Pediatrics News and Research RSS Feed - Pediatrics News and Research

Pediatrics is the branch of medicine that deals with the medical care of infants, children, and adolescents. The age limit of such patients ranges from birth to 18. In countries where the age of majority is 18, this age limit may be from birth to age 17 (such as in Canada). A medical practitioner who specializes in this area is known as a pediatrician.
Vanderbilt engineers develop virtual-reality driving environment to help teenagers with ASD

Vanderbilt engineers develop virtual-reality driving environment to help teenagers with ASD

Astronauts and pilots use them. So do truck drivers and Formula One race-car drivers. [More]
NewYork-Presbyterian launches new suite of telehealth services to improve, expand patient care

NewYork-Presbyterian launches new suite of telehealth services to improve, expand patient care

NewYork-Presbyterian has announced the rollout of NYP OnDemand, a new suite of digital health services designed to improve and expand patient care, while also extending access to the clinical expertise of NewYork-Presbyterian's physicians to their peers throughout the Hospital's vast healthcare network. [More]
Web-based software program helps improve quality of pediatric ADHD care and treatment outcomes

Web-based software program helps improve quality of pediatric ADHD care and treatment outcomes

As cases of ADHD continue to rise among U.S. children, pediatricians at busy community practices are getting a much-needed assist from a web-based technology to improve the quality of ADHD care and patient outcomes. [More]
Adding DNA sequencing to newborn screenings may increase early diagnosis of cystic fibrosis

Adding DNA sequencing to newborn screenings may increase early diagnosis of cystic fibrosis

A study by researchers at Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Brigham and Women's Hospital and the California Department of Public Health suggests that all babies with a known mutation for cystic fibrosis (CF) and second mutation called the 5T allele should receive additional screening in order to better predict the risk of developing CF later in life. [More]
Care4Moms study to identify, address health care needs of mothers with medically fragile infants

Care4Moms study to identify, address health care needs of mothers with medically fragile infants

An interdisciplinary team of researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine has received nearly $900,000 in federal funding to identify and address the needs of mothers with medically fragile infants, a vastly understudied group. [More]
Researchers find conceivable alternative way to treat Pompe disease

Researchers find conceivable alternative way to treat Pompe disease

Researchers at Duke Health have identified a potential new avenue for treating Pompe disease, a rare condition caused by the build-up of glycogen, a storage form of sugar, in cardiac and skeletal muscle, the liver and other tissues, due to deficiency of a particular enzyme. [More]
New study tracks developmental differences between late preterm babies and full term infants

New study tracks developmental differences between late preterm babies and full term infants

Developmental differences in babies born 4 to 6 weeks early may not show up until after they turn two, a new study suggests. [More]
New neuroprotective compounds may prevent development of epilepsy

New neuroprotective compounds may prevent development of epilepsy

A team led by Nicolas Bazan, MD, PhD, Boyd Professor and Director of LSU Health New Orleans' Neuroscience Center of Excellence, has developed neuroprotective compounds that may prevent the development of epilepsy. [More]
Football players sustain more serious head impacts when hitting another player, study shows

Football players sustain more serious head impacts when hitting another player, study shows

In football, player-vs.-player hits will likely cause more severe head impacts than other impacts, according to a new study by a University of Georgia researcher. [More]
Study shows physicians accept shaken baby syndrome, abusive head trauma as valid diagnoses

Study shows physicians accept shaken baby syndrome, abusive head trauma as valid diagnoses

Survey data reveals a high degree of medical consensus that shaking a young child is capable of producing subdural hematoma (a life-threatening pooling of blood outside the brain), severe retinal hemorrhage, coma or death, according to a study published in The Journal of Pediatrics. [More]
Study highlights effectiveness of atypical antipsychotic drug in treating children with TD

Study highlights effectiveness of atypical antipsychotic drug in treating children with TD

A meta-analysis of clinical trials evaluating the effectiveness of aripiprazole for the treatment of Tourette's disorder (TD) in children and adolescents showed a significantly greater overall improvement in total tics and tic severity from pretreatment to post-treatment for the aripiprazole compared to the placebo group. [More]
New study of fMRI aims to develop efficient real-time method to detect brain activation in AD patients

New study of fMRI aims to develop efficient real-time method to detect brain activation in AD patients

Researchers at University Hospitals Case Medical Center are beginning a study of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to detect how brain activation in patients in early and middle stages of Alzheimer's disease compares to people without it. [More]
Antibiotic usage, infections may contribute to manic episodes in people with mental disorders

Antibiotic usage, infections may contribute to manic episodes in people with mental disorders

In research using patient medical records, investigators from Johns Hopkins and Sheppard Pratt Health System report that people with serious mental disorders who were hospitalized for mania were more likely to be on antibiotics to treat active infections than a group of people without a mental disorder. [More]
Maternal antiretroviral treatment eliminates HIV transmission to infants during breastfeeding

Maternal antiretroviral treatment eliminates HIV transmission to infants during breastfeeding

For HIV-infected mothers whose immune system is in good health, taking a three-drug antiretroviral regimen during breastfeeding essentially eliminates HIV transmission by breast milk to their infants, according to results from a large clinical trial conducted in sub-Saharan Africa and India. [More]
In-hospital formula introduction and family history may help explain racial, ethnic breastfeeding disparities

In-hospital formula introduction and family history may help explain racial, ethnic breastfeeding disparities

A national research collaboration funded by the National Institutes of Health has found significant racial and ethnic disparities in breastfeeding outcomes, according to a study published online this week in Pediatrics. [More]
Diabetes Professional Care conference unveils speaker line-up for 2016

Diabetes Professional Care conference unveils speaker line-up for 2016

Diabetes Professional Care 2016, the leading free-to-attend two-day CPD accredited conference and exhibition has unveiled its speaker line-up for 2016, which includes keynote presentations from NHS England and The Diabetes Think Tank. [More]
Parental substance use increases health risks among children

Parental substance use increases health risks among children

Children whose parents or caregivers misuse alcohol or use, produce or distribute drugs face an increased risk of medical and behavioral problems. According to a new clinical report by experts at Beth Israel Medical Center and Boston Children's Hospital, pediatricians are in a unique position to assess risk and intervene to protect children. [More]
Preventing sudden unexpected deaths of babies and children: an interview with Professor Peter Fleming

Preventing sudden unexpected deaths of babies and children: an interview with Professor Peter Fleming

SIDS is the sudden and unexpected death of a baby, which usually occurs during sleep. The great majority of the babies are aged between about two weeks and seven or eight months. [More]
Findings offer renewed hope for speedy development curative medicines for people with toxoplasmosis

Findings offer renewed hope for speedy development curative medicines for people with toxoplasmosis

In the July 14 edition of Scientific Reports (Nature), 39 researchers from 14 leading institutions in the United States, United Kingdom and France suggest novel approaches that could hasten the development of better medications for people suffering from toxoplasmosis. [More]
Researches create mini-brain model of idiopathic ASD characterized by early neuronal overgrowth

Researches create mini-brain model of idiopathic ASD characterized by early neuronal overgrowth

The vast majority of cases of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are idiopathic - the cause is unknown. [More]
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