Obesity News and Research RSS Feed - Obesity News and Research Twitter

Overweight and obesity are defined by the WHO as abnormal or excessive fat accumulation that presents a risk to an individuals health.

Overweight and obesity are major risk factors for a number of chronic diseases, including diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and cancer and while it was once an issue only in high income countries, overweight and obesity has now dramatically risen in low- and middle-income countries.Such countries are now facing a "double burden" of disease, for while they continue to deal with the problems of infectious disease and under-nutrition, they are also experiencing a rapid upsurge in chronic disease risk factors such as obesity and overweight, particularly in urban settings.
Study finds that BMI in healthy adolescents has significant association with blood pressures

Study finds that BMI in healthy adolescents has significant association with blood pressures

A recent study published in the American Journal of Hypertension has found that body mass index (BMI) in healthy adolescents has a statistically significant association with both systolic blood pressures (SBP) and diastolic blood pressures (DBP), and highlights the significance of the global trend of rapidly increasing adolescent obesity. [More]
New report: Prevalence of CKD in the U.S. projected to increase 16.7% by 2030

New report: Prevalence of CKD in the U.S. projected to increase 16.7% by 2030

The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) will rise in the United States, according to a new report led by RTI International and published in the American Journal of Kidney Diseases during March's National Kidney Month. [More]
Teen-LABS study explores safety, health effects of surgical weight loss procedures

Teen-LABS study explores safety, health effects of surgical weight loss procedures

Cardiovascular risks of severe pediatric obesity, assessed among adolescents participating in the "Teen Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery" (Teen-LABS) study, were published this week in JAMA Pediatrics. Teen-LABS is a multi-center clinical study funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases at the National Institutes of Health that is examining the safety and health effects of surgical weight loss procedures. [More]
Experts review diagnostic approaches to treat obstructive coronary artery disease in women

Experts review diagnostic approaches to treat obstructive coronary artery disease in women

Obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) in women often presents with different types of symptoms than in men and can be challenging to diagnose due to a variety of factors. A national panel of experts convened to review the latest evidence regarding CAD in women, diagnostic approaches, and new types of tests and technologies. [More]
Alizé Pharma announces launch of AZP-531 Phase II trial in patients with Prader-Willi syndrome

Alizé Pharma announces launch of AZP-531 Phase II trial in patients with Prader-Willi syndrome

Alizé Pharma, a company specialized in the development of drugs for the treatment of metabolic disorders and rare diseases, today announces the launch of a Phase II clinical trial of AZP-531, its unacylated ghrelin analog, in patients with Prader-Willi syndrome. [More]
Cancer Care Ontario raises awareness about colorectal cancer

Cancer Care Ontario raises awareness about colorectal cancer

March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month and Cancer Care Ontario (CCO) is on a mission to raise awareness about an organ that doesn't get the attention it deserves. [More]
Transition completes enrolment of patients in ELND005 Phase 2 study for treatment of AD patients

Transition completes enrolment of patients in ELND005 Phase 2 study for treatment of AD patients

Transition Therapeutics Inc. announced that its wholly owned subsidiary, Transition Therapeutics Ireland Limited completed enrolment of the Phase 2 clinical study evaluating neuropsychiatric drug candidate ELND005 as a treatment for agitation and aggression in patients with mild, moderate and severe Alzheimer's disease ("AD"). [More]
Study reports 10% reduction in overall C-section births in Portugal

Study reports 10% reduction in overall C-section births in Portugal

A new study reports a significant decline in the rate of cesarean section (C-section) births in Portugal. Findings published in Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, a journal of the Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology, indicate a 10% reduction in overall C-section rates between 2009 and 2014, with a 14% reduction in state-hospitals during the same time period. [More]
PHA, MBUSA and five Let's Move! Active Schools partners commit to improve health of youth

PHA, MBUSA and five Let's Move! Active Schools partners commit to improve health of youth

