Pharmacology News and Research RSS Feed - Pharmacology News and Research

Pharmacology is the study of how chemical substances interact with living systems. If substances have medicinal properties, they are considered pharmaceuticals. The field encompasses drug composition and properties, interactions, toxicology, therapy, and medical applications and antipathogenic capabilities.
Keratin 17 protein plays crucial role in degrading key tumor suppressor protein

Keratin 17 protein plays crucial role in degrading key tumor suppressor protein

Keratin 17 (K17), a protein previously believed to provide only mechanical support for cancer cells, appears to play a crucial role in degrading a key tumor suppressor protein in cancer cells named p27. This finding, published in the September 1 issue of Cancer Research, is based on the work of researchers in the Department of Pathology at Stony Brook University School of Medicine. [More]
Four UC San Diego researchers selected to receive newly established NCI Outstanding Investigator Award

Four UC San Diego researchers selected to receive newly established NCI Outstanding Investigator Award

Four University of California, San Diego School of Medicine researchers have been selected to receive the newly established National Cancer Institute (NCI) Outstanding Investigator Award. The multi-million dollar awards fund new projects that have an unusual potential in cancer research over seven years. [More]
Brain cells in Parkinson's disease die prematurely, burning out like an overheating motor

Brain cells in Parkinson's disease die prematurely, burning out like an overheating motor

The death of brain cells in Parkinson's disease may be caused by a form of cellular energy crisis in neurons that require unusually high quantities of energy to carry out their job of regulating movement, researchers at the University of Montreal reported today. [More]
Researchers design online database to help researchers identify cancer gene mutations

Researchers design online database to help researchers identify cancer gene mutations

Many clinical trials use genome sequencing to learn which gene mutations are present in a patient's tumor cells. The question is important because targeting the right mutations with the right drugs can stop cancer in its tracks. But it can be difficult to determine whether there is evidence in the medical literature that particular mutations might drive cancer growth and could be targeted by therapy, and which mutations are of no consequence. [More]
UCSF study reveals molecular timing mechanism of stem cells

UCSF study reveals molecular timing mechanism of stem cells

UC San Francisco researchers have for the first time developed a method to precisely control embryonic stem cell differentiation with beams of light, enabling them to be transformed into neurons in response to a precise external cue. [More]
Researchers reveal new electrical mechanism that can control molecular switches regulating cancer cell growth

Researchers reveal new electrical mechanism that can control molecular switches regulating cancer cell growth

The molecular switches regulating human cell growth do a great job of replacing cells that die during the course of a lifetime. But when they misfire, life-threatening cancers can occur. Research led by scientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) has revealed a new electrical mechanism that can control these switches. [More]
Accutest makes strategic expansion into Latin America to support the growth of pharmaceutical sector

Accutest makes strategic expansion into Latin America to support the growth of pharmaceutical sector

Accutest Research Laboratories, a leading global Contract Research Organization (CRO), further pursues its strategic expansion into Latin America by opening offices and establishing operational presence in Brazil. [More]
Penn State College of Medicine students to work with medical educators to design new curriculum

Penn State College of Medicine students to work with medical educators to design new curriculum

The medical school model that has existed for decades involves two years of study in the basic sciences followed by two years of clinical study. An initiative under way at Penn State College of Medicine will involve students in developing a new curriculum that integrates the two areas of study, with a goal of preparing physicians for the new realities of health care. [More]
New research identifies cause of disruption in brain's communication channels linked to psychiatric disorders

New research identifies cause of disruption in brain's communication channels linked to psychiatric disorders

New research has identified the mechanisms that trigger disruption in the brain's communication channels linked to symptoms in psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia. The University of Bristol study, published today [17 Aug] in the Proceedings of National Academy of Sciences, could have important implications for treating symptoms of brain disorders. [More]
New OTEMTO phase three results show potential improvement to quality of life for COPD patients

New OTEMTO phase three results show potential improvement to quality of life for COPD patients

Boehringer Ingelheim announced the publication of new data from the Phase IIIb OTEMTO® 1&2 trials (NCT01964352/NCT02006732), which show Spiolto® Respimat® (tiotropium/olodaterol) provides consistent, clinically meaningful improvements in quality of life versus placebo in patients with COPD [More]
Dietitians skilled in integrative medical nutrition therapy could benefit patients

