Pediatrics News and Research RSS Feed - Pediatrics News and Research

Pediatrics is the branch of medicine that deals with the medical care of infants, children, and adolescents. The age limit of such patients ranges from birth to 18. In countries where the age of majority is 18, this age limit may be from birth to age 17 (such as in Canada). A medical practitioner who specializes in this area is known as a pediatrician.
UC San Diego researchers receive CIRM grants to advance studies on Zika virus and cancer

UC San Diego researchers receive CIRM grants to advance studies on Zika virus and cancer

The Independent Citizens Oversight Committee of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine has approved a pair of $2 million awards to University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers to advance studies of new treatments for Zika virus infections and the use of stem cell-derived natural killer (NK) cells to target ovarian cancer and other malignancies. [More]
New research exposes cellular responses linked to bird flu vaccine

New research exposes cellular responses linked to bird flu vaccine

New research from Vanderbilt eavesdrops on gene expression in human immune system cells before and after vaccination against bird flu. [More]
Scientists find altered blood-brain barrier and increased intestinal permeability in people with ASD

Scientists find altered blood-brain barrier and increased intestinal permeability in people with ASD

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has the dubious distinction of being the fastest-growing developmental disability in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [More]
Researchers explore ins and outs of genome sequencing in newborns

Researchers explore ins and outs of genome sequencing in newborns

When you have a baby, a nurse or a phlebotomist performs a heel stick to take a few drops of blood from your infant and sends it off to a state lab for a battery of tests. [More]
New techniques and treatments show promise for eliminating retinopathy of prematurity

New techniques and treatments show promise for eliminating retinopathy of prematurity

A mini-symposium published in the Journal of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus provides important insights into new techniques and treatments that show promise for eliminating retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) throughout the world. [More]
New review discusses about care for pediatric liver transplant recipients

New review discusses about care for pediatric liver transplant recipients

A new review discusses important consideration when caring for children who have received liver transplants. [More]
Delayed cord clamping prevents anaemia in infants up to six months of age

Delayed cord clamping prevents anaemia in infants up to six months of age

When clamping of the umbilical cord is delayed, iron deficiency up to six months of age can be prevented, according to a new study from Uppsala University, published in JAMA Pediatrics. The study was conducted in Nepal. [More]
Bionic hand reconstruction offers hope for patients with global brachial plexopathies

Bionic hand reconstruction offers hope for patients with global brachial plexopathies

​Bionic hand? No longer only an image conjured by science fiction, bionic hands return functionality in cases of traumatic nerve and muscle loss. [More]
Accurate test for jaundice could lead to effective treatment in premature newborns

Accurate test for jaundice could lead to effective treatment in premature newborns

Seeking to improve the care of preterm infants, a new study by researchers at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School has found a more accurate test for jaundice, a common disorder in newborns. [More]
Synthesized steroid prevents lethal protein buildup in animal model of Parkinson's disease

Synthesized steroid prevents lethal protein buildup in animal model of Parkinson's disease

A synthesized steroid mirroring one naturally made by the dogfish shark prevents the buildup of a lethal protein implicated in some neurodegenerative diseases, reports an international research team studying an animal model of Parkinson's disease. [More]
Naturally-occurring compound can inhibit early formation of toxins linked to Parkinson's Disease

Naturally-occurring compound can inhibit early formation of toxins linked to Parkinson's Disease

A naturally-occurring compound has been found to block a molecular process thought to underlie Parkinson's Disease, and to suppress its toxic products, scientists have reported. [More]
Study compares two common treatment options for pelvic organ prolapse

Study compares two common treatment options for pelvic organ prolapse

Pelvic organ prolapse occurs when the pelvic organs drop from their normal position in the pelvis. [More]
Genes implicated in rare pediatric epilepsy contribute to common forms of disorder, study finds

Genes implicated in rare pediatric epilepsy contribute to common forms of disorder, study finds

An international study led by Columbia University Medical Center and NewYork-Presbyterian researchers has found that several genes previously implicated only in rare, severe forms of pediatric epilepsy also contribute to common forms of the disorder. [More]
Folic acid supplements can reduce risk of having pregnancy affected by neural tube defects

Folic acid supplements can reduce risk of having pregnancy affected by neural tube defects

Despite the mandatory addition of folic acid to enriched grain products in the United States, many women still do not consume adequate amounts of this important vitamin, according to an editorial written by Laura E. Mitchell, Ph.D., professor in the Department of Epidemiology, Human Genetics and Environmental Sciences at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Public Health. [More]
Air pollution exposure and sedentary lifestyle pose serious health threats to children in China

Air pollution exposure and sedentary lifestyle pose serious health threats to children in China

Children and adolescents in mainland China are facing two serious and conflicting public health threats: ongoing exposure to air pollution and an increasingly sedentary lifestyle with little regular physical activity outside school. [More]
Fish sauce may help provide better nutrition for mothers and young children

Fish sauce may help provide better nutrition for mothers and young children

Researchers from the South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute and the University of Adelaide have found a way to provide mothers and young children in Cambodia with better nutrition through an unlikely source -- fish sauce. [More]
Parents concerned about neighborhoods more likely to restrict children's outdoor play, study shows

Parents concerned about neighborhoods more likely to restrict children's outdoor play, study shows

A study conducted by LSU Health New Orleans School of Public Health is the first to demonstrate that parents who are concerned about their neighborhoods restrict their children's outdoor play. [More]
Study finds link between physical activity of parents and preschoolers from low-income families

Study finds link between physical activity of parents and preschoolers from low-income families

Preschool-age children from low-income families are more likely to be physically active if parents increase activity and reduce sedentary behavior while wearing movement monitors (accelerometers), according to a Vanderbilt study published today in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. [More]
Premature infants show changes in neural systems prior to birth, new study suggests

Premature infants show changes in neural systems prior to birth, new study suggests

Even before they are born, premature babies may display alterations in the circuitry of their developing brains, according to a first-of-its kind research study by Yale School of Medicine researchers and their colleagues at the National Institutes of Health and Wayne State University. [More]
Johns Hopkins researchers identify barriers to young men's sexual and reproductive health

Johns Hopkins researchers identify barriers to young men's sexual and reproductive health

Johns Hopkins researchers who conducted a dozen focus groups with 70 straight and gay/bisexual Hispanic and African-American males ages 15 to 24 report that gaining a better understanding of the context in which young men grow up will allow health care providers to improve this population's use of sexual and reproductive health care. [More]
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