Pediatrics News and Research RSS Feed - Pediatrics News and Research

Pediatrics is the branch of medicine that deals with the medical care of infants, children, and adolescents. The age limit of such patients ranges from birth to 18. In countries where the age of majority is 18, this age limit may be from birth to age 17 (such as in Canada). A medical practitioner who specializes in this area is known as a pediatrician.
UCSD researchers implicate new gene in idiopathic or non-syndromic autism

UCSD researchers implicate new gene in idiopathic or non-syndromic autism

With the help of mouse models, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and the "tooth fairy," researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have implicated a new gene in idiopathic or non-syndromic autism. The gene is associated with Rett syndrome, a syndromic form of autism, suggesting that different types of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may share similar molecular pathways. [More]
Researchers refine diagnostic tools to predict treatment outcomes for children with neuroblastoma

Researchers refine diagnostic tools to predict treatment outcomes for children with neuroblastoma

Oncology researchers studying gene mutations in the childhood cancer neuroblastoma are refining their diagnostic tools to predict which patients are more likely to respond to drugs called ALK inhibitors that target such mutations. Removing some of the guesswork in diagnosis and treatment, the researchers say, may lead to more successful outcomes for children with this often-deadly cancer. [More]
UW SMPH awarded $70 million grant to continue work on Inner-City Asthma Consortium

UW SMPH awarded $70 million grant to continue work on Inner-City Asthma Consortium

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, has awarded the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health a seven-year, $70 million grant for its continuing work on the Inner-City Asthma Consortium (ICAC) -- a nationwide clinical research network to evaluate and develop promising new immune-based treatments. [More]
Child-mortality gap narrows between the poorest and wealthiest families in developing countries

Child-mortality gap narrows between the poorest and wealthiest families in developing countries

The child-mortality gap has narrowed between the poorest and wealthiest households in a majority of more than 50 developing countries, a new study from the Stanford University School of Medicine has found. [More]
Obese children face increased risk of becoming obese in teen years

Obese children face increased risk of becoming obese in teen years

Children who are overweight or obese by fifth grade have a high risk of becoming or remaining obese in their teen years, according to a study by researchers from Boston Children's Hospital and elsewhere. [More]
Researchers develop standardized, team-based approach to reduce alarm fatigue in hospitals

Researchers develop standardized, team-based approach to reduce alarm fatigue in hospitals

The sound of monitor alarms in hospitals can save patients' lives, but the frequency with which the monitors go off can also lead to "alarm fatigue," in which caregivers become desensitized to the ubiquitous beeping. [More]
UTHealth professor wins 2014 APGAR Award for contributions to perinatal medicine and education

UTHealth professor wins 2014 APGAR Award for contributions to perinatal medicine and education

Jon Tyson, M.D., M.P.H., the Michelle Bain Distinguished Professor of Medicine and Public Health at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston Medical School, has won the 2014 APGAR Award for his lifelong contributions to perinatal medicine and education. [More]
New wearable device can automatically track diet

New wearable device can automatically track diet

Sensors and software used to track physical activity are increasingly popular, as smart phones and their apps become more powerful and sophisticated, but, when it comes to food, they all rely on the user to report meals. [More]
Researchers develop 'smart bomb' to attack B-lineage ALL

Researchers develop 'smart bomb' to attack B-lineage ALL

Fatih Uckun, Jianjun Cheng and their colleagues have taken the first steps towards developing a so-called "smart bomb" to attack the most common and deadly form of childhood cancer — called B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). [More]
Study measures effects of high-fat maternal diet on the cognitive functioning of offspring

Study measures effects of high-fat maternal diet on the cognitive functioning of offspring

New research suggests that a high-fat maternal diet during pregnancy and while breastfeeding could have significant and lasting detrimental effects on the brain function and behavior of children. [More]
Study suggests possible link between body fat and risk of immunotherapy toxicity

Study suggests possible link between body fat and risk of immunotherapy toxicity

Immunotherapy that can be effective against tumors in young, thin mice can be lethal to obese ones, a new study by UC Davis researchers has found. [More]
Study: Tonsil removal for children with sleep apnea decreases asthma severity

Study: Tonsil removal for children with sleep apnea decreases asthma severity

Surgical removal of the tonsils and adenoids in children suffering from sleep apnea is associated with decreased asthma severity, according to the first large study of the connection, published in the journal PLOS Medicine. [More]
UC Davis researchers link increased body fat and lethal drug reactions in mice

UC Davis researchers link increased body fat and lethal drug reactions in mice

Immunotherapy that can be effective against tumors in young, thin mice can be lethal to obese ones, a new study by UC Davis researchers has found. The findings, published online today in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggest a possible link between body fat and the risk of toxicity from some types of immunotherapy. [More]
March of Dimes calls for nationwide effort to reduce U.S. preterm births to 5.5% by 2030

March of Dimes calls for nationwide effort to reduce U.S. preterm births to 5.5% by 2030

The March of Dimes is calling for a nationwide effort to reduce U.S. preterm births to 5.5 percent of all live births by 2030. Seven other developed countries already have preterm birth rates below 6 percent, and 15 have rates below 7 percent. [More]
Researchers to develop new tests to evaluate cognitive growth in people with intellectual disability

Researchers to develop new tests to evaluate cognitive growth in people with intellectual disability

Leading researchers, funded through a new, five-year, $3.2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health, are collaborating to develop and evaluate tests designed to measure and track changes in the cognitive functioning of people who typically are difficult to assess accurately: those with an intellectual disability, formerly termed mental retardation. [More]
Wimpy antibody prevents more serious self-inflicted forms of kidney disease, researchers say

Wimpy antibody prevents more serious self-inflicted forms of kidney disease, researchers say

An antibody abundant in mice and previously thought to offer poor assistance in fighting against infection may actually play a key role in keeping immune responses in check and preventing more serious self-inflicted forms of kidney disease, researchers say. [More]
New consensus guidelines for toxicity testing of oligonucleotide-based therapeutics

New consensus guidelines for toxicity testing of oligonucleotide-based therapeutics

Oligonucleotide-based therapeutics present unique challenges when it comes to testing their potential to cause reproductive and developmental harm. New consensus guidelines for toxicity testing that take into consideration the combined chemical and biological characteristics of these novel biopharmaceuticals are presented in Nucleic Acid Therapeutics, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. publishers. [More]
Reduced chemotherapy exposure after surgery could decrease overall complications

Reduced chemotherapy exposure after surgery could decrease overall complications

A study of pediatric patients with hepatoblastoma led by researchers at Children's Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA) suggests an opportunity to reduce chemotherapy in up to 65 percent of patients, which could lead to a decrease in the incidence of adverse effects. [More]
Dietary patterns of children vary according to socioeconomic backgrounds of mothers

Dietary patterns of children vary according to socioeconomic backgrounds of mothers

You have to be at least 2 years old to be covered by U.S. dietary guidelines. For younger babies, no official U.S. guidance exists other than the general recommendation by national and international organizations that mothers exclusively breastfeed for at least the first six months. [More]
Study: Nearly 5% of U.S. children affected by fetal alcohol spectrum disorders

Study: Nearly 5% of U.S. children affected by fetal alcohol spectrum disorders

Nearly 5 percent of U.S. children may be affected by fetal alcohol spectrum disorders, according to a new study co-authored by Sanford Research's Gene Hoyme, M.D., and Amy Elliott, Ph.D., and published by Pediatrics. [More]