy ‘surprisingly common’ in AD dementia

A study shows that about a quarter of people with clinically diagnosed mild or moderate Alzheimer’s disease have only minimal β-amyloid deposition on autopsy. [More]
Dementia sufferers may begin to lose awareness of memory problems 2-3 years before onset

Dementia sufferers may begin to lose awareness of memory problems 2-3 years before onset

People who will develop dementia may begin to lose awareness of their memory problems two to three years before the actual onset of the disease, according to a new study published in the August 26, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Childhood cancer survivors have high risk of suffering stroke at young age

Childhood cancer survivors have high risk of suffering stroke at young age

Most people assume strokes only happen to octogenarians, but recent evidence suggests that survivors of childhood cancer have a high risk of suffering a stroke at a surprisingly young age. [More]
Common gene mutation may cause brain damage associated with ALS and FTD

Common gene mutation may cause brain damage associated with ALS and FTD

Johns Hopkins researchers say they have discovered some of the first steps in how a very common gene mutation causes the brain damage associated with both amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). [More]
Scientists reveal how a common gene mutation in ALS and FTD disrupts normal cell function

Scientists reveal how a common gene mutation in ALS and FTD disrupts normal cell function

Researchers have determined how the most common gene mutation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) disrupts normal cell function, providing insight likely to advance efforts to develop targeted therapies for these brain diseases. [More]
Mental visual imagery training may improve AM/EFT functioning in RR-MS patients

Mental visual imagery training may improve AM/EFT functioning in RR-MS patients

Patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RR-MS), the most common form of the disease, often have deficits in two neuropsychological functions, autobiographical memory (AM) and episodic future thinking (EFT), which impact quality of life. [More]
FDA, EMA accept filing applications for Boehringer Ingelheim's afatinib to treat patients with advanced SCC of the lung

FDA, EMA accept filing applications for Boehringer Ingelheim's afatinib to treat patients with advanced SCC of the lung

Boehringer Ingelheim today announced that both the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency have accepted filing applications for afatinib for the treatment of patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the lung progressing after treatment with first-line chemotherapy. [More]
Repetitive sacral root magnetic stimulation can reduce frequency of nighttime bedwetting

Repetitive sacral root magnetic stimulation can reduce frequency of nighttime bedwetting

Bedwetting, or nocturnal enuresis, causes distress in children and young adults, as well as for their parents or caregivers. The causes are not fully understood and there may be both physiological and psychological components to the condition. In a new study published in Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience, researchers report that repetitive sacral root magnetic stimulation (rSMS) can reduce the frequency of nighttime bedwetting and improve quality-of-life for sufferers. [More]
Number of dementia patients stabilizing experts claim

Number of dementia patients stabilizing experts claim

Risk of dementia may be falling due to improved education and living conditions, and better prevention and treatment of vascular diseases, highlighting the need for policies to improve health across the life course. [More]
Treatment score aids decision-making in unruptured intracranial aneurysm management

Treatment score aids decision-making in unruptured intracranial aneurysm management

Researchers have developed an unruptured intracranial aneurysm treatment score model that arms clinicians with consensus from a group of specialists on how to manage individuals with the condition. [More]
Valeant enters into definitive agreement to acquire Sprout Pharmaceuticals

Valeant enters into definitive agreement to acquire Sprout Pharmaceuticals

Valeant Pharmaceuticals International, Inc. and Sprout Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced that they have entered into a definitive agreement under which a wholly-owned subsidiary of Valeant will acquire Sprout, on a debt-free basis, for approximately $1 billion in cash, plus a share of future profits based upon the achievement of certain milestones. [More]
New scientific conference 'Aspirin in the 21st Century' to be held in London

New scientific conference 'Aspirin in the 21st Century' to be held in London

What more can be said about aspirin, a medicine that was first prescribed at the end of the 19th century? It is known and accepted in every country. For over a hundred years it has been the standard by which all other, newer, painkillers have had to be judged, and it has never been found to be inferior. It is still considered the world's leading analgesic. [More]
GARFIELD-AF data to demonstrate impact of antithrombotic treatment patterns on AF patients at ESC Congress 2015

GARFIELD-AF data to demonstrate impact of antithrombotic treatment patterns on AF patients at ESC Congress 2015

New analyses from the Global Anticoagulant Registry in the Field - Atrial Fibrillation (GARFIELD-AF) will be presented at ESC Congress 2015 to be held in London, United Kingdom, from August 29 to September 2, 2015. [More]
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