Pediatrics News and Research RSS Feed - Pediatrics News and Research

Pediatrics is the branch of medicine that deals with the medical care of infants, children, and adolescents. The age limit of such patients ranges from birth to 18. In countries where the age of majority is 18, this age limit may be from birth to age 17 (such as in Canada). A medical practitioner who specializes in this area is known as a pediatrician.
Corrective information can successfully reduce false beliefs about flu vaccines

Corrective information can successfully reduce false beliefs about flu vaccines

With health systems in the U.S., U.K., and around the world trying to increase vaccination levels, it is critical to understand how to address vaccine hesitancy and counter myths about vaccine safety. A new article in the journal "Vaccine" concludes, however, that correcting myths about vaccines may not be the most effective approach to promoting immunization among vaccine skeptics. [More]
Study provides insights into genetic underpinnings of childhood epilepsies

Study provides insights into genetic underpinnings of childhood epilepsies

Technological advances in genetic analysis have uncovered changes in single genes that account for a surprising number of infantile and early-childhood epilepsies. Though some of the affected genes have been identified, the physical manifestations of these alterations remain largely uncharacterized. [More]
Innovative cell therapy shows highly promising results in pediatric patients with ALL

Innovative cell therapy shows highly promising results in pediatric patients with ALL

An innovative cell therapy against a highly aggressive form of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) continues to show highly promising results in children treated in a pilot study. Ninety-two percent of the 39 children receiving bioengineered T cells had no evidence of cancer at one month after treatment, with this complete response persisting in some cases for more than two years. [More]
Researchers assess efficiency and safety of breast milk stimulant

Researchers assess efficiency and safety of breast milk stimulant

Most women can make all the milk their baby needs, but some mothers turn to medications to help increase their supply. While some specialists encourage the off-label use of domperidone to stimulate breast milk production, some studies have suggested it may be related to negative side effects, including irregular heartbeat and sudden cardiac death. [More]
New study finds link between birth weights and academic performance in school

New study finds link between birth weights and academic performance in school

It's no secret that low-birth-weight babies face significantly greater risks for certain health problems early on, such as respiratory distress or infection. Now, a new study from researchers at the University of Florida and Northwestern University shows that lower weights at birth also have an adverse effect on children's performance in school, which is likely due to the early health struggles small babies often face. [More]
Study examines rate of psychotropic medication prescribed to children in Kentucky

Study examines rate of psychotropic medication prescribed to children in Kentucky

Researchers with the Child and Adolescent Health Research Design and Support Unit (CAHRDS Unit) at the University of Louisville have begun a study to examine one of Kentucky's most vexing children's health issues: the higher-than-average rate of psychotropic medication being prescribed to children in the Bluegrass State. [More]
Identifying infant and toddler injuries that require emergency medical care

Identifying infant and toddler injuries that require emergency medical care

Bianca Edison, MD, MS is an attending physician in the Children's Orthopaedic Center at Children's Hospital Los Angeles, and is assistant clinical professor of Orthopaedics at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California. Edison is a licensed, Board-Certified pediatrician and Fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics who completed a fellowship in Primary Care SportsMedicine. Her interests and experience include orthopaedic conditions affecting young children, teens, and athletes. Here she reviews common infant and toddler injuries, and how parents can determine if emergency medical care is needed. [More]
Study: Heavier newborns do better in school

Study: Heavier newborns do better in school

Birth weight makes a difference to a child's future academic performance, according to new Northwestern University research that found heavier newborns do better in elementary and middle school than infants with lower birth weights. [More]
Kentucky governor, Lt. governor unveil multidisciplinary health care home for children

Kentucky governor, Lt. governor unveil multidisciplinary health care home for children

Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear and Lt. Gov. Crit Luallen today (Dec. 1) announced an innovative public/private partnership between Community Dental, a nonprofit of Kentucky, and University of Louisville Pediatrics to provide a multidisciplinary health care home for Kentucky children enrolled in the Medicaid program. [More]
Commonly used osteoporosis medications may also prevent lung, breast and colon cancers

Commonly used osteoporosis medications may also prevent lung, breast and colon cancers

The most commonly used medications for osteoporosis worldwide, bisphosphonates, may also prevent certain kinds of lung, breast and colon cancers, according to two studies led by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. [More]
New study details weight loss patterns of breastfed newborns

New study details weight loss patterns of breastfed newborns

Using weights obtained from over 100,000 Northern California babies, a new study is the first to detail the weight loss patterns of exclusively breastfed newborns. The results show that some breastfed babies lose weight faster and for a longer period than was previously recognized. [More]
‘Optimal degree’ of catch-up growth defined for SGA babies

‘Optimal degree’ of catch-up growth defined for SGA babies

A growth trajectory in which small for gestational age babies achieve catch-up growth to a defined degree within the first few months of life appears to be best for their subsequent health, say researchers. [More]
Rate of toy-related injuries in children increases nearly 40% from 1990 through 2011

Rate of toy-related injuries in children increases nearly 40% from 1990 through 2011

'Tis the season for toys. Children are writing lists full of them, and parents are standing in lines (or tapping on computers) trying to find them. Playing with toys this season or any other is an important way for children to develop, learn, and explore. But anyone planning to buy new toys, or anyone with toys already at home, should know that many toys pose an injury risk to children. [More]
Unsafe infant bedding increases risk of sudden infant death syndrome

Unsafe infant bedding increases risk of sudden infant death syndrome

Nearly 55 percent of U.S. infants are placed to sleep with bedding that increases the risk of sudden infant death syndrome, or SIDS, despite recommendations against the practice, report researchers at the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and other institutions. [More]
Pathology specialist publishes invited commentary on breast cancer gene screening

Pathology specialist publishes invited commentary on breast cancer gene screening

There has been much recent debate on the benefits and risks of screening for breast cancer using BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in the general adult population. [More]
New NIH funding to help researchers develop drug delivery system to prevent HIV infection in women

New NIH funding to help researchers develop drug delivery system to prevent HIV infection in women

The University of Texas Medical Branch is part of a collaboration led by the Oak Crest Institute of Science that received a $20 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to develop a novel intravaginal ring capable of delivering powerful antiretroviral drugs to prevent the spread of sexually transmitted HIV in women. The total award to UTMB is approximately $2.5 million. [More]
Automated biospecimen thawing: an interview with Dr Rolf Ehrhardt, CEO of BioCision

Automated biospecimen thawing: an interview with Dr Rolf Ehrhardt, CEO of BioCision

Surprisingly, even with decades of cryopreservation research, little progress has been made in the way frozen biospecimens are thawed. It’s still very common for researchers and clinicians to thaw cells and other frozen biological samples in a variety of manual ways ... [More]
Comprehensive guide to help parents obtain quality medical care for children with ASDs

Comprehensive guide to help parents obtain quality medical care for children with ASDs

Navigating through the maze of health and medical services can be challenging for parents of children who have been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). A new resource is now available for caregivers, health professionals and, especially, parents. [More]
Children with NAFLD at substantial risk for high blood pressure

Children with NAFLD at substantial risk for high blood pressure

High blood pressure and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are two emerging health problems related to the epidemic of childhood obesity. In a recent study, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine sought to determine the prevalence of high blood pressure in children with NAFLD, which places them at risk for premature cardiovascular disease. [More]
Five USF faculty members named AAAS Fellow

Five USF faculty members named AAAS Fellow

Five faculty members from the University of South Florida in Tampa have been named Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Election as an AAAS Fellow is an honor bestowed upon AAAS members by their peers. [More]