Pediatrics News and Research RSS Feed - Pediatrics News and Research

Pediatrics is the branch of medicine that deals with the medical care of infants, children, and adolescents. The age limit of such patients ranges from birth to 18. In countries where the age of majority is 18, this age limit may be from birth to age 17 (such as in Canada). A medical practitioner who specializes in this area is known as a pediatrician.
New study shows ulcer-causing bacteria can directly interact with stomach stem cells

New study shows ulcer-causing bacteria can directly interact with stomach stem cells

The ulcer-causing bacterium Helicobacter pylori can directly interact with stomach stem cells, causing the cells to divide more rapidly, according to a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. [More]
UTHealth professor awarded $1 million grant from Stryker Neurovascular for stroke research

UTHealth professor awarded $1 million grant from Stryker Neurovascular for stroke research

A $1 million grant for stroke research has been awarded from Stryker Neurovascular to Amrou Sarraj, M.D., assistant professor of neurology at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. [More]
NTNU researchers find link between sleep disorders and psychiatric problems in young children

NTNU researchers find link between sleep disorders and psychiatric problems in young children

Toddlers who take a long time to fall asleep or wake up many times during the night have put many a desperate mom and dad to the test. Tired parents are often told that night waking is part of toddlerhood, and that it will soon pass on its own, but this is not the case for everyone. [More]
Spirometry underutilized for asthma management in U.S. adults

Spirometry underutilized for asthma management in U.S. adults

Researchers from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have found, for the first time, that spirometry was underutilized for asthma diagnosis and management in U.S. adults from 2001 to 2011, despite it's accuracy, cost effectiveness and the publication of national guidelines advocating its use. [More]
Mutations in PARN and RTEL1 associated with familial pulmonary fibrosis, telomere shortening

Mutations in PARN and RTEL1 associated with familial pulmonary fibrosis, telomere shortening

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified mutations in two genes that cause a fatal lung scarring disease known as familial pulmonary fibrosis. [More]
Frederick Alt honored with 2015 Szent-Györgyi Prize for Progress in Cancer Research

Frederick Alt honored with 2015 Szent-Györgyi Prize for Progress in Cancer Research

Frederick Alt, PhD, director of the Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine at Boston Children's Hospital, has been honored with the 2015 Szent-Györgyi Prize for Progress in Cancer Research. [More]
Researchers suggest ways to keep harmful tobacco and alcohol products away from young people

Researchers suggest ways to keep harmful tobacco and alcohol products away from young people

As the realities of legalized marijuana take hold in four states and the District of Columbia, legislators and regulators could learn a lot from the successes -- and failures -- of the tobacco and alcohol industries in keeping their harmful products out of the hands of children and adolescents. [More]
Study shows how pharmacies may play important role in reducing asthma-related illness

Study shows how pharmacies may play important role in reducing asthma-related illness

A new study shows how pharmacies might collaborate with physicians and families to reduce asthma-related illness. [More]
Neonatal abstinence syndrome on the rise in U.S.

Neonatal abstinence syndrome on the rise in U.S.

The number of infants born in the United States with drug withdrawal symptoms, also known as neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), nearly doubled in a four-year period. By 2012, one infant was born every 25 minutes in the U.S. with the syndrome, accounting for $1.5 billion in annual health care charges, according to a new Vanderbilt study published in the Journal of Perinatology. [More]
Study opens door for new therapeutic approaches to treating patients with melanoma

Study opens door for new therapeutic approaches to treating patients with melanoma

Weill Cornell Medical College researchers have shown for the first time that a gene previously implicated in blood vessel formation during embryonic development and tumor growth also induces immune suppression during tumor development. [More]
Montefiore and Einstein researchers to present data on obesity, asthma and autism at PAS 2015

Montefiore and Einstein researchers to present data on obesity, asthma and autism at PAS 2015

Researchers from the Children's Hospital at Montefiore and Albert Einstein College of Medicine will present data from more than 50 studies that explore topics including obesity, asthma and autism at the annual meeting of the Pediatric Academic Societies. [More]
Teen-LABS research study reveals musculoskeletal disease outcomes among obese adolescents

Teen-LABS research study reveals musculoskeletal disease outcomes among obese adolescents

Outcomes regarding musculoskeletal disease among severely obese adolescents participating in the "Teen Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery" (Teen-LABS) study were published this week in JAMA Pediatrics. Teen-LABS is a multi-center clinical study funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases at the National Institutes of Health that is examining the safety and health effects of surgical weight loss procedures. [More]
Preventive intervention improves knowledge, attitudes about sexual risk among adolescent boys than girls

Preventive intervention improves knowledge, attitudes about sexual risk among adolescent boys than girls

Boys aged between 12-14 years old showed improved knowledge and attitudes about sexual risk after a preventive intervention, compared to girls of the same age, according to a study presented yesterday at the Pediatric Academic Societies Annual Meeting. [More]
UC Davis researchers settle long-standing controversy surrounding Canavan disease

UC Davis researchers settle long-standing controversy surrounding Canavan disease

UC Davis investigators have settled a long-standing controversy surrounding the molecular basis of an inherited disorder that historically affected Ashkenazi Jews from Eastern Europe but now also arises in other populations of Semitic descent, particularly families from Saudi Arabia. [More]
Non-powder gun-related pediatric eye injuries on the rise in U.S.

Non-powder gun-related pediatric eye injuries on the rise in U.S.

Over 3000 children were treated in U.S. emergency departments in 2012 for eye injuries related to paintball guns, airsoft guns, BB guns and pellet guns, which are popular non-powder guns. [More]
New T1D Prevention Initiative launched to identify pathways to prevent type 1 diabetes

New T1D Prevention Initiative launched to identify pathways to prevent type 1 diabetes

As the incidence of type 1 diabetes (T1D) rises worldwide, The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust today announced the launch of an ambitious new T1D Prevention Initiative to investigate the early stages of development of the disease and identify new pathways to prevent it. [More]
OpenMRS community drives the world's largest open source project to tackle Ebola virus

OpenMRS community drives the world's largest open source project to tackle Ebola virus

An accurate, up to the minute, accessible medical record system is fundamental to effective treatment and tracking of the Ebola virus. [More]
Yale researchers successfully correct gene mutation that causes cystic fibrosis

Yale researchers successfully correct gene mutation that causes cystic fibrosis

Yale researchers successfully corrected the most common mutation in the gene that causes cystic fibrosis, a lethal genetic disorder. The study was published April 27 in Nature Communications. [More]
Depression, suicidal tendency common among teens who are victims of bullying in school

Depression, suicidal tendency common among teens who are victims of bullying in school

High school students subjected to bullying and other forms of harassment are more likely to report being seriously depressed, consider suicide and carry weapons to school, according to findings from a trio of studies reported at the Pediatric Academic Societies meeting in San Diego. [More]
Health food stores promote adult-only dietary supplements to minors

Health food stores promote adult-only dietary supplements to minors

Fifteen year olds are not only able to buy over-the-counter dietary supplements from a sampling of health food stores across the country, the staff at those stores actually went so far as to recommend certain products, despite labels reading "for adult use only." [More]
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