Pediatrics News and Research RSS Feed - Pediatrics News and Research

Pediatrics is the branch of medicine that deals with the medical care of infants, children, and adolescents. The age limit of such patients ranges from birth to 18. In countries where the age of majority is 18, this age limit may be from birth to age 17 (such as in Canada). A medical practitioner who specializes in this area is known as a pediatrician.
Researchers find new way for treating GBS infection in neonates

Researchers find new way for treating GBS infection in neonates

Researchers have discovered how the bacteria Group B streptococcus (GBS) avoids detection by the immune system during pregnancy. [More]
High levels of zinc may lead to kidney stone formation

High levels of zinc may lead to kidney stone formation

David Killilea, PhD, a staff scientist at Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute- the research arm of UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital Oakland - co-authored a study into the causes of kidney stones. [More]
New study shows microRNAs play important role in inducing asthma

New study shows microRNAs play important role in inducing asthma

A new study shows that microRNAs, which are small, noncoding RNA molecules that can silence genes, have an important role in inducing asthma. [More]
CD Laboratory at MedUni Vienna explores new therapeutic approaches to enhance peritoneal dialysis

CD Laboratory at MedUni Vienna explores new therapeutic approaches to enhance peritoneal dialysis

One of the main functions of the kidneys is to filter metabolic products out of the blood. If the kidneys are no longer able to do this, the blood has to be artificially purified and drained of excess fluid. [More]
Gamma-ray irradiation improves safety of stem cell transplantation in Parkinson’s disease patients

Gamma-ray irradiation improves safety of stem cell transplantation in Parkinson’s disease patients

Replacing dopamine-producing cells in the brain represents a promising therapeutic approach in Parkinson's disease, and a new study shows how post-transplantation gamma-ray irradiation can reduce the risk of tumor formation. [More]
Smartphone app may increase discharge preparedness for parents of VLBW infants

Smartphone app may increase discharge preparedness for parents of VLBW infants

A smartphone app specifically designed to support parents of very low birth weight (VLBW) premature infants as they transition home from the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) may increase parenting self-efficacy and discharge preparedness, according to a pilot randomized controlled trial at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago that was published in the journal Internet Interventions. [More]
New virtual reality simulator may help researchers learn more about ATV-related crashes

New virtual reality simulator may help researchers learn more about ATV-related crashes

A new virtual reality simulator will help University of Iowa researchers study how and why people lose control while driving all-terrain vehicles. [More]
Scientists detect new genetic candidate for testing treatments that could influence fear learning in PTSD patients

Scientists detect new genetic candidate for testing treatments that could influence fear learning in PTSD patients

Researchers at The Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles have identified a new genetic candidate for testing therapies that might affect fear learning in people with PTSD or other conditions. Results of the study have been published in the Journal of Neuroscience. [More]
VUMC researchers aim to decode genetic underpinnings of human immune system

VUMC researchers aim to decode genetic underpinnings of human immune system

Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center this month began recruiting volunteers to participate in a clinical trial aimed at decoding the human "immunome," the genetic underpinnings of the immune system. [More]
Single, short duration exposure of general anesthesia appears to cause no cognitive harm in healthy, young children

Single, short duration exposure of general anesthesia appears to cause no cognitive harm in healthy, young children

A recent study concluded that very young, healthy children undergoing short surgical procedures requiring a single exposure to general anesthesia did not exhibit any effect on the cognitive outcomes tested, according to SmartTots, a public-private partnership of the International Anesthesia Research Society and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. [More]
E-cigarette use modifies gene expression important for upper airway immune defense

E-cigarette use modifies gene expression important for upper airway immune defense

When we smoke cigarettes, dozens of genes important for immune defense are altered in the epithelial cells that line the respiratory tract. Several of these changes likely increase the risk of bacterial infections, viruses, and inflammation. [More]
New blood test could help predict severity of pulmonary arterial hypertension

New blood test could help predict severity of pulmonary arterial hypertension

Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report that rising blood levels of a protein called hematoma derived growth factor (HDGF) are linked to the increasing severity of pulmonary arterial hypertension, a form of damaging high blood pressure in the lungs. [More]
Elevated levels of CXCL10 protein could help diagnose cGvHD in blood, bone marrow transplant patients

Elevated levels of CXCL10 protein could help diagnose cGvHD in blood, bone marrow transplant patients

A new study published today in the journal Blood has identified a protein that could diagnose chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGvHD), a serious, long-term complication that affects some patients after a blood and bone marrow transplant. [More]
Black children more likely to have postsurgical complications after urologic surgery

Black children more likely to have postsurgical complications after urologic surgery

Black children who undergo urologic surgery are more likely than white children to have postsurgical complications and hospital-acquired infections 30 days after the surgery. [More]
New study reveals high percentages of unsafe blood lead levels among U.S. children

New study reveals high percentages of unsafe blood lead levels among U.S. children

Despite four decades of public health efforts to minimize children’s exposure to lead, high percentages of unsafe blood lead levels are still found in children in numerous regions of the United States, according to a new study by researchers at Quest Diagnostics, the world’s leading provider of diagnostic information services. [More]
Study evaluates effectiveness of robotic approach over manual ablation in treating heart arrhythmia

Study evaluates effectiveness of robotic approach over manual ablation in treating heart arrhythmia

Whether ablation of the highest-risk heart arrhythmia is best handled by a robot or the hands of an electrophysiologist should be answered by an international comparison of the two. [More]
Targeted intervention helps improve effectiveness of newborn hearing screening programs

Targeted intervention helps improve effectiveness of newborn hearing screening programs

Researchers at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center found that targeted intervention helps improve follow-up rates by more than 70 percent for newborns who fail initial hearing screenings at birth hospitals. [More]
Surgical treatment more effective than medical therapy for treating severely obese adolescents

Surgical treatment more effective than medical therapy for treating severely obese adolescents

An analysis of the results of a study of bariatric surgery and a separate trial of medical therapy in treating type 2 diabetes in teenagers with severe obesity shows that after two years of treatment, body mass index (BMI) and HbA1c, a measure of blood sugar control, are both significantly better with surgery. [More]
Nightly fluctuations in sleep predict worse daytime mood in healthy adolescents

Nightly fluctuations in sleep predict worse daytime mood in healthy adolescents

A new study of adolescents suggests that obtaining an insufficient amount of sleep increases variability in sadness, anger, energy and feelings of sleepiness. [More]
Primary care-based program can help improve assessment and treatment of asthma in children

Primary care-based program can help improve assessment and treatment of asthma in children

An innovative primary care-based asthma program improves identification of poorly controlled asthma among children and enhances treatment plans, compared to care provided during routine office visits, according to research published in the current edition of the Journal of Asthma. [More]
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