Pediatrics News and Research RSS Feed - Pediatrics News and Research

Pediatrics is the branch of medicine that deals with the medical care of infants, children, and adolescents. The age limit of such patients ranges from birth to 18. In countries where the age of majority is 18, this age limit may be from birth to age 17 (such as in Canada). A medical practitioner who specializes in this area is known as a pediatrician.
Natural disaster survival tips for families

Natural disaster survival tips for families

If an earthquake hit tomorrow, would you be prepared? What would you do if a hurricane or wild fire was headed toward your community and you only had a few hours' notice to grab your belongings and evacuate? How would you handle situations like these with your children? [More]
Allakos secures additional $10M investment to expand its development portfolio

Allakos secures additional $10M investment to expand its development portfolio

Allakos Inc. announced today that it has secured an additional $10 million investment from current investors to fund development of an additional therapeutic antibody. [More]
ProMedica and Harbor team up to address growing community need for mental health services

ProMedica and Harbor team up to address growing community need for mental health services

Today ProMedica and Harbor announced plans to form a joint operating company (JOC) to address a growing community need for mental health services in northwest Ohio and southeast Michigan. [More]
Antibiotic exposure in infancy linked to childhood obesity

Antibiotic exposure in infancy linked to childhood obesity

Repeated exposure to broad-spectrum antibiotics in the first two years of life is associated with early childhood obesity, say researchers from The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia in a retrospective study based on data from electronic health records from the extensive CHOP Care Network. [More]
Specific nurse-to-patient staffing standards lower job-related injuries, illnesses for nurses

Specific nurse-to-patient staffing standards lower job-related injuries, illnesses for nurses

A 2004 California law mandating specific nurse-to-patient staffing standards in acute care hospitals significantly lowered job-related injuries and illnesses for both registered nurses and licensed practical nurses, according to UC Davis research published online in the International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health. [More]
Rogers Behavioral Health System opens treatment center in Tampa, Fla.

Rogers Behavioral Health System opens treatment center in Tampa, Fla.

Rogers Behavioral Health System, Wisconsin's largest, not-for-profit mental health and addiction services provider, is opening its first treatment center outside of Wisconsin in Tampa, Fla., on Monday, September 29. [More]
AAPA welcomes NGA’s report that highlights role of PAs in the U.S. healthcare

AAPA welcomes NGA’s report that highlights role of PAs in the U.S. healthcare

The American Academy of Physician Assistants welcomes a new report from the National Governors Association (NGA) that highlights the important—and rapidly growing—role of physician assistants (PAs) in the U.S. healthcare workforce. [More]
CHLA achieves Accredited Pediatric Heart Failure Institute designation

CHLA achieves Accredited Pediatric Heart Failure Institute designation

Children's Hospital Los Angeles was honored by The Healthcare Colloquium as the first west coast pediatric hospital to achieve designation as an Accredited Pediatric Heart Failure Institute. [More]
Prevalence of NTDs in Latin American countries presents opportunity for US foreign policy

Prevalence of NTDs in Latin American countries presents opportunity for US foreign policy

Recently published prevalence estimates of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) in five Latin American countries - Bolivia, Cuba, Ecuador, Nicaragua and Venezuela - could suggest a new direction for United States foreign policy in the region, according to a tropical-disease expert at Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy. [More]
Study findings have potential to advance treatments for small cell lung cell cancer

Study findings have potential to advance treatments for small cell lung cell cancer

Two recently published studies by a research team at University Hospitals Case Medical Center Seidman Cancer Center have the potential to advance treatments for small cell lung cell cancer (SCLC). This aggressive form of lung cancer has seen no treatment advances in 30 years and "is a disease in urgent need of new drug therapies," write the study's authors. [More]
Researchers explore gene expression in normal vestibular nerves, vestibular schwannomas

Researchers explore gene expression in normal vestibular nerves, vestibular schwannomas

Researchers from the University of Toronto, directed by Drs. Gelareh Zadeh and Boris Krischek, investigated gene expression in normal vestibular nerves and vestibular schwannomas (VSs). [More]
MediValve successfully completes post-market clinical evaluation of acWire Guidewire

MediValve successfully completes post-market clinical evaluation of acWire Guidewire

MediValve, Ltd., a Trendlines portfolio company, today announced that it has successfully completed the first two cases of post-market clinical evaluation of its acWire Guidewire. [More]
Study raises questions about educational efforts to increase knowledge of HPV vaccination

Study raises questions about educational efforts to increase knowledge of HPV vaccination

"Knowledge is power" is an old saying. Another cliché warns, "a little knowledge is a dangerous thing." When it comes to getting inoculated against the Human Papilloavirus (HPV), it seems that neither saying is true. In fact, according to a study by a multidisciplinary University of Pennsylvania research team, knowledge may in fact be a meaningless thing. [More]
Brainwave EEG test could be the key to accurate, precise identification of children with autism

Brainwave EEG test could be the key to accurate, precise identification of children with autism

A new study by researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University suggests that measuring how fast the brain responds to sights and sounds could help in objectively classifying people on the autism spectrum and may help diagnose the condition earlier. [More]
ACP and 20 other groups applaud Senate bill that ensures primary care access for women, children

ACP and 20 other groups applaud Senate bill that ensures primary care access for women, children

The efforts and leadership of Senators Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) and Patty Murray (D-Wash.) to ensure access to vital primary care services were lauded yesterday by the American College of Physicians and 20 other organizations, representing internal medicine and related subspecialties. [More]
Single-family room environment can optimize care for preterm infants

Single-family room environment can optimize care for preterm infants

The prevalence of preterm birth - the birth of an infant prior to 37 weeks of pregnancy - is a significant health problem that has increased over the past two decades. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, preterm birth affects nearly 500,000 babies each year, or one of every eight born in the U.S. While medical care has improved survival rates for preterm infants, questions remain about ways to positively impact the neurodevelopmental outcomes of preterm infants. [More]
Food allergies in inner-city children: an interview with Dr. Robert Wood

Food allergies in inner-city children: an interview with Dr. Robert Wood

The general interest is in trying to better define the true prevalence of food allergy; not just how common it is, but whether it's becoming more common over time. [More]
Improvements in NICU nursing care could boost health outcomes for underweight black infants

Improvements in NICU nursing care could boost health outcomes for underweight black infants

The health outcomes and quality of care for underweight black infants could greatly improve with more nurses on staff at hospitals with higher concentrations of black patients, according to a new study co-led by a Rutgers researcher. [More]
SLU pediatric researcher to study efficacy of new hepatitis C drug treatment in children

SLU pediatric researcher to study efficacy of new hepatitis C drug treatment in children

After the success of a new drug treatment in adults with hepatitis C infection, a Saint Louis University pediatric researcher is testing the safety and efficacy of the medications in children. [More]
LSU Health researchers reveal how Chop plays crucial role to combat cancer

LSU Health researchers reveal how Chop plays crucial role to combat cancer

Research led by Paulo Rodriguez, PhD, an assistant research professor of Microbiology, Immunology & Parasitology at LSU Health New Orleans' Stanley S. Scott Cancer Center, has identified the crucial role an inflammatory protein known as Chop plays in the body's ability to fight cancer. [More]