Pediatrics News and Research RSS Feed - Pediatrics News and Research

Pediatrics is the branch of medicine that deals with the medical care of infants, children, and adolescents. The age limit of such patients ranges from birth to 18. In countries where the age of majority is 18, this age limit may be from birth to age 17 (such as in Canada). A medical practitioner who specializes in this area is known as a pediatrician.
WellStar establishes new health park in East Cobb

WellStar establishes new health park in East Cobb

WellStar East Cobb Health Park opened its doors September 15, serving as a comprehensive, one-stop shop for outpatient medical needs. [More]
Simple point-of-care testing device provides more rapid diagnosis of anemia

Simple point-of-care testing device provides more rapid diagnosis of anemia

A simple point-of-care testing device for anemia could provide more rapid diagnosis of the common blood disorder and allow inexpensive at-home self-monitoring of persons with chronic forms of the disease. [More]
New class of compounds protect brain cells from traumatic brain injury

New class of compounds protect brain cells from traumatic brain injury

A new class of compounds has now been shown to protect brain cells from the type of damage caused by blast-mediated traumatic brain injury (TBI). [More]
Kids who are bullied at ages 8-10 are more likely to suffer from nightmares by age 12

Kids who are bullied at ages 8-10 are more likely to suffer from nightmares by age 12

Children who are bullied at ages 8-10 are more likely to suffer from sleep walking, night terrors or nightmares by the time they are 12 years old. [More]
Get SET Early: New program to reduce mean age of ASD diagnosis in multiple cities

Get SET Early: New program to reduce mean age of ASD diagnosis in multiple cities

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is now estimated to impact one in every 68 children born in the United States. Yet despite its rising prevalence and the known benefits of early detection and treatment, toddlers in much of the United States are routinely not identified as possibly having ASD until well after their third birthday. [More]
Young adults use ER less often after health law allowed them to stay on parents' plans

Young adults use ER less often after health law allowed them to stay on parents' plans

That conclusion is from one study of the expanded coverage. Another study finds young adults don't see themselves as healthier and many still find health care expensive. [More]
Research specifically targets males' accessibility to emergency contraception

Research specifically targets males' accessibility to emergency contraception

Male shoppers in search of emergency contraception do not always have an easy time making these purchases and may be turned away at their local pharmacies. [More]
Hospitals see sharp declines in rates of CLABSIs and ventilator-associated pneumonias

Hospitals see sharp declines in rates of CLABSIs and ventilator-associated pneumonias

Hospitals across the country have seen sharp declines in rates of central line-associated blood stream infections (CLABSIs) and ventilator-associated pneumonias (VAPs) among critically ill neonates and children, according to a new study in the journal Pediatrics. [More]
Research shown to increase chances of babies surviving neonatal resuscitation

Research shown to increase chances of babies surviving neonatal resuscitation

For several Edmonton parents, the work being done by University of Alberta researchers Po-Yin Cheung and Georg Schm-lzer could not be more meaningful. [More]
Treatment at earliest age reduces symptoms of autism spectrum disorder

Treatment at earliest age reduces symptoms of autism spectrum disorder

Treatment at the earliest age when symptoms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) appear - sometimes in infants as young as 6 months old - significantly reduces symptoms so that, by age 3, most who received the therapy had neither ASD nor developmental delay, a UC Davis MIND Institute research study has found. [More]
Researchers aim to safely and quickly suppress food allergies in human

Researchers aim to safely and quickly suppress food allergies in human

In mice, the answer appears to be "yes," but making sure the same can happen in humans is a task that Fred Finkelman, MD, professor of medicine and pediatrics in the University of Cincinnati's (UC) College of Medicine and a researcher at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, is attempting to tackle. [More]
Skipping school, failing test linked to more frequent vaginal sex, less frequent condom use

Skipping school, failing test linked to more frequent vaginal sex, less frequent condom use

What do skipping school, failing tests and engaging in risky sexual behavior have in common? Lots, according to Indiana University researchers who combed through 80,000 diary entries written by 14- to 17-year-old girls. [More]
State highlights: Texas lawmaker proposes '3 strikes' for nursing homes

State highlights: Texas lawmaker proposes '3 strikes' for nursing homes

New Yorker Deadra Malloy was diagnosed with HIV in 1988, but she remained healthy for so long she wasn't completely convinced she was positive. [More]
Breast milk may protect premature infants from intestinal destruction

Breast milk may protect premature infants from intestinal destruction

Premature infants are at increased risk for a potentially lethal gastrointestinal disease called necrotizing enterocolitis, or NEC. [More]
Schools without health plans are unprepared to handle life-threatening emergencies

Schools without health plans are unprepared to handle life-threatening emergencies

Only one in four students with asthma and half of children with food allergies have emergency health management plans in place at school, leaving schools inadequately prepared to manage daily needs and handle medical emergencies related to often life-threatening medical conditions, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study in partnership with Chicago Public Schools (CPS). [More]
Transparency Life receives SBIR program grant to fund Phase 2a proof-of-concept study for MS

Transparency Life receives SBIR program grant to fund Phase 2a proof-of-concept study for MS

Transparency Life Sciences, LLC (TLS), the world's first clinical-stage drug development company based on open innovation, today announced that it has received a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program grant to fund a Phase 2a proof-of-concept study testing the utility of the ACE inhibitor lisinopril as an adjunctive therapy for multiple sclerosis (MS). [More]
Study urges women not to drink during full nine months of pregnancy

Study urges women not to drink during full nine months of pregnancy

All things in moderation, the saying goes, but if you are a pregnant woman no amount of alcohol is known to be safe for the developing baby. [More]
Synthetic platelet-like particles could augment natural blood clotting for treatment of traumatic injuries

Synthetic platelet-like particles could augment natural blood clotting for treatment of traumatic injuries

A new class of synthetic platelet-like particles could augment natural blood clotting for the emergency treatment of traumatic injuries - and potentially offer doctors a new option for curbing surgical bleeding and addressing certain blood clotting disorders without the need for transfusions of natural platelets. [More]
Research roundup: Doctors' training; expanding FEHBP; the ACA and part-time work

Research roundup: Doctors' training; expanding FEHBP; the ACA and part-time work

Growing concern about rising costs and potential harms of medical care has stimulated interest in assessing physicians' ability to minimize the provision of unnecessary care. Objective: To assess whether graduates of residency programs characterized by low-intensity practice patterns are more capable of managing patients' care conservatively ... [More]
Study could lead to improvements in outcomes for women with triple-negative breast cancer

Study could lead to improvements in outcomes for women with triple-negative breast cancer

William M. Sikov, a medical oncologist in the Breast Health Center and associate director for clinical research in the Program in Women's Oncology at Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island, served as study chair and lead author for a recently-published major national study that could lead to improvements in outcomes for women with triple-negative breast cancer, an aggressive form of the disease that disproportionately affects younger women. [More]