Pharmacology News and Research RSS Feed - Pharmacology News and Research

Pharmacology is the study of how chemical substances interact with living systems. If substances have medicinal properties, they are considered pharmaceuticals. The field encompasses drug composition and properties, interactions, toxicology, therapy, and medical applications and antipathogenic capabilities.
UT Southwestern faculty awarded CPRIT grants to combat cancer

UT Southwestern faculty awarded CPRIT grants to combat cancer

UT Southwestern Medical Center faculty have received 19 grants totaling more than $26 million from the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas to expand cancer screenings, investigate the effectiveness and viability for cancer therapies and radiation treatments, conduct research into cancer biology, and recruitment. [More]
New online analytic tool enhances process of re-engineering cells for biomedical research

New online analytic tool enhances process of re-engineering cells for biomedical research

A Mayo Clinic researcher and his collaborators have developed an online analytic tool that will speed up and enhance the process of re-engineering cells for biomedical investigation. CellNet is a free-use Internet platform that uses network biology methods to aid stem cell engineering. [More]
Study: Many HIV infected African-Americans may not be receiving effective doses of maraviroc drug

Study: Many HIV infected African-Americans may not be receiving effective doses of maraviroc drug

Many African-Americans may not be getting effective doses of the HIV drug maraviroc, a new study from Johns Hopkins suggests. The initial dosing studies, completed before the drug was licensed in 2007, included mostly European-Americans, who generally lack a protein that is key to removing maraviroc from the body. [More]
Authors emphasize benefits of calcium and vitamin D supplements on bone health

Authors emphasize benefits of calcium and vitamin D supplements on bone health

Calcium and vitamin D are essential to keeping bones strong, dense and healthy as we age, as well as preventing bone loss, osteporosis, and skeletal fractures. [More]
UT Southwestern researchers discover crucial link between high insulin levels and obesity pathways

UT Southwestern researchers discover crucial link between high insulin levels and obesity pathways

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have identified a crucial link between high levels of insulin and pathways that lead to obesity, a finding that may have important implications when treating diabetes. [More]
New mouse model to open door to research on epilepsy, Alzheimer's

New mouse model to open door to research on epilepsy, Alzheimer's

University of Utah scientists have developed a genetically engineered line of mice that is expected to open the door to new research on epilepsy, Alzheimer's and other diseases. [More]
Children and adolescents with autism have surplus of synapses in brain

Children and adolescents with autism have surplus of synapses in brain

Children and adolescents with autism have a surplus of synapses in the brain, and this excess is due to a slowdown in a normal brain "pruning" process during development, according to a study by neuroscientists at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC). [More]
VCU receives federal grant totaling $6.9 million to study genetics of alcohol abuse

VCU receives federal grant totaling $6.9 million to study genetics of alcohol abuse

Virginia Commonwealth University has received a federal grant totaling $6.9 million to study the genetics of alcohol abuse and alcoholism - work that may lead to further advances in its treatment, control and prevention. [More]
Researchers shed light on the dual action of aspirin

Researchers shed light on the dual action of aspirin

Hugely popular non-steroidal anti-inflammation drugs like aspirin, naproxen (marketed as Aleve) and ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) all work by inhibiting or killing an enzyme called cyclooxygenase - a key catalyst in production of hormone-like lipid compounds called prostaglandins that are linked to a variety of ailments, from headaches and arthritis to menstrual cramps and wound sepsis. [More]
Research findings call for clinical testing of relevant drugs to prevent NASH

Research findings call for clinical testing of relevant drugs to prevent NASH

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common affliction, affecting almost 30 percent of Americans, with a significant number suffering from its most severe form, called non-alcoholic steatohepatitis or NASH, which can lead to cirrhosis and liver cancer. In recent years, NASH has become the leading cause of liver transplantation. [More]
Research findings may lead to novel target for chemoresistant cancer cells

Research findings may lead to novel target for chemoresistant cancer cells

Dartmouth cancer researchers at Norris Cotton Cancer Center found a means of causing the elimination of a protein that maintains cancer cell viability; the results of the study appear in the August 8 issue of The Journal of Biological Chemistry. [More]
Hippo pathway identifies and prevents progression of abnormal cells into cancer

Hippo pathway identifies and prevents progression of abnormal cells into cancer

Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine report that a tumor suppressor pathway, called the Hippo pathway, is responsible for sensing abnormal chromosome numbers in cells and triggering cell cycle arrest, thus preventing progression into cancer. [More]
Vitamin D deficiency linked to higher surgical risk

Vitamin D deficiency linked to higher surgical risk

Patients with low blood levels of vitamin D are at increased risk of death and serious complications after noncardiac surgery, suggests a study in Anesthesia & Analgesia. [More]
Finding suggests that aspirin could play role in reducing breast cancer mortality

Finding suggests that aspirin could play role in reducing breast cancer mortality

Researchers have discovered that women who had been prescribed aspirin regularly before being diagnosed with breast cancer are less likely to have cancer that spread to the lymph-nodes than women who were not on prescription aspirin. These women are also less likely to die from their breast cancer. [More]
Clinical trial tests COXEN model in bladder cancer to find promising treatment

Clinical trial tests COXEN model in bladder cancer to find promising treatment

Imagine being able to match a cancer's genes to the best treatment. That's the promise of COXEN (CO eXpression ExtrapolatioN) - a computer program that looks at a panel of cancer genes in a patient's tumor to predict whether it will respond to chemotherapy. [More]
Researchers identify mechanism used by deadly MERS virus to transmit from bats to humans

Researchers identify mechanism used by deadly MERS virus to transmit from bats to humans

Researchers have identified the mechanism used by the deadly MERS virus to transmit from bats to humans. Bats are a native reservoir for MERS and the finding could be critical for understanding the animal origins of the virus, as well as preventing and controlling the spread of MERS and related viruses in humans. [More]
Cardium announces review in Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology finds gene therapy for subset of heart disease patients ‘highly warranted’

Cardium announces review in Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology finds gene therapy for subset of heart disease patients ‘highly warranted’

Cardium Therapeutics, an operating unit of Taxus Cardium Pharmaceuticals Group Inc. (Trading Symbol: CRXM) has announced the publication of a review article in the Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology that concludes a gene therapy product promoting the growth of blood vessels is “highly warranted” to treat about 1 million U.S. heart-disease patients and 6 million more worldwide who are either ineligible or poor candidates for traditional angioplasty, stent placement or bypass surgery. [More]
Study provides new insight into neuroprotective effects of Asiaticoside

Study provides new insight into neuroprotective effects of Asiaticoside

In the central nervous system, Asiaticoside has been shown to attenuate in vitro neuronal damage caused by exposure to β-amyloid. [More]
Researchers discover how immunosensory system attacks viruses on a molecular level

Researchers discover how immunosensory system attacks viruses on a molecular level

Our immunosensory system detects virus such as influenza via specific characteristics of viral ribonucleic acid. Previously, it was unclear how the immune system prevents viruses from simply donning molecular camouflage in order to escape detection. [More]
TAXIS acquires novel antimicrobial drug candidates from Biota

TAXIS acquires novel antimicrobial drug candidates from Biota

TAXIS Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced the acquisition of a group of novel antimicrobial drug candidates from Biota Pharmaceuticals Inc. of Atlanta, GA. [More]