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TUM researchers discover new mechanism for regulating programmed cell death

TUM researchers discover new mechanism for regulating programmed cell death

Programmed cell death is a mechanism that causes defective and potentially harmful cells to destroy themselves. It serves a number of purposes in the body, including the prevention of malignant tumor growth. Now, researchers at Technische Universität München have discovered a previously unknown mechanism for regulating programmed cell death. [More]
Researchers treat myocardial infarction with new telomerase-based gene therapy

Researchers treat myocardial infarction with new telomerase-based gene therapy

The enzyme telomerase repairs cell damage produced by ageing, and has been used successfully in therapies to lengthen the life of mice. Now it has been observed that it could also be used to cure illnesses related to the ageing process. [More]
Trophoblasts respond to inflammatory danger signals, find NTNU researchers

Trophoblasts respond to inflammatory danger signals, find NTNU researchers

Trophoblasts, cells that form an outer layer around a fertilized egg and develop into the major part of the placenta, have now been shown to respond to inflammatory danger signals, researchers from Norwegian University of Science and Technology found in a recent study published in Journal of Reproductive Immunology December 2014. [More]
Broccoli can help reduce HGPS-related defects

Broccoli can help reduce HGPS-related defects

Children who suffer from Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria syndrome age prematurely due to a defective protein in their cells. Scientists at Technische Universität München have now identified another important pathological factor: the system responsible for removing cellular debris and for breaking down defective proteins operates at lower levels in HGPS cells than in normal cells. The researchers have succeeded in reactivating protein breakdown in HGPS cells and thus reducing disease-related defects by using a substance from broccoli. [More]
Two orphan receptor proteins exert fatal double whammy effect against glioblastoma cells

Two orphan receptor proteins exert fatal double whammy effect against glioblastoma cells

Two related proteins exert a lethal double whammy effect against glioblastoma cells when activated with a small molecule, say researchers at Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center. [More]
Eight researchers to receive 2015 Leibniz Prize

Eight researchers to receive 2015 Leibniz Prize

The new recipients of Germany's most prestigious research funding prize have been announced. In Bonn today, the Joint Committee of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, German Research Foundation) decided to award the 2015 Leibniz Prize to eight researchers. [More]
Research findings may lead to new treatment strategies for Ewing sarcoma

Research findings may lead to new treatment strategies for Ewing sarcoma

The genetic abnormality that drives the bone cancer Ewing sarcoma operates through two distinct processes - both activating genes that stimulate tumor growth and suppressing those that should keep cancer from developing. These findings by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators, published in the November issue of Cancer Cell, may lead to new therapies targeting these aberrant mechanisms. [More]
Loyola neurologist finds little scientific evidence that brain games improve cognitive function

Loyola neurologist finds little scientific evidence that brain games improve cognitive function

Computerized brain games that are advertised as a way to help boost intelligence and prevent dementia will be popular Christmas gifts this year. [More]
Tel Aviv University study throws spotlight on gene mutation responsible for premature ovarian failure

Tel Aviv University study throws spotlight on gene mutation responsible for premature ovarian failure

Premature ovarian failure, also known as primary ovarian insufficiency (POI), affects 1% of all women worldwide. In most cases, the exact cause of the condition, which is often associated with infertility, is difficult to determine. [More]
Researchers identify a single protein as root cause of multiple allergic reactions

Researchers identify a single protein as root cause of multiple allergic reactions

Johns Hopkins and University of Alberta researchers have identified a single protein as the root of painful and dangerous allergic reactions to a range of medications and other substances. If a new drug can be found that targets the problematic protein, they say, it could help smooth treatment for patients with conditions ranging from prostate cancer to diabetes to HIV [More]
Scientists produce novel class of molecules that could help combat cancer, other diseases

Scientists produce novel class of molecules that could help combat cancer, other diseases

Promising treatments known as biologics are on the market and under development for many serious illnesses such as cancer, but some of them come with high risks, even lethal ones. Now scientists have produced a novel class of molecules that could be as effective but without the dangerous side effects. [More]
Researchers find new 'sliding scale' model to rule out blood clots in lungs

Researchers find new 'sliding scale' model to rule out blood clots in lungs

Researchers from Intermountain Medical Center in Salt Lake City have identified a new "sliding scale" model used to rule out potentially deadly blood clots in the lungs, known as pulmonary embolisms, that is more accurate than current diagnostic methods. [More]
Researchers identify 53 existing drugs that may block Ebola virus from entering human cells

Researchers identify 53 existing drugs that may block Ebola virus from entering human cells

Researchers found 53 existing drugs that may keep the Ebola virus from entering human cells, a key step in the process of infection, according to a study led by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and the National Institutes of Health, and published today in the Nature Press journal Emerging Microbes and Infections. [More]
Researchers gain new insight into how motor neurons in the brain die during ALS

Researchers gain new insight into how motor neurons in the brain die during ALS

Researchers look to understand the causes of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), in the hope of finding new ways to treat the disease. A new study published online today (December 17th) in the Cell Press journal Neuron shows that a common gene mutation in ALS generates a deadly protein that may cause the damage in the brain that leads to ALS. [More]
RCC renal function independent of axitinib-induced proteinuria

RCC renal function independent of axitinib-induced proteinuria

Treatment with the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor inhibitor axitinib does not adversely affect renal function in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma even in the presence of proteinuria, a Japanese study indicates. [More]

Bruker Launches BioScope Resolve™ at the Sixth AFM BioMed Conference

Bruker unveiled the BioScope Resolve™, a biological atomic force microscope (bioAFM), at the sixth AFM BioMed Conference. The BioScope Resolve™ features excellent resolution imaging and comprehensive cell mechanics capabilities, and can be used with an inverted optical microscope (IOM). [More]
Research finding could inspire new ideas for treating type 2 oculocutaneous albinism

Research finding could inspire new ideas for treating type 2 oculocutaneous albinism

Newly published research provides the first demonstration of how a genetic mutation associated with a common form of albinism leads to the lack of melanin pigments that characterizes the condition. [More]
Researchers examining new antioxidant-based therapeutic approaches to hypertension

Researchers examining new antioxidant-based therapeutic approaches to hypertension

High blood pressure affects more than 70 million Americans and is a major risk factor for stroke, heart failure and other renal and cardiovascular diseases. Two University of Houston College of Pharmacy researchers are examining the role of intrinsic antioxidant pathways in mitigating hypertension. [More]
Lilly receives FDA approval for CYRAMZA (ramucirumab)

Lilly receives FDA approval for CYRAMZA (ramucirumab)

Eli Lilly and Company has received its third U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for CYRAMZA (ramucirumab). [More]
Isis Pharmaceuticals begins ISIS-DMPK Rx clinical study in DM1 patients

Isis Pharmaceuticals begins ISIS-DMPK Rx clinical study in DM1 patients

Isis Pharmaceuticals, Inc. announced today that it has initiated a study for ISIS-DMPK Rx in patients with Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 (DM1). DM1 is a rare genetic neuromuscular disease caused by the production of toxic dystrophia myotonica-protein kinase (DMPK) RNA in cells. ISIS-DMPKRx is specifically designed to reduce toxic DMPK RNA. [More]