Pharmacology News and Research RSS Feed - Pharmacology News and Research

Pharmacology is the study of how chemical substances interact with living systems. If substances have medicinal properties, they are considered pharmaceuticals. The field encompasses drug composition and properties, interactions, toxicology, therapy, and medical applications and antipathogenic capabilities.
Abide Therapeutics begins Phase 1a study of ABX-1431 investigational endocannabinoid system modulator

Abide Therapeutics begins Phase 1a study of ABX-1431 investigational endocannabinoid system modulator

Abide Therapeutics, a developer of innovative pharmaceuticals, announced today initiation of enrollment and dosing of the first subject in a Phase 1a clinical study of ABX-1431, a first-in-class, investigational endocannabinoid system modulator. [More]
Researchers identify link between autoimmune diseases, medications and Long QT syndrome

Researchers identify link between autoimmune diseases, medications and Long QT syndrome

Mohamed Boutjdir, PhD, professor of medicine, cell biology, and physiology and pharmacology at SUNY Downstate Medical Center, has led a study with international collaborators identifying the mechanism by which patients with various autoimmune and connective tissue disorders may be at risk for life-threatening cardiac events if they take certain anti-histamine or anti-depressant medications. [More]
Sialic acid attached to brain cells may affect brain structure, cause neurological problems

Sialic acid attached to brain cells may affect brain structure, cause neurological problems

New research from The Johns Hopkins University suggests that a molecule commonly found “decorating” brain cells in higher animals, including humans, may affect brain structure. [More]
NDSU's Stephen O'Rourke awarded NIH grant to conduct cardiovascular research

NDSU's Stephen O'Rourke awarded NIH grant to conduct cardiovascular research

Stephen O'Rourke, professor of pharmaceutical sciences at North Dakota State University, Fargo, has received a $435,000 grant from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health to conduct cardiovascular research. [More]
St John's Wort may cause same adverse reactions as antidepressants

St John's Wort may cause same adverse reactions as antidepressants

St John's Wort can produce the same adverse reactions as antidepressants, and serious side effects can occur when the two are taken together, according to new University of Adelaide research. [More]
Histones steadily replaced in brain cells throughout life, find Mount Sinai researchers

Histones steadily replaced in brain cells throughout life, find Mount Sinai researchers

For decades, researchers in the genetics field have theorized that the protein spools around which DNA is wound, histones, remain constant in the brain, never changing after development in the womb. [More]
Concert Pharmaceuticals’ precision deuteration platform can enhance metabolic properties of drugs

Concert Pharmaceuticals’ precision deuteration platform can enhance metabolic properties of drugs

Substituting deuterium for certain hydrogen atoms in molecules has been shown to enhance the metabolic properties of a number of drugs and provides a promising approach to the discovery and development of innovative drug products. [More]

Sialic acid may play significant role in certain brain disorders

A new report published in the July 2015 issue of The FASEB Journal suggests that a common molecule found in higher animals, including humans, affects brain structure. This molecule may play a significant role in how brain cells communicate, possibly shedding light on the underlying causes of certain brain disorders. [More]
Researchers map physical properties of live breast cancer cells using advanced AFM technology

Researchers map physical properties of live breast cancer cells using advanced AFM technology

Researchers who developed a high-speed form of atomic force microscopy have shown how to image the physical properties of live breast cancer cells, for the first time revealing details about how deactivation of a key protein may lead to metastasis. [More]
University of Cambridge, AstraZeneca announce new joint schemes to support PhD scholarships, clinical lectureships

University of Cambridge, AstraZeneca announce new joint schemes to support PhD scholarships, clinical lectureships

AstraZeneca and the University of Cambridge today announced three new joint schemes to support more than 80 PhD scholarshipsand eight clinical lectureships over the next five years spanning translational science, basic and clinical research. [More]
Spinifex Pharmaceuticals enters into agreement to be acquired by Novartis