Today at its fourth annual Building a Healthier Future Summit, the Partnership for a Healthier America announced that its first automotive partner, as well as five new Let's Move! Active Schools partners, committed to making healthier choices easier for busy parents and families. [More]
Researchers successfully convert adult human skin cells into neurons that control appetite

Researchers successfully convert adult human skin cells into neurons that control appetite

Researchers have for the first time successfully converted adult human skin cells into neurons of the type that regulate appetite, providing a patient-specific model for studying the neurophysiology of weight control and testing new therapies for obesity. [More]
Scientists confirm relation between levels of certain pollutants in the body and levels of obesity

Scientists confirm relation between levels of certain pollutants in the body and levels of obesity

A team of Spanish scientists, which includes several researchers from the University of Granada, has confirmed that there is a relation between the levels of certain environmental pollutants that a person accumulates in his or her body and their level of obesity. Subjects with more pollutants in their organisms present besides higher levels of cholesterol and triglycerides, which are important risk factors for cardiovascular disease. [More]
Children watching TV for more than two hours a day at greater risk of blood pressure

Children watching TV for more than two hours a day at greater risk of blood pressure

A study on European children concludes that spending more than two hours a day in front of a screen increases the probability of high blood pressure by 30%. The article also points out that doing no daily physical activity or doing less than an hour a day increases this risk by 50%. [More]
Loyola physician reveals top five health concerns for men, offers tips to prevent them

Loyola physician reveals top five health concerns for men, offers tips to prevent them

Men lead women in the likelihood to die from nearly all the most common causes of death. Still, men are less likely to go to the doctor than women and often try to ignore symptoms of health problems. [More]
Researchers find that people with disabilities have unmet medical needs, poorer overall health

Researchers find that people with disabilities have unmet medical needs, poorer overall health

People with disabilities have unmet medical needs and poorer overall health throughout their lives, and as a result should be recognized as a health disparity group so more attention can be directed to improving their quality of life, a team of policy researchers has found. [More]
Emulsifiers can alter gut microbiota composition to induce intestinal inflammation

Emulsifiers can alter gut microbiota composition to induce intestinal inflammation

Emulsifiers, which are added to most processed foods to aid texture and extend shelf life, can alter the gut microbiota composition and localization to induce intestinal inflammation that promotes the development of inflammatory bowel disease and metabolic syndrome, new research shows. [More]
Researchers introduce the idea of using sewage to study human microbiome

Researchers introduce the idea of using sewage to study human microbiome

A new study demonstrates that sewage is an effective means to sample the fecal bacteria from millions of people. Researchers say the information gleaned from the work provides a unique opportunity to monitor, through gut microbes, the public health of a large population without compromising the privacy of individuals. [More]
Study: Plant compounds can help prevent liver damage during menopause

Study: Plant compounds can help prevent liver damage during menopause

Women going through menopause often struggle with weight gain that results when their estrogen levels drop, and many turn to weight-loss supplements to help them shed those extra pounds. But those supplements may cause an accumulation of fat in the liver and a potentially life-threatening condition called non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. [More]
Psoriasis management: an interview with Dr Sandy McBride

Psoriasis management: an interview with Dr Sandy McBride

A major challenge around treating psoriasis is communication - psoriasis can flare and resolve in between appointments so it can be difficult to express and describe the life impact of these flares and recall possible triggers and response to treatments. People with psoriasis can also find it very difficult to talk about their emotions – something known as alexithymia – again making it difficult for clinicians to fully appreciate the impact of psoriasis. [More]
'Walking football' could have a multitude of health benefits, say researchers

'Walking football' could have a multitude of health benefits, say researchers

The new sporting craze of 'Walking Football' may enable people to continue playing football into their 60s and 70s while reaping a multitude of health benefits, according to Aston University researchers. [More]
Henry Ford researchers say that breastfeeding influences baby's immune system development

Henry Ford researchers say that breastfeeding influences baby's immune system development

Henry Ford Hospital researchers say that breastfeeding and other factors influence a baby's immune system development and susceptibility to allergies and asthma by what's in their gut. [More]