Pediatrics News and Research RSS Feed - Pediatrics News and Research

Pediatrics is the branch of medicine that deals with the medical care of infants, children, and adolescents. The age limit of such patients ranges from birth to 18. In countries where the age of majority is 18, this age limit may be from birth to age 17 (such as in Canada). A medical practitioner who specializes in this area is known as a pediatrician.
Yale researchers successfully correct gene mutation that causes cystic fibrosis

Yale researchers successfully correct gene mutation that causes cystic fibrosis

Yale researchers successfully corrected the most common mutation in the gene that causes cystic fibrosis, a lethal genetic disorder. The study was published April 27 in Nature Communications. [More]
Depression, suicidal tendency common among teens who are victims of bullying in school

Depression, suicidal tendency common among teens who are victims of bullying in school

High school students subjected to bullying and other forms of harassment are more likely to report being seriously depressed, consider suicide and carry weapons to school, according to findings from a trio of studies reported at the Pediatric Academic Societies meeting in San Diego. [More]
Health food stores promote adult-only dietary supplements to minors

Health food stores promote adult-only dietary supplements to minors

Fifteen year olds are not only able to buy over-the-counter dietary supplements from a sampling of health food stores across the country, the staff at those stores actually went so far as to recommend certain products, despite labels reading "for adult use only." [More]
Study: Therapeutic hypothermia offers little neurological benefit to children with cardiac arrest

Study: Therapeutic hypothermia offers little neurological benefit to children with cardiac arrest

A new, randomized clinical study co-authored by Cohen Children's Medical Center's chair of pediatrics says there is little neurological benefit to using therapeutic hypothermia to lower a child's core temperature after an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. [More]
Emergency body cooling, therapeutic hypothermia yield similar outcomes for children with cardiac arrest

Emergency body cooling, therapeutic hypothermia yield similar outcomes for children with cardiac arrest

A large-scale, multicenter study has shown that emergency body cooling does not improve survival rates or reduce brain injury in infants and children with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest more than normal temperature control. [More]
New study shows how parents may notice early signs of autism in their child

New study shows how parents may notice early signs of autism in their child

As co-director of the University of Alberta's Autism Research Centre, Lonnie Zwaigenbaum has devoted much of his career to understanding how to identify autism as early as possible. But despite his years of experience, Zwaigenbaum says many physicians like him would do well to seek other expert advice when working with children not yet diagnosed--that of the parents of these young patients. [More]
Researchers explain how improper use of car seats, swings or bouncers can lead to infant deaths

Researchers explain how improper use of car seats, swings or bouncers can lead to infant deaths

Sleep-related deaths are the most common cause of death for infants 1-12 months of age. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that infants sleep on their back on a firm mattress, without loose bedding. However, many parents use sitting or carrying devices, such as car seats, swings, or bouncers, as alternative sleeping environments, which could lead to potential injury or death. [More]
PCMH care model gaining acceptance in primary care, specialist practices

PCMH care model gaining acceptance in primary care, specialist practices

Primary-care physicians play a pivotal role in assuring that patients who require specialized care are transitioned properly from one clinical environment to another to help lower the risks for adverse events and repeat hospitalizations, according to a health quality management expert who spoke today at the National Quality Summit sponsored by the National Association for Healthcare Quality. [More]
Orphaned children face high risk of trauma

Orphaned children face high risk of trauma

Orphaned children in low- and middle-income countries face a high risk of trauma, with physical and sexual abuse being by far the most prevalent traumatic events. [More]
Case Western Reserve and MIT receive $1.7 million to explore potential treatments for Down syndrome

Case Western Reserve and MIT receive $1.7 million to explore potential treatments for Down syndrome

Thanks to the generosity of a philanthropy dedicated to children's issues, renowned Down syndrome researcher Alberto Costa, MD, PhD, has taken yet another step toward making Northeast Ohio the nation's leader in exploring potential treatments of the genetic condition that affects 400,000 people in the U.S. [More]
Study findings challenge current thinking on BPA toxicology

Study findings challenge current thinking on BPA toxicology

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers say that while a large majority of newborns are exposed in their earliest days to bisphenol A (BPA), a much-studied chemical used in plastics and in food and soda can linings, they can chemically alter and rid their bodies of it. [More]
Children exposed to adverse childhood experience more likely to develop asthma

Children exposed to adverse childhood experience more likely to develop asthma

Robyn Wing, M.D., an emergency medicine physician at Hasbro Children's Hospital, recently led a study that found children who were exposed to an adverse childhood experience (ACE) were 28 percent more likely to develop asthma. [More]
Scientists find genetic link between autism and prodigy

Scientists find genetic link between autism and prodigy

Researchers have uncovered the first evidence of a genetic link between prodigy and autism. The scientists found that child prodigies in their sample share some of the same genetic variations with people who have autism. [More]
UC San Diego, Scripps partner to improve patient care, physician training and research in hospice medicine

UC San Diego, Scripps partner to improve patient care, physician training and research in hospice medicine

UC San Diego Health System and Scripps Health are partnering to provide improved continuity of patient care, fellowship training and research in hospice and palliative medicine. Under a new five-year agreement, Scripps will work with UC San Diego to provide outpatient and inpatient hospice care for UC San Diego patients, allowing UC San Diego physicians to better coordinate post-acute care for patients with chronic illness. [More]
Oral insulin could help prevent type 1 diabetes in high-risk children

Oral insulin could help prevent type 1 diabetes in high-risk children

Children at risk for type 1 diabetes, who were given daily doses of oral insulin, developed a protective immune response to the disease that researchers with the Barbara Davis Center for Childhood Diabetes at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus say could possibly lay the groundwork for a vaccine against the chronic illness. [More]
Electronic cigarettes pose particular risks to the developing brains, organs of young people

Electronic cigarettes pose particular risks to the developing brains, organs of young people

Although heavily promoted as a safer cigarette and an aid to quit smoking, electronic cigarettes and the nicotine they deliver pose particular risks to the developing brains and organs of children. Use of electronic cigarettes by school-age children has surpassed traditional cigarette smoking, and it is critical to recognize and understand the risks related to nicotine exposure, addiction, and the poor regulation of these products, as described in the comprehensive Review article "Electronic Cigarettes: Vulnerability of Youth," published in Pediatric Allergy, Immunology, and Pulmonology, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan, UMHS collaborate to improve quality of care for Michiganians

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan, UMHS collaborate to improve quality of care for Michiganians

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan and the University of Michigan Health System will collaborate with emergency physicians at participating hospitals across the state to develop best practices to improve the experience and outcomes of patients receiving care in emergency departments. [More]
Study opens door to new treatment for hard-to-treat asthmatic children

Study opens door to new treatment for hard-to-treat asthmatic children

Researchers have identified a biological basis for asthmatic children who do not respond well to corticosteroid treatment – currently the most effective treatment for chronic asthma and acute asthma attack. [More]
Researchers discover molecular mechanism that links breast tissue stiffness to tumor metastasis

Researchers discover molecular mechanism that links breast tissue stiffness to tumor metastasis

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center have discovered a molecular mechanism that connects breast tissue stiffness to tumor metastasis and poor prognosis. The study, published April 20 in Nature Cell Biology, may inspire new approaches to predicting patient outcomes and halting tumor metastasis. [More]

New study explores parent satisfaction with research study on treating severe childhood aggression

A new study of families participating in a clinical trial to treat children with severe physical aggression explored the factors affecting parent satisfaction with the research study. [More]
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