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Apathy signals brain shrinkage in old people

Apathy signals brain shrinkage in old people

Launer's team used brain volume as a measure of accelerated brain aging. Brain volume losses occur during normal aging, but in this study, larger amounts of brain volume loss could indicate brain diseases. [More]
Researchers coax human embryonic stem cells to turn into working spinal cord cells

Researchers coax human embryonic stem cells to turn into working spinal cord cells

The sponginess of the environment where human embryonic stem cells are growing affects the type of specialized cells they eventually become, a University of Michigan study shows. [More]
Community efforts boost people for HIV testing and reduce new infections

Community efforts boost people for HIV testing and reduce new infections

Communities in Africa and Thailand that worked together on HIV-prevention efforts saw not only a rise in HIV screening but a drop in new infections, according to a new study in the peer-reviewed journal The Lancet Global Health. [More]
Study shows how infection worsens damage caused by stroke

Study shows how infection worsens damage caused by stroke

Infection is bad news for all of us - but it can be really serious to people who have had a stroke. Evidence is mounting that infection makes things much worse after a stroke. [More]
Researchers identify eight new active molecules against Alzheimer

Researchers identify eight new active molecules against Alzheimer

Researchers of the Unit of Medicine Design and Molecular Topology (Department of Physics Chemistry) of the University of Valencia have discovered eight new active molecules against Alzheimer by a novel mechanism of action, different to the currently used medicines. The work has just been published in the "Plos One" magazine. [More]
ABAM Foundation accredits four new addiction medicine fellowship programs

ABAM Foundation accredits four new addiction medicine fellowship programs

The American Board of Addiction Medicine Foundation today announced the accreditation of four new addiction medicine fellowship programs, bringing the total number of accredited programs to 23. [More]
Researchers identify biological process that appears to trigger Parkinson's disease

Researchers identify biological process that appears to trigger Parkinson's disease

Working with human neurons and fruit flies, researchers at Johns Hopkins have identified and then shut down a biological process that appears to trigger a particular form of Parkinson's disease present in a large number of patients. A report on the study, in the April 10 issue of the journal Cell, could lead to new treatments for this disorder. [More]

New discovery opens door to development of new treatments that stop progression of Parkinson's disease

A research led by the Research Institute Vall d'Hebron (VHIR), in which the University of Valencia participated, has shown that pathological forms of the α-synuclein protein present in deceased patients with Parkinson's disease are able to initiate and spread in mice and primates the neurodegenerative process that typifies this disease. [More]
Experts and entrepreneurs to gather at 2014 Biotech China on 14-16 May

Experts and entrepreneurs to gather at 2014 Biotech China on 14-16 May

With just one month until 2014 Biotech China, experts, entrepreneurs and decision-makers from the international biotechnology industry will gather at the heart of the Chinese biotechnology industry on May 14-16th, 09:00 AM-06:00 PM in Nanjing China. [More]

Stem cells culled from bone marrow may prove beneficial in stroke recovery

Stem cells culled from bone marrow may prove beneficial in stroke recovery, scientists at UC Irvine's Sue & Bill Gross Stem Cell Research Center have learned. [More]
Older people with memory and thinking problems may have lower risk of dying from cancer

Older people with memory and thinking problems may have lower risk of dying from cancer

Older people who are starting to have memory and thinking problems, but do not yet have dementia may have a lower risk of dying from cancer than people who have no memory and thinking problems, according to a study published in the April 9, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Physical activity seems to protect from dementia in old age

Physical activity seems to protect from dementia in old age

Physical activity in midlife seems to protect from dementia in old age, according to a study carried out at the University of Eastern Finland. Those who engaged in physical activity at least twice a week had a lower risk of dementia than those who were less active. [More]

Research shows blocking DNA repair improves radiation therapy for glioblastomas

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have demonstrated in both cancer cell lines and in mice that blocking critical DNA repair mechanisms could improve the effectiveness of radiation therapy for highly fatal brain tumors called glioblastomas. [More]
Scientists work together to get a better understanding of Parkinson's disease

Scientists work together to get a better understanding of Parkinson's disease

Each day, 80 people are newly diagnosed with Parkinson's disease (PD) in the UK and one in 20 will be under the age of 40. [More]
UCSF launches Brain Health Registry to advance neuroscience research

UCSF launches Brain Health Registry to advance neuroscience research

A new online project led by researchers at UC San Francisco promises to dramatically cut the time and cost of conducting clinical trials for brain diseases, while also helping scientists analyze and track the brain functions of thousands of volunteers over time. [More]

Researcher wins 2014 Abraham White Distinguished Science Award for contributions in treatment of neurological diseases

Michael Chopp, Ph.D., scientific director of the Henry Ford Neuroscience Institute at Henry Ford Hospital, won the 2014 Abraham White Distinguished Science Award for his discovery of the role of a protein in the treatment of brain injuries and neurodegenerative diseases. [More]
Alkermes announces results from phase 3 clinical trial of aripiprazole lauroxil in patients with schizophrenia

Alkermes announces results from phase 3 clinical trial of aripiprazole lauroxil in patients with schizophrenia

Alkermes plc today announced positive topline results from a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 3 clinical trial of aripiprazole lauroxil in patients with schizophrenia. Patients treated once monthly with either 441 mg or 882 mg of aripiprazole lauroxil demonstrated statistically significant reductions from baseline in Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) total scores at week 12, compared to placebo (p<0.001 aripiprazole lauroxil 441 mg, p<0.001 aripiprazole lauroxil 882 mg), which was the prespecified primary endpoint in the study. Based on the positive results from this phase 3 study, Alkermes plans to submit a New Drug Application (NDA) to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the third quarter of 2014. [More]
Research suggests that person can slow aging process by exercising regularly

Research suggests that person can slow aging process by exercising regularly

New research by Canadian sports medicine physician Mark Tarnopolsky, MD, PhD, suggests that a person can slow the speed at which they age by exercising regularly. Dr. Tarnopolsky presented his research titled, "Exercise as a Countermeasure for Aging: From Mice to Humans" today at the 23rd Annual Meeting of the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM). Dr. Tarnopolsky discussed how regular exercise not only improves the quality of life but can also extend a person's lifespan by up to five years. [More]
Arnold Palmer Hospital cardiologists perform Florida's first pediatric implant of new device to prevent sudden cardiac arrest

Arnold Palmer Hospital cardiologists perform Florida's first pediatric implant of new device to prevent sudden cardiac arrest

Cardiologists at Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children today performed Florida's first pediatric implant of a new device to prevent sudden cardiac arrest. [More]

UCL scientists find new way to artificially control paralyzed muscles using light

​A new way to artificially control muscles using light, with the potential to restore function to muscles paralysed by conditions such as motor neuron disease and spinal cord injury, has been developed by scientists at UCL and King's College London. [More]