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Overweight and obesity are defined by the WHO as abnormal or excessive fat accumulation that presents a risk to an individuals health.

Overweight and obesity are major risk factors for a number of chronic diseases, including diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and cancer and while it was once an issue only in high income countries, overweight and obesity has now dramatically risen in low- and middle-income countries.Such countries are now facing a "double burden" of disease, for while they continue to deal with the problems of infectious disease and under-nutrition, they are also experiencing a rapid upsurge in chronic disease risk factors such as obesity and overweight, particularly in urban settings.
IBM, CVS Health to transform care management services for patients with chronic disease

IBM, CVS Health to transform care management services for patients with chronic disease

CVS Health (NYSE: CVS) and IBM today announced they will use predictive analytics and Watson cognitive computing to transform care management services for patients with chronic disease. [More]
Despite weight-loss surgery, one in five adolescents still suffers from depression

Despite weight-loss surgery, one in five adolescents still suffers from depression

Teenagers suffering from severe obesity generally feel worse than their peers, but after undergoing gastric bypass nearly all experience improved mental health. [More]
Blocking the expression of certain gene reduces excessive fat in patients

Blocking the expression of certain gene reduces excessive fat in patients

By blocking the expression of a certain gene in patients, University of Montreal researchers have contributed to the demonstration of great decreases in the concentration of triglycerides in their blood, even in various severe forms of hypertriglyceridemia and regardless of the base values or the treatment the patient usually receives. [More]
New UNSW research shows high-fat maternal diet changes tastebuds of newborn's heart

New UNSW research shows high-fat maternal diet changes tastebuds of newborn's heart

Baby rats whose mothers were fed a high-fat diet had larger than normal hearts with fewer taste receptors for bitter flavours, according to new UNSW research. [More]
Consumption of B-GOS prebiotic has positive effect on gut microbiota, immune systems of elderly people

Consumption of B-GOS prebiotic has positive effect on gut microbiota, immune systems of elderly people

Clasado Biosciences Limited, the producers and suppliers of the second generation prebiotic Bimuno, a unique trans-galactooligosaccharide, and the Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences, The University of Reading, UK, today announce the results of human research demonstrating the positive effects of an advanced prebiotic on the immune system of the elderly. [More]
New polymer gel could help create swallowable devices for ultra-long drug delivery

New polymer gel could help create swallowable devices for ultra-long drug delivery

Medical devices designed to reside in the stomach have a variety of applications, including prolonged drug delivery, electronic monitoring, and weight-loss intervention. However, these devices, often created with nondegradable elastic polymers, bear an inherent risk of intestinal obstruction as a result of accidental fracture or migration. As such, they are usually designed to remain in the stomach for a limited time. [More]
New Tel Aviv University study reveals impact of skipping breakfast on the health of diabetics

New Tel Aviv University study reveals impact of skipping breakfast on the health of diabetics

More and more Americans on-the-go are skipping the "most important meal of the day," not eating until lunch. This tendency to miss breakfast has already been linked to the growing epidemic of obesity and cardiovascular problems in the US -- and it may put the health of diabetics at risk as well. [More]
Moffitt researchers find cancer healthcare disparities in LGBTQ community

Moffitt researchers find cancer healthcare disparities in LGBTQ community

The Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender/Transsexual, Queer/Questioning (LGBTQ) community is a growing and medically-underserved minority population in the United States, with 3 to 12 percent of the population estimated to identify as LGBTQ. [More]
New study to explore mechanisms responsible for taste changes following RYGB, diet-induced obesity

New study to explore mechanisms responsible for taste changes following RYGB, diet-induced obesity

Currently, one of the most effective surgical methods for treating obesity is the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery, which limits the amount of food and drink that can be ingested at one time and the amount of calories and nutrients absorbed through the intestinal tract. An unintended side effect of RYGB is that it reduces the patient's taste for sweet and fatty foods—but there is no scientific explanation for why these taste changes occur. [More]
Weight loss through lifestyle modifications, bariatric surgery can reduce features of NASH

Weight loss through lifestyle modifications, bariatric surgery can reduce features of NASH

Weight loss through both lifestyle modification and bariatric surgery can significantly reduce features of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a disease characterized by fat in the liver, according to two new studies published in Gastroenterology, the official journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]
Resistance training can help reduce liver fat levels in patients suffering from fatty liver disease

Resistance training can help reduce liver fat levels in patients suffering from fatty liver disease

Resistance training in the gym leads to a fall in liver fat levels. This is the finding of a new study held at the University of Haifa in cooperation with Tel Aviv Medical Center and Tel Aviv University. [More]
UTHealth researchers provide insights into current understanding of childhood obesity epidemic

UTHealth researchers provide insights into current understanding of childhood obesity epidemic

Encouraging more social interaction for children rather than just limiting TV time and enforcing strong nutritional policies in schools are two of the ways to decrease child obesity rates, according to researchers from the Michael & Susan Dell Center for Healthy Living at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Public Health Austin Regional Campus. [More]
New Iowa State study finds strong link between insulin resistance and increased Alzheimer's disease risk

New Iowa State study finds strong link between insulin resistance and increased Alzheimer's disease risk

The fact that obesity increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and some cancers is well known. But a new Iowa State University study adds to the growing evidence that memory loss should also be a top concern. [More]
TSRI scientists awarded grant to explore therapeutic potential of protein receptors in Parkinson's disease, other disorders

TSRI scientists awarded grant to explore therapeutic potential of protein receptors in Parkinson's disease, other disorders

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have been awarded nearly $1.5 million from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health to explore the therapeutic potential of a class of proteins that play essential roles in the regulation and maintenance of human health. [More]
Scientists develop exercise mimic molecule that could help treat type 2 diabetes and obesity

Scientists develop exercise mimic molecule that could help treat type 2 diabetes and obesity

Scientists from the University of Southampton have developed a molecule that acts as an exercise mimic, which could potentially help treat type 2 diabetes and obesity. [More]
New special issue addresses hottest areas of research in cancer and metabolism

New special issue addresses hottest areas of research in cancer and metabolism

The latest Special Issue in ecancermedicalscience collects four original articles from experts in cancer and metabolism, addressing the hottest areas of research in this rapidly developing field. [More]
Study examines possible new approaches to improve health and quality of life for people with MS

Study examines possible new approaches to improve health and quality of life for people with MS

The physical symptoms of weakness and fatigue from multiple sclerosis (MS) can rock a person's confidence and ability to engage in what he or she feels is important, from being a good parent and friend to taking up a hobby, according to Matthew Plow, assistant professor from Case Western Reserve University's Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing. [More]
Regular exercise, healthy diet may help reduce knee pain for overweight adults with diabetes

Regular exercise, healthy diet may help reduce knee pain for overweight adults with diabetes

Knee pain in older adults, often caused by osteoarthritis, usually means more visits to the doctor and also can be a harbinger of disability. [More]
Body fat can send stress signals, say University of Florida Health researchers

Body fat can send stress signals, say University of Florida Health researchers

The brain's effect on other parts of the body has been well established. Now, a group that includes two University of Florida Health researchers has found that it's a two-way street: Body fat can send a signal that affects the way the brain deals with stress and metabolism. [More]
Endocrine Society selects 18 endocrinologists as winners of 2016 Laureate Awards

Endocrine Society selects 18 endocrinologists as winners of 2016 Laureate Awards

The Endocrine Society today announced it has chosen 18 accomplished endocrinologists as winners of the organization's prestigious 2016 Laureate Awards. [More]
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