Pediatrics News and Research RSS Feed - Pediatrics News and Research

Pediatrics is the branch of medicine that deals with the medical care of infants, children, and adolescents. The age limit of such patients ranges from birth to 18. In countries where the age of majority is 18, this age limit may be from birth to age 17 (such as in Canada). A medical practitioner who specializes in this area is known as a pediatrician.
UofL conducts Phase I research study for children with relapsed tumors

UofL conducts Phase I research study for children with relapsed tumors

Zach feels "pretty good." Sam wants to be "done with shots!" And Tyler finds it helps to "just keep thinking that at least I'm getting out of school." They are normal boys who had normal lives until cancer came into the picture. All have faced the disease for two years or more, with surgeries, chemotherapy and radiation treatments. All were diagnosed with various malignant solid tumors, went into remission and then relapsed. [More]
NuSI launches groundbreaking clinical study to halt nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in children

NuSI launches groundbreaking clinical study to halt nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in children

Nutrition Science Initiative has launched the first-ever randomized, controlled clinical trial to determine whether removing added sugars from the diet can halt or even reverse nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in children. [More]
New ISU study provides snapshot of health-related fitness levels for U.S. schoolchildren

New ISU study provides snapshot of health-related fitness levels for U.S. schoolchildren

A new study provides a snapshot of health-related physical fitness levels for U.S. schoolchildren in grades first through 12th. Iowa State University researchers analyzing data collected nationally through the NFL PLAY 60 FITNESSGRAM Partnership Project found that fitness levels sharply declined as students got older. [More]
Family, cultural and geographical factors influence unsafe sleep position of infants

Family, cultural and geographical factors influence unsafe sleep position of infants

When it comes to newborn sleep, mother may not know best. According to Deborah Raines, associate professor in the University at Buffalo School of Nursing, family, cultural and geographical influences may lead some mothers to place their newborn children in unsafe sleeping positions. [More]
Emory University immunologists identify long-lived antibody-producing cells in bone marrow

Emory University immunologists identify long-lived antibody-producing cells in bone marrow

Immunologists from Emory University have identified a distinct set of long-lived antibody-producing cells in the human bone marrow that function as an immune archive. [More]
New study highlights burden of community-acquired pneumonia hospitalizations among U.S. adults

New study highlights burden of community-acquired pneumonia hospitalizations among U.S. adults

Viruses, not bacteria, are the most commonly detected respiratory pathogens in U.S. adults hospitalized with pneumonia, according to a New England Journal of Medicine study released today and conducted by researchers at Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and hospitals in Chicago and Nashville, including Vanderbilt University Medical Center. [More]
New research may explain why youngsters' recovery times vary widely after traumatic brain injury

New research may explain why youngsters' recovery times vary widely after traumatic brain injury

Why do some youngsters bounce back quickly from a traumatic brain injury, while others suffer devastating side effects for years? New UCLA/USC research suggests that damage to the fatty sheaths around the brain's nerve fibers--not injury severity-- may explain the difference. Published in the July 15 edition of the Journal of Neuroscience, the finding identifies possible biomarkers that physicians could use to predict higher-risk patients who require closer monitoring. [More]
Teen birth, mental illness increase hospitalization of children in Texas

Teen birth, mental illness increase hospitalization of children in Texas

From 2004 to 2010 in Texas, mental illness was the most common reason for the hospitalization of children ages 10-14 while pregnancy/birth was the most common reason for the hospitalization of adolescents ages 15-17, according to researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston Medical School. [More]
Noninvasive prenatal screening could detect maternal cancer

Noninvasive prenatal screening could detect maternal cancer

A study published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association shows that genetic test results, as revealed by non-invasive prenatal testing for fetal chromosome abnormalities, may detect underlying conditions in the mother, including cancer. [More]
Study: Distinct naming convention for babies in NICU can reduce wrong-patient errors by almost 40%

Study: Distinct naming convention for babies in NICU can reduce wrong-patient errors by almost 40%

Traditionally, babies in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) are temporarily identified by gender and last name, such as Babyboy Jackson or Babygirl Smith, but this naming configuration can result in wrong-patient errors for the fragile newborns. [More]
Newborn's first stool can signal future cognitive problems

Newborn's first stool can signal future cognitive problems

A newborn's first stool can signal the child may struggle with persistent cognitive problems, according to Case Western Reserve University Project Newborn researchers. [More]
Novel gene therapy control system regulates expression of therapeutic transgenes

Novel gene therapy control system regulates expression of therapeutic transgenes

Korean researchers have described a novel control system to regulate the expression of a therapeutic transgene by targeting the passenger strand of a microRNA (miR-122) linked to the transgene. [More]
U-M Medical School researchers compare reality and rhetoric of two health plans

U-M Medical School researchers compare reality and rhetoric of two health plans

Few people today would dare call President Richard Nixon a radical liberal. But 44 years ago, he proposed a health plan that went far beyond what today's Affordable Care Act includes. After the first plan failed, he did it again three years later. [More]
WellStar opens new inpatient pediatric unit

WellStar opens new inpatient pediatric unit

WellStar Kennestone Hospital opened a new inpatient pediatric unit. Previously, Cobb County did not have an inpatient pediatric unit, forcing families to leave their community to receive hospital-based care. The new unit will keep pediatric patients and their families close to home. [More]
University of Chicago Medicine named to FARE Clinical Network

University of Chicago Medicine named to FARE Clinical Network

The University of Chicago Medicine is among 22 centers of excellence across the country chosen by Food Allergy Research & Education (FARE) to be inaugural members of its FARE Clinical Network, which will work to accelerate development of therapies and raise the standard of care for people with life-threating food allergies. [More]
High-frequency tympanometry testing can help identify middle-ear problems in newborn babies

High-frequency tympanometry testing can help identify middle-ear problems in newborn babies

Screening newborn babies who are in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) using a testing process called high-frequency tympanometry can help identify middle-ear problems earlier, according to newly published research from a local team of researchers. [More]
Four young scientists named recipients of Damon Runyon-Sohn Pediatric Cancer Research Fellowship Award

Four young scientists named recipients of Damon Runyon-Sohn Pediatric Cancer Research Fellowship Award

The Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation has named four outstanding young scientists as recipients of the prestigious Damon Runyon-Sohn Pediatric Cancer Research Fellowship Award, committing nearly $875,000 to help address a critical shortage of funding for pediatric cancer research. [More]
Modified, healthier meal plan for youth with type 1 diabetes more expensive

Modified, healthier meal plan for youth with type 1 diabetes more expensive

Patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) often need to modify their eating habits, but many youths with T1DM do not consume a healthful diet. To learn more about the challenges their parents may face in providing them with a more healthful diet, researchers set out to discover the availability of healthier food options and the price difference of the food items at stores frequented by families in northeastern Kansas and western Missouri. [More]
Adolescents more likely to try e-cigarettes when exposed to TV ads

Adolescents more likely to try e-cigarettes when exposed to TV ads

Adolescents who are exposed to e-cigarette TV advertising are more likely to try e-cigarettes in the future, according to a groundbreaking experiment from researchers at RTI International. Although advertising and adolescent use of e-cigarettes have simultaneously increased in recent years, this is the first study to demonstrate a direct link between adolescents' exposure to advertising and their likelihood of future use. [More]
Researchers develop novel technique to generate activated T cells to tackle advanced melanoma

Researchers develop novel technique to generate activated T cells to tackle advanced melanoma

T cells from patients with melanoma can trigger a protective immune response against the disease according to a new study out of University Hospitals Case Medical Center Seidman Cancer Center and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. [More]
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