Pediatrics News and Research RSS Feed - Pediatrics News and Research

Pediatrics is the branch of medicine that deals with the medical care of infants, children, and adolescents. The age limit of such patients ranges from birth to 18. In countries where the age of majority is 18, this age limit may be from birth to age 17 (such as in Canada). A medical practitioner who specializes in this area is known as a pediatrician.
Nearly 3.3 million children in U.S. have dizziness or balance problem

Nearly 3.3 million children in U.S. have dizziness or balance problem

More than 1 in 20 (nearly 3.3 million) children between the ages of 3 and 17 have a dizziness or balance problem, according to an analysis of the first large-scale, nationally representative survey of these problems in U.S. children. [More]
Dysport phase III study results in children with cerebral palsy with lower limb spasticity published in Pediatrics

Dysport phase III study results in children with cerebral palsy with lower limb spasticity published in Pediatrics

Ipsen today announced that the scientific journal Pediatrics published the detailed results of the phase III randomized study showing both the efficacy and the safety of Dysport in the treatment of dynamic equinus foot deformity, a condition associated with cerebral palsy in children. [More]
Study leads to FDA approval of first immunotherapy for treatment of neuroblastoma

Study leads to FDA approval of first immunotherapy for treatment of neuroblastoma

Building upon more than two decades of basic research conducted at Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Araz Marachelian, MD, of CHLA, and her colleagues at pediatric academic centers across the U. S., have shown that an immunotherapy that until now has only been available to patients enrolled in research studies, is equivalent to the product that has been manufactured for commercial use and can be made available to all patients. [More]
Innovative programs may increase social, academic engagement for children growing up in poverty

Innovative programs may increase social, academic engagement for children growing up in poverty

Programs that help parents read and play more effectively with their young children may prevent behavior problems such as hyperactivity and increase social and academic engagement for children growing up in poverty, according to a new study led by pediatricians and psychologists at NYU Langone Medical Center and NYC Health + Hospitals/Bellevue. [More]
CHLA researchers to discuss how novel 3-D motion analysis could be used to predict risk for ACL injuries

CHLA researchers to discuss how novel 3-D motion analysis could be used to predict risk for ACL injuries

Children's Hospital Los Angeles expert to discuss how novel 3-D motion analysis can be used as a tool to predict risk for knee injuries. [More]
Chronic fatigue syndrome affects almost 2% of 16-year-olds

Chronic fatigue syndrome affects almost 2% of 16-year-olds

In what is believed to be the biggest study of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) -- also known as myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) -- in children to date, researchers at the University of Bristol (UK), have found that almost 2 per cent of 16-year-olds have CFS lasting more than six months and nearly 3 per cent have CFS lasting more than three months (the UK definition). [More]
UC San Diego researchers develop rapid susceptibility test for Staphylococcus aureus

UC San Diego researchers develop rapid susceptibility test for Staphylococcus aureus

A team of biologists and biomedical researchers at UC San Diego has developed a new method to determine if bacteria are susceptible to antibiotics within a few hours, an advance that could slow the appearance of drug resistance and allow doctors to more rapidly identify the appropriate treatment for patients with life threatening bacterial infections. [More]
Beta- and gamma-HPVs associated with development of head and neck cancers, finds Einstein study

Beta- and gamma-HPVs associated with development of head and neck cancers, finds Einstein study

Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine have found that when human papillomavirus (HPV)-16 is detected in peoples' mouths, they are 22 times more likely than those without HPV-16 to develop a type of head and neck cancer. [More]
Colon cancer patients lacking CDX2 protein more likely to benefit from chemotherapy

Colon cancer patients lacking CDX2 protein more likely to benefit from chemotherapy

Using a new computer science approach, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, Columbia University and Stanford University discovered a distinctive molecular feature — a biomarker — that identified colon cancer patients who were most likely to remain disease-free up to five years after surgery. [More]
Metabolic profile derived from routine newborn screenings could determine infant's gestational age

Metabolic profile derived from routine newborn screenings could determine infant's gestational age

Knowing if an infant was born on time or prematurely can make all the difference in deciding what medical care the baby needs. [More]
OSU researchers find no evidence that water births pose increased harm to newborns

OSU researchers find no evidence that water births pose increased harm to newborns

There is no evidence that water births, where a baby is intentionally born under water in a tub or pool, poses any increased harm to the child, Oregon State University researchers have found. [More]
IDEAL study holds new hope for children exposed to methamphetamine in the womb

IDEAL study holds new hope for children exposed to methamphetamine in the womb

Despite continuing reports that methamphetamine abuse during pregnancy can lead to behavioral and emotional problems in children, pregnant women continue to abuse the illicit drug. Nearly one-fourth of pregnant women seeking treatment at federal facilities were methamphetamine users. [More]
Parental debt may have adverse effects on socioemotional well-being of children

Parental debt may have adverse effects on socioemotional well-being of children

Certain types of debt that parents take on may have adverse effects on children's socioemotional well-being according to a new study by researchers at the University of Wisconsin at Madison and Dartmouth published by the journal Pediatrics. [More]
Study provides better understanding of familial risk for depression

Study provides better understanding of familial risk for depression

Building on a 30-year, three-generation study of depressed individuals, their children and offspring, a study published in the journal Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging provides a better understanding of the familial risk for depression and the role neuroplasticity might have in increasing the risk of developing depression. [More]
Easy access to children's GPs reduces visits to emergency departments

Easy access to children's GPs reduces visits to emergency departments

Children whose GPs are easy to access are less likely to visit A&E than those whose GPs are less able to provide appointments. During weekdays, children's visits to A&E peak after school hours. [More]
Artificial pancreas moves closer to becoming a reality

Artificial pancreas moves closer to becoming a reality

As the accuracy, reliability, adoption, and successful use of Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) continue to increase, the ultimate goal of combining CGM with an insulin pump and sophisticated algorithms for automating the control and suspension of insulin infusion--known as the "artificial pancreas"--moves closer to becoming a reality. [More]
Four USF professors selected as AIMBE College of Fellows

Four USF professors selected as AIMBE College of Fellows

Four University of South Florida professors have been elected to the 2016 College of Fellows of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE): Cesario Borlongan and Shyam Mohapatra from the USF Morsani College of Medicine, USF Health; and Robert Frisina, Jr., and Sudeep Sarkar from the USF College of Engineering. [More]
Study shows slow global progress on stillbirth prevention leaves over 2.6 million babies at risk each year

Study shows slow global progress on stillbirth prevention leaves over 2.6 million babies at risk each year

More than 2.6 million stillbirths continue to occur globally every year with very slow progress made to tackle this 'silent problem', according to new research published in The Lancet. Despite significant reductions in the number of maternal and child deaths, there has been little change in the number of stillbirths (in the third trimester of pregnancy) even though the majority are preventable. [More]
Researchers identify protein that could protect against toxic degeneration of cells in ALS

Researchers identify protein that could protect against toxic degeneration of cells in ALS

J. Gavin Daigle, a PhD candidate at the LSU Health New Orleans School of Graduate Studies, is the first author of a paper whose findings reveal another piece of the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) puzzle. [More]
Researchers confirm that cranberry extract helps fight UTIs in breastfed children under age one

Researchers confirm that cranberry extract helps fight UTIs in breastfed children under age one

Researchers from the universities of Granada (Spain) and Kvopio (Finland) have confirmed that cranberry extract helps fighting urinary tract infections (UTIs) in breastfed babies under one year of age. [More]
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