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Pharmacology is the study of how chemical substances interact with living systems. If substances have medicinal properties, they are considered pharmaceuticals. The field encompasses drug composition and properties, interactions, toxicology, therapy, and medical applications and antipathogenic capabilities.
Drinking extra 2 cups of coffee per day may reduce cirrhosis risk by 44%

Drinking extra 2 cups of coffee per day may reduce cirrhosis risk by 44%

Regular consumption of coffee was linked with a reduced risk of liver cirrhosis in a review of relevant studies published before July 2015. [More]
Alternative splicing: a new approach to drug development? An interview with Lucy Donaldson

Alternative splicing: a new approach to drug development? An interview with Lucy Donaldson

RNA is becoming an interesting drug target as it takes possible intervention back one step to the synthesis of a target protein, instead of trying to block or inhibit a process. [More]
HUYA, Eisai sign exclusive license agreement for HBI-8000 in Japan and other Asian countries

HUYA, Eisai sign exclusive license agreement for HBI-8000 in Japan and other Asian countries

HUYA Bioscience International President, CEO, Executive Chairman & Founder Dr. Mireille Gillings announced that Eisai Co., Ltd. has acquired from HUYA an exclusive license agreement for HBI-8000 in Japan, South Korea, Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia, Philippines, Vietnam and Singapore. [More]
Framework for improving chemical hazard assessment without animals

Framework for improving chemical hazard assessment without animals

A new paper published in Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology, co-authored by the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, calls for ongoing development and regulatory acceptance of adverse outcome pathways (AOPs), a framework for improving chemical hazard assessment by prioritizing modern test methods that reduce animal use. [More]
HIV protein alters activity of networked neurons

HIV protein alters activity of networked neurons

Nearly half of HIV infected patients suffer from impaired neurocognitive function. The HIV protein transactivator of transcription (Tat) is an important contributor to HIV neuropathogenesis because it is a potent neurotoxin that continues to be produced despite treatment with antiretroviral therapy. [More]
FDA-approved blood pressure drug reduces cell damage linked to Alzheimer's disease

FDA-approved blood pressure drug reduces cell damage linked to Alzheimer's disease

In laboratory neuronal cultures, an FDA-approved drug used to treat high blood pressure reduced cell damage often linked to Alzheimer's disease, say researchers at Georgetown University Medical Center and the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Researchers develop new painkiller as strong as morphine but not addictive

Researchers develop new painkiller as strong as morphine but not addictive

Researchers at Tulane University and Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System have developed a painkiller that is as strong as morphine but isn't likely to be addictive and with fewer side effects, according to a new study in the journal Neuropharmacology. [More]
Researchers discover potential candidates for development of novel targeted therapies for blood cancers

Researchers discover potential candidates for development of novel targeted therapies for blood cancers

A research team from the Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics at Roswell Park Cancer Institute has discovered a new class of small-molecule compounds that are good candidates for development of novel targeted therapies in the treatment of leukemia and lymphoma. [More]
Study leads to FDA approval of first immunotherapy for treatment of neuroblastoma

Study leads to FDA approval of first immunotherapy for treatment of neuroblastoma

Building upon more than two decades of basic research conducted at Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Araz Marachelian, MD, of CHLA, and her colleagues at pediatric academic centers across the U. S., have shown that an immunotherapy that until now has only been available to patients enrolled in research studies, is equivalent to the product that has been manufactured for commercial use and can be made available to all patients. [More]
New machine-learning technique could be used to uncover previously unknown features of organisms

New machine-learning technique could be used to uncover previously unknown features of organisms

A powerful new machine-learning technique can be applied to large datasets in the biological sciences to uncover previously unknown features of organisms and their genes, according to a team led by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Weekend junk food binges bad for your gut health

Weekend junk food binges bad for your gut health

Yo-yoing between eating well during the week and bingeing on junk food over the weekend is likely to be just as bad for your gut health as a consistent diet of junk, new UNSW research suggests. [More]
Berlin researchers identify defects in myotubular myopathy

Berlin researchers identify defects in myotubular myopathy

Tiny deviations in the body's cells can sometimes have severe consequences. Researchers from Berlin have discovered why cells from patients suffering from the rare muscular disease myotubular myopathy cannot function properly. [More]
Diabetes drug fails to show any benefit against pancreatic cancer

Diabetes drug fails to show any benefit against pancreatic cancer

A diabetes drug that showed promise in previous studies as an anti-cancer treatment failed to show any benefit in a UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center-led study that used pancreatic cancer tissue samples to test sensitivity to the drug. [More]
New blood biomarkers could lead to better evaluation of treatment for patients with PAH

New blood biomarkers could lead to better evaluation of treatment for patients with PAH

New blood biomarkers reflecting vasoreactivity in lung blood vessels of patients with heart- and lung disease, can lead to simplified diagnostics and better evaluation of treatment for patients with the condition pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). [More]
Researchers reveal biological connection between obesity and colorectal cancer risk

Researchers reveal biological connection between obesity and colorectal cancer risk

Obesity has long been associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer, but the link has never been understood. Now, a research team led by investigators at Thomas Jefferson University has revealed the biological connection, and in the process, has identified an approved drug that might prevent development of the cancer. [More]
Discoveries could lead to development of novel therapies to prevent C. diff infection

Discoveries could lead to development of novel therapies to prevent C. diff infection

Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center have obtained the crystal structure of a toxin from the bacterium Clostridium difficile ("C. diff") -- the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhea in the United States. [More]
Sage Analytics establishes distribution network in South America

Sage Analytics establishes distribution network in South America

Sage Analytics, the developers of portable, laboratory-quality cannabis potency measurement systems, announced it established a distribution network in South America, anchored by Senses Biotech in Uruguay. [More]
New strategy may reduce growth of pancreatic cancers in patients with KRAS gene mutation

New strategy may reduce growth of pancreatic cancers in patients with KRAS gene mutation

University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers have found a promising strategy that may limit the growth of pancreatic cancers in patients with a mutation in a gene called KRAS. [More]
Salk Institute scientists find new target for glioblastoma multiforme treatment

Salk Institute scientists find new target for glioblastoma multiforme treatment

Glioblastoma multiforme is a particularly deadly cancer. A person diagnosed with this type of brain tumor typically survives 15 months, if given the best care. The late Senator Ted Kennedy succumbed to this disease in just over a year. [More]
New injectable agent can potentially increase surgeon's ability to remove cancerous tumor during surgery

New injectable agent can potentially increase surgeon's ability to remove cancerous tumor during surgery

Doctors at the Duke University School of Medicine have tested a new injectable agent that causes cancer cells in a tumor to fluoresce, potentially increasing a surgeon's ability to locate and remove all of a cancerous tumor on the first attempt. The imaging technology was developed through collaboration with scientists at Duke, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Lumicell Inc. [More]
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