Pediatrics News and Research RSS Feed - Pediatrics News and Research

Pediatrics is the branch of medicine that deals with the medical care of infants, children, and adolescents. The age limit of such patients ranges from birth to 18. In countries where the age of majority is 18, this age limit may be from birth to age 17 (such as in Canada). A medical practitioner who specializes in this area is known as a pediatrician.
Childhood cancer survivors have high risk of suffering stroke at young age

Childhood cancer survivors have high risk of suffering stroke at young age

Most people assume strokes only happen to octogenarians, but recent evidence suggests that survivors of childhood cancer have a high risk of suffering a stroke at a surprisingly young age. [More]
Women's Medicine Collaborative primary care team earns NCQA recognition

Women's Medicine Collaborative primary care team earns NCQA recognition

The Women's Medicine Collaborative primary care team has been designated a Level 3 Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) by the National Committee for Quality Assurance. The patient-centered medical home model of care emphasizes using coordination and communication to transform primary care to accommodate patients' needs. Having a nurse care manager work one on one with high-risk patients who have chronic conditions leads to a higher quality, better patient experience and reduced costs. Level 3 is NCQA's highest designation in its recognition program. [More]
Variations in opioid receptor genes linked to neonatal abstinence syndrome severity in newborn babies

Variations in opioid receptor genes linked to neonatal abstinence syndrome severity in newborn babies

A new study led by researchers at Boston Medical Center indicates that variations in opioid receptor genes are associated with more severe neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) in newborn babies. The findings, published online in Drug & Alcohol Dependence, could help lead to the development of individualized treatment plans tailored to each infants' risk of requiring medication to curb their NAS symptoms, which could help improve these patients' outcomes and reduce how long some stay in the hospital. [More]
New study reveals that many parents unaware of the dangers of e-cigarettes to children

New study reveals that many parents unaware of the dangers of e-cigarettes to children

As the use of e-cigarettes has risen dramatically in the United States in recent years, so have calls to poison centers about them. Yet many parents who use e-cigarettes - or "vape" - aren't aware of the dangers to children, according to a new study at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]
New assessment tool under development can help detect physical traits of Klinefelter syndrome

New assessment tool under development can help detect physical traits of Klinefelter syndrome

Klinefelter syndrome is the most common disorder of the male sex chromosomes, yet is rarely diagnosed in children. A new assessment tool is being developed by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) to help pediatricians detect the physical traits of the syndrome. The tool could pave the way for early interventions that prevent and treat a range of physical, psychological, social, and cognitive impairments. [More]
Significant divide can exist between patients and physicians about same medical terms

Significant divide can exist between patients and physicians about same medical terms

Few things are more stressful than dealing with a sick child. From discussing treatment with a pediatrician to complying with day care policies, a parent must consider many factors when making a decision about their child's health. Now, a recent study from the University of Missouri and the University of Michigan is shedding light on the significant divide that can exist between patients and physicians about the same terminology--especially when it comes to discussing "pink eye," a particular flashpoint in childcare. [More]
Researchers awarded $6.4 million grant to identify causes of neurodevelopmental disorders in children with CHDs

Researchers awarded $6.4 million grant to identify causes of neurodevelopmental disorders in children with CHDs

As advances in medicine are giving rise to growing numbers of children who are surviving severe heart defects, a phenomenon is emerging that is catching parents and healthcare providers off-guard. Over half of these children also have a seemingly unrelated disability: neurodevelopmental disorders. Some have severe cognitive and motor deficits that arise early. [More]
CPR123 completes expansion into greater San Antonio, TX area

CPR123 completes expansion into greater San Antonio, TX area

CPR123 Inc., a leading resource for state-of-the-art emergency response training and AED programs, is pleased to announce that their expansion into the greater San Antonio, TX area has been successfully completed. In addition, CPR123 has also established the CPR123 Foundation which aims to decrease cardiac arrest deaths by providing fully-funded and accessible CPR training, equipment, and healthy hearts workshops. [More]
Study finds significant decline in CT usage at children's hospitals for common childhood diagnoses

Study finds significant decline in CT usage at children's hospitals for common childhood diagnoses

