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Pediatrics is the branch of medicine that deals with the medical care of infants, children, and adolescents. The age limit of such patients ranges from birth to 18. In countries where the age of majority is 18, this age limit may be from birth to age 17 (such as in Canada). A medical practitioner who specializes in this area is known as a pediatrician.
Physicians develop new quality measures for treatment of childhood obstructive sleep apnea

Physicians develop new quality measures for treatment of childhood obstructive sleep apnea

A work group of physicians from leading academic medical centers across the country, including NYU Langone Medical Center, has developed new quality measures for the detection and treatment of childhood obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), a potentially morbid, life-altering condition that affects hundreds of thousands of children and adolescents nationwide. [More]
Increasing minimum age of legal access to tobacco products would reduce smoking, save lives

Increasing minimum age of legal access to tobacco products would reduce smoking, save lives

Increasing the minimum age of legal access (MLA) to tobacco products will prevent or delay initiation of tobacco use by adolescents and young adults, particularly those ages 15 to 17, and improve the health of Americans across the lifespan, says a new report from the Institute of Medicine. [More]
USAP, Pinnacle announce new partnership with Excel Anesthesia

USAP, Pinnacle announce new partnership with Excel Anesthesia

U.S. Anesthesia Partners, the nation's largest anesthesia-focused, single-specialty physician services organization, and Pinnacle Anesthesia Consultants of Dallas, Texas today announced their partnership with Excel Anesthesia, P.A. [More]
Repeatedly exposing children to secondhand smoke is child abuse, argues Adam Goldstein

Repeatedly exposing children to secondhand smoke is child abuse, argues Adam Goldstein

Purposefully and repeatedly exposing children to secondhand smoke — a known human carcinogen — is child abuse, according to an opinion piece written by Adam Goldstein, MD, MPH, a professor in the Department of Family Medicine at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine. [More]
Inhaled Nitric Oxide still being used in preterm neonates despite evidence of short-term benefit

Inhaled Nitric Oxide still being used in preterm neonates despite evidence of short-term benefit

Inhaled Nitric Oxide (iNO) is a drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration that is commonly used in term and near-term neonates who have severe respiratory failure caused by pulmonary hypertension. Over the last decade there have been multiple large studies trying to determine a clinical use for iNO in preterm neonates, but despite evidence of short-term benefit, this drug has not been shown to improve long-term outcomes in preemies. [More]
United Therapeutics announces FDA approval of dinutuximab for treatment of high-risk neuroblastoma

United Therapeutics announces FDA approval of dinutuximab for treatment of high-risk neuroblastoma

United Therapeutics Corporation announced today that the United States Food and Drug Administration has approved Unituxin (dinutuximab) Injection (formerly called ch14.18), in combination with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin-2 (IL-2), and 13-cis-retinoic acid (RA), for the treatment of pediatric patients with high-risk neuroblastoma who achieve at least a partial response to prior first-line multiagent, multimodality therapy. [More]
University Hospitals recognized as a 2015 World's Most Ethical Company

University Hospitals recognized as a 2015 World's Most Ethical Company

University Hospitals has been recognized by the Ethisphere Institute, the global leader in defining and advancing the standards of ethical business practices, as a 2015 World's Most Ethical Company. [More]
Suicide rates for U.S. youths nearly double in rural areas

Suicide rates for U.S. youths nearly double in rural areas

The adolescent and young-adult suicide rate in the United States was almost twice as high in rural settings than in urban areas between 1996 and 2010, and new research suggests that the gap appears to be widening. [More]
Whole genome sequencing may help identify disease risks

Whole genome sequencing may help identify disease risks

Using a small amount of blood or saliva, a technology called whole genome sequencing makes that possible - and more than half of parents said they'd not only be interested in the technology for themselves but for their children too, a new nationally-representative University of Michigan study shows. [More]
CPRIT awards research and recruitment grants to improve cancer research

CPRIT awards research and recruitment grants to improve cancer research

The Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT) has awarded UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers more than $7.5 million in research grants to improve diagnostic and therapeutic services and research relating to cancers of the brain, breast, throat, and bone, as well as to improve scientific understanding of cancer biology. [More]
New type of vaccine holds promise for prevention of genital herpes

New type of vaccine holds promise for prevention of genital herpes

Scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have designed a new type of vaccine that could be the first-ever for preventing genital herpes--one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases, affecting some 500 million people worldwide. [More]
Africa's under-five children at greater risk of developing parasitic disease

Africa's under-five children at greater risk of developing parasitic disease

Children under five living in sub-Saharan Africa are at greater risk than older children of developing a long-term parasitic disease, research suggests. [More]
Exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals estimated to cost EU €157 billion a year

Exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals estimated to cost EU €157 billion a year

A new economic analysis found exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals likely costs the European Union €157 billion ($209 billion) a year in actual health care expenses and lost earning potential, according to a new series of studies published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. [More]
Better understanding of stomach's response to infection could lead to therapies against gastric damage

Better understanding of stomach's response to infection could lead to therapies against gastric damage

A better understanding of the stomach's immune response to Helicobater pylori (H. pylori) infection could lead to new therapies targeting damage in the stomach, report researchers in the March issue of Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the basic science journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]
Environmental conditions play significant role in determining growth, height

Environmental conditions play significant role in determining growth, height

If you've ever wondered why you aren't a little taller, it turns out it's not all about genetics. In findings published in the Journal of Pediatrics (January 2015), an Israeli research team shows that the environment in which one lives from the womb to about age one largely determines an adult's height. [More]
Loss of funding for THC program could disrupt training of medical residents in underserved areas

Loss of funding for THC program could disrupt training of medical residents in underserved areas

The shortage of primary care doctors could worsen if funding for the Teaching Health Centers, a program to train medical residents in underserved areas, is eliminated. Loss of funding - which has already been drastically reduced - could disrupt the training of 550 current medical residents and cut off the pipeline of future primary care residents, says a new report conducted by the Geiger Gibson/RCHN Community Health Foundation Research Collaborative at Milken Institute School of Public Health at the George Washington University. [More]
New standardized approach for feeding infants in NICU improves growth of babies

New standardized approach for feeding infants in NICU improves growth of babies

A new standardized approach for feeding infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) helps babies attain full oral feeds sooner, improves their growth and sends them home sooner. [More]
Teen-LABS study explores safety, health effects of surgical weight loss procedures

Teen-LABS study explores safety, health effects of surgical weight loss procedures

Cardiovascular risks of severe pediatric obesity, assessed among adolescents participating in the "Teen Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery" (Teen-LABS) study, were published this week in JAMA Pediatrics. Teen-LABS is a multi-center clinical study funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases at the National Institutes of Health that is examining the safety and health effects of surgical weight loss procedures. [More]
Study explores use of antipsychotic medications among pediatric patients

Study explores use of antipsychotic medications among pediatric patients

More kids nationwide are taking medications designed to treat such mental illnesses as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, and pediatricians and psychiatrists at the University of Vermont want to know why. [More]
Pediatricians, health care providers encounter requests to postpone vaccinations

Pediatricians, health care providers encounter requests to postpone vaccinations

Pediatricians are facing increasing pressure from some parents who want to spread out the recommended vaccine schedule for their children by postponing vaccines, pointing to a need for improved programs that support timely vaccinations, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Colorado School of Medicine at the Anschutz Medical Campus. [More]
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