Pediatrics News and Research RSS Feed - Pediatrics News and Research

Pediatrics is the branch of medicine that deals with the medical care of infants, children, and adolescents. The age limit of such patients ranges from birth to 18. In countries where the age of majority is 18, this age limit may be from birth to age 17 (such as in Canada). A medical practitioner who specializes in this area is known as a pediatrician.
Suggestions for successful breast feeding from nurse midwifery program

Suggestions for successful breast feeding from nurse midwifery program

Most new moms know the benefits of breast feeding. For babies, it can lower the risk of developing asthma, diabetes, and leukemia. For moms, it reduces the risk of breast cancer. But many women still don't know where to turn for help when breast feeding doesn't go as smoothly as they imagined it would. [More]
Bedsharing reduce infants sleep duration

Bedsharing reduce infants sleep duration

Nocturnal awakenings are frequent among 6-month-old children, but sharing bed might make things worse. [More]
Loyola University Medical Center redesignated as Level III Perinatal Center

Loyola University Medical Center redesignated as Level III Perinatal Center

Loyola University Medical Center has been redesignated as a Level III Perinatal Center by the Illinois Department of Public Health. [More]
UW researchers develop smartphone app that detects newborn jaundice within minutes

UW researchers develop smartphone app that detects newborn jaundice within minutes

University of Washington engineers and physicians have developed a smartphone application that checks for jaundice in newborns and can deliver results to parents and pediatricians within minutes. It could serve as a screening tool to determine whether a baby needs a blood test - the gold standard for detecting high levels of bilirubin. [More]
Pediatricians have new prescription for schools: later start times for teens

Pediatricians have new prescription for schools: later start times for teens

Pediatricians have a new prescription for schools: later start times for teens. Delaying the start of the school day until at least 8:30 a.m. would help curb their lack of sleep, which has been linked with poor health, bad grades, car crashes and other problems, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) said in a new policy, which outlined chronic sleep deficits in our nation's adolescents. [More]
Repurposing anti-depressant medication to target new pathway may help combat medulloblastoma

Repurposing anti-depressant medication to target new pathway may help combat medulloblastoma

An international research team reports in Nature Medicine a novel molecular pathway that causes an aggressive form of medulloblastoma, and suggests repurposing an anti-depressant medication to target the new pathway may help combat one of the most common brain cancers in children. [More]
Intervention program to help parents manage children's behaviors after being diagnosed with autism

Intervention program to help parents manage children's behaviors after being diagnosed with autism

In a first of its kind clinical trial, Debra Zand, Ph.D., and her team at Saint Louis University, will run an intervention program to help parents address and manage their children's challenging behaviors immediately after being diagnosed with autism. [More]
American Heart Association issues new policy recommendations on use of e-cigarettes

American Heart Association issues new policy recommendations on use of e-cigarettes

The American Heart Association issued new policy recommendations today on the use of e-cigarettes and their impact on tobacco-control efforts. The guidance was published in the association's journal, Circulation. [More]
Young people with chronic illnesses face uncertainty when transitioning from pediatric to adult care

Young people with chronic illnesses face uncertainty when transitioning from pediatric to adult care

Young people with chronic illnesses face uncertainty when their care is transferred from pediatrics to adult-oriented health professionals. A new study in the Journal of Adolescent Health has found that one in five such young adults said the transfer of their care was unsatisfactory. [More]
Ohio State, Nationwide Children's Hospital partner with ENTvantage for diagnosing bacterial sinusitis

Ohio State, Nationwide Children's Hospital partner with ENTvantage for diagnosing bacterial sinusitis

The Ohio State University, through the Ohio State Innovation Foundation, and Nationwide Children's Hospital announced the signing of an exclusive, world-wide agreement with ENTvantage Diagnostics Inc. licensing a technology for rapid diagnosing of bacterial sinusitis. [More]
Viewpoints: Threat to drug development; GOP's Obamacare criticism tempered; finding doctors for seniors

Viewpoints: Threat to drug development; GOP's Obamacare criticism tempered; finding doctors for seniors

An invasive species has been introduced into the U.S. health innovation ecosystem, with a growing danger of permanent damage to the development of specialty drugs. [More]
Newborn screening for SCID holds promise that affected children can lead healthy lives

Newborn screening for SCID holds promise that affected children can lead healthy lives

Using population-based screening outcomes of approximately 3 million infants, a team of scientists across 14 states, including four researchers at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, have shown that newborn screening for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) can be successfully implemented across public health newborn screening programs. [More]
Regular blood transfusion therapy reduces recurrence of strokes in kids with sickle cell anemia

Regular blood transfusion therapy reduces recurrence of strokes in kids with sickle cell anemia

Vanderbilt-led research, as part of an international, multicenter trial, found regular blood transfusion therapy significantly reduces the recurrence of silent strokes and strokes in children with sickle cell anemia who have had pre-existing silent strokes, according to study results released today in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM). [More]
Scientists discover area of brain that could control person's motivation to exercise

Scientists discover area of brain that could control person's motivation to exercise

Scientists at Seattle Children's Research Institute have discovered an area of the brain that could control a person's motivation to exercise and participate in other rewarding activities - potentially leading to improved treatments for depression. [More]
Five tips to make children go back to school

Five tips to make children go back to school

It's that time of year again: parents are winding down summer plans and tightening the reins on bedtime schedules. And while adding anything else to the back-to-school to-do list may seem daunting, Children's Memorial Hermann Hospital has five tips that will make going back to school this year easier than ever. [More]
Researchers examine effect of sleeplessness on obesity in teenagers over time

Researchers examine effect of sleeplessness on obesity in teenagers over time

Teenagers who don't get enough sleep may wake up to worse consequences than nodding off during chemistry class. According to new research, risk of being obese by age 21 was 20 percent higher among 16-year-olds who got less than six hours of sleep a night, compared with their peers who slumbered more than eight hours. [More]
Using a nanotech microchip to diagnose type 1 diabetes: an interview with Dr. Brian Feldman, Stanford School of Medicine

Using a nanotech microchip to diagnose type 1 diabetes: an interview with Dr. Brian Feldman, Stanford School of Medicine

The most common form of diabetes is sometimes referred to as metabolic diabetes, which is the diabetes most people are very familiar with, type 2 diabetes. This form of diabetes is most prevalent in people that are overweight or obese. Historically, it has been confined to adults or older patients but it has been on the rise as the global obesity problem has continued to worsen. [More]
Researchers focus on how exposure to opioids may alter expression of OPRM1 gene

Researchers focus on how exposure to opioids may alter expression of OPRM1 gene

Some infants born with neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) secondary to in-utero opioid exposure have a more difficult time going through withdrawal than others, but the underlying reasons are not well understood. [More]
CONversation Cards promote discussion about child's weight management

CONversation Cards promote discussion about child's weight management

Out of all his research, Geoff Ball says it is his simplest project that has shown the greatest return. [More]
Communications about the benefits of vaccination influence parents' intentions to immunize children

Communications about the benefits of vaccination influence parents' intentions to immunize children

How do parents decide whether to vaccinate their child? In a study designed to formally look at the content of parent-targeted communications about the benefits of vaccination for measles, mumps and rubella, Indiana University School of Medicine investigators report that the framing of these messages influences parents' intentions to immunize their children. [More]