Pediatrics News and Research RSS Feed - Pediatrics News and Research

Pediatrics is the branch of medicine that deals with the medical care of infants, children, and adolescents. The age limit of such patients ranges from birth to 18. In countries where the age of majority is 18, this age limit may be from birth to age 17 (such as in Canada). A medical practitioner who specializes in this area is known as a pediatrician.
Mothers who plan to breastfeed but return to work full-time are less likely to meet breastfeeding goals

Mothers who plan to breastfeed but return to work full-time are less likely to meet breastfeeding goals

Breastfeeding is known to provide significant health benefits for both infants and their mothers. However, while many women intend to breastfeed despite returning to work, a new study finds that mothers who plan to breastfeed for at least three months but return to work full-time are less likely to meet their breastfeeding goals. [More]
Researcher finds genetic identifier that may allow clinicians to determine babies at risk for autism

Researcher finds genetic identifier that may allow clinicians to determine babies at risk for autism

A researcher at Seattle Children's Hospital and Research Institute has found a genetic identifier for autism that includes physical features that may eventually allow clinicians to identify babies who are at risk for autism before they are born. [More]
Women with history of pregnancy loss are at higher risk for cardiovascular disease later

Women with history of pregnancy loss are at higher risk for cardiovascular disease later

The Annals of Family Medicine today published an article detailing research showing that women with a history of pregnancy loss are at higher risk for cardiovascular disease later in adulthood than other women, work completed by physicians in the Center for Primary Care and Prevention (CPCP) at Memorial Hospital of Rhode Island. [More]
Teenage boys desire intimacy and sex relationship with their partners

Teenage boys desire intimacy and sex relationship with their partners

Teenage boys desire intimacy and sex in the context of a meaningful relationship and value trust in their partnerships, according to researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. [More]
Research reveals why HIV remains a long-lasting infection

Research reveals why HIV remains a long-lasting infection

HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, has the ability to integrate into the human genome, making it extremely difficult to cure the infection. A new study by scientists at Seattle Children's Research Institute, University of Washington and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center found that when HIV integrates into genes involved with cancer, these cells tend to reproduce to a greater extent than others HIV-infected cells. [More]
Inappropriate expectations, lack of empathy play role in children with developmental disabilities

Inappropriate expectations, lack of empathy play role in children with developmental disabilities

Children with developmental disabilities are at higher risk for abuse and neglect from parents than children developing at a typical rate. [More]
UH Case Medical Center named one of nation's top hospitals

UH Case Medical Center named one of nation's top hospitals

University Hospitals Case Medical Center has once again been named one of the nation's top hospitals, according to U.S. News & World Report's annual Best Hospitals rankings. UH Case Medical Center was ranked in all 12 methodology-ranked specialties for the third year in a row and in the Top 20 in four specialties - Cancer, Gastroenterology, Ear, Nose & Throat, and Orthopaedics. [More]
Urgent Care for Kids plans to add four new clinics throughout Texas

Urgent Care for Kids plans to add four new clinics throughout Texas

Urgent Care for Kids announced plans to enter the Austin market and add four new clinics throughout the state. The practice is slated to open two new Houston-area clinics as well as two clinics in the greater Austin area by the end of the summer. Urgent Care for Kids selected these areas by identifying key growth markets where it can respond to increased demand for high quality after-hours pediatric care. [More]
Portable, microchip-based test for diagnosing type-1 diabetes

Portable, microchip-based test for diagnosing type-1 diabetes

An inexpensive, portable, microchip-based test for diagnosing type-1 diabetes could improve patient care worldwide and help researchers better understand the disease, according to the device's inventors at the Stanford University School of Medicine. [More]
Mississippi baby: Infant seemingly cured of HIV has detectable levels of HIV

Mississippi baby: Infant seemingly cured of HIV has detectable levels of HIV

The child known as the "Mississippi baby"-an infant seemingly cured of HIV that was reported as a case study of a prolonged remission of HIV infection in The New England Journal of Medicine last fall-now has detectable levels of HIV after more than two years of not taking antiretroviral therapy without evidence of virus, according to the pediatric HIV specialist and researchers involved in the case. [More]
New hope for patients with tuberous sclerosis complex

New hope for patients with tuberous sclerosis complex

Although it is rare, tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) can be a difficult and frightening diagnosis for parents and children. The genetic disorder causes nonmalignant tumors to form in many different organs, including the brain, eyes, kidneys and heart. [More]
Self-competence seems to decrease quality of life for children living with cardiac pacemaker

Self-competence seems to decrease quality of life for children living with cardiac pacemaker

For children and teens living with a cardiac pacemaker, a low sense of self-competence seems to contribute to decreased quality of life, reports a study in the July Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics, the official journal of the Society for Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics. [More]
New approach for developing personalized gene therapies to treat retinitis pigmentosa

New approach for developing personalized gene therapies to treat retinitis pigmentosa

Columbia University Medical Center researchers have created a way to develop personalized gene therapies for patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a leading cause of vision loss. [More]
HHS grant to support new model of care for patients with complex cancer

HHS grant to support new model of care for patients with complex cancer

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has announced a three-year grant to University Hospitals Case Medical Center Seidman Cancer Center totaling $4.7 million to support a new national model aimed at improving care for patients with complex cancer. [More]
Kaleo announces U.S. availability of EVZIO for emergency treatment of opioid overdose

Kaleo announces U.S. availability of EVZIO for emergency treatment of opioid overdose

Kaleo, a privately-held pharmaceutical company headquartered in Richmond, Virginia, today announced the United States (U.S.) commercial availability of EVZIO for the emergency treatment of known or suspected opioid overdose, as manifested by respiratory and/or central nervous system depression. [More]
Time spent outdoors after school positively associated with MVPA

Time spent outdoors after school positively associated with MVPA

The World Health Organization recommends that youth participate in a minimum of 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) each day. [More]
Immune marker predicts infection risk in critically ill children with traumatic injuries

Immune marker predicts infection risk in critically ill children with traumatic injuries

Researchers studying critically ill children with traumatic injuries have identified an immune marker that predicts which patients are likely to develop a hospital-acquired infection. [More]
Study compares level of physical fitness of adolescents in south with centre and north of Europe

Study compares level of physical fitness of adolescents in south with centre and north of Europe

Adolescents in southern Europe are less fit in terms of cardiorespiratory capacity, strength and speed-agility than their central-northern European peers. Moreover, southern adolescents are more obese and present higher levels of total and abdominal fat than those from the centre-north of Europe. [More]
New gene therapy may be effective for fighting fungal infections in cancer patients

New gene therapy may be effective for fighting fungal infections in cancer patients

Sleeping Beauty and fungal infections - not two items one would normally associate together, but for immunocompromised cancer patients they may prove to be a helpful combination. [More]
Over 650 000 children develop tuberculosis every year in the 22 HBCs according to new estimates

Over 650 000 children develop tuberculosis every year in the 22 HBCs according to new estimates

New estimates indicate that over 650 000 children develop tuberculosis (TB) every year in the 22 countries with a high burden of the disease (HBCs)*—almost 25% higher than the total number of new cases worldwide estimated by WHO in 2012 (530 000)**. The research, published in The Lancet Global Health, also suggests that about 15 million children are exposed to TB every year, and roughly 53 million are living with latent TB infection, which can progress to infectious active TB at any time. [More]