Pediatrics News and Research RSS Feed - Pediatrics News and Research

Pediatrics is the branch of medicine that deals with the medical care of infants, children, and adolescents. The age limit of such patients ranges from birth to 18. In countries where the age of majority is 18, this age limit may be from birth to age 17 (such as in Canada). A medical practitioner who specializes in this area is known as a pediatrician.
Developmental salivary biomarkers linked to feeding success in newborns

Developmental salivary biomarkers linked to feeding success in newborns

Results from a study published online in the Journal of Pediatrics hold the potential to substantially improve clinical decision-making to determine when a premature newborn is ready for oral feeding. The study describes developmental salivary biomarkers associated with feeding success in newborns, markers that could lead to development of objective assessment tools for caregivers. [More]
Researchers devise novel way to generate corneal stem cells for treating corneal blindness

Researchers devise novel way to generate corneal stem cells for treating corneal blindness

Researchers in the Cedars-Sinai Board of Governors Regenerative Medicine Institute have devised a novel way to generate transplantable corneal stem cells that may eventually benefit patients suffering from life-altering forms of blindness. [More]
Kaleo, CHMI partner to reduce prescription drug-related deaths

Kaleo, CHMI partner to reduce prescription drug-related deaths

Kaleo, a privately-held pharmaceutical company, today announced a national strategic partnership with the Clinton Health Matters Initiative, an initiative of the Clinton Foundation, that will help support its goal of cutting prescription drug-related deaths in half, saving approximately 10,000 lives over five years. [More]
CHLA researchers develop new protein-based therapy against drug-resistant leukemia cells

CHLA researchers develop new protein-based therapy against drug-resistant leukemia cells

Resistance of leukemia cells to contemporary chemotherapy is one of the most formidable obstacles to treating acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common form of childhood cancer. Now researchers at Children's Hospital Los Angeles have designed and developed a new protein-based therapy they believe will prove highly effective against drug-resistant leukemia cells. [More]
Morphine after tonsillectomy may be life threatening for children

Morphine after tonsillectomy may be life threatening for children

Treating post-operative pain with morphine can cause life-threatening respiratory problems in some children who have had their tonsils and/or adenoids removed, new research has found. [More]
Study: 20% of very-low-birth-weight babies born in California not referred for follow-up care

Study: 20% of very-low-birth-weight babies born in California not referred for follow-up care

The tiniest babies need special follow-up care when they go home from the hospital after birth. But, of the thousands of very-low-birth-weight babies born in California during 2010 and 2011, 20 percent were not referred to the state's high-risk infant follow-up program, according to a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. [More]
UAB Research Probes Molecular Basis Of Rare Genetic Disorder

UAB Research Probes Molecular Basis Of Rare Genetic Disorder

An international group co-led by University of Alabama at Birmingham researcher Mary MacDougall, Ph.D., has unraveled the molecular basis for the rare, inherited genetic disorder, Singleton-Merten Syndrome (SMS). Individuals with SMS develop extreme, life-threatening calcification of the aorta and heart valves, early-onset periodontitis and root resorption of the teeth, decreases in bone density, and loss of bone tissue at the tips of fingers and toes. [More]
LA BioMed's physician-researchers named among Southern California Super Doctors for 2015

LA BioMed's physician-researchers named among Southern California Super Doctors for 2015

Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute's physician-researchers continue to rate among the nation's and the region's best doctors, with 44 of them listed among Southern California Super Doctors for 2015 or set to be listed among America's Top Doctors when it issues its 2015 publication later this year. [More]
Scientists take a huge step forward in identifying root causes of psoriasis

Scientists take a huge step forward in identifying root causes of psoriasis

Case Western Reserve scientists have taken a huge leap toward identifying root causes of psoriasis, an inflammatory skin condition affecting 125 million people around the world. Of the roughly 50,000 proteins in the human body, researchers have zeroed in on four that appear most likely to contribute this chronic disease. [More]
Umbilical cord-derived stem cells from women with gestational diabetes show premature aging

Umbilical cord-derived stem cells from women with gestational diabetes show premature aging

