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Overweight and obesity are defined by the WHO as abnormal or excessive fat accumulation that presents a risk to an individuals health.

Overweight and obesity are major risk factors for a number of chronic diseases, including diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and cancer and while it was once an issue only in high income countries, overweight and obesity has now dramatically risen in low- and middle-income countries.Such countries are now facing a "double burden" of disease, for while they continue to deal with the problems of infectious disease and under-nutrition, they are also experiencing a rapid upsurge in chronic disease risk factors such as obesity and overweight, particularly in urban settings.
Obese people experience silent cardiac damage that fuels risk for heart failure

Obese people experience silent cardiac damage that fuels risk for heart failure

Using an ultrasensitive blood test to detect the presence of a protein that heralds heart muscle injury, researchers from Johns Hopkins and elsewhere have found that obese people without overt heart disease experience silent cardiac damage that fuels their risk for heart failure down the road. [More]
Snus consumption in Norway is highest among young people

Snus consumption in Norway is highest among young people

The increase in Scandinavian snus consumption in Norway is highest among young people, according to a new report from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. [More]
Children of women who work full time get fewer hours of sleep, have higher BMIs

Children of women who work full time get fewer hours of sleep, have higher BMIs

The majority of preschoolers may not be getting the amount of sleep they need each night, placing them at higher risk of being overweight or obese within a year, according to a new study. [More]
One third of male adolescents inaccurately perceive their weight, shows study

One third of male adolescents inaccurately perceive their weight, shows study

Almost one third of male adolescents inaccurately perceive their weight. This can influence their eating habits and, consequently, their health, according to a study led by the UAB and conducted with 600 teenage boys from Barcelona and surrounding areas. [More]
New nutrition standards do not limit added sugar in school meals

New nutrition standards do not limit added sugar in school meals

New federal regulations requiring school meals to contain more whole grains, less saturated fat and more fruits and vegetables, while perhaps improving some aspects of the food being served at schools across the United States, may also be perpetuating eating habits linked to obesity, diabetes and other diet-related diseases, an analysis by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers has found. [More]
Poor young people with positive perceptions report better health than people with worse perceptions

Poor young people with positive perceptions report better health than people with worse perceptions

Young people growing up in impoverished neighborhoods who perceive their poor communities in a positive light report better health and well-being than those with worse perceptions of where they live, new research led by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests. [More]
Exposure to antibiotics during pregnancy increases obesity risk in children

Exposure to antibiotics during pregnancy increases obesity risk in children

A study just released by Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health found that children who were exposed to antibiotics in the second or third trimester of pregnancy had a higher risk of childhood obesity at age 7. The research also showed that for mothers who delivered their babies by a Caesarean section, whether elective or non-elective, there was a higher risk for obesity in their offspring. [More]
Lifestyle of young people could pose risk for developing diabetes mellitus

Lifestyle of young people could pose risk for developing diabetes mellitus

Research performed by the University of Veracruz, in the east coast of Mexico, called Lifestyles Nutrition Students and Risk of Type II Diabetes, showed that the lifestyle of young people between 17 and 24 years of age, like lack of physical activity, mild psychological stress, and the omission of breakfast could pose a risk for developing diseases such as diabetes mellitus. [More]
Study finds that fat around heart closely associated with atrial fibrillation

Study finds that fat around heart closely associated with atrial fibrillation

Obesity is a known risk factor for atrial fibrillation, the most common heart rhythm disorder. [More]
People who frequently cook meals at home eat healthier than those who cook less

People who frequently cook meals at home eat healthier than those who cook less

People who frequently cook meals at home eat healthier and consume fewer calories than those who cook less, according to new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research. [More]
Research finding points to potential new treatment for metabolic disorders

Research finding points to potential new treatment for metabolic disorders

Researchers at the University of Michigan have discovered how a previously unknown hormone serves as a messenger from fat cells to the liver and are investigating the potential of developing a new treatment for metabolic disorders. [More]
NIH study finds limited kidney benefit from more rigorous blood pressure treatment

NIH study finds limited kidney benefit from more rigorous blood pressure treatment

Using two drugs was no more effective than a single drug in slowing disease progression in people with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), according to two studies funded by the National Institutes of Health. One of the studies also showed that rigorous blood pressure treatment slowed growth of kidney cysts, a marker of ADPKD, but had little effect on kidney function compared to standard blood pressure treatment. [More]
Preterm birth becomes world's number one killer of young children

Preterm birth becomes world's number one killer of young children

For the first time in history, the complications of preterm birth outrank all other causes as the world's number one killer of young children. [More]
New research finds prevalence of obesity among teens with disabilities

New research finds prevalence of obesity among teens with disabilities

Teens with physical or mental disabilities are more likely to be obese compared to adolescents without disabilities, according to new research presented today at the American Public Health Association's 142nd Annual Meeting in New Orleans. [More]
Chemical compound in coffee may help prevent damaging effects of obesity

Chemical compound in coffee may help prevent damaging effects of obesity

Researchers at the University of Georgia have discovered that a chemical compound commonly found in coffee may help prevent some of the damaging effects of obesity. [More]
Exposure to tobacco smoke, roadway air pollution can contribute to obesity

Exposure to tobacco smoke, roadway air pollution can contribute to obesity

New research from Keck Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC) bolsters evidence that exposure to tobacco smoke and near-roadway air pollution contributes to the development of obesity. [More]
Researchers identify molecular switch that controls inflammatory processes in aging-related disorders

Researchers identify molecular switch that controls inflammatory processes in aging-related disorders

A study led by Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators has identified what appears to be a molecular switch controlling inflammatory processes involved in conditions ranging from muscle atrophy to Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Internet lessons, tailored text alerts can help young people adopt healthier lifestyles

Internet lessons, tailored text alerts can help young people adopt healthier lifestyles

Internet lessons and "tailored" text alerts can help some young people adopt healthier lifestyles, according to a national study aimed at preventing weight gain. [More]
Study: Fast-food outlets in inner city neighborhoods linked to risk of diabetes, obesity

Study: Fast-food outlets in inner city neighborhoods linked to risk of diabetes, obesity

How close you are to fast-food outlets may be linked to your risk of Type-2 diabetes and obesity a new study led by the University of Leicester has discovered. [More]

Research reveals that majority of people unable to correctly identify obesity

The majority of people - including healthcare professionals - are unable to visually identify whether a person is a healthy weight, overweight or obese according to research by psychologists at the University of Liverpool. [More]