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Researchers discover two common genetic variants associated with memory performance

Researchers discover two common genetic variants associated with memory performance

In the largest study of the genetics of memory ever undertaken, an international researcher team including scientists from Boston University School of Medicine, have discovered two common genetic variants that are believed to be associated with memory performance. [More]
ProMedica invests in early stage medical device company

ProMedica invests in early stage medical device company

ProMedica has invested in an early stage medical device company that is developing and commercializing innovative and cost-effective devices for treating common vascular diseases such as peripheral artery disease (PAD). Jobst Vascular Surgeon John Pigott, MD, founded the Sylvania-based company, VentureMed Group, and its first invention is already being used in clinical trials underway in Europe. [More]
Comprehensive guide to help parents obtain quality medical care for children with ASDs

Comprehensive guide to help parents obtain quality medical care for children with ASDs

Navigating through the maze of health and medical services can be challenging for parents of children who have been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). A new resource is now available for caregivers, health professionals and, especially, parents. [More]
Research findings could provide insight into how doctors could restore human memory

Research findings could provide insight into how doctors could restore human memory

UCLA neurophysicists have found that space-mapping neurons in the brain react differently to virtual reality than they do to real-world environments. Their findings could be significant for people who use virtual reality for gaming, military, commercial, scientific or other purposes. [More]
Protein that awakens brain from sleep may fight against Alzheimer's disease

Protein that awakens brain from sleep may fight against Alzheimer's disease

A protein that stimulates the brain to awaken from sleep may be a target for preventing Alzheimer's disease, a study by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests. [More]
New, enhanced MRI identifies brain injury in BBB of football players following mild concussions

New, enhanced MRI identifies brain injury in BBB of football players following mild concussions

A new, enhanced MRI diagnostic approach was, for the first time, able to identify significant damage to the blood-brain barrier (BBB) of professional football players following "unreported" trauma or mild concussions. Published in the current issue of JAMA Neurology, this study could improve decision making on when an athlete should "return to play." [More]
Bayer's Amikacin Inhale and Ciprofloxacin DPI receive QIDP designation from FDA

Bayer's Amikacin Inhale and Ciprofloxacin DPI receive QIDP designation from FDA

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted qualified infectious disease product (QIDP) designation to two Bayer investigational agents, Amikacin Inhale and Ciprofloxacin Dry Powder for Inhalation (DPI). [More]
Research paves way for improving efficacy of ALS treatement

Research paves way for improving efficacy of ALS treatement

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, is a neurodegenerative disease that primarily kills motor neurons, leading to paralysis and death 2 to 5 years from diagnosis. Currently ALS has no cure. Despite promising early-stage research, the majority of drugs in development for ALS have failed. Now researchers have uncovered a possible explanation. [More]
Study sheds light on how HIV medications cause significant damage to fetal hearts

Study sheds light on how HIV medications cause significant damage to fetal hearts

A study by a Wayne State University and Children's Hospital of Michigan, Detroit Medical Center research team is shedding new light on the troubling question of whether the drugs often given to HIV-positive pregnant women can cause significant long-term heart problems for the non-HIV-infected babies they carry. [More]
MGH investigators develop system to accurately track the process of falling asleep

MGH investigators develop system to accurately track the process of falling asleep

Massachusetts General Hospital investigators have developed a system to accurately track the dynamic process of falling asleep, something has not been possible with existing techniques. In their report in the October issue of the open-access journal PLOS Computational Biology, the research team describes how combining key physiologic measurements with a behavioral task that does not interfere with sleep onset gives a better picture of the gradual process of falling asleep. [More]
Cocaine disrupts woman's estrus cycle, may explain sex differences in cocaine addiction

Cocaine disrupts woman's estrus cycle, may explain sex differences in cocaine addiction

Women are more sensitive to the effects of cocaine and more susceptible to cocaine abuse than men. Cocaine's ability to disrupt a woman's estrus cycle may explain the sex differences in cocaine addiction, and new evidence that caffeine may be neuroprotective and able to block cocaine's direct effects on the estrus cycle reveals novel treatment possibilities, according to an article published in Journal of Caffeine Research: The International Multidisciplinary Journal of Caffeine Science, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
People who handle complex jobs may have longer-lasting memory and thinking abilities

People who handle complex jobs may have longer-lasting memory and thinking abilities

People whose jobs require more complex work with other people, such as social workers and lawyers, or with data, like architects or graphic designers, may end up having longer-lasting memory and thinking abilities compared to people who do less complex work, according to research published in the November 19, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Pros and cons of medical marijuana to be discussed at Queensland Epilepsy Symposium

Pros and cons of medical marijuana to be discussed at Queensland Epilepsy Symposium

The pros and cons of medical marijuana is a discussion focus at the fifth annual Queensland Epilepsy Symposium, Epilepsy – On the Horizon. [More]

Prana's Phase 2 trial data on Huntington Disease published in The Lancet Neurology

Prana Biotechnology has today announced the results of its Phase 2 trial in Huntington Disease, REACH2HD, has been published online in one of the world’s leading medical journals, The Lancet Neurology. [More]

Simple tests can help differentiate between early-stage PD and atypical parkinsonism

Two simple tests conducted during the neurological exam can help clinicians differentiate between early-stage Parkinson's disease (PD) and atypical parkinsonism. By asking patients to perform a tandem gait test and inquiring whether they are still able to ride a bicycle, clinicians can ascertain whether medio-lateral balance is impaired, a defining characteristic of atypical parkinsonism. [More]
Valeant Pharmaceuticals hosts ribbon-cutting ceremony to celebrate renovation of U.S. headquarters in NJ

Valeant Pharmaceuticals hosts ribbon-cutting ceremony to celebrate renovation of U.S. headquarters in NJ

Valeant Pharmaceuticals International, Inc. (NYSE: VRX) (TSX: VRX) today celebrated the completion of renovations to its U.S. headquarters in Bridgewater, New Jersey with a ribbon-cutting ceremony. [More]
RI-MUHC-led study identifies new player in brain function and memory

RI-MUHC-led study identifies new player in brain function and memory

Is it possible to change the amount of information the brain can store? Maybe, according to a new international study led by the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC). [More]
Multi-institutional study establishes new criteria for Alzheimer's-related memory disorder

Multi-institutional study establishes new criteria for Alzheimer's-related memory disorder

A multi-institutional study has defined and established criteria for a new neurological disease closely resembling Alzheimer's disease called primary age-related tauopathy (PART). [More]
Study defines, establishes criteria for primary age-related tauopathy

Study defines, establishes criteria for primary age-related tauopathy

A multi-institutional study has defined and established criteria for a new neurological disease closely resembling Alzheimer's disease called primary age-related tauopathy (PART). Patients with PART develop cognitive impairment that can be indistinguishable from Alzheimer's disease, but they lack amyloid plaques. Awareness of this neurological disease will help doctors diagnose and develop more effective treatments for patients with different types of memory impairment. [More]
Vitamin B12, folic acid supplements may not reduce risk of memory and thinking problems

Vitamin B12, folic acid supplements may not reduce risk of memory and thinking problems

Taking vitamin B12 and folic acid supplements may not reduce the risk of memory and thinking problems after all, according to a new study published in the November 12, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study is one of the largest to date to test long-term use of supplements and thinking and memory skills. [More]