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Pediatrics is the branch of medicine that deals with the medical care of infants, children, and adolescents. The age limit of such patients ranges from birth to 18. In countries where the age of majority is 18, this age limit may be from birth to age 17 (such as in Canada). A medical practitioner who specializes in this area is known as a pediatrician.
Social, emotional factors may raise risk of postpartum depression in mothers of preterm infants

Social, emotional factors may raise risk of postpartum depression in mothers of preterm infants

Postpartum depression is the most common complication of pregnancy and childbirth, affecting up to 15 percent of all women within the first three months following delivery. [More]
New paper provides insights into impact of music therapy on anxiety of surgical patients

New paper provides insights into impact of music therapy on anxiety of surgical patients

A new paper published in the September 2016 issue of the AORN Journal provides insights into the impact of implementing a music therapy program for surgical patients. [More]
Graded aerobic treadmill testing useful in evaluating sports-related concussion in children

Graded aerobic treadmill testing useful in evaluating sports-related concussion in children

Graded aerobic treadmill testing is safe, tolerable, and useful in evaluating and managing cases of sports-related concussion in children and adolescents. [More]
Orlando Health to bring benefits of MRI-guided radiation therapy to Central Florida

Orlando Health to bring benefits of MRI-guided radiation therapy to Central Florida

Orlando Health will soon begin providing a new therapy that allows oncologists to see the tumor they are treating continuously during radiation therapy. [More]
Research reveals how Zika virus arrests fetal brain development in pigtail macaque

Research reveals how Zika virus arrests fetal brain development in pigtail macaque

For the first time, abnormal brain development following a Zika infection during pregnancy has been documented experimentally in the offspring of a non-human primate. [More]
Researchers find dramatic increase in rate of soccer-related head injuries among young players

Researchers find dramatic increase in rate of soccer-related head injuries among young players

Soccer is an increasingly popular sport in the United States, both professionally and recreationally, with over 3 million registered soccer players under 19 years of age playing in leagues every year. [More]
Experts develop urine-based method to diagnose conditions in newborn babies

Experts develop urine-based method to diagnose conditions in newborn babies

Experts from the V. I. Kulakov Research Center for Obstetrics, Gynecology and Perinatology and the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology have devised a method that uses the urinary proteome to diagnose conditions in newborn babies. [More]
CHORI scientists reveal improved protective antibody responses to new meningococcal vaccine

CHORI scientists reveal improved protective antibody responses to new meningococcal vaccine

A study conducted by UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute scientists shows greatly improved protective antibody responses to a new mutant vaccine antigen for prevention of disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis - also known as meningococcus - that has the potential to improve the current vaccines for meningitis. [More]
Smartphone application may be feasible, effective sexual health education tool for teenage girls

Smartphone application may be feasible, effective sexual health education tool for teenage girls

Across the globe, there is increased focus on developing interventions related to comprehensive sexual health education for adolescents, with the ultimate goal of combatting unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections. [More]
New blood test helps identify bacterial infection in infants with fever

New blood test helps identify bacterial infection in infants with fever

A blood test used to measure patterns of ribonucleic acid (RNA) expression can help determine if fever in infants under 2 months old is caused by bacterial or viral infection, according to a preliminary study recently published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. [More]
Intervention to address family social needs improves overall health status of pediatric patients

Intervention to address family social needs improves overall health status of pediatric patients

An intervention that paired caregivers with a navigator to help address the social needs of families of pediatric patients was associated with decreased needs reported by the families and improved overall child health status, according to an article published online by JAMA Pediatrics. [More]
Researchers isolate cord blood factor that helps fight harmful inflammation

Researchers isolate cord blood factor that helps fight harmful inflammation

A factor found in umbilical cord blood could become the basis for developing a new therapy to fight harmful inflammation, University of Utah School of Medicine researchers report. [More]
Individuals born via cesarean may be at increased risk of obesity, new study shows

Individuals born via cesarean may be at increased risk of obesity, new study shows

Individuals born by cesarean delivery were 15% more likely to become obese as children than individuals born by vaginal birth--and the increased risk may persist through adulthood, according to a large new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. [More]
Extreme preemies more likey to develop abnormal blood glucose and high body fat in adulthood

Extreme preemies more likey to develop abnormal blood glucose and high body fat in adulthood

By the time they are in their early 30s, extremely low birth weight (ELBW) babies are four times more likely to develop dysglycemia, or abnormal blood glucose, than their normal birth weight (NBW) peers. [More]
Sign language may be highly effective in treating children with apraxia of speech

Sign language may be highly effective in treating children with apraxia of speech

Using sign language with intensive speech therapy may be an effective treatment for children with a rare speech disorder called apraxia of speech, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. [More]
Study sheds new light on why colon cancers are more aggressive in African Americans

Study sheds new light on why colon cancers are more aggressive in African Americans

Case Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers, a research collaboration which includes University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center and Case Western Reserve University, who last year identified new gene mutations unique to colon cancers in African Americans, have found that tumors with these mutations are highly aggressive and more likely to recur and metastasize. [More]
New research sheds light on underlying genetic basis of heart arrhythmias

New research sheds light on underlying genetic basis of heart arrhythmias

In the August 31 issue of Science Translational Medicine, new research from the University of Chicago shows how deficits in a specific pathway of genes can lead to the development of atrial fibrillation, a common irregular heartbeat, which poses a significant health risk. [More]
New stem-cell model of heart tissue unravels mechanisms linked to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

New stem-cell model of heart tissue unravels mechanisms linked to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

Using advanced stem cell technology, scientists from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have created a model of a heart condition called hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) — an excessive thickening of the heart that is associated with a number of rare and common illnesses, some of which have a strong genetic component. [More]
New collaborative initiative aims to improve adult immunization rates

New collaborative initiative aims to improve adult immunization rates

A new quality improvement initiative that aims to create effective solutions in optimizing adult vaccination rates was announced today. [More]
Respiratory viral infection triggering asthma attack in children linked to treatment failure

Respiratory viral infection triggering asthma attack in children linked to treatment failure

The results of a study conducted by Dr. Francine Ducharme, Professor in the Departments of Pediatrics and Social and Preventive Medicine at the University of Montreal, published in the medical journal The Lancet Respiratory Medicine, confirm that respiratory viral detection, not child's age, explains the high rate of hospitalization for asthma attacks in children under six. [More]
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