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Researchers find that considerable proportion of infections is discovered outside hospital setting

Researchers find that considerable proportion of infections is discovered outside hospital setting

More than 80 percent of hospitalized patients who tested positive for Clostridium difficile were tested outside the hospital or within the first 72 hours of hospitalization, suggesting that settings outside of the hospital may play key roles in the identification, onset and possible transmission of the disease, according to a new Kaiser Permanente study published today in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings. [More]
Scientist develops highly accurate device for diagnosing fatal lung disease

Scientist develops highly accurate device for diagnosing fatal lung disease

A scientist from the University of Exeter has developed a simple, cheap and highly accurate device for diagnosing a frequently fatal lung disease which attacks immune deficient individuals such as cancer patients and bone marrow transplant recipients. [More]
Black women who strongly identified with race more likely to feel anxious in healthcare setting

Black women who strongly identified with race more likely to feel anxious in healthcare setting

A first-of-its-kind study by researchers at USC and Loyola Marymount University (LMU) has found evidence that the persistent health disparities across race may, in part, be related to anxiety about being confronted by negative racial stereotypes while receiving healthcare. [More]
Experts join MD Anderson to end cancer

Experts join MD Anderson to end cancer

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center is pleased to announce that one of the world's preeminent experts in breast cancer research and treatment, V. Craig Jordan, Ph.D., will join the institution's efforts to end cancer. Jordan is considered the "Father of Tamoxifen," the groundbreaking therapeutic drug that has saved countless lives. [More]
Information about female condom is necessary to communicate with young people

Information about female condom is necessary to communicate with young people

The female condom is one of just two barrier methods that can protect against sexually transmitted infections and unplanned pregnancies, yet many young adults are not aware of the device, a new study by two UT Arlington researchers has found. [More]
Early-career physicians receive National Psoriasis Foundation fellowship to study psoriasis

Early-career physicians receive National Psoriasis Foundation fellowship to study psoriasis

Twelve residents and medical students each received a one-year, $50,000 National Psoriasis Foundation fellowship to study psoriasis. [More]
Marmoset's unique rapid reproductive system sheds new light on evolution and primate biology

Marmoset's unique rapid reproductive system sheds new light on evolution and primate biology

A team of scientists from around the world led by Baylor College of Medicine and Washington University in St. Louis has completed the genome sequence of the common marmoset - the first sequence of a New World Monkey - providing new information about the marmoset's unique rapid reproductive system, physiology and growth, shedding new light on primate biology and evolution. [More]
Signaling pathway key player in formation of front-most portion of developing vertebrate embryos

Signaling pathway key player in formation of front-most portion of developing vertebrate embryos

A signaling pathway once thought to have little if any role during embryogenesis is a key player in the formation of the front-most portion of developing vertebrate embryos. [More]
Senate Dems aim to reverse Hobby Lobby decision, undermine state abortion restrictions

Senate Dems aim to reverse Hobby Lobby decision, undermine state abortion restrictions

Democrats have scheduled a Senate vote Wednesday on legislation offered to respond to the Supreme Court's recent ruling. And, on Tuesday, the Senate Judiciary Committee heard testimony about another measure that would void some state abortion restrictions. [More]
Women with history of pregnancy loss are at higher risk for cardiovascular disease later

Women with history of pregnancy loss are at higher risk for cardiovascular disease later

The Annals of Family Medicine today published an article detailing research showing that women with a history of pregnancy loss are at higher risk for cardiovascular disease later in adulthood than other women, work completed by physicians in the Center for Primary Care and Prevention (CPCP) at Memorial Hospital of Rhode Island. [More]
First Edition: July 16, 2014

First Edition: July 16, 2014

Today's headlines include reports about the Congressional Budget Office's latest estimate on federal health care spending. [More]
Surprising suggestion for why divorce is more common among families with girls

Surprising suggestion for why divorce is more common among families with girls

In the U.S., couples with daughters are somewhat more likely to divorce than couples with sons. Many scholars have read those numbers as evidence that daughters cause divorce. [More]
CHEST guideline released for PAH

CHEST guideline released for PAH

An updated CHEST guideline for treating pulmonary arterial hypertension provides some evidence-based recommendations but also highlights many evidence gaps. [More]
Nocturia affects one in three premenopausal women

Nocturia affects one in three premenopausal women

Nocturia affects around one-third of women of reproductive age, a survey has found, highlighting that the condition is not confined to elderly individuals. [More]
B vitamins do not prevent Alzheimer's disease

B vitamins do not prevent Alzheimer's disease

Taking B vitamins doesn't slow mental decline as we age, nor is it likely to prevent Alzheimer's disease, conclude Oxford University researchers who have assembled all the best clinical trial data involving 22,000 people to offer a final answer on this debate. [More]
Babies born to mothers who immigrated from other countries have lower rates of cerebral palsy

Babies born to mothers who immigrated from other countries have lower rates of cerebral palsy

Babies born to mothers who immigrated to Ontario from other countries have significantly lower rates of cerebral palsy than those of Canadian-born mothers, especially those from the Caribbean and East Asia, new research has found. [More]
Medac Pharma's Rasuvo injection gets FDA approval for RA, pJIA and psoriasis

Medac Pharma's Rasuvo injection gets FDA approval for RA, pJIA and psoriasis

Medac Pharma, Inc., a privately held pharmaceutical company focused on the development of new molecules and improving the effectiveness of existing medicines, announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved Rasuvo, a subcutaneous injectable methotrexate (MTX) therapy delivered in an auto-injector for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), polyarticular-course juvenile idiopathic arthritis (pJIA) and psoriasis. [More]
Mississippi baby: Infant seemingly cured of HIV has detectable levels of HIV

Mississippi baby: Infant seemingly cured of HIV has detectable levels of HIV

The child known as the "Mississippi baby"-an infant seemingly cured of HIV that was reported as a case study of a prolonged remission of HIV infection in The New England Journal of Medicine last fall-now has detectable levels of HIV after more than two years of not taking antiretroviral therapy without evidence of virus, according to the pediatric HIV specialist and researchers involved in the case. [More]
New hope for patients with tuberous sclerosis complex

New hope for patients with tuberous sclerosis complex

Although it is rare, tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) can be a difficult and frightening diagnosis for parents and children. The genetic disorder causes nonmalignant tumors to form in many different organs, including the brain, eyes, kidneys and heart. [More]

New health education program can reduce dating violence behaviors among minority youth

New research from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) shows that It's Your Game-Keep it Real (IYG), a health education program designed to delay sexual behavior and promote healthy dating relationships, can significantly reduce dating violence behaviors among minority youth. [More]