Pediatrics News and Research RSS Feed - Pediatrics News and Research

Pediatrics is the branch of medicine that deals with the medical care of infants, children, and adolescents. The age limit of such patients ranges from birth to 18. In countries where the age of majority is 18, this age limit may be from birth to age 17 (such as in Canada). A medical practitioner who specializes in this area is known as a pediatrician.
Providence Tarzana, CHLA collaborate to provide enhanced care to children in the San Fernando Valley

Providence Tarzana, CHLA collaborate to provide enhanced care to children in the San Fernando Valley

Children in the San Fernando Valley now have access to an enhanced level of pediatric care, under the terms of an innovative agreement between Providence Tarzana Medical Center and Children's Hospital Los Angeles and its physicians. [More]
UCLA cardiologists use less invasive approach to replace heart valve

UCLA cardiologists use less invasive approach to replace heart valve

Last summer, after a long career as a successful entrepreneur and a brief retirement, Richard Whitaker was helping to start another new company. Unfortunately, a serious health concern caused a couple of interruptions in his work on the new venture. One of Whitaker's heart valves wasn't working properly, which caused congestive heart failure and led to two hospitalizations within several months. [More]
Wayne State University awarded grant to explore new MS pathology model

Wayne State University awarded grant to explore new MS pathology model

The National Multiple Sclerosis Society has provided a grant to a Wayne State University School of Medicine professor to explore a new model of MS pathology. [More]
Premature babies who avoid eye contact in early infancy less likely to show symptoms of autism

Premature babies who avoid eye contact in early infancy less likely to show symptoms of autism

Premature babies are at an increased risk for developing autism spectrum disorder. But a small study indicates that preemies who avoid eye contact in early infancy are less likely to demonstrate symptoms of autism at age 2 than preemies who maintain eye contact during early interactions, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]
Researchers complete phase 1 clinical trial of new drug for children suffering from neuroblastoma

Researchers complete phase 1 clinical trial of new drug for children suffering from neuroblastoma

Researchers at Spectrum Health Helen DeVos Children's Hospital have completed the first clinical trial of a new treatment for children suffering from neuroblastoma. In a clinical trial led by Giselle Sholler, MD, pediatric oncologist at Helen DeVos Children's Hospital and the Neuroblastoma and Medulloblastoma Translational Research Consortium (NMTRC), DFMO, an investigational agent, showed minimal side effects with long-term survival of three patients. [More]
R. Rodney Howell receives ASHG’s annual Advocacy Award

R. Rodney Howell receives ASHG’s annual Advocacy Award

The American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) has named R. Rodney Howell, MD, Professor in the Department of Pediatrics, Chairman Emeritus of Pediatrics, and Member of the Hussman Institute for Human Genomics, at the University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, as the first recipient of its new, annual Advocacy Award. [More]
Study: Around 6% survive cardiac arrest outside of hospital setting

Study: Around 6% survive cardiac arrest outside of hospital setting

Cardiac arrest strikes almost 600,000 people each year, killing the vast majority of those individuals, says a new report from the Institute of Medicine. Every year in the U.S., approximately 395,000 cases of cardiac arrest occur outside of a hospital setting, in which less than 6 percent survive. Approximately 200,000 cardiac arrests occur each year in hospitals, and 24 percent of those patients survive. Estimates suggest that cardiac arrest is the third leading cause of death in the U.S. behind cancer and heart disease. [More]
Multiple courses of antibiotics may have significant impact on child development

Multiple courses of antibiotics may have significant impact on child development

A new animal study by NYU Langone Medical Center researchers adds to growing evidence that multiple courses of commonly used antibiotics may have a significant impact on children's development. [More]
Researchers explore why some mutations can cause severe disease in humans, but benign in animals

Researchers explore why some mutations can cause severe disease in humans, but benign in animals

