Pediatrics News and Research RSS Feed - Pediatrics News and Research

Pediatrics is the branch of medicine that deals with the medical care of infants, children, and adolescents. The age limit of such patients ranges from birth to 18. In countries where the age of majority is 18, this age limit may be from birth to age 17 (such as in Canada). A medical practitioner who specializes in this area is known as a pediatrician.
First investigational treatment for infantile-onset SMA shows promising results in clinical trial

First investigational treatment for infantile-onset SMA shows promising results in clinical trial

A major milestone was reached when nusinersen, an investigational treatment for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), was shown to significantly improve achievement of motor milestones in babies with infantile-onset SMA, according to an interim analysis of the double-blind, randomized, placebo controlled Phase 3 clinical trial called ENDEAR. [More]
New model of Williams syndrome may shed light on neurobiology of the human social brain

New model of Williams syndrome may shed light on neurobiology of the human social brain

In a study spanning molecular genetics, stem cells and the sciences of both brain and behavior, researchers at University of California San Diego, with colleagues at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies and elsewhere, have created a neurodevelopmental model of a rare genetic disorder that may provide new insights into the underlying neurobiology of the human social brain. [More]
RNA silencing technique developed by spinoff from UM-Madison effective in battling hepatitis B

RNA silencing technique developed by spinoff from UM-Madison effective in battling hepatitis B

A method for "silencing" RNA that emerged from a University of Wisconsin-Madison spinoff company is in clinical trials in Europe, Asia and the United States against hepatitis B, an infection that can destroy the liver. [More]
Experts propose new clinical guidelines for diagnosing FASD

Experts propose new clinical guidelines for diagnosing FASD

A group of experts on fetal alcohol spectrum disorders, organized by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, has produced proposed clinical guidelines for diagnosing FASD, which can result when a mother drinks during pregnancy. [More]
NYU Lutheran offers comprehensive cardiac care for unborn babies

NYU Lutheran offers comprehensive cardiac care for unborn babies

Caring for an infant begins long before birth. Expectant moms are advised to avoid smoking and drinking, watch what they eat, and follow a host of other recommendations that are in the best interest of themselves and their little one on the way. [More]
Coordinated treatment for both illnesses could save lives of people with HIV and TB

Coordinated treatment for both illnesses could save lives of people with HIV and TB

Tuberculosis (TB) is a leading killer of people with HIV, and providing therapy for both illnesses simultaneously saves lives - according to new guidelines on the treatment of drug-susceptible TB developed jointly by the American Thoracic Society, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Infectious Diseases Society of America. [More]
Distraction techniques can help calm children from shot-related anxiety during flu season

Distraction techniques can help calm children from shot-related anxiety during flu season

A typical visit to the pediatrician when it is time for a child to get a shot can include tears, tantrums and might not seem worth the trouble. [More]
ISCT selects London as host city for 2017 landmark conference to celebrate silver jubilee year

ISCT selects London as host city for 2017 landmark conference to celebrate silver jubilee year

The International Society for Cellular Therapy, the global society of clinicians, researchers, regulatory specialists, technologists, and industry partners dedicated to the translation of cellular therapy into safe and effective therapies to improve patients’ lives, today announces they have awarded London as the host city for the landmark ISCT 2017 Annual Meeting to be held on May 3-6, at ExCeL London Exhibition and Convention Centre, UK to celebrate the Society’s 25th silver jubilee year. More than 1,600 international delegates are expected to attend. [More]
Appealing new flavors contribute to alarming trends in youth consumption of e-cigarettes

Appealing new flavors contribute to alarming trends in youth consumption of e-cigarettes

Currently, we are experiencing a new phenomenon with youth consumption of e-cigarettes all around the United States. For the second consecutive year, e-cigarettes were the most popular product among youth. [More]
Activation of specific neural circuit can inhibit binge-like eating behavior in mice

Activation of specific neural circuit can inhibit binge-like eating behavior in mice

While binge eating affects about 10 percent of adults in the United States, the neurobiological basis of the disease is unclear. [More]
Clinics with comprehensive care for premature infants alleviate concerns for parents

Clinics with comprehensive care for premature infants alleviate concerns for parents

On January 24, 2013, Iris Vega-Figueroa's life changed completely. That's the day she gave birth to her twin girls, Iris and Geraldine. The twins were monoamniotic-monochorionic, meaning they shared one amniotic sack and one placenta in the womb. These rare pregnancies are considered high risk because of the uneven blood flow that occurs between the infants through the placenta. [More]
Kaiser Permanente study provides new insights into how autism affects siblings

Kaiser Permanente study provides new insights into how autism affects siblings

A new Kaiser Permanente study found that the risk of younger siblings developing an autism spectrum disorder is 14 times higher if an older sibling has ASD. The study, which was published today in Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics, also found the risk level was consistent across gestational age at birth. [More]
Disordered airway microbiome at birth may be linked to severe neonatal lung disease

Disordered airway microbiome at birth may be linked to severe neonatal lung disease

In contrast to the general belief that the airways of an infant are sterile until after birth, University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers and colleagues have found that the infant airway is already colonized with bacteria or bacterial DNA when a baby is born -- and this is true for infants born as early as 24 weeks gestation. [More]
Sleep-disordered breathing promotes progression of pediatric NAFLD to NASH

Sleep-disordered breathing promotes progression of pediatric NAFLD to NASH

Studies have shown that obstructive sleep apnea and low nighttime oxygen, which result in oxidative stress, are associated with the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in adults. [More]
Clinical trials in children commonly go uncompleted or unpublished, study finds

Clinical trials in children commonly go uncompleted or unpublished, study finds

Recent legislation is encouraging clinical trials in children, including the Best Pharmaceuticals for Children Act and the Pediatric Research Equity Act. [More]
Child's home address may help identify children and families at risk of asthma

Child's home address may help identify children and families at risk of asthma

A child's home address may be enough information to identify children and families at risk for more severe cases of asthma due to social and economic hardships. In fact, the home address could guide risk assessment starting the moment a family arrives and registers in the hospital or at the doctor's office. [More]
ATS releases guidelines to help pediatricians evaluate infants with recurrent, persistent wheezing

ATS releases guidelines to help pediatricians evaluate infants with recurrent, persistent wheezing

The American Thoracic Society has issued clinical practice guidelines to help pediatricians and pediatric pulmonologists evaluate infants with recurrent or persistent wheezing. [More]
Malfunctioning of molecular signaling system suppresses mature blood cells battling against sepsis

Malfunctioning of molecular signaling system suppresses mature blood cells battling against sepsis

When the body encounters an infection, a molecular signaling system ramps up the body's infection-fighting system to produce more white blood cells to attack invading bacteria. [More]
University of Utah investigators receive $25 million grant to improve clinical research

University of Utah investigators receive $25 million grant to improve clinical research

Investigators at the University of Utah School of Medicine's Data Coordinating Center have been awarded a seven-year, $25 million grant from the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences of the National Institutes of Health, to form one of three Trial Innovation Centers to improve clinical research. [More]
Study verifies human gene therapy in MPS I animal model

Study verifies human gene therapy in MPS I animal model

Researchers are closer to finding a better way to treat children with a rare metabolic disorder called MPS I. It is caused by a deficiency of the key enzyme IDUA needed to break down complex sugars in cells. [More]
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