A study published online Aug. 24 by the journal Pediatrics finds a significant decrease in the use of computed tomography (CT) scans at children's hospitals for 10 common childhood diagnoses including seizure, concussion, appendectomy and upper respiratory tract infection. [More]
Novel wound closure technique may reduce complication rates for patients with scoliosis

Novel wound closure technique may reduce complication rates for patients with scoliosis

Patients with scoliosis who undergo surgery may be less likely to develop an infection or other complications after the procedure when a novel wound closure technique pioneered at NYU Langone Medical Center is utilized, according to new research. [More]
Caring for young children with eczema

Caring for young children with eczema

The excitement of a newborn baby turned to worry when a few weeks after Lorenzo Torres-Ramirez was born his parents started to notice red spots on his face. [More]
Adolescent e-cigarette users more likely to start smoking

Adolescent e-cigarette users more likely to start smoking

As e-cigarette usage among high school students continues to climb, a recent study from The Journal of the American Medical Association reveals an unsettling trend: that adolescent e-cigarette users are more likely than their non-vaping peers to initiate use of combustible tobacco products such as cigarettes, cigars and hookahs. The reason may lie in a common denominator between e-cigarettes and their combustible counterparts: nicotine. [More]
Seizures are common but not clinically apparent in newborns after cardiac surgery

Seizures are common but not clinically apparent in newborns after cardiac surgery

In 2011, the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society issued a guideline recommending that neonates undergoing cardiac surgery for repair of congenital heart disease be placed on continuous encephalographic (EEG) monitoring after surgery to detect seizures. These recommendations followed reports that seizures are common in this population, may not be detected clinically, and are associated with adverse neurocognitive outcomes. [More]
Loyola doctor provides tips to alleviate back-to-school anxiety in children

Loyola doctor provides tips to alleviate back-to-school anxiety in children

As the number of days of summer vacation decrease, children and adolescent anxiety levels often increase. In addition to getting school supplies, registration completed and vaccinations up to date, it's important for parents to talk to their kids and understand how they feel about heading back to school. [More]
Parents need to enforce traffic-safety rules for kids heading back to school

Parents need to enforce traffic-safety rules for kids heading back to school

Part of heading back to school is actually getting your kids back to school safely. According to the Centers for Disease Control, on average, there is one pedestrian death every two hours and a pedestrian injury every eight minutes in the United States. Vehicles and kids can be a very scary combination whether the child is walking, biking, riding or driving. [More]
Survey identifies key factors linked to pediatric safety events in out-of-hospital emergent care situations

Survey identifies key factors linked to pediatric safety events in out-of-hospital emergent care situations

A national survey of more than 750 emergency medical services providers conducted by researchers at Oregon Health & Science University identified airway management skills, personal anxiety and limited pediatric care proficiency among key factors that may contribute to pediatric safety events for children in out-of-hospital emergent care situations. [More]
Music therapy reduces anxiety in women undergoing surgical breast biopsies

Music therapy reduces anxiety in women undergoing surgical breast biopsies

A first-of-its-kind study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology finds that music therapy lessened anxiety for women undergoing surgical breast biopsies for cancer diagnosis and treatment. [More]
New combination vaccine may reduce number of injections for young children

New combination vaccine may reduce number of injections for young children

A new combination vaccine may reduce the number of injections required to keep infants and toddlers up to date with the United States infant immunization schedule recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In a phase III trial reported in the August 2015 issue of Pediatrics, the vaccine was determined to be effective, safe and well-tolerated. Gary S. Marshall, M.D., professor of pediatrics at the University of Louisville, was the principal investigator of the multi-center trial and first author of the report. [More]
Johns Hopkins study finds substantial increase in rate, costs of hospitalizations for pediatric pulmonary hypertension

Johns Hopkins study finds substantial increase in rate, costs of hospitalizations for pediatric pulmonary hypertension

A review of 15 years’ worth of data in a national pediatric medical database has documented a substantial increase in the rate of hospitalizations for children with a form of high blood pressure once most common in those with congenital heart disease. [More]

Adult IQ of children with very low birth weight can be predicted by age two

Research from the University of Warwick indicates that the IQ of adults born very premature or of very low birth weight can be predicted when they are just a toddler. [More]
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