Researchers at Duke University School of Medicine and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School have identified a mechanism that explains why some mutations can be disease-causing in one genome but benign in another. [More]
Student applications to PNP and NNP training programs falling

Student applications to PNP and NNP training programs falling

While the number of graduates from family or adult nurse practitioner programs continues to rise, student applications to pediatric nurse practitioner and neonatal nurse practitioner programs are falling. Yet there is capacity in PNP and NNP training programs and unmet demand for graduates. [More]
Specialized mental health treatment can benefit children from poor nations

Specialized mental health treatment can benefit children from poor nations

A specific type of talk therapy dispensed in the developing world to orphans and other vulnerable children who experienced trauma such as sexual and domestic abuse showed dramatic results, despite being administered by workers with little education, new research shows. [More]
Amphetamine-based drug Evekeo effective in treating ADHD symptoms in children

Amphetamine-based drug Evekeo effective in treating ADHD symptoms in children

The amphetamine-based drug Evekeo, given once or twice daily to children 6-12 years of age, is effective in treating attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms and improving performance in a laboratory classroom setting, according to the results of a new study published in the Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]

Survey provides estimates of wide range of violence against children, youth

More than a third of children and teens 17 and younger experienced a physical assault in the last year, primarily at the hands of siblings and peers, according to an article published online by JAMA Pediatrics. [More]
Study may lead to better treatments for children with neuroblastoma

Study may lead to better treatments for children with neuroblastoma

Researchers studying the pediatric cancer neuroblastoma have detailed how cancer-driving mutations evolve during chemotherapy, and they hope to exploit this knowledge to design better treatments for children. [More]
Study: Umbilical cord milking improves blood pressure, red blood cell levels in preterm infants

Study: Umbilical cord milking improves blood pressure, red blood cell levels in preterm infants

A technique to increase the flow of blood from the umbilical cord into the infant's circulatory system improves blood pressure and red blood cell levels in preterm infants delivered by Cesarean section, according to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Emergency room visits, hospitalizations of children with food allergy reactions increase in Illinois

Emergency room visits, hospitalizations of children with food allergy reactions increase in Illinois

Emergency room visits and hospitalizations of children with severe, potentially life-threatening food allergy reactions increased nearly 30 percent in Illinois over five years, reports a Northwestern Medicine study. [More]
Open windows can be extremely dangerous for young children

Open windows can be extremely dangerous for young children

The dog days of summer are here. But as we try to catch a cool breeze, that open window can become a dangerous hazard for children. In fact, emergency rooms treat more than 5,000 children each year for injuries related to falls from windows. [More]
BUSM recognized with People's Health Medals for advancing hospital nutrition in Vietnam

BUSM recognized with People's Health Medals for advancing hospital nutrition in Vietnam

Carine Lenders, M.D., M.S., ScD, associate professor of pediatrics at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) and physician nutrition specialist at Boston Medical Center (BMC), and Elizabeth Henry, DrPH, MHS, who will graduate from BU's School of Public Health (BUSPH) in September, have received the People's Health Medal from the Social Republic of Vietnam's Ministry of Health for their work on behalf of the Abbott Fund Institute of Nutrition Science (AFINS). [More]
Sugar-gobbling enzyme helps restore normal function in heart muscles of diabetic rats

Sugar-gobbling enzyme helps restore normal function in heart muscles of diabetic rats

Working with heart muscle cells from diabetic rats, scientists at Johns Hopkins have located what they say is the epicenter of mischief wreaked by too much blood sugar and used a sugar-gobbling enzyme to restore normal function in the glucose-damaged cells of animal heart muscles. [More]
Study shows cystic fibrosis is more deadly for Hispanic than non-Hispanic patients

Study shows cystic fibrosis is more deadly for Hispanic than non-Hispanic patients

Cystic fibrosis is more deadly for Hispanic than non-Hispanic patients, a disparity that is not explained by differences in their access to health care, according to a new study from the Stanford University School of Medicine. [More]
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