Spinifex Pharmaceuticals enters into agreement to be acquired by Novartis

Spinifex Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a company focused on the development of new drugs for the treatment of chronic pain, today announces that it has agreed to the sale of Spinifex to Novartis International AG, for an upfront cash consideration of US$200 million plus undisclosed clinical development and regulatory milestone payments. [More]
Discovery sheds light on how the Hippo pathway maintains cellular balance

Discovery sheds light on how the Hippo pathway maintains cellular balance

Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered a self-regulating loop in the Hippo pathway, a signaling channel garnering increased attention from cancer researchers due to its role in controlling organ size, cell proliferation and cell death. [More]
SLU researchers find way to stop growth of cancer cells by targeting the Warburg Effect

SLU researchers find way to stop growth of cancer cells by targeting the Warburg Effect

In research published in Cancer Cell, Thomas Burris, Ph.D., chair of pharmacology and physiology at Saint Louis University, has, for the first time, found a way to stop cancer cell growth by targeting the Warburg Effect, a trait of cancer cell metabolism that scientists have been eager to exploit. [More]
Scientists develop small molecule drug that prevents autophagy from starting in cancer cells

Scientists develop small molecule drug that prevents autophagy from starting in cancer cells

As a tumor grows, its cancerous cells ramp up an energy-harvesting process to support its hasty development. This process, called autophagy, is normally used by a cell to recycle damaged organelles and proteins, but is also co-opted by cancer cells to meet their increased energy and metabolic demands. [More]
E2F4 biomarker can help predict prognosis and response to BCG therapy in bladder cancer

E2F4 biomarker can help predict prognosis and response to BCG therapy in bladder cancer

Investigators from Dartmouth's Norris Cotton Cancer Center harnessed genomic data to discover that the previously identified E2F4 signature in breast cancer can be utilized to predict prognosis and response to therapy in bladder cancer. [More]
UIC researchers identify molecular mechanism that directs embryonic stem cells to turn into endothelial cells

UIC researchers identify molecular mechanism that directs embryonic stem cells to turn into endothelial cells

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have identified a molecular mechanism that directs embryonic stem cells to mature into endothelial cells -- the specialized cells that form blood vessels. Understanding the processes initiated by this mechanism could help scientists more efficiently convert stem cells into endothelial cells for use in tissue repair, or for engineering blood vessels to bypass blockages in the heart. [More]
Purdue University-led study could lead to better treatments for people infected with MERS virus

Purdue University-led study could lead to better treatments for people infected with MERS virus

A Purdue University-led team of researchers studying the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, have found molecules that shut down the activity of an essential enzyme in the virus and could lead the way to better treatments for those infected. [More]
Researchers explore the science of exosomes in heart repair

Researchers explore the science of exosomes in heart repair

A little more than a decade ago, researchers discovered that all cells secrete tiny communications modules jammed with an entire work crew of messages for other cells. Today, a team of researchers, led by stem cell researcher Raj Kishore, PhD, Director of the Stem Cell Therapy Program at the Center for Translational Medicine at Temple University School of Medicine, is harnessing the communications vesicles excreted by stem cells and using them to induce the damaged heart to repair itself. [More]
UB study sheds light on the molecular basis of cocaine addiction

UB study sheds light on the molecular basis of cocaine addiction

Researchers at the University at Buffalo have discovered a previously unknown neural pathway that can regulate changes made in the brain due to cocaine use, providing new insight into the molecular basis of cocaine addiction. [More]
Montefiore dermatologist debunks myths regarding skin care, offers information to help people enjoy summer days

Montefiore dermatologist debunks myths regarding skin care, offers information to help people enjoy summer days

As many begin to spend long summer days outside, it's crucial to have the right information about skin protection and the dangers of sun exposure. Today, Montefiore dermatologist Dr. Holly Kanavy debunks many widely-shared myths regarding skin care and offers accurate information to help people enjoy the outdoors this summer while preserving their skin. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement