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Drosophila Research Conference to highlight recent advances in genetics research

Drosophila Research Conference to highlight recent advances in genetics research

Over 1,500 scientists from 30 countries and 46 states will attend next week's 56th Annual Drosophila Research Conference organized by the Genetics Society of America, March 4–8 in Chicago, IL. [More]
Perceived cost affects placebo response in Parkinson’s disease

Perceived cost affects placebo response in Parkinson’s disease

Patients with Parkinson’s disease may gain a greater benefit from a placebo treatment if they believe it to be expensive, research suggests. [More]
Study: Levodopa-carbidopa intestinal gel improves quality of life in advanced PD patients

Study: Levodopa-carbidopa intestinal gel improves quality of life in advanced PD patients

Although levodopa remains the "gold standard" to effectively control motor deficits in the treatment of early stage Parkinson's disease (PD), it loses effectiveness as the disease progresses. After four to six years of treatment with oral medications for Parkinson's disease, about 40% of patients experience lack of muscle control (dyskinesias), end-of-dose wearing off, and fluctuations in "On/Off" states. [More]
Articles discuss use of ICF in clinical practice, research related to neurorehabilitation

Articles discuss use of ICF in clinical practice, research related to neurorehabilitation

Use of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) has increased significantly over the last decade. The current issue of NeuroRehabilitation features a series of insightful articles that provide examples of how the ICF can be successfully implemented in clinical practice and research related to neurorehabilitation, ultimately benefiting patient care. [More]
Drinking coffee may lower risk of developing multiple sclerosis

Drinking coffee may lower risk of developing multiple sclerosis

Drinking coffee may be associated with a lower risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 67th Annual Meeting in Washington, DC, April 18 to 25, 2015. [More]
Patients with Parkinson's disease often face difficulties with reduced visual contrast acuity

Patients with Parkinson's disease often face difficulties with reduced visual contrast acuity

Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) often have difficulties with visual acuity in low-contrast images. Because they may have normal high-contrast vision, this is often overlooked during routine eye exams. In the current issue of the Journal of Parkinson's Disease, researchers report that PD patients had significantly worse vision for low-contrast images at close (40 cm) and far (2 m) distances. Even for high-contrast images, PD patients' vision was deficient at far distances. [More]
Sleeping more than eight hours a night could increase risk of stroke

Sleeping more than eight hours a night could increase risk of stroke

People who sleep more than eight hours a night may have an increased risk of stroke, according to a new study published in the February 25, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
UTHealth study explores use of app to help improve health of minority stroke patients

UTHealth study explores use of app to help improve health of minority stroke patients

A clinical trial investigating the use of a physician-monitored app to help first-time minority stroke patients become healthier has begun at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. [More]
Direct brain responsive neurostimulator reduces seizures, improves quality of life

Direct brain responsive neurostimulator reduces seizures, improves quality of life

Piotr Olejniczak, MD, PhD, LSU Health New Orleans Professor of Neurology and Director of the Epilepsy Center, contributed to a study of the long-term effectiveness of the first direct brain responsive neurostimulator for partial onset, or focal, seizures that cannot be controlled with medication. [More]
New skin test may help detect abnormal proteins in patients with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases

New skin test may help detect abnormal proteins in patients with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases

Scientists have discovered a skin test that may shed new light on Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, according to a study released today will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 67th Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C., April 18 to 25, 2015. [More]
People who exhibit resistance to aspirin may be at risk of more severe strokes

People who exhibit resistance to aspirin may be at risk of more severe strokes

People who exhibit a resistance to aspirin may be more likely to have more severe strokes than people who still respond to the drug, according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 67th Annual Meeting in Washington, DC, April 18 to 25, 2015. [More]
Johns Hopkins scientists identify genetic pathway that may spur cancer cell growth in children

Johns Hopkins scientists identify genetic pathway that may spur cancer cell growth in children

Working with cells taken from children with a very rare but ferocious form of brain cancer, Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center scientists have identified a genetic pathway that acts as a master regulator of thousands of other genes and may spur cancer cell growth and resistance to anticancer treatment. [More]
Bayer expands patient assistance program for intrauterine devices

Bayer expands patient assistance program for intrauterine devices

Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals Inc. today announced the expansion of its patient assistance program for intrauterine devices (IUD). The ARCH (Access and Resources for Contraceptive Health) program will provide Skyla (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) 13.5 mg and Mirena (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) 52 mg to low-income women who meet eligibility criteria. [More]
University of Tübingen, Mediso partner to develop whole body preclinical PET insert

University of Tübingen, Mediso partner to develop whole body preclinical PET insert

University of Tübingen and Mediso Ltd announced today at the 4th Tübingen PET/MR Workshop to enter into a collaboration to develop a whole body preclinical PET insert based on silicon photomultiplier sensor technology. This system can be inserted into a high field (7T) preclinical MRI scanner to enable simultaneous PET/MR imaging. [More]
Valeant Pharmaceuticals agrees to acquire Salix Pharmaceuticals

Valeant Pharmaceuticals agrees to acquire Salix Pharmaceuticals

Valeant Pharmaceuticals International, Inc. and Salix Pharmaceuticals, Ltd. today announced that they have entered into a definitive agreement under which Valeant will acquire all of the outstanding common stock of Salix for $158.00 per share in cash, or a total enterprise value of approximately $14.5 billion. [More]
Proximity Ligation Assay helps detect effectiveness of cancer vaccines

Proximity Ligation Assay helps detect effectiveness of cancer vaccines

Cancer vaccines are designed to turn the body's own immune system specifically against tumor cells. Particularly promising are vaccines that are directed against so-called neoantigens: These are proteins that have undergone a genetic mutation in tumor cells and, therefore, differ from their counterparts in healthy cells. [More]
Virus that causes chicken pox and shingles linked to giant cell arteritis

Virus that causes chicken pox and shingles linked to giant cell arteritis

A new study developed at the University of Colorado School of Medicine at the Anschutz Medical Campus links the virus that causes chicken pox and shingles to a condition that inflames blood vessels on the temples and scalp in the elderly, called giant cell arteritis. [More]
Women with multiple sclerosis may have lower levels of antioxidant, anti-inflammatory nutrients

Women with multiple sclerosis may have lower levels of antioxidant, anti-inflammatory nutrients

Women with multiple sclerosis (MS) may have lower levels of important antioxidant and anti-inflammatory nutrients, such as folate from food and vitamin E, than healthy people, according to a new study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 67th Annual Meeting in Washington, DC, April 18 to 25, 2015. [More]
New study finds that statins may not reduce risk for Parkinson's disease

New study finds that statins may not reduce risk for Parkinson's disease

The use of statins may not be associated with lowering risk for Parkinson's disease, according to a new study led by researchers at Penn State College of Medicine and National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. The findings cast doubts on reports suggesting that the cholesterol-lowering medications may protect against this neurodegenerative brain disorder. [More]
New study links chicken pox and shingles virus to giant cell arteritis in elderly

New study links chicken pox and shingles virus to giant cell arteritis in elderly

A new study links the virus that causes chicken pox and shingles to a condition that inflames blood vessels on the temples and scalp in the elderly, called giant cell arteritis. The study is published in the February 18, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The condition can cause sudden blindness or stroke and can be life-threatening. [More]