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Vasopressin more effective for cardiopulmonary resuscitation

Vasopressin more effective for cardiopulmonary resuscitation

Epinephrine has been shown to be a first-choice drug for cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Nevertheless, its β-adrenergic effect probably increases myocardial oxygen consumption and leads to severe cardiac and cerebral injuries; moreover, epinephrine does not elevate long-term survival rates. [More]
Study: Young athletes need to avoid continuous repetitive activity to decrease risk of pars fracture

Study: Young athletes need to avoid continuous repetitive activity to decrease risk of pars fracture

Young athletes today often participate in sports year round and with increasingly competitive club and school sports, it has become common to choose one sport to specialize at a young age. While this specialization may seem like a competitive edge, new Northwestern Medicine research suggests that repetitive activity in just one sport, high impact or not, may not be a great idea for growing athletes. [More]
New MS treatment found safe, tolerable in phase I clinical trials

New MS treatment found safe, tolerable in phase I clinical trials

A new treatment under investigation for multiple sclerosis (MS) is safe and tolerable in phase I clinical trials, according to a study published August 27, 2014, in Neurology Neuroimmunology & Neuroinflammation, a new online-only, freely accessible, specialty medical journal. [More]
Mindfulness training can brighten outlook on life for person with memory loss and caregiver

Mindfulness training can brighten outlook on life for person with memory loss and caregiver

Mindfulness training for individuals with early-stage dementia and their caregivers together in the same class was beneficial for both groups, easing depression and improving sleep and quality of life, reports new Northwestern Medicine study. [More]
Repurposing anti-depressant medication to target new pathway may help combat medulloblastoma

Repurposing anti-depressant medication to target new pathway may help combat medulloblastoma

An international research team reports in Nature Medicine a novel molecular pathway that causes an aggressive form of medulloblastoma, and suggests repurposing an anti-depressant medication to target the new pathway may help combat one of the most common brain cancers in children. [More]
Implantating DBS devices poses no greater risk of complications to older Parkinson's patients

Implantating DBS devices poses no greater risk of complications to older Parkinson's patients

Implantating deep brain stimulation devices poses no greater risk of complications to older patients than it does to younger patients with Parkinson's disease, researchers at Duke Medicine report. [More]
People with cognitive impairment are more likely to have stroke

People with cognitive impairment are more likely to have stroke

People with cognitive impairment are significantly more likely to have a stroke, with a 39% increased risk, than people with normal cognitive function, according to a new study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). [More]
Study sheds new light on sleep drunkenness disorder

Study sheds new light on sleep drunkenness disorder

A study is shining new light on a sleep disorder called "sleep drunkenness". The disorder may be as prevalent as affecting one in every seven people. The research is published in the August 26, 2014, print issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Finding suggests that retina acts as type of window to the brain

Finding suggests that retina acts as type of window to the brain

Researchers at the Gladstone Institutes and University of California, San Francisco have shown that a loss of cells in the retina is one of the earliest signs of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) in people with a genetic risk for the disorder-even before any changes appear in their behavior. [More]
ProMedica participates in innovative research into development of non-invasive treatment for BPH

ProMedica participates in innovative research into development of non-invasive treatment for BPH

ProMedica is participating in innovative research into the development of a safe, non-invasive treatment for BPH or enlarged prostate. BPH can block the flow of urine out of the bladder and cause bladder, urinary tract or kidney problems. [More]
Physician develops new device to treat stroke more effectively

Physician develops new device to treat stroke more effectively

A new device developed by a physician at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences and a researcher at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock could soon be available to treat stroke more effectively. [More]
Children and adolescents with autism have surplus of synapses in brain

Children and adolescents with autism have surplus of synapses in brain

Children and adolescents with autism have a surplus of synapses in the brain, and this excess is due to a slowdown in a normal brain "pruning" process during development, according to a study by neuroscientists at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC). [More]
Researchers restore missing repair protein in skeletal muscle of patients with muscular dystrophy

Researchers restore missing repair protein in skeletal muscle of patients with muscular dystrophy

Advances in the treatment of muscular dystrophy: For the first time, a research team has succeeded in restoring a missing repair protein in skeletal muscle of patients with muscular dystrophy. [More]
Study could pave way for preventing brain and cardiac ischemia induced by atherosclerosis

Study could pave way for preventing brain and cardiac ischemia induced by atherosclerosis

A recent Finnish study could pave the way for preventing brain and cardiac ischemia induced by atherosclerosis. Finnish researchers have found that the low-expression variant of fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4), which is particularly common among Finns, reduces the risk of heart attack and stroke. [More]
Regular blood transfusion therapy reduces recurrence of strokes in kids with sickle cell anemia

Regular blood transfusion therapy reduces recurrence of strokes in kids with sickle cell anemia

Vanderbilt-led research, as part of an international, multicenter trial, found regular blood transfusion therapy significantly reduces the recurrence of silent strokes and strokes in children with sickle cell anemia who have had pre-existing silent strokes, according to study results released today in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM). [More]
Study suggests that colds may temporarily increase stroke risk in kids

Study suggests that colds may temporarily increase stroke risk in kids

A new study suggests that colds and other minor infections may temporarily increase stroke risk in children. The study is published in the August 20, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Study explores the effectiveness of stents in treating vein obstructions

Study explores the effectiveness of stents in treating vein obstructions

Jobst Vascular Institute is conducting pioneering research that looks at using stents to treat blocked veins. For years, stents - small mesh tubes - have been used to treat narrowed or blocked arteries; however none are specifically designed for use in veins. [More]
Study helps explain why sleep becomes more fragmented with age

Study helps explain why sleep becomes more fragmented with age

As people grow older, they often have difficulty falling asleep and staying asleep, and tend to awaken too early in the morning. [More]
VCU receives federal grant totaling $6.9 million to study genetics of alcohol abuse

VCU receives federal grant totaling $6.9 million to study genetics of alcohol abuse

Virginia Commonwealth University has received a federal grant totaling $6.9 million to study the genetics of alcohol abuse and alcoholism - work that may lead to further advances in its treatment, control and prevention. [More]
Rettsyndrome.Org awards $1.5M to advance translational research, support Neuro-Habilitation Program

Rettsyndrome.Org awards $1.5M to advance translational research, support Neuro-Habilitation Program

The International Rett Syndrome Foundation now doing business as Rettsyndrome.org announces today that the Board of Trustees has awarded $1.5M to support 10 new grants to further translational research and launch of the neuro-habilitation therapeutic program, and fund clinical research. [More]