Dietitians skilled in integrative medical nutrition therapy could benefit patients

Integrative medicine is a quickly expanding field of health care that emphasizes nutrition as a key component. Dietitians and nutritionists have an opportunity to meet workforce demands by practicing dietetics and integrative medicine (DIM). A new JACN article, The Next Generation of Dietitians: Implementing Dietetics Education and Practice in Integrative Medicine describes a DIM education program and practicum. The review article appears in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition (JACN), official publication of the American College of Nutrition. [More]
UC San Diego researchers discover cells that regenerate better liver tissue than ordinary liver cells

UC San Diego researchers discover cells that regenerate better liver tissue than ordinary liver cells

The mechanisms that allow the liver to repair and regenerate itself have long been a matter of debate. Now researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered a population of liver cells that are better at regenerating liver tissue than ordinary liver cells, or hepatocytes. [More]
3D protein structure reveals new drug targets for cancer, neurodegenerative diseases

3D protein structure reveals new drug targets for cancer, neurodegenerative diseases

Protein Kinase C (PKC) is a family of enzymes that controls the activity of other proteins in a cell by attaching chemical tags. That simple act helps determine cell survival or death. [More]
ESC Congress to highlight results from global trials in six press conferences

ESC Congress to highlight results from global trials in six press conferences

Members of the press will be the first to hear the highly anticipated results from global trials in six press conferences devoted to hot lines research. [More]
Sorrento, TNK Therapeutics to exclusively license NanoVelcro CTC assay from CytoLumina and FetoLumina

Sorrento, TNK Therapeutics to exclusively license NanoVelcro CTC assay from CytoLumina and FetoLumina

Sorrento Therapeutics, Inc. announced today that it as well as its wholly-owned subsidiary TNK Therapeutics, Inc. have entered into a binding term sheet to exclusively license the NanoVelcro Circulating Tumor Cell (CTC) profiling assay technology from CytoLumina Technologies Corp. and FetoLumina Technologies Corp., two privately-held sister biotechnology companies in Los Angeles, California. [More]
New review points to most promising areas for liposomes' further development

New review points to most promising areas for liposomes' further development

An international group of scientists, including Vladimir Chupin, head of the Biophysics Section at MIPT, and Vladimir Torchilin (Northeastern University, the USA), one of the world's leading experts in pharmacology, recently presented a review of liposomes, microscopic capsules widely used all over the world in the development of new drugs. [More]
New technology advances genome engineering

New technology advances genome engineering

In his mind, Basil Hubbard can already picture a new world of therapeutic treatments for millions of patients just over the horizon. It's a future in which diseases like muscular dystrophy, cystic fibrosis and many others are treated permanently through the science of genome engineering. [More]
UNC researchers show how a genetic mutation disables molecular switch and causes autism

UNC researchers show how a genetic mutation disables molecular switch and causes autism

Last December, researchers identified more than 1,000 gene mutations in individuals with autism, but how these mutations increased risk for autism was unclear. Now, UNC School of Medicine researchers are the first to show how one of these mutations disables a molecular switch in one of these genes and causes autism. [More]
Researchers show how microbiota protects against type 1 diabetes development

Researchers show how microbiota protects against type 1 diabetes development

Our bodies have ten times the amount of microbes than human cells. This set of bacteria is called microbiota. In some instances, bacteria known as pathogens can cause infectious diseases. However, these micro-organisms can also protect us from certain diseases. Researchers from Inserm, Paris Descartes University and the CNRS (French National Centre for Scientific Research), through collaboration with teams from China and Sweden, have recently shown how microbiota protects against the development of type 1 diabetes. [More]
Circadian factors, host gender could help understand microbiome and its effect on inflammatory bowel disease

Circadian factors, host gender could help understand microbiome and its effect on inflammatory bowel disease

By now, the old saw, "You are what you eat," has been well-used in describing the microbiome. However axiomatic that phrase may be, a new study has also found that who and when that consumption is done can affect microbiome make-up. [More]
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