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Pediatrics is the branch of medicine that deals with the medical care of infants, children, and adolescents. The age limit of such patients ranges from birth to 18. In countries where the age of majority is 18, this age limit may be from birth to age 17 (such as in Canada). A medical practitioner who specializes in this area is known as a pediatrician.
Wayne State's faculty selected for Aspen Health Innovators Fellowship

Wayne State's faculty selected for Aspen Health Innovators Fellowship

The Washington, D.C.-based educational and policy studies organization The Aspen Institute has selected Wayne State University School of Medicine's Patrick Hines, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor of Physiology and an assistant professor of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, one of only 20 health care leaders in the country for the inaugural class of its Health Innovators Fellowship. [More]
Girls are born with weaker spines compared to boys, study finds

Girls are born with weaker spines compared to boys, study finds

Looking at measurements of the vertebrae - the series of small bones that make up the spinal column - in newborn children, investigators at Children's Hospital Los Angeles found that differences between the sexes are present at birth. Results of the study, now online in advance of publication in the August issue of the Journal of Pediatrics, suggest that this difference is evolutionary, allowing the female spine to adapt to the fetal load during pregnancy. [More]
Endocrine Society selects 18 endocrinologists as winners of 2016 Laureate Awards

Endocrine Society selects 18 endocrinologists as winners of 2016 Laureate Awards

The Endocrine Society today announced it has chosen 18 accomplished endocrinologists as winners of the organization's prestigious 2016 Laureate Awards. [More]
New guidelines for nutrition of management GI symptoms in children with autism

New guidelines for nutrition of management GI symptoms in children with autism

A new guideline for the nutrition of management gastrointestinal symptoms in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) provides a framework for clinicians to navigate frequently seen issues such as food selectivity, alternative diets and nutritional deficits. The expert panel was convened at Marcus Autism Center, an affiliate of Children's Healthcare of Atlanta and the resulting guideline was published online by the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. [More]
Availability of primary care appointments improves for people with Medicaid in Michigan

Availability of primary care appointments improves for people with Medicaid in Michigan

Getting access to health insurance, and getting access to a doctor, are two very different things. But a new University of Michigan study suggests that the two have gone hand-in-hand in the state of Michigan, despite a rapid influx of hundreds of thousands of newly insured people under the state's expansion of Medicaid. [More]
New diagnostic criteria can help distinguish malignant cancerous chest cavity masses from histoplasmosis

New diagnostic criteria can help distinguish malignant cancerous chest cavity masses from histoplasmosis

Researchers led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have developed new diagnostic criteria to enable clinicians to distinguish malignant cancerous chest cavity masses from those caused by fungal histoplasmosis infection. [More]
New UTMB study reveals mechanism central to pollen-induced allergies

New UTMB study reveals mechanism central to pollen-induced allergies

A new study from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston has uncovered a mechanism that is central to becoming allergic to ragweed pollen and developing allergic asthma or seasonal nasal allergies. The findings are currently available online in the American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology. [More]
Researchers develop diagnostic test to detect enterovirus D68

Researchers develop diagnostic test to detect enterovirus D68

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have developed a diagnostic test to quickly detect enterovirus D68 (EV-D68), a respiratory virus that caused unusually severe illness in children last year. The outbreak caused infections at an unprecedented rate, with over 1,000 confirmed cases and 14 reported deaths nationwide, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [More]
New research suggests updates to current dietary protein recommendations

New research suggests updates to current dietary protein recommendations

New research based on modern techniques suggests that recommendations for protein intake in healthy populations may be incorrect. In a paper just published in Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, an NRC Research Press journal (a division of Canadian Science Publishing), researchers put the focus on protein as an essential component of a healthy diet. [More]
Tyrone Regional Health Network signs letter of intent to become member of Penn State Health

Tyrone Regional Health Network signs letter of intent to become member of Penn State Health

Tyrone Regional Health Network and Penn State Health have signed a letter of intent to enter into formal affiliation. With approval by organizational boards and state authorities, Tyrone Regional will become a member of Penn State Health. [More]
Men gain weight after they become dads, new Northwestern Medicine study finds

Men gain weight after they become dads, new Northwestern Medicine study finds

All those leftover pizza crusts you snatch from your kids' plates add up. Men gain weight after they become fathers for the first time whether or not they live with their children, reports a large, new Northwestern Medicine study that tracked the weight of more than 10,000 men from adolescence to young adulthood. [More]
Poverty has detrimental effects on child's brain development

Poverty has detrimental effects on child's brain development

An alarming 22 percent of U.S. children live in poverty, which can have long-lasting negative consequences on brain development, emotional health and academic achievement. A new study, published July 20 in JAMA Pediatrics, provides even more compelling evidence that growing up in poverty has detrimental effects on the brain. [More]
Mothers with chemical intolerances more likely to have children with ASD or ADHD

Mothers with chemical intolerances more likely to have children with ASD or ADHD

A new study from The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio found that mothers with chemical intolerances are two to three times more likely than other women to have a child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). [More]
Antibiotics may increase risk of juvenile arthritis

Antibiotics may increase risk of juvenile arthritis

Taking antibiotics may increase the risk that a child will develop juvenile arthritis, according to a study from Rutgers University, University of Pennsylvania and Nemours A.I. duPont Hospital for Children published today in Pediatrics. [More]
Children recover well from acute central nervous system demyelination

Children recover well from acute central nervous system demyelination

Most children can expect a good and quick physical recovery following acute central nervous system demyelination, study findings suggest. [More]
Researchers find evidence that directly links disrupted metabolism to fatal type of lymphoma

Researchers find evidence that directly links disrupted metabolism to fatal type of lymphoma

Researchers from the School of Medicine at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio have found evidence that directly links disrupted metabolism (energy production in cells) to a common and often fatal type of lymphoma. [More]
UofL conducts Phase I research study for children with relapsed tumors

UofL conducts Phase I research study for children with relapsed tumors

Zach feels "pretty good." Sam wants to be "done with shots!" And Tyler finds it helps to "just keep thinking that at least I'm getting out of school." They are normal boys who had normal lives until cancer came into the picture. All have faced the disease for two years or more, with surgeries, chemotherapy and radiation treatments. All were diagnosed with various malignant solid tumors, went into remission and then relapsed. [More]
NuSI launches groundbreaking clinical study to halt nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in children

NuSI launches groundbreaking clinical study to halt nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in children

Nutrition Science Initiative has launched the first-ever randomized, controlled clinical trial to determine whether removing added sugars from the diet can halt or even reverse nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in children. [More]
New ISU study provides snapshot of health-related fitness levels for U.S. schoolchildren

New ISU study provides snapshot of health-related fitness levels for U.S. schoolchildren

A new study provides a snapshot of health-related physical fitness levels for U.S. schoolchildren in grades first through 12th. Iowa State University researchers analyzing data collected nationally through the NFL PLAY 60 FITNESSGRAM Partnership Project found that fitness levels sharply declined as students got older. [More]
Family, cultural and geographical factors influence unsafe sleep position of infants

Family, cultural and geographical factors influence unsafe sleep position of infants

When it comes to newborn sleep, mother may not know best. According to Deborah Raines, associate professor in the University at Buffalo School of Nursing, family, cultural and geographical influences may lead some mothers to place their newborn children in unsafe sleeping positions. [More]
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