Pediatrics News and Research RSS Feed - Pediatrics News and Research

Pediatrics is the branch of medicine that deals with the medical care of infants, children, and adolescents. The age limit of such patients ranges from birth to 18. In countries where the age of majority is 18, this age limit may be from birth to age 17 (such as in Canada). A medical practitioner who specializes in this area is known as a pediatrician.
New nationwide survey shows steady increase in pediatric patients treated with proton radiation therapy

New nationwide survey shows steady increase in pediatric patients treated with proton radiation therapy

Results from a new nationwide survey announced today indicate a steady increase in the number of pediatric patients who are being treated with proton radiation therapy for cancerous and non-cancerous tumors. [More]
Aptensio XR once-daily treatment for ADHD to be available in Summer 2015

Aptensio XR once-daily treatment for ADHD to be available in Summer 2015

Today, Rhodes Pharmaceuticals L.P. announced that Aptensio XR, a once-daily central nervous system stimulant indicated for the treatment of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) will be available to patients beginning Summer 2015. [More]
Pharmacy data ‘could reduce asthma treatment inequality’

Pharmacy data ‘could reduce asthma treatment inequality’

Research has found that the ratio of dispensed asthma controller to rescue medication at community pharmacies is associated with the need for emergency asthma treatment in paediatric patients. [More]
Women born preterm have higher risk of preterm delivery, study finds

Women born preterm have higher risk of preterm delivery, study finds

Women who were born preterm have a higher risk of giving birth to preterm children, according to a study, published in the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology, from researchers of the CHU Sainte-Justine and the University of Montreal. [More]
Study finds new colon cancer screening as promising alternative to colonoscopy for African Americans

Study finds new colon cancer screening as promising alternative to colonoscopy for African Americans

In a first-of-its-kind clinical trial, physician-scientists at University Hospitals Case Medical Center Seidman Cancer Center and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine found that a new non-invasive technology for colon cancer screening is a promising alternative to colonoscopy for African Americans. [More]
Researchers reveal molecular steps that allow pancreatic cancer to spread to the liver

Researchers reveal molecular steps that allow pancreatic cancer to spread to the liver

An international team led by Weill Cornell Medical College investigators has illuminated the precise molecular steps that enable pancreatic cancer to spread to the liver -- the event that makes the most common form of the disease lethal. By understanding this process, investigators say their discovery can lead to targeted treatments that delay metastasis, and could offer clinicians a new biomarker to test for the earliest signs of pancreatic cancer. [More]
Adolescents with sleep issues more likely to use alcohol, marijuana

Adolescents with sleep issues more likely to use alcohol, marijuana

Adolescents who sleep less or stay up later are significantly more likely to have used alcohol and marijuana over the past month when compared to their peers who report better sleep patterns, according to a new RAND Corporation study. [More]
Griffith students providing healthcare in Malawi

Griffith students providing healthcare in Malawi

Malawi was the recent destination for a group of Griffith Health students who found that they could learn more from the disadvantaged local people than they had ever imagined. [More]
Lumenis and top urologists to host instructive workshop series at AUA 2015

Lumenis and top urologists to host instructive workshop series at AUA 2015

Lumenis Ltd., the world's largest energy-based medical device company for surgical, ophthalmology, and aesthetic applications announced today that the company will host an educational symposium, in collaboration with nationally distinguished urologists, and an instructive workshop series at the American Urological Association's (AUA) 2015 Annual Meeting, being held in New Orleans, La., from May 15 – 19, 2015. [More]
Combined therapy shows promise in cystic fibrosis patients

Combined therapy shows promise in cystic fibrosis patients

Treatment with two medications that target the most common genetic cause of cystic fibrosis improves lung function and lowers the rate of pulmonary exacerbations, according to the results from a Phase III international clinical trial published online in the New England Journal of Medicine on May 17, 2015. [More]
Blocking FGL2 protein may offer new approach to treating brain cancer

Blocking FGL2 protein may offer new approach to treating brain cancer

Blocking FGL2, a protein known to promote cancer, may offer a new strategy for treating brain cancer, according to a study at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. [More]
TGen-led study associates 'X-linked' syndromes to genetic origins

TGen-led study associates 'X-linked' syndromes to genetic origins

A study led by the Translational Genomics Research Institute has for the first time matched dozens of infantile diseases and syndromes involving muscle weakness and stiff joints to their likely genetic origins. [More]
UBM Medica recognized with three national accolades by ASHPE

UBM Medica recognized with three national accolades by ASHPE

UBM Medica announced today that Physicians Practice, a leading online community for physicians and practice management professionals, has been recognized by the American Society of Healthcare Publication Editors with three national accolades. [More]
MD Anderson researchers discover link between telomere degeneration and MDS

MD Anderson researchers discover link between telomere degeneration and MDS

A study revealing fresh insight about chromosome "tails" called telomeres may provide scientists with a new way to look at developing treatments or even preventing a group of blood cell disorders known as myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). [More]
Going to the dentist just got a little less scary for U.S. children with autism

Going to the dentist just got a little less scary for U.S. children with autism

Going to the dentist might have just gotten a little less scary for the estimated 1 in 68 U.S. children with autism spectrum disorder as well as children with dental anxiety, thanks to new research from USC. [More]
Scientists identify gene that causes hereditary hypertension and brachydactyly type E

Scientists identify gene that causes hereditary hypertension and brachydactyly type E

Individuals with this altered gene have hereditary hypertension (high blood pressure) and at the same time a skeletal malformation called brachydactyly type E, which is characterized by unusually short fingers and toes. The effect on blood pressure is so serious that -- if left untreated -- it most often leads to death before age fifty. [More]
Gynecologic oncologist awarded grant to improve quality of life for women with endometrial cancer

Gynecologic oncologist awarded grant to improve quality of life for women with endometrial cancer

The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute Board of Governors recently awarded more than $2.7 million in contracted funding to Katina Robison, MD, a gynecologic oncologist with the Program in Women's Oncology at Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island, a Care New England hospital, for the study "Cancer of the Uterus and Treatment of Stress Incontinence." [More]
Discovery opens up new avenue for development of potential therapies to treat, prevent malaria

Discovery opens up new avenue for development of potential therapies to treat, prevent malaria

Scientists have identified a protein on the surface of human red blood cells that serves as an essential entry point for invasion by the malaria parasite. This discovery opens up a promising new avenue for the development of therapies to treat and prevent malaria. [More]
UC Davis researchers develop new intervention to help depressed mothers seek treatment

UC Davis researchers develop new intervention to help depressed mothers seek treatment

Researchers at UC Davis have developed a new intervention that identifies potentially depressed mothers and encourages them to seek treatment. The Motivating our Mothers (MOM) program takes a unique approach, relying on pediatricians rather than the mother's doctor for diagnosis. [More]
Loyola's Ronald McDonald Children's Hospital implements pediatric early warning scoring system

Loyola's Ronald McDonald Children's Hospital implements pediatric early warning scoring system

The Ronald McDonald Children's Hospital at Loyola University Medical Center has implemented a pediatric early warning scoring system to better identify children who are at-risk of becoming critically ill while in the hospital. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement