Pediatrics News and Research RSS Feed - Pediatrics News and Research

Pediatrics is the branch of medicine that deals with the medical care of infants, children, and adolescents. The age limit of such patients ranges from birth to 18. In countries where the age of majority is 18, this age limit may be from birth to age 17 (such as in Canada). A medical practitioner who specializes in this area is known as a pediatrician.
SSRI treatment improves cognitive and social functioning in young children with fragile X

SSRI treatment improves cognitive and social functioning in young children with fragile X

Treatment with sertraline may provide nominal but important improvements in cognition and social participation in very young children with fragile X syndrome, the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability and the leading single-gene cause of autism, a study by researchers with the UC Davis MIND Institute has found. [More]
Children with existing food allergy at increased risk of developing asthma and rhinitis

Children with existing food allergy at increased risk of developing asthma and rhinitis

Children with a history of food allergy have a high risk of developing asthma and allergic rhinitis during childhood as well. [More]
Study explores how parental use of religious coping strategies in NICU affects family's interactions

Study explores how parental use of religious coping strategies in NICU affects family's interactions

Understanding how parents cope while their child is in the neonatal intensive care unit could lead to better support for the family and a more successful transition to home when the baby is healthy, according to Penn State College of Medicine and Penn State Harrisburg researchers. [More]
VUMC receives $11 million renewal grant to advance pulmonary fibrosis research

VUMC receives $11 million renewal grant to advance pulmonary fibrosis research

Vanderbilt University Medical Center has received an $11 million program project renewal grant from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute to study the genetics and underlying biological mechanisms that lead to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). [More]
Umbilical cells from babies of obese mothers show impaired expression of vital genes regulating metabolism

Umbilical cells from babies of obese mothers show impaired expression of vital genes regulating metabolism

Scientists have long known that infants born to women who are obese show higher risks of obesity, but they don't fully understand what boosts those risks. [More]
Study suggests limiting tackling drills in youth football practices could reduce risk of head impacts

Study suggests limiting tackling drills in youth football practices could reduce risk of head impacts

Nearly three quarters of the football players in the U.S. are less than 14 years old. But amid growing concern about concussion risk in football, the majority of the head-impact research has focused on college and professional players. [More]
Injecting omega-3 fatty acid reduces brain damage in neonatal mouse model of stroke

Injecting omega-3 fatty acid reduces brain damage in neonatal mouse model of stroke

Researchers from Columbia University Medical Center found that omega-3 fatty acids reduced brain damage in a neonatal mouse model of stroke. [More]
New recommendations offer evidence-based strategies to help teenagers avoid obesity and eating disorders

New recommendations offer evidence-based strategies to help teenagers avoid obesity and eating disorders

A single approach can prevent both obesity and eating disorders in teenagers, according to new guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics. [More]
Active video games offer potential personal and public health benefits

Active video games offer potential personal and public health benefits

The combination of augmented reality technology, geocaching, and other novel techniques to create innovative active video games (AVGs) has potential personal and public health implications, as discussed in the Editorial "Pokémon Go, Go, Go, Gone? (http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/g4h.2016.01055.tbp)" published in Games for Health, a peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
New clinical trial to examine safety of checkpoint inhibitor in pediatric cancer patients

New clinical trial to examine safety of checkpoint inhibitor in pediatric cancer patients

In an innovative, first-in-pediatrics study, available only at Children's Hospital Los Angeles, researchers will be enrolling children between 1 and 18 years of age who have certain types of relapsed or treatment-resistant cancer. [More]
Many children treated for stroller or carrier-related injuries in U.S. hospitals, study finds

Many children treated for stroller or carrier-related injuries in U.S. hospitals, study finds

Although strollers and carriers are typically used to safely transport children, injuries do occur while using these products. [More]
Study finds alarming rates of obesity, high blood pressure readings among adolescent student-athletes

Study finds alarming rates of obesity, high blood pressure readings among adolescent student-athletes

Researchers at Thomas Jefferson University found similar rates of obesity and high blood pressure readings in student-athletes as would be expected in the general adolescent population, which may suggest that participation in athletics does not protect against these conditions. [More]
Many medical specialists accept shaken baby syndrome as valid medical diagnosis

Many medical specialists accept shaken baby syndrome as valid medical diagnosis

A University of Colorado School of Medicine researcher and colleagues have conducted the first-ever survey of physicians on the validity of "abusive head trauma" as a medical diagnosis. [More]
Obstructive sleep apnea and hypoxia linked to progression of NAFLD in obese adolescents

Obstructive sleep apnea and hypoxia linked to progression of NAFLD in obese adolescents

Researchers from the University of Colorado School of Medicine have published a new study showing that sleep apnea worsens non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in obese adolescents. [More]
Steroid treatment linked to increased risk of retinopathy in very low birth weight infants

Steroid treatment linked to increased risk of retinopathy in very low birth weight infants

Because of the beneficial effect of corticosteroids on lung function, especially in infants who are ventilator dependent, corticosteroids are, at times, administered to very low birth weight neonates to treat established or evolving lung disease. However, it has long been suspected that steroids may have negative neurodevelopmental effects on very premature infants. [More]
Food commercials may alter brain mechanisms of children's food choices

Food commercials may alter brain mechanisms of children's food choices

Food advertising is a multi-billion dollar industry, with approximately $1.8 billion annually aimed at children and adolescents, who view between 1,000 and 2,000 ads per year. [More]
First investigational treatment for infantile-onset SMA shows promising results in clinical trial

First investigational treatment for infantile-onset SMA shows promising results in clinical trial

A major milestone was reached when nusinersen, an investigational treatment for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), was shown to significantly improve achievement of motor milestones in babies with infantile-onset SMA, according to an interim analysis of the double-blind, randomized, placebo controlled Phase 3 clinical trial called ENDEAR. [More]
New model of Williams syndrome may shed light on neurobiology of the human social brain

New model of Williams syndrome may shed light on neurobiology of the human social brain

In a study spanning molecular genetics, stem cells and the sciences of both brain and behavior, researchers at University of California San Diego, with colleagues at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies and elsewhere, have created a neurodevelopmental model of a rare genetic disorder that may provide new insights into the underlying neurobiology of the human social brain. [More]
RNA silencing technique developed by spinoff from UM-Madison effective in battling hepatitis B

RNA silencing technique developed by spinoff from UM-Madison effective in battling hepatitis B

A method for "silencing" RNA that emerged from a University of Wisconsin-Madison spinoff company is in clinical trials in Europe, Asia and the United States against hepatitis B, an infection that can destroy the liver. [More]
Experts propose new clinical guidelines for diagnosing FASD

Experts propose new clinical guidelines for diagnosing FASD

A group of experts on fetal alcohol spectrum disorders, organized by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, has produced proposed clinical guidelines for diagnosing FASD, which can result when a mother drinks during pregnancy. [More]
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