Multipotent cells isolated from the human umbilical cord, called mesenchymal stromal cells (hUC-MSCs) have shown promise for use in cell therapy to treat a variety of human diseases. However, intriguing new evidence shows that hUC-MSCs isolated from women with gestational diabetes demonstrate premature aging, poorer cell growth, and altered metabolic function, as reported in an article in Stem Cells and Development, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
UH Case Medical Center offers new test for coronary artery disease

UH Case Medical Center offers new test for coronary artery disease

Medical tests are stressful. Invasive tests, stress tests and unnecessary surgeries are too, not to mention the costs associated with all of them, but the alternative of undiagnosed heart problems are not. They can be fatal. [More]
Study suggests link between neonatal ghrelin and obesity risk

Study suggests link between neonatal ghrelin and obesity risk

Our subconscious motivation to eat is powerfully and dynamically regulated by hormone signals. The gut-derived hormone ghrelin is one such key regulator, promoting appetite through its effects on neurons in a small region of the brain called the hypothalamus. [More]
UChicago researchers awarded NIH grants to develop novel medications for sleep apnea, asthma

UChicago researchers awarded NIH grants to develop novel medications for sleep apnea, asthma

Two research teams based at the University of Chicago have received prestigious grants from the National Institutes of Health to develop novel medications to treat sleep apnea and asthma. [More]
Exposure to alcohol TV ads associated with underage drinking

Exposure to alcohol TV ads associated with underage drinking

Seeing and liking alcohol advertising on television among underage youths was associated with the onset of drinking, binge drinking and hazardous drinking, according to a study by researchers at the Norris Cotton Cancer Center and Children's Hospital at Dartmouth-Hitchcock published online by JAMA Pediatrics. [More]
Income, race and ethnic origin may play more potent roles in asthma risk

Income, race and ethnic origin may play more potent roles in asthma risk

Challenging the long-standing belief that city dwellers suffer disproportionately from asthma, the results of a new Johns Hopkins Children's Center study of more than 23,000 U.S. children reveal that income, race and ethnic origin may play far more potent roles in asthma risk than kids' physical surroundings. [More]
CUMC researcher develops new 3D microscope that can help view living things at very high speeds

CUMC researcher develops new 3D microscope that can help view living things at very high speeds

Opening new doors for biomedical and neuroscience research, Elizabeth Hillman, associate professor of biomedical engineering at Columbia Engineering and of radiology at Columbia University Medical Center, has developed a new microscope that can image living things in 3D at very high speeds. [More]
Researchers find genetic mutation that causes glycogen storage disease type IIIa in Inuit

Researchers find genetic mutation that causes glycogen storage disease type IIIa in Inuit

A team of Canadian and Japanese researchers has identified the genetic mutation responsible for glycogen storage disease type IIIa in Inuit in northern Quebec, Canada, in a study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). [More]
Researchers identify clusters of underimmunization, vaccine refusal in Northern California

Researchers identify clusters of underimmunization, vaccine refusal in Northern California

Researchers used spatial analysis software and electronic medical records to identify clusters of underimmunization and vaccine refusal among Kaiser Permanente members in Northern California, according to a study published today in the journal Pediatrics. [More]
UH Case Medical Center researchers find that coenzyme A plays key role in cell metabolism

UH Case Medical Center researchers find that coenzyme A plays key role in cell metabolism

Case Western Reserve and University Hospitals Case Medical Center researchers and physicians have discovered that the molecule known as coenzyme A plays a key role in cell metabolism by regulating the actions of nitric oxide. Cell metabolism is the ongoing process of chemical transformations within the body's cells that sustains life, and alterations in metabolism are a common cause of human disease, including cancer and heart disease. [More]
People with iron overload disease are more vulnerable to Vibrio vulnificus infections

People with iron overload disease are more vulnerable to Vibrio vulnificus infections

Every summer, the news reports on a bacterium called Vibrio vulnificus found in warm saltwater that causes people to get sick, or die, after they eat raw tainted shellfish or when an open wound comes in contact with seawater. [More]