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Nottingham researchers developing mobile phone app that could help identify premature babies

Nottingham researchers developing mobile phone app that could help identify premature babies

A mobile phone app that will identify babies born prematurely in the developing world is being developed by researchers at The University of Nottingham. [More]
Pediatricians, health care providers encounter requests to postpone vaccinations

Pediatricians, health care providers encounter requests to postpone vaccinations

Pediatricians are facing increasing pressure from some parents who want to spread out the recommended vaccine schedule for their children by postponing vaccines, pointing to a need for improved programs that support timely vaccinations, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Colorado School of Medicine at the Anschutz Medical Campus. [More]
Study reports 10% reduction in overall C-section births in Portugal

Study reports 10% reduction in overall C-section births in Portugal

A new study reports a significant decline in the rate of cesarean section (C-section) births in Portugal. Findings published in Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, a journal of the Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology, indicate a 10% reduction in overall C-section rates between 2009 and 2014, with a 14% reduction in state-hospitals during the same time period. [More]
ACHA reports that nearly 2 million adults living with CHD in the U.S.

ACHA reports that nearly 2 million adults living with CHD in the U.S.

At one time, many children born with congenital heart disease (CHD) suffered from issues that carried fatal prognoses. [More]
FDA approves LILETTA (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) to prevent pregnancy

FDA approves LILETTA (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) to prevent pregnancy

Actavis plc, a leading global specialty pharmaceutical company, and Medicines360, a nonprofit women's health pharmaceutical company, today announced the approval of LILETTA (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use by women to prevent pregnancy for up to three years. [More]
TOMS Bag Collection launched to address issue of maternal health worldwide

TOMS Bag Collection launched to address issue of maternal health worldwide

TOMS – the company known for starting a global movement through its One for One business model – has launched its fourth and newest product, the TOMS Bag Collection, addressing the issue of maternal health worldwide. [More]
Researchers examine individuals' confidence or reluctance in vaccination decision-making

Researchers examine individuals' confidence or reluctance in vaccination decision-making

Researchers explore individuals' confidence or reluctance to vaccinate their families and the associated effects on global health, in a collection published on February 25, 2015 by the open-access journal, PLOS Currents: Outbreaks. The collection is accompanied by the editorial "Hesitancy, trust and individualism in vaccination decision-making" by Jonathan E. Suk et al. from the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. [More]
New medical device could revolutionise kidney disease care in the UK

New medical device could revolutionise kidney disease care in the UK

A new medical device which combines nanotechnology with a pregnancy tester could help diagnose and treat the 1 million people in the UK who don’t know they have kidney disease, a new report by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers reveals today. [More]
Researchers identify previously unknown effect of vitamin A in embryonic development

Researchers identify previously unknown effect of vitamin A in embryonic development

Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have identified a previously unknown effect of vitamin A in human embryonic development. Their findings show that vitamin A affects the formation of blood cells. [More]
Simple paper strip test can rapidly diagnose Ebola

Simple paper strip test can rapidly diagnose Ebola

When diagnosing a case of Ebola, time is of the essence. However, existing diagnostic tests take at least a day or two to yield results, preventing health care workers from quickly determining whether a patient needs immediate treatment and isolation. [More]
Bayer expands patient assistance program for intrauterine devices

Bayer expands patient assistance program for intrauterine devices

Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals Inc. today announced the expansion of its patient assistance program for intrauterine devices (IUD). The ARCH (Access and Resources for Contraceptive Health) program will provide Skyla (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) 13.5 mg and Mirena (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) 52 mg to low-income women who meet eligibility criteria. [More]
Telephone-based peer support may help reduce postpartum depression in new mothers

Telephone-based peer support may help reduce postpartum depression in new mothers

New research reveals that telephone-based peer support may help reduce postnatal depression, also known as postpartum depression, in new mothers. Findings published in the Journal of Advanced Nursing also found that social support from peers may be effective for maternal depression up to two years after delivery. [More]
EKF introduces new diabetic biomarker test – The Stanbio Chemistry GSP LiquiColor® Assay

EKF introduces new diabetic biomarker test – The Stanbio Chemistry GSP LiquiColor® Assay

Glycated Serum Protein bridges the gap in diabetes testing in cases where HbA1c cannot be reliably measured [More]
Researchers review ten years of scientific studies on mitochondrial toxicity in pregnant women

Researchers review ten years of scientific studies on mitochondrial toxicity in pregnant women

Researchers from the Hospital Clinic of Barcelona (Spain) have reviewed ten years' worth of scientific studies on mitochondrial toxicity in pregnant women. Exposure to toxic agents such as viruses, certain drugs, pesticides, alcohol and tobacco cause mitochondrial diseases about which very little is known, and which are transmitted from the mother to the foetus. [More]
New Danish study suggests that proactive labour induction practice can improve perinatal outcomes

New Danish study suggests that proactive labour induction practice can improve perinatal outcomes

A proactive labour induction practice once women are full term can improve perinatal outcomes suggests a new Danish study, published today (18 February) in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (BJOG). [More]
Study examines relationship between substance use and teen pregnancy

Study examines relationship between substance use and teen pregnancy

New research from The University of Texas at Austin suggests that many teenagers, especially younger teens, may not be getting the message about the risks of using alcohol and other drugs during pregnancy -- but that having involved parents and being engaged academically can help. [More]
Weill Cornell receives NIH grant to study TB-causing bacteria

Weill Cornell receives NIH grant to study TB-causing bacteria

In an effort to stop tuberculosis (TB) from becoming progressively less treatable worldwide, the National Institutes of Health has awarded Weill Cornell Medical College more than $6.2 million in first-year funding to support a research collaboration among six institutions in close alliance with voluntary pharmaceutical partners. [More]
Fetal exposure to drugs can cause neurological problems

Fetal exposure to drugs can cause neurological problems

Research suggests that fetal exposure to chemicals or drugs can cause neurological problems. Babies whose mothers take the epilepsy drug valporic acid (VPA) during pregnancy, for example, appear to have an elevated risk of developing an autism spectrum disorder. [More]
Research: 14% of cerebral palsy cases are linked to genetic mutation

Research: 14% of cerebral palsy cases are linked to genetic mutation

An international research group led by a team at the University of Adelaide has made what they believe could be the biggest discovery into cerebral palsy in 20 years. [More]
Study shows that de novo mutations can be detected in human in vitro fertilized embryos using PGD

Study shows that de novo mutations can be detected in human in vitro fertilized embryos using PGD

Reprogenetics, the largest U.S. genetics laboratory specializing in Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD), announced today the publication of new clinical data in the March issue of Genome Research demonstrating that de novo single base mutations can be detected in embryos after in vitro fertilization (IVF). [More]