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People with traumatic brain injuries may have buildup of plaques related to Alzheimer's disease

People with traumatic brain injuries may have buildup of plaques related to Alzheimer's disease

A new study suggests that people with brain injuries following head trauma may have buildup of the plaques related to Alzheimer's disease in their brains. The research is published in the February 3, 2016, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Natalizumab shows relapse prevention benefits over fingolimod in MS

Natalizumab shows relapse prevention benefits over fingolimod in MS

Natalizumab may be superior to fingolimod for preventing relapses during the first year of treatment in patients with relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis, observational study findings show. [More]
BDNF gene expression signals cognitive reserve against AD progression

BDNF gene expression signals cognitive reserve against AD progression

Brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene expression contributes to slowing of cognitive decline in older adults and may protect against the effects of Alzheimer’s disease pathology, researchers report in Neurology. [More]
Diffusion tensor imaging ‘should be routine’ in SVD assessment

Diffusion tensor imaging ‘should be routine’ in SVD assessment

Gait speed and microstructural brain damage may be the best indicators of mortality risk in patients with small vessel disease, say researchers. [More]
Molecular imaging and radiochemistry: the importance of instrumentation. An interview with Professor Björn Wängler

Molecular imaging and radiochemistry: the importance of instrumentation. An interview with Professor Björn Wängler

I’m Björn Wängler, Professor for Molecular Imaging and Radiochemistry at the medical faculty Mannheim of Heidelberg University. I’m a radiopharmaceutical chemist by background and completed my PhD in 2004 at the University of Mainz. [More]
New study finds steep decline in basic science publications

New study finds steep decline in basic science publications

A new study has found a steep decline in the number of scholarly papers about basic science published in leading medical journals in the last 20 years. [More]
FDA approves ZEMBRACESymTouch (sumatriptan succinate) injection for treatment of acute migraines

FDA approves ZEMBRACESymTouch (sumatriptan succinate) injection for treatment of acute migraines

Dr. Reddy's Laboratories, announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved ZEMBRACESymTouch (sumatriptan succinate) injection, a drug-device combination product intended for the treatment of acute migraine episodes, with or without aura, in adults who are inadequately managed with existing treatment regimens. [More]
Continuing weight loss from midlife predicts MCI risk

Continuing weight loss from midlife predicts MCI risk

Increasing weight loss from middle age through the later stages of life may be an indicator of mild cognitive impairment, suggest study findings. [More]
Saliva gland test may help diagnose early Parkinson's disease

Saliva gland test may help diagnose early Parkinson's disease

Researchers from Mayo Clinic in Arizona and Banner Sun Health Research Institute have determined that testing a portion of a person's submandibular gland may be a way to diagnose early Parkinson's disease. The study was published this month in Movement Disorders, the official journal of the International Parkinson and Movement Disorders Society. [More]
New way of using MRI scanners to diagnose multiple sclerosis

New way of using MRI scanners to diagnose multiple sclerosis

A new way of using MRI scanners to look for evidence of multiple sclerosis in the brain has been successfully tested by researchers at The University of Nottingham and Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust. [More]
New study lays foundation for future gene replacement therapies to treat ALS patients

New study lays foundation for future gene replacement therapies to treat ALS patients

Scientists have demonstrated for the first time that it is possible to specifically modify gene expression in diseased upper motor neurons, brain cells that break down in ALS. [More]
Research offers novel insights into root causes of schizophrenia

Research offers novel insights into root causes of schizophrenia

Schizophrenia is a mysterious and devastating disorder that afflicts one percent of the adult population worldwide. Its symptoms — hallucinations, emotional withdrawal, and cognitive impairment — are chronic and typically emerge just as individuals are entering adulthood. Today's medications treat just one of these symptoms (psychosis); treatments for the underlying disease and its many other symptoms have been hard to develop, because no one really understands what causes the disorder. [More]
Graphene-based electrodes could be safely implanted in the brain

Graphene-based electrodes could be safely implanted in the brain

Researchers have successfully demonstrated how it is possible to interface graphene - a two-dimensional form of carbon - with neurons, or nerve cells, while maintaining the integrity of these vital cells. The work may be used to build graphene-based electrodes that can safely be implanted in the brain, offering promise for the restoration of sensory functions for amputee or paralysed patients, or for individuals with motor disorders such as epilepsy or Parkinson's disease. [More]
MRI safe for patients with implantable cardiac devices

MRI safe for patients with implantable cardiac devices

The findings of a major study led by cardiovascular imaging specialists at Allegheny General Hospital, part of the Allegheny Health Network, suggest that magnetic resonance imaging is a safe and effective diagnostic procedure for patients with implantable cardiac devices. [More]
Proton radiotherapy as effective as standard photon therapy in treating pediatric brain tumor

Proton radiotherapy as effective as standard photon therapy in treating pediatric brain tumor

The use of proton radiotherapy to treat the most common malignant brain tumor in children is as effective as standard photon (x-ray) radiation therapy while causing fewer long-term side effects such as hearing loss and cognitive disorders, according to a study receiving online publication in Lancet Oncology. [More]
Vestibular test may aid ocular myasthenia gravis diagnosis

Vestibular test may aid ocular myasthenia gravis diagnosis

Assessing extraocular muscle activity by recording ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials is a promising test for isolated ocular myasthenia gravis, report researchers. [More]
Neuroprotection powers for phenytoin in acute optic neuritis

Neuroprotection powers for phenytoin in acute optic neuritis

Selective sodium channel blockade with the anti-epileptic drug phenytoin protects against acute demyelinating optic neuritis, researchers report. [More]
Clinicoradiological syndromes allow rapid recognition of EV71 neurological problems

Clinicoradiological syndromes allow rapid recognition of EV71 neurological problems

Severe enterovirus 71 neurological disease in children predominantly involves the spinal cord and brainstem and can be quickly recognised using the World Health Organisation classification of clinicoradiological syndromes, study findings suggest. [More]
Multinational study suggests new way to classify gliomas

Multinational study suggests new way to classify gliomas

A comprehensive analysis of the molecular characteristics of gliomas—the most common malignant brain tumor—explains why some patients diagnosed with slow-growing (low-grade) tumors quickly succumb to the disease while others with more aggressive (high-grade) tumors survive for many years. [More]

New computational techniques could help researchers pinpoint anatomical source of seizures

For the third of all epilepsy patients who don't respond to medication, an alternative is to locate the small cluster of neurons that act as the seed of a seizure's aberrant electrical activity and surgically remove it. Unfortunately, such surgeries often fail to bring any relief. The ability to reliably pinpoint the anatomical source of seizures, different for each patient, remains elusive. [More]
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