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Overweight and obesity are defined by the WHO as abnormal or excessive fat accumulation that presents a risk to an individuals health.

Overweight and obesity are major risk factors for a number of chronic diseases, including diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and cancer and while it was once an issue only in high income countries, overweight and obesity has now dramatically risen in low- and middle-income countries.Such countries are now facing a "double burden" of disease, for while they continue to deal with the problems of infectious disease and under-nutrition, they are also experiencing a rapid upsurge in chronic disease risk factors such as obesity and overweight, particularly in urban settings.
Three Johns Hopkins researchers awarded grants for work on potential treatments for diabetes

Three Johns Hopkins researchers awarded grants for work on potential treatments for diabetes

Three Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine researchers have been awarded two-year grants for their work on potential treatments for diabetes, Novo Nordisk announced this month. Of the 110 initial submissions to the new Novo Nordisk Diabetes and Obesity Biologics Science Forum Program, only four projects were funded, three of which are led by Johns Hopkins researchers. They are Jonathan Powell, M.D., Ph.D.; G. William Wong, Ph.D.; and Elias Zambidis, M.D., Ph.D. [More]
Longer Looks: HIV epidemic in the Deep South; planning for Alzheimer's; Obamacare conspiracy theory

Longer Looks: HIV epidemic in the Deep South; planning for Alzheimer's; Obamacare conspiracy theory

One of the strangest things about the H.I.V. epidemic in the Deep South-;from Louisiana to Alabama to Mississippi-;is how easily most Americans have elided it, choosing instead to imagine that the disease is now an out-there, elsewhere epidemic. [More]
Prenatal risk factors linked with development of chronic kidney disease in children

Prenatal risk factors linked with development of chronic kidney disease in children

Certain prenatal risk factors are associated with the development of chronic kidney disease in children, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN). Future studies should investigate whether modifying these factors could help protect children's kidney health. [More]

SCRA Technology Ventures announces sale of Selah Genomics to EKF Diagnostics

SCRA Technology Ventures today announced that portfolio company Selah Genomics was sold to EKF Diagnostics, a publically-traded UK-based diagnostics firm. Selah, a provider of advanced molecular and genomic diagnostic services, completed the deal today, making it the largest of nine exits out of the SC Launch program since 2006. [More]
Food shortage will have serious implications for people and governments in the world

Food shortage will have serious implications for people and governments in the world

The world is less than 40 years away from a food shortage that will have serious implications for people and governments, according to a top scientist at the U.S. Agency for International Development. [More]
First MRI scan shows 'brown fat' in living adult can help fight diabetes

First MRI scan shows 'brown fat' in living adult can help fight diabetes

The first MRI scan to show 'brown fat' in a living adult could prove to be an essential step towards a new wave of therapies to aid the fight against diabetes and obesity. [More]
Targeted Medical Pharma signs agreement with Lebanon based company, ATL

Targeted Medical Pharma signs agreement with Lebanon based company, ATL

Targeted Medical Pharma, today announced the completion of an agreement between Analytical Testing Laboratories (ATL), a Lebanon based company that specializes in drug testing services and inborn errors of metabolism, for the exclusive distribution of the company's amino acid based products to physicians and pharmacies throughout the Middle East. [More]

Study indicates that culture or genetics could be blamed for obesity disparities in women

Racial disparities in obesity rates among the third of U.S. adults considered obese are often blamed on socioeconomic status because of its influence on diet and physical activity, but new findings from the University of Alabama at Birmingham published in Obesity suggest otherwise — particularly for women. [More]
Study indicates that changes in appetite and taste are very common after gastric bypass surgery

Study indicates that changes in appetite and taste are very common after gastric bypass surgery

Changes in appetite, taste and smell are par for the course for people who have undergone Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery during which one's stomach is made smaller and small intestines shortened. [More]

EKF Diagnostics' new handheld Lactate Scout+ device ideal for checking sports medical health

Following the recent launch of its new Lactate Scout+ analyzer incorporating hematocrit compensation, EKF Diagnostics, the global diagnostics business, is seeing an increasing interest from a broad range of users in both sports and medical science. Consequently, EKF has launched a specific product resource website housing numerous guides and scientific papers on lactate testing. [More]
New syndrome osteosarcopenic obesity links deterioration of bone density and muscle mass with obesity

New syndrome osteosarcopenic obesity links deterioration of bone density and muscle mass with obesity

Florida State University researchers have identified a new syndrome called "osteosarcopenic obesity" that links the deterioration of bone density and muscle mass with obesity. [More]
Waist circumference, body mass index, and postmenopausal breast cancer incidence

Waist circumference, body mass index, and postmenopausal breast cancer incidence

A study of predominantly white women finds a larger waist circumference is associated with higher risk of postmenopausal breast cancer, but not beyond its contribution to BMI. The study, by American Cancer Society researchers, fails to confirm previous findings that body shape itself is an independent risk factor for breast cancer. The current study appears in the April 2014 issue of Cancer Causes, and Control. [More]

Alarming increases in diabetes and pre-diabetes cases in the U.S.

Cases of diabetes and pre-diabetes in the United States have nearly doubled since 1988, suggests new research from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, with obesity apparently to blame for the surge. The researchers also found that the burden of the disease has not hit all groups equally, with alarming increases in diabetes in blacks, Hispanics and the elderly. [More]

FDA approves GSK's Tanzeum as once-weekly treatment for type 2 diabetes

GlaxoSmithKline plc today announced that the US Food and Drug Administration has approved Tanzeum (albiglutide) for injection, for subcutaneous use, as a once-weekly treatment for type 2 diabetes. Tanzeum has been approved as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. [More]

Eating Recovery Center collaborates with Eating Disorder Center at San Antonio

Eating Recovery Center (www.EatingRecoveryCenter.com), an international center providing comprehensive, specialized eating disorders treatment to female and male adults, adolescents and children, has partnered with the Eating Disorder Center at San Antonio (EDCASA). [More]
Research: Antibiotics for Q fever can contribute to obesity

Research: Antibiotics for Q fever can contribute to obesity

Scientists have unearthed still more evidence that antibiotics can contribute to obesity. Research published ahead of print in the journal Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy suggests that patients on long-term antibiotic treatment gained weight and had significant changes in their gut microbiota. [More]

Gaining too much or too little weight during pregnancy may increase risk of having obese child, says study

Gaining both too much or too little weight during pregnancy appears to increase the risk of having an overweight or obese child, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published today in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. [More]
Students competing in Center for Medical Innovation’s Annual Bench-to-Bedside Competition win nearly $72,000

Students competing in Center for Medical Innovation’s Annual Bench-to-Bedside Competition win nearly $72,000

University of Utah students competing in the Center for Medical Innovation's Annual Bench-to-Bedside Competition were awarded nearly $72,000 in prize money on April 9 at the Utah State Capitol. [More]

UK study finds link between low vitamin D status and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in British children

A UK study investigating the link between low vitamin D status and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in British children has identified a genetic variant associated with the disease's severity. [More]
miRNA expression and inhibition: an interview with Maja Petkovic, AMSBIO

miRNA expression and inhibition: an interview with Maja Petkovic, AMSBIO

RNA interference is a process in which RNA molecules inhibit gene expression. This gene silencing process is controlled by RNA-induced silencing complex or RISC and is initiated by small duplex RNA molecules or miRNA that is present inside cell plasma. [More]