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New mouse model to open door to research on epilepsy, Alzheimer's

New mouse model to open door to research on epilepsy, Alzheimer's

University of Utah scientists have developed a genetically engineered line of mice that is expected to open the door to new research on epilepsy, Alzheimer's and other diseases. [More]
Understanding neuron development: an interview with Dr. Brock Grill, The Scripps Research Institute

Understanding neuron development: an interview with Dr. Brock Grill, The Scripps Research Institute

There’s a big difference between understanding coordination and actually building connectivity. In terms of building connectivity, several molecules have been identified that control this process and a lot has been learned from both genetic and biochemical research in a variety of different systems, particularly studies in the nematode C. elegans, the fruit fly Drosophila and mice. [More]
Three commonly used NSAIDs affect cell membranes, produce unwanted side effects

Three commonly used NSAIDs affect cell membranes, produce unwanted side effects

Researchers have discovered that three commonly used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, alter the activity of enzymes within cell membranes. Their finding suggests that, if taken at higher-than-approved doses and/or for long periods of time, these prescription-level NSAIDs and other drugs that affect the membrane may produce wide-ranging and unwanted side effects. [More]
Study shows new role for protein APC in suppressing colorectal cancer

Study shows new role for protein APC in suppressing colorectal cancer

A study recently published in the journal Carcinogenesis by researchers at the University of Kansas shows a new role for the protein adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) in suppressing colorectal cancer - the second-leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the U.S. [More]
Children and adolescents with autism have surplus of synapses in brain

Children and adolescents with autism have surplus of synapses in brain

Children and adolescents with autism have a surplus of synapses in the brain, and this excess is due to a slowdown in a normal brain "pruning" process during development, according to a study by neuroscientists at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC). [More]
Ohio State, Nationwide Children's Hospital partner with ENTvantage for diagnosing bacterial sinusitis

Ohio State, Nationwide Children's Hospital partner with ENTvantage for diagnosing bacterial sinusitis

The Ohio State University, through the Ohio State Innovation Foundation, and Nationwide Children's Hospital announced the signing of an exclusive, world-wide agreement with ENTvantage Diagnostics Inc. licensing a technology for rapid diagnosing of bacterial sinusitis. [More]
Baxter reports positive results from BAX 855 Phase 3 trial for hemophilia A

Baxter reports positive results from BAX 855 Phase 3 trial for hemophilia A

Nektar Therapeutics reports Baxter International Inc. today announced positive results from its Phase 3 pivotal clinical trial of BAX 855, an investigational, extended half-life recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII) treatment for hemophilia A based on ADVATE [Antihemophilic Factor (Recombinant)], which met its primary endpoint in reducing annualized bleed rates (ABR) in the prophylaxis arm compared to the on-demand arm. [More]
Live cell imaging solution launched by QImaging

Live cell imaging solution launched by QImaging

QImaging™ today launched a new, all-in-one camera package that supports demanding live cell fluorescence imaging requirements. The Live Cell Imaging Package provides researchers with the sensitivity of EMCCD and the versatility of sCMOS camera technologies by combining QImaging’s Rolera™ Thunder EMCCD and optiMOS™ sCMOScameras. Now, researchers can address their unique imaging needs for a broader, more diverse set of scientific applications. [More]
Research offers hope to patient suffering from Duchenne muscular dystrophy

Research offers hope to patient suffering from Duchenne muscular dystrophy

Research at Stockholm's KTH Royal Institute of Technology offers hope to those who suffer from Duchenne muscular dystrophy, an incurable, debilitating disease that cuts young lives short. [More]
Researchers restore missing repair protein in skeletal muscle of patients with muscular dystrophy

Researchers restore missing repair protein in skeletal muscle of patients with muscular dystrophy

Advances in the treatment of muscular dystrophy: For the first time, a research team has succeeded in restoring a missing repair protein in skeletal muscle of patients with muscular dystrophy. [More]
New gene therapy protects mice from life-threatening heart condition

New gene therapy protects mice from life-threatening heart condition

A new gene therapy developed by researchers at the University of Missouri School of Medicine has been shown to protect mice from a life-threatening heart condition caused by muscular dystrophy. [More]
Study could pave way for preventing brain and cardiac ischemia induced by atherosclerosis

Study could pave way for preventing brain and cardiac ischemia induced by atherosclerosis

A recent Finnish study could pave the way for preventing brain and cardiac ischemia induced by atherosclerosis. Finnish researchers have found that the low-expression variant of fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4), which is particularly common among Finns, reduces the risk of heart attack and stroke. [More]
Research demonstrates that African Americans bear heavier burden of DME

Research demonstrates that African Americans bear heavier burden of DME

Research by Keck Medicine of USC ophthalmology scientists demonstrates that African Americans bear heavier burden of diabetic macular edema (DME), one of the leading causes of blindness in diabetic patients in the United States. [More]
Study identifies protein that appears to play key role in protecting people infected with tuberculosis

Study identifies protein that appears to play key role in protecting people infected with tuberculosis

UCLA-led study has identified a protein that appears to play a key role in protecting people infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis — the bacterium that causes tuberculosis — from developing the active form of the disease. [More]
Five tips to make children go back to school

Five tips to make children go back to school

It's that time of year again: parents are winding down summer plans and tightening the reins on bedtime schedules. And while adding anything else to the back-to-school to-do list may seem daunting, Children's Memorial Hermann Hospital has five tips that will make going back to school this year easier than ever. [More]
Shuganjieyu capsule effectively reverses depressive by increasing neurotrophic factor

Shuganjieyu capsule effectively reverses depressive by increasing neurotrophic factor

Shuganjieyu capsule has been approved for clinical treatment by the State Food and Drug Administration of China since 2008. In the clinic, Shuganjieyu capsule is often used to treat mild to moderate depression. [More]
Deep sequencing technique opens up new possibilities for finding genetic causes for brain disorder

Deep sequencing technique opens up new possibilities for finding genetic causes for brain disorder

Not every cell in the body is the same genetically, and disease-causing mutations don't necessarily affect every cell—making these mutations easy to miss even with next-generation genomic sequencing. [More]
Scientists explore chili pepper's effect to develop new drug candidate for pain

Scientists explore chili pepper's effect to develop new drug candidate for pain

Biting into a chili pepper causes a burning spiciness that is irresistible to some, but intolerable to others. Scientists exploring the chili pepper's effect are using their findings to develop a new drug candidate for many kinds of pain, which can be caused by inflammation or other problems. [More]
EGFR biomarkers predict NSCLC response to vandetanib

EGFR biomarkers predict NSCLC response to vandetanib

Biomarker analyses of tumour samples from the ZODIAC study indicate that epidermal growth factor receptor gene copy number and mutation status may help identify the non-small-cell lung cancer patients most likely to benefit from treatment with vandetanib plus docetaxel. [More]
CD157 important in malignant pleural mesothelioma

CD157 important in malignant pleural mesothelioma

CD157 plays a pivotal role in the progression of malignant pleural mesothelioma and may be useful in the stratification of patients into different prognostic groups, Italian research suggests. [More]