Pediatrics News and Research RSS Feed - Pediatrics News and Research

Pediatrics is the branch of medicine that deals with the medical care of infants, children, and adolescents. The age limit of such patients ranges from birth to 18. In countries where the age of majority is 18, this age limit may be from birth to age 17 (such as in Canada). A medical practitioner who specializes in this area is known as a pediatrician.
Indoor smoking bans reduce asthma-related ER visits among children

Indoor smoking bans reduce asthma-related ER visits among children

Emergency rooms in communities with indoor smoking bans reported a 17 percent decrease in the number of children needing care for asthma attacks, according to new research from the University of Chicago Medicine. [More]
"More aggressive" nutrition improves growth and development of tiny premature babies

"More aggressive" nutrition improves growth and development of tiny premature babies

On New Year's Day this coming Sunday, we will once again be waiting to see whereabouts in Austria the first baby is born safe and sound to be our "New Year's Baby 2017". [More]
Article reports increase in health care spending on children

Article reports increase in health care spending on children

Health care spending on children grew 56 percent between 1996 and 2013, with the most money spent in 2013 on inpatient well-newborn care, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and well-dental care, according to an article published online by JAMA Pediatrics. [More]
Study reports volume and cost of in-home care for children with special medical conditions

Study reports volume and cost of in-home care for children with special medical conditions

U.S. families provide nearly $36 billion annually in uncompensated medical care at home to children who have special health care needs, such as muscular dystrophy and cystic fibrosis, according to a large national study. [More]
Critical illness events linked to delayed discharge from hospital for neighboring patients

Critical illness events linked to delayed discharge from hospital for neighboring patients

In a research letter published Dec. 27, 2016, in JAMA, University of Chicago physicians describe a new concern for patients in the hospital: distractions caused by the misfortune of other patients. [More]
Legalization of recreational marijuana impacts adolescent drug perception and use

Legalization of recreational marijuana impacts adolescent drug perception and use

Marijuana use increased and the drug's perceived harmfulness decreased among eighth- and 10th-graders in Washington after marijuana was legalized for recreational use by adults but there was no change among 12th-graders or among students in the three grades in Colorado after legalization for adults there, according to a new study published online by JAMA Pediatrics. [More]
Potential drug could become first effective treatment option for Prader-Willi syndrome

Potential drug could become first effective treatment option for Prader-Willi syndrome

Duke Health researchers have identified a drug-like small molecule that, in animal experiments, appears to be an effective treatment for a genetic disorder called Prader-Willi syndrome. [More]
Study tracks parents' unpaid time assisting children with special health care needs

Study tracks parents' unpaid time assisting children with special health care needs

About half of U.S. children with special health care needs -- 5.6 million children -- receive medical care from uncompensated family members worth billions of dollars, finds a large national study led by Boston Children's Hospital and the University of Southern California (USC). [More]
Ionis announces FDA approval of first SMA drug in the U.S for pediatric and adult patients

Ionis announces FDA approval of first SMA drug in the U.S for pediatric and adult patients

Ionis Pharmaceuticals, Inc. announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved SPINRAZATM (nusinersen) under Priority Review for the treatment of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) in pediatric and adult patients. [More]
Groundbreaking research finds concussion biomarker in auditory system

Groundbreaking research finds concussion biomarker in auditory system

The secret to reliably diagnosing concussions lies in the brain's ability to process sound, according to a new study by researchers from Northwestern University's Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory. [More]
Researchers engineer promising live-attenuated RSV vaccine candidate

Researchers engineer promising live-attenuated RSV vaccine candidate

Crafting a vaccine against RSV (respiratory syncytial virus) has been a minefield for 50 years, but scientists believe they have found the right balance. [More]
UT Southwestern researchers find new way to combat multidrug-resistant bacteria in burn injuries

UT Southwestern researchers find new way to combat multidrug-resistant bacteria in burn injuries

A new way to fight multidrug-resistant bacteria by blinding them rather than killing them proved highly effective in a model of burn injuries, UT Southwestern Medical Center research shows. [More]
Clinical study tests adult stem cell therapy for infants with congenital HLHS

Clinical study tests adult stem cell therapy for infants with congenital HLHS

In a first-in-children randomized clinical study, medical researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and the Interdisciplinary Stem Cell Institute at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine have begun testing to see whether adult stem cells derived from bone marrow benefit children with the congenital heart defect hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS). [More]
Genetic mutation may increase susceptibility to cytomegalovirus infection

Genetic mutation may increase susceptibility to cytomegalovirus infection

Experimenting with human cells and mice, Johns Hopkins researchers have found that a genetic mutation that alters a protein called NOD1 may increase susceptibility to human cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. [More]
Low-carbohydrate diet may help reverse inherited intellectual disability linked to Kabuki syndrome

Low-carbohydrate diet may help reverse inherited intellectual disability linked to Kabuki syndrome

Experimenting on mice with a genetic change similar to that found in people with a rare inherited disease called Kabuki syndrome, Johns Hopkins scientists report that a very low-carbohydrate diet can "open up" DNA and improve mental function. [More]

Advertisers and crib manufacturers fail to adhere to safe sleep recommendations for infants

A new study from the University of Alabama at Birmingham shows that national magazine advertisements and manufacturers of infant cribs continue to depict unsafe sleep environments, despite longtime guidelines established by the American Academy of Pediatrics to protect against SIDS and other sleep-related deaths. [More]

Study shows potential long-term socioeconomic impact of child maltreatment

People who suffer neglect and abuse in childhood are much more likely to have time off work due to long-term sickness and less likely to own their own homes when they reach middle age than their peers, according to new research undertaken at UCL. [More]
Zika-linked abnormalities in fetuses more extensive and severe than previously thought

Zika-linked abnormalities in fetuses more extensive and severe than previously thought

New UCLA-led research finds that Zika-linked abnormalities that occur in human fetuses are more extensive — and severe — than previously thought, with 46 percent of 125 pregnancies among Zika-infected women resulting in birth defects in newborns or ending in fetal death. [More]
Viral infection during pregnancy affects maternal care and can trigger depression in offspring

Viral infection during pregnancy affects maternal care and can trigger depression in offspring

A viral infection in a pregnant woman not only affects her subsequent ability to provide maternal care but can also trigger depression in her offspring, which can then even extend into the next generation as a result of changes to genetic mechanisms in the brain. [More]
New parent home visiting program could reduce need for medical services during first year of child's life

New parent home visiting program could reduce need for medical services during first year of child's life

Infants in families who participated in an intensive new parent home visiting program involving both nurses and lay educators used significantly less medical services during the first year of life, according to a new RAND Corporation study. [More]
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