Pharmacology News and Research RSS Feed - Pharmacology News and Research

Pharmacology is the study of how chemical substances interact with living systems. If substances have medicinal properties, they are considered pharmaceuticals. The field encompasses drug composition and properties, interactions, toxicology, therapy, and medical applications and antipathogenic capabilities.
NIGHTSEA and EMS nominate Dr. Sarah Petersen for 2016 KEY Award

NIGHTSEA and EMS nominate Dr. Sarah Petersen for 2016 KEY Award

NIGHTSEA, creators and manufacturers of the innovative Stereo Microscope Fluorescence Adapter (SFA), and Electron Microscopy Sciences (EMS) are pleased to award the second annual KEY Award for New Faculty to Dr. Sarah Petersen of Kenyon College. [More]
Human pluripotent stem cells may revolutionize drug discovery in heart disease

Human pluripotent stem cells may revolutionize drug discovery in heart disease

Coaxing stem cells from patients to become heart cells may help clinicians personalize drug treatments and prevent heart-related toxicity. [More]
Study quantifies burden of clinically impactful ADRs in general adult population

Study quantifies burden of clinically impactful ADRs in general adult population

In a study of 1000 adult patients with unplanned admission to a tertiary hospital in Singapore, the prevalence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) at the time of admission was 12.4 percent, and the prevalence of ADRs causing admission to the hospital was 8.1 percent. [More]
UC Irvine study shows how YHS effectively treats different forms of pain

UC Irvine study shows how YHS effectively treats different forms of pain

Root extracts from the flowering herbal plant Corydalis yanhusuo, or YHS, has widely used for centuries as a pain treatment. Yet few studies have investigated how it works on different forms of pain, and little is known about its molecular mechanisms. [More]
Study finds South Africans living with HIV more resilient despite chronic pain

Study finds South Africans living with HIV more resilient despite chronic pain

When one thinks about chronic conditions that are commonly painful, HIV doesn't typically spring to mind. However, more than 50% of HIV-positive individuals experience a painful condition like headache, chest pain or neuropathy, and that pain is frequently experienced as moderate to severe in intensity. [More]
New study raises safety concerns on clinical use of caspase inhibitors for liver diseases

New study raises safety concerns on clinical use of caspase inhibitors for liver diseases

Many acute and chronic liver diseases, including alcoholic hepatitis, result from apoptotic (programmed) cell death mediated by the enzyme caspase. Caspase inhibitors have therapeutic potential to treat and prevent apoptosis-mediated liver injury, and some are currently in clinical trials. [More]
Triptolide molecule can turn into 'cruise missile' against cancer

Triptolide molecule can turn into 'cruise missile' against cancer

More than 20 years ago, a billboard in China piqued the interest of a chemical biologist. It endorsed an extract from the plant known as the “thunder god vine” as an immunosuppressant. [More]
Researchers discover how immune cells transition from silent to merciless killing machines

Researchers discover how immune cells transition from silent to merciless killing machines

Neutrophils are the superheroes of the body's immune system. Normally mild-mannered, they travel through the bloodstream until they reach an emergency situation, such as a cut or infection, where they switch into battle-mode to engulf and destroy foreign invaders. [More]
New molecular mechanism may explain pain relieving drug’s diverse benefits

New molecular mechanism may explain pain relieving drug’s diverse benefits

Aspirin's ability to reduce the risk of both cardiovascular disease and colon cancer has been a welcome, yet puzzling, attribute of the pain reliever that has been a mainstay in medicine cabinets for more than 100 years. [More]
Study highlights need for additional systems to report adverse drug reactions in infants

Study highlights need for additional systems to report adverse drug reactions in infants

A new study reveals that adverse drug reactions in newborns and infants may be under-reported. [More]
Researchers use unique computational approach to identify promising drug leads for heart diseases

Researchers use unique computational approach to identify promising drug leads for heart diseases

Using a unique computational approach to rapidly sample, in millisecond time intervals, proteins in their natural state of gyrating, bobbing, and weaving, a research team from UC San Diego and Monash University in Australia has identified promising drug leads that may selectively combat heart disease, from arrhythmias to cardiac failure. [More]
JMU scientists crystallize new inhibitory antibodies targeting sclerostin

JMU scientists crystallize new inhibitory antibodies targeting sclerostin

Osteoporosis particularly affects elderly women: the bone's structure weakens and the risk of suffering fractures rises. [More]

New study provides insights into how regulators support accelerated access to new therapies

It can be challenging for regulators to keep up with advances related to medical drugs and devices. A new analysis and editorial published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology provide insights on how officials are working to support accelerated access to new therapies while also ensuring their safety. [More]
Adenosine may play role in inhibiting REM sleep

Adenosine may play role in inhibiting REM sleep

The regulation and function of sleep is one of the biggest black boxes of today's brain science. [More]
Research reveals new insights into happy hormone, dopamine

Research reveals new insights into happy hormone, dopamine

Dopamine is a so-called messenger substance or neurotransmitter that conveys signals between neurons. [More]
Mitosis study identifies new potential target for cancer therapy

Mitosis study identifies new potential target for cancer therapy

Structural biologists show in a new study that an apparently key step in the process of cell division depends on a unique interaction among specific proteins, including one that is strongly linked to cancer. Their hope now is that the detailed new characterization of the interaction will make it a target for exploring a new cancer therapy. [More]
Study reveals vital new details about inner workings of CRISPR-Cas9 machinery in live cells

Study reveals vital new details about inner workings of CRISPR-Cas9 machinery in live cells

A study in The Journal of Cell Biology by scientists at the University of Massachusetts Medical School reveals important new details about the inner workings of the CRISPR-Cas9 machinery in live cells that may have implications for the development of therapeutics that use the powerful gene editing tool. [More]
Novel compound provides safe, effective pain relief with zero abuse potential in animal model

Novel compound provides safe, effective pain relief with zero abuse potential in animal model

Since the isolation of morphine from opium in the 19th century, scientists have hoped to find a potent opioid analgesic that isn't addictive and doesn't cause respiratory arrest with increased doses. [More]
Gentle combination of FDA-approved drugs could combat photoreceptor degeneration in mice

Gentle combination of FDA-approved drugs could combat photoreceptor degeneration in mice

In microseconds, every light ray that enters the eye triggers an explosion of coordinated cellular events. [More]
Engineered gut bacteria may one day help reduce negative health effects of obesity

Engineered gut bacteria may one day help reduce negative health effects of obesity

A new therapy that involves engineered gut bacteria may one day help reduce the health problems that come with obesity. Incorporating the engineered bacteria into the guts of mice both kept them from gaining weight and protected them against some of the negative health effects of obesity. [More]
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