Pediatrics News and Research RSS Feed - Pediatrics News and Research

Pediatrics is the branch of medicine that deals with the medical care of infants, children, and adolescents. The age limit of such patients ranges from birth to 18. In countries where the age of majority is 18, this age limit may be from birth to age 17 (such as in Canada). A medical practitioner who specializes in this area is known as a pediatrician.
Researchers identify process in the brains of mice that may explain repetitive actions in Rett patients

Researchers identify process in the brains of mice that may explain repetitive actions in Rett patients

Three-year-old Naomi slaps her forehead a few times, bites her fingers and toddles across the doctor's office in her white and pink pajamas before turning her head into a door with a dull thud. [More]
UCM REACT program receives $2 million federal grant to support children affected by violence

UCM REACT program receives $2 million federal grant to support children affected by violence

The University of Chicago Medicine Comer Children's Hospital will provide screening and mental health care for hundreds of children and families that have been affected by violence in many of Chicago's South and West side neighborhoods. [More]
Children's Hospital of Michigan wins Excellence through Insight award for exceptional pediatric care

Children's Hospital of Michigan wins Excellence through Insight award for exceptional pediatric care

The Children's Hospital of Michigan, part of the Detroit Medical Center was recently recognized with an Excellence through Insight award for "Overall Outpatient Surgery Experience" in the Pediatrics Unit Category by HealthStream, Inc. [More]
Pediatrician advises parents to identify depression and suicidal tendencies among teens

Pediatrician advises parents to identify depression and suicidal tendencies among teens

The teen years can be a time of stress, confusion and uncertainty. There is pressure to fit in, to stand out and to succeed. So you can hardly blame adolescents for sometimes being moody, down, or wanting to be left alone. [More]
Bile acid transporter inhibitors can prevent NASH in mice, study shows

Bile acid transporter inhibitors can prevent NASH in mice, study shows

Drugs that interfere with bile acid recycling can prevent several aspects of NASH (nonalcoholic steatohepatitis) in mice fed a high-fat diet, scientists from Emory University School of Medicine and Children's Healthcare of Atlanta have shown. [More]
UofL researchers receive NIH funding to explore how environmental exposures influence health of children

UofL researchers receive NIH funding to explore how environmental exposures influence health of children

The National Institutes of Health today announced a team of researchers headed by Janice Sullivan, M.D., of the University of Louisville is among grant recipients nationwide receiving funding for a seven-year, multicenter initiative called Environmental influences on Child Health Outcomes. [More]
LARC benefits wider population of potential users than previously thought

LARC benefits wider population of potential users than previously thought

New research provides strong scientific evidence that long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) benefits a wider population of potential users than previously thought. [More]
First case-control study examines link between microcephaly and in utero Zika virus infection

First case-control study examines link between microcephaly and in utero Zika virus infection

The relation between Zika virus and microcephaly is widely assumed to be causal because of strong evidence of an association. However, evidence so far comes from case reports, case series, modelling studies, and preliminary reports from cohort studies – none of which have included appropriate control groups. [More]
Study finds link between gut flora and fat distribution in children and teenagers

Study finds link between gut flora and fat distribution in children and teenagers

Children and teenagers who are obese have different microorganisms living in the digestive tract than their lean counterparts, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
Gene therapy may be viable approach for treating CF lung problems

Gene therapy may be viable approach for treating CF lung problems

Two new studies from the University of Iowa suggest that gene therapy may be a viable approach for treating or preventing lung disease caused by cystic fibrosis. [More]
New intervention improves health, wellness outcomes in adolescents with persistent concussion

New intervention improves health, wellness outcomes in adolescents with persistent concussion

Concussions can create a host of symptoms—headache, dizziness, moodiness, upset stomach and other issues. [More]
Study identifies promising, cost-effective treatment for depressed adolescents

Study identifies promising, cost-effective treatment for depressed adolescents

Depression is one of the most common mental health issues a teenager can face. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, an estimated 2.8 million adolescents ages 12 to 17 in the U.S. had at least one major depressive episode in 2014, or 11.4% of adolescents that age. [More]
Guidelines for staying healthy during flu season

Guidelines for staying healthy during flu season

The American Academy of Pediatrics updated its annual influenza (flu) season guidelines, withdrawing the child-friendly nasal flu vaccine, FluMist, this year. [More]
Many parents support expansion of health education in schools, new survey reveals

Many parents support expansion of health education in schools, new survey reveals

Teaching kids about drugs, alcohol and sex appears to be less controversial than ever before with the majority of parents in a new poll saying schools should and do teach these subjects. [More]
New less invasive method could detect bacterial infection in young febrile infants

New less invasive method could detect bacterial infection in young febrile infants

Physicians from Children's Hospital of Michigan, Wayne State University, UC Davis Medical Center and Nationwide Children's Hospital, in collaboration with 19 other pediatric emergency departments around the country, have established a "proof of principle" for measuring patterns of ribonucleic acid (RNA) expression in the bloodstream that can enable clinicians to distinguish bacterial infections from other causes of fever in infants up to two months old. [More]
Language barriers can complicate treatment for children with special health care needs

Language barriers can complicate treatment for children with special health care needs

Language barriers can have dangerous consequences for children with special health care needs, according to a paper by authors including pediatric specialists at McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. [More]
Hamilton researchers conduct ground-breaking new trial on pediatric fecal transplant for IBD

Hamilton researchers conduct ground-breaking new trial on pediatric fecal transplant for IBD

Hamilton researchers are conducting a ground-breaking new trial looking at fecal transplants to help treat inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in children. [More]
Research findings point to potential new targeted therapy for SMA

Research findings point to potential new targeted therapy for SMA

For the first time, scientists found that in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), the affected nerve cells that control muscle movement, or motor neurons, have defects in their mitochondria, which generate energy used by the cell. [More]
Dermatologist offers tips to help parents figure out how often children need to bathe

Dermatologist offers tips to help parents figure out how often children need to bathe

For many families, bath time is a struggle. For this reason, many parents will be glad to know that a daily bath may not be necessary for their kids, according to dermatologists from the American Academy of Dermatology. [More]
Study finds half of children spend time in homes with firearms

Study finds half of children spend time in homes with firearms

A survey of parents in Missouri and Illinois reveals that about half of the children in the families queried spent time in homes that have firearms. However, few reported talking about gun safety with their children's pediatricians. [More]
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