Pharmacology News and Research RSS Feed - Pharmacology News and Research

Pharmacology is the study of how chemical substances interact with living systems. If substances have medicinal properties, they are considered pharmaceuticals. The field encompasses drug composition and properties, interactions, toxicology, therapy, and medical applications and antipathogenic capabilities.
Rosuvastatin drug more effective among prediabetic patients, finds new study

Rosuvastatin drug more effective among prediabetic patients, finds new study

Cardiovascular disease is the leading causes of death worldwide and high cholesterol plays a major role in accelerating its progression. Medical practitioners have turned to statins as a treatment to decrease cholesterol-carrying lipoproteins such as small dense lipoproteins (sdLDL), considered to be especially harmful. [More]
Researchers gain new knowledge about complex processes that cause Parkinson's disease

Researchers gain new knowledge about complex processes that cause Parkinson's disease

Using advanced computer models, neuroscience researchers at the University of Copenhagen have gained new knowledge about the complex processes that cause Parkinson's disease. The findings have recently been published in the prestigious Journal of Neuroscience. [More]
NIH awards grant to scientist to link drugs, genes and diseases

NIH awards grant to scientist to link drugs, genes and diseases

The National Institutes of Health wants to make the process of finding new drugs faster and better. The effort will help all 27 of its research institutes and centers. So, the nation's medical research agency awarded Tudor Oprea, MD, PhD, a 2-year $4.9 million grant to develop a tool scientists can use to link information about drugs, diseases and genes. [More]
Adding common epilepsy drug to morphine can result in better pain control, say IU researchers

Adding common epilepsy drug to morphine can result in better pain control, say IU researchers

Adding a common epilepsy drug to a morphine regimen can result in better pain control with fewer side effects. Moreover, the combination can reduce the dosage of the opioid needed to be effective, according to a team of pain researchers at Indiana University. [More]
Collaborative study takes important step toward finding targeted treatments for bladder cancer

Collaborative study takes important step toward finding targeted treatments for bladder cancer

The story of cancer care seems so simple: find the mutated gene that causes cancer and turn it off or fix it. But rarely does a single gene cause cancer. More often, many genes are altered together to drive the disease. So the challenge becomes sorting out which altered genes are the most to blame in which cancers. [More]
Discovery reveals promising target for treatment of end-stage heart failure

Discovery reveals promising target for treatment of end-stage heart failure

As a heart fails, losing its ability to squeeze blood through the circulatory system, the body releases a neurohormone that interferes with the heart's best chance to improve contractility, a team of Temple University School of Medicine researchers show in a study published September 9th in the American Heart Association journal, Circulation. [More]
Research shown to increase chances of babies surviving neonatal resuscitation

Research shown to increase chances of babies surviving neonatal resuscitation

For several Edmonton parents, the work being done by University of Alberta researchers Po-Yin Cheung and Georg Schm-lzer could not be more meaningful. [More]
New potential therapeutic targets for treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension

New potential therapeutic targets for treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension

Two new potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension, a deadly disease marked by high blood pressure in the lungs, have been identified by researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago. [More]
Protein RBM4 drastically decreases multiple forms of human cancer

Protein RBM4 drastically decreases multiple forms of human cancer

Researchers from the UNC School of Medicine have discovered that the protein RBM4, a molecule crucial to the process of gene splicing, is drastically decreased in multiple forms of human cancer, including lung and breast cancers. [More]
Case Western Reserve scientists discover leaky gut as source of non-AIDS complications

Case Western Reserve scientists discover leaky gut as source of non-AIDS complications

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is no longer a fatal condition, thanks to newer medications inhibiting the retrovirus, but a puzzling phenomenon has surfaced among these patients — non-AIDS complications. Scientists at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have resolved the mystery with their discovery of the leaky gut as the offender. [More]

Scanning electron microscope for 3D volume imaging of cells and tissues announced by FEI

FEI (NASDAQ: FEIC) announced today its new Teneo VS™ scanning electron microscope (SEM), which offers a VolumeScope™ capability for life science applications. The Teneo platform tightly integrates FEI’s latest-generation SEM with VolumeScope, an in-chamber microtome and proprietary analytical software to provide fully-automated, large-volume reconstructions with dramatically improved z-axis resolution. [More]
New journal on cardiovascular pharmacotherapy from ESC

New journal on cardiovascular pharmacotherapy from ESC

A new ESC journal on cardiovascular pharmacotherapy is launched today at ESC Congress by the ESC and Oxford University Press. [More]
UT Southwestern faculty awarded CPRIT grants to combat cancer

UT Southwestern faculty awarded CPRIT grants to combat cancer

UT Southwestern Medical Center faculty have received 19 grants totaling more than $26 million from the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas to expand cancer screenings, investigate the effectiveness and viability for cancer therapies and radiation treatments, conduct research into cancer biology, and recruitment. [More]
New online analytic tool enhances process of re-engineering cells for biomedical research

New online analytic tool enhances process of re-engineering cells for biomedical research

A Mayo Clinic researcher and his collaborators have developed an online analytic tool that will speed up and enhance the process of re-engineering cells for biomedical investigation. CellNet is a free-use Internet platform that uses network biology methods to aid stem cell engineering. [More]
Study: Many HIV infected African-Americans may not be receiving effective doses of maraviroc drug

Study: Many HIV infected African-Americans may not be receiving effective doses of maraviroc drug

Many African-Americans may not be getting effective doses of the HIV drug maraviroc, a new study from Johns Hopkins suggests. The initial dosing studies, completed before the drug was licensed in 2007, included mostly European-Americans, who generally lack a protein that is key to removing maraviroc from the body. [More]
Authors emphasize benefits of calcium and vitamin D supplements on bone health

Authors emphasize benefits of calcium and vitamin D supplements on bone health

Calcium and vitamin D are essential to keeping bones strong, dense and healthy as we age, as well as preventing bone loss, osteporosis, and skeletal fractures. [More]
UT Southwestern researchers discover crucial link between high insulin levels and obesity pathways

UT Southwestern researchers discover crucial link between high insulin levels and obesity pathways

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have identified a crucial link between high levels of insulin and pathways that lead to obesity, a finding that may have important implications when treating diabetes. [More]
New mouse model to open door to research on epilepsy, Alzheimer's

New mouse model to open door to research on epilepsy, Alzheimer's

University of Utah scientists have developed a genetically engineered line of mice that is expected to open the door to new research on epilepsy, Alzheimer's and other diseases. [More]
Children and adolescents with autism have surplus of synapses in brain

Children and adolescents with autism have surplus of synapses in brain

Children and adolescents with autism have a surplus of synapses in the brain, and this excess is due to a slowdown in a normal brain "pruning" process during development, according to a study by neuroscientists at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC). [More]
VCU receives federal grant totaling $6.9 million to study genetics of alcohol abuse

VCU receives federal grant totaling $6.9 million to study genetics of alcohol abuse

Virginia Commonwealth University has received a federal grant totaling $6.9 million to study the genetics of alcohol abuse and alcoholism - work that may lead to further advances in its treatment, control and prevention. [More]