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Overweight and obesity are defined by the WHO as abnormal or excessive fat accumulation that presents a risk to an individuals health.

Overweight and obesity are major risk factors for a number of chronic diseases, including diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and cancer and while it was once an issue only in high income countries, overweight and obesity has now dramatically risen in low- and middle-income countries.Such countries are now facing a "double burden" of disease, for while they continue to deal with the problems of infectious disease and under-nutrition, they are also experiencing a rapid upsurge in chronic disease risk factors such as obesity and overweight, particularly in urban settings.
Purdue researchers find potential way to overcome limitations posed by CAR T-cell therapy

Purdue researchers find potential way to overcome limitations posed by CAR T-cell therapy

Purdue University researchers may have figured out a way to call off a cancer cell assassin that sometimes goes rogue and assign it a larger tumor-specific "hit list." [More]
School obesity prevention program helps seventh graders lose weight over long-term period

School obesity prevention program helps seventh graders lose weight over long-term period

A five-week obesity prevention program for seventh grade students in Southern California helped obese students lose weight over a long-term period, according to a new study from the RAND Corporation, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School and the Los Angeles Unified School District. [More]
Study links low- and high-birthweight babies to increased cardiovascular disease risk

Study links low- and high-birthweight babies to increased cardiovascular disease risk

For reasons that remain unclear at least in the smaller babies, both birthweight extremes appear to increase the likelihood of early development of dangerous fat around major organs in the abdomen that significantly increases these risks, said Dr. Brian Stansfield, neonatologist at the Children's Hospital of Georgia and the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University. [More]
Epigenetic modification of Igfbp2 gene may increase risk of obesity and fatty liver

Epigenetic modification of Igfbp2 gene may increase risk of obesity and fatty liver

Scientists of the German Center for Diabetes Research led by the German Institute of Human Nutrition have shown in a mouse model that the epigenetic modification of the Igfbp2 gene observed in the young animal precedes a fatty liver in the adult animal later in life. [More]
Higher aerobic fitness in childhood may reduce metabolic syndrome risks in early adulthood

Higher aerobic fitness in childhood may reduce metabolic syndrome risks in early adulthood

A new study from a group of international researchers has identified a potentially effective tool to reduce the long-term health risks of childhood obesity—aerobic exercise. [More]
Clinical study examines efficacy of new interactive software game to treat pediatric food allergies

Clinical study examines efficacy of new interactive software game to treat pediatric food allergies

Elizabeth McQuaid, Ph.D., a staff psychologist from the Bradley Hasbro Children's Research Center, is leading the Phase II trial of an interactive software game developed to help children with food allergies better manage allergy symptoms, social situations and proper food avoidance. [More]
Studies explore possible link between pediatric cancer and light therapy for newborn jaundice

Studies explore possible link between pediatric cancer and light therapy for newborn jaundice

Two new studies raise enough questions about a possible link between childhood cancer and light therapy for newborn jaundice that clinicians should exercise caution in prescribing the treatment for infants whose jaundice is likely to resolve on its own, a pediatric oncologist from Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center argues in an editorial published today by the journal Pediatrics. [More]
New study may contribute to ongoing debate on fortification program

New study may contribute to ongoing debate on fortification program

Fortifying the U.S. food supply with folic acid was not associated with a decline in certain birth defects that researchers expected to see in California, according to a new study from the Stanford University School of Medicine. [More]
Robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy may reduce risk of blood loss, prolonged hospital stays in obese men

Robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy may reduce risk of blood loss, prolonged hospital stays in obese men

In obese prostate cancer patients, robotic-assisted surgery to remove the prostate reduces the risk of blood loss and prolonged hospital stays, a Loyola Medicine study has found. [More]
Scientists take key step towards understanding link between obesity and physically distant diseases

Scientists take key step towards understanding link between obesity and physically distant diseases

Obesity is on the rise throughout the world, and in some developed countries two-third of the adult population is either overweight or obese. This brings with it an increased risk of serious conditions such as heart disease, stroke, cancer and osteoarthritis. [More]
Four major phenotypes may help improve prediction, prevention of cardiometabolic risk in prediabetes

Four major phenotypes may help improve prediction, prevention of cardiometabolic risk in prediabetes

Prediabetes is associated with increased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, dementia and cancer. However, the disease risk considerably varies among subjects. [More]
Arthroscopic surgery may not be best option for older, arthritis patients

Arthroscopic surgery may not be best option for older, arthritis patients

For patients with serious, ongoing hip pain, sometimes surgery is their best bet for relief. Given the choice between minimally invasive hip surgery and total hip replacement, most patients would choose the less invasive procedure, often done on an outpatient basis. [More]
Study examines effects of ultra-low doses of glyphosate on gene expression profiles

Study examines effects of ultra-low doses of glyphosate on gene expression profiles

Glyphosate, often sold under the brand name of Roundup, is the world's most widely used weed-killer. While Glyphosate has approval from regulatory bodies worldwide, there are growing concerns about its possible adverse health effects. [More]
TAK1 deficit protects mice from obesity

TAK1 deficit protects mice from obesity

Obesity and subsequent complications are increasing in frequency worldwide. The accumulation of adipose tissue is associated with increased inflammation, and it has been proposed that modification of proinflammatory responses could alter adipose tissue composition. [More]
Neuropeptide plays role in driving rhythms of detoxification gene activity, study shows

Neuropeptide plays role in driving rhythms of detoxification gene activity, study shows

A 24-hour rhythm of cellular detoxification in flies and mammals is coordinated by a neuropeptide that also drives feeding in both organisms, found a team led by Amita Sehgal, PhD, a professor of Neuroscience and director of the Chronobiology Program, in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Study shows impact of reducing nicotine doses on body weight

Study shows impact of reducing nicotine doses on body weight

A study published today in Nicotine & Tobacco Research demonstrates in a carefully controlled series of studies that the self-administration of nicotine by rats suppresses body weight gain independent of food intake. [More]
Higher adolescent intake of saturated fat linked to higher dense breast volume in early adulthood

Higher adolescent intake of saturated fat linked to higher dense breast volume in early adulthood

Consuming high amounts of saturated fat or low amounts of mono- and polyunsaturated fats as an adolescent was associated with higher breast density in young adulthood. Breast density is a risk factor for breast cancer. [More]
Maintaining balance of P1 and P2 isoforms vital for reducing colon cancer, colitis risk

Maintaining balance of P1 and P2 isoforms vital for reducing colon cancer, colitis risk

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), of which Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are the main types, is on the increase in the United States, affecting more than 1.6 million people and explaining perhaps the increase in advertisements offering treatments and cures. [More]
Exposure to BBP can make babies obese even before they are born

Exposure to BBP can make babies obese even before they are born

Benzyl butyl phthalate (BBP), a chemical commonly used in the food manufacturing process, can increase fat stores in the body even before we're born, according to a new study published in the Journal of Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology. [More]
Philips leads large scale eHealth initiative to deliver coordinated care for tens of thousands of chronic disease patients across Europe

Philips leads large scale eHealth initiative to deliver coordinated care for tens of thousands of chronic disease patients across Europe

Royal Philips and a consortium of leading European healthcare regions, companies, universities and hospitals* today announced the start of the first large scale care coordination and telehealth program in the European Union to support tens of thousands of people living with chronic conditions. [More]
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