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Experts at EAN Congress discuss spread of Zika virus threat across Europe

Experts at EAN Congress discuss spread of Zika virus threat across Europe

The Zika epidemic has long assumed global proportions, experts told the Congress of the European Academy of Neurology in Copenhagen. Europe needs to get prepared to deal with the relentless spread of the health threat, in particular with a view to "imported" infection. [More]
WHO/PAHO provides public health advice to mitigate Zika virus risk during 2016 Olympics in Brazil

WHO/PAHO provides public health advice to mitigate Zika virus risk during 2016 Olympics in Brazil

Based on current assessment, cancelling or changing the location of the 2016 Olympics will not significantly alter the international spread of Zika virus. [More]
Premature babies have lower peak bone mass as adults

Premature babies have lower peak bone mass as adults

Among the many important processes that happen during a woman's last few weeks of pregnancy is the transfer of calcium to the growing foetus to boost bone development. [More]
New research estimates unmet surgical needs of forcibly displaced persons

New research estimates unmet surgical needs of forcibly displaced persons

New research from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests that the world's estimated 60 million refugees, displaced from their homes due to conflict, persecution or human rights violations, may need at least 2.78 million surgeries a year, something thought to be very difficult to arrange in the midst of their upheaval. [More]
Scientists discover how Zika virus replicates in the placenta

Scientists discover how Zika virus replicates in the placenta

Zika virus can infect and replicate in immune cells from the placenta, without killing them, scientists have discovered. The finding may explain how the virus can pass through the placenta of a pregnant woman, on its way to infect developing brain cells in her fetus. [More]
Prenatal fruit consumption linked to improved cognitive development in infants

Prenatal fruit consumption linked to improved cognitive development in infants

Most people have heard the old adage "an apple a day keeps the doctor away." It's an old truth that encompasses more than just apples--eating fruit in general is well known to reduce risk for a wide variety of health conditions such as heart disease and stroke. [More]
Zika virus infection may cause ocular problems in Brazilian infants with microcephaly

Zika virus infection may cause ocular problems in Brazilian infants with microcephaly

Researchers studying babies with a Zika virus-related birth defect say they have found previously unreported eye problems possibly linked to the virus that could result in severe visual impairment. [More]
Depressive symptoms may affect fertility of women

Depressive symptoms may affect fertility of women

Women with severe depressive symptoms have a decreased chance of becoming pregnant, while the use of psychotropic medications does not appear to harm fertility, a study by researchers from the Boston University Schools of Public Health and Medicine shows. [More]
Lancet study highlights long-term effect of 1999 nationwide strategy to reduce teenage pregnancy

Lancet study highlights long-term effect of 1999 nationwide strategy to reduce teenage pregnancy

Rates of teenage pregnancy in England have halved since the implementation of the Government's Teenage Pregnancy Strategy (TPS) in 1999, and the greatest effect is seen in areas of high deprivation and areas that received the most TPS funding, according to research published in The Lancet. [More]
Study links low- and high-birthweight babies to increased cardiovascular disease risk

Study links low- and high-birthweight babies to increased cardiovascular disease risk

For reasons that remain unclear at least in the smaller babies, both birthweight extremes appear to increase the likelihood of early development of dangerous fat around major organs in the abdomen that significantly increases these risks, said Dr. Brian Stansfield, neonatologist at the Children's Hospital of Georgia and the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University. [More]
New real-time imaging technique holds great potential in shaping assisted reproduction procedures

New real-time imaging technique holds great potential in shaping assisted reproduction procedures

Researchers at A*STAR's Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology (IMCB) have developed advanced microscopy technologies to monitor embryo development in real time, revealing how mammalian cells differentiate during the earliest stages of embryonic life. [More]
GMU’s early-detection urine test works for Lyme disease, study shows

GMU’s early-detection urine test works for Lyme disease, study shows

After three years and 300 patients, George Mason University researchers have proof that their early-detection urine test for Lyme disease works. [More]
Global life expectancy on the rise, but major health inequalities persist

Global life expectancy on the rise, but major health inequalities persist

Dramatic gains in life expectancy have been made globally since 2000, but major inequalities persist within and among countries, according to this year’s “World Health Statistics: Monitoring Health for the SDGs”. [More]
New research looks at conversations that take place among selected parenting groups on Facebook

New research looks at conversations that take place among selected parenting groups on Facebook

A study of conversations among pregnant women and new mothers on Facebook has highlighted a need for health professionals to provide clear direction on where new parents and pregnant women can access reliable and evidence based information about medicines. [More]
Maternal pregabalin exposure linked to major birth defect risk

Maternal pregabalin exposure linked to major birth defect risk

First trimester exposure to pregabalin may be associated with an increased risk of major birth defects, an observational study suggests. [More]
High doses of vitamin D supplements could lead to fewer birth complications but reduce fertility

High doses of vitamin D supplements could lead to fewer birth complications but reduce fertility

New research has established that high doses of vitamin D supplements can lead to fewer complications during childbirth but reduce a woman's chances of getting pregnant in the first place. [More]
New lab blood test may help identify HELLP syndrome in pregnant women

New lab blood test may help identify HELLP syndrome in pregnant women

A laboratory blood test developed at Johns Hopkins for the diagnosis of a rare genetic red blood cell disorder also shows promise in identifying HELLP syndrome, a life-threatening high blood pressure condition affecting 1 percent of all pregnant women that causes hypertension along with end organ damage, researchers report in the May issue of the journal Experimental Hematology. [More]
Taking pregabalin drug during pregnancy could lead to major birth defects

Taking pregabalin drug during pregnancy could lead to major birth defects

A drug commonly used to treat pain, epilepsy, anxiety and other brain health disorders may be associated with an increased risk of major birth defects, according to a study published in the May 18, 2016, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Bioprinted 3-D placenta model could help better understand preeclampsia

Bioprinted 3-D placenta model could help better understand preeclampsia

Preeclampsia is a pregnancy complication involving the placenta that can be serious -- even fatal -- for the mother or fetus. The only effective treatment option is premature delivery. [More]
Selenium deficiency could be possible risk factor for PPCM that affects pregnant women

Selenium deficiency could be possible risk factor for PPCM that affects pregnant women

Researchers have found a close link between selenium deficiency and Peripartum Cardiomyopathy (PPCM), a heart disease that affects pregnant women and recent mothers. The study of patients in Nigeria also showed that rural women were three times more likely to develop the disease, according to a doctoral dissertation at Umea University. [More]
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