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KAUST researchers develop biocompatible nanostructures for use in gene delivery

KAUST researchers develop biocompatible nanostructures for use in gene delivery

A tiny therapeutic delivery system that can control the body’s ability to manufacture proteins has been developed by Saudi Arabia's King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) researchers. [More]
Antibody drug offers new therapeutic approach for treating AML

Antibody drug offers new therapeutic approach for treating AML

An antibody drug that targets a surface marker on cancer stem cells could offer a promising new therapeutic approach for treating acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a form of blood cancer that affects an estimated 50,000 people in Saudi Arabia. [More]
DGIST researchers uncover mechanisms that control appetite during low glucose conditions in the brain

DGIST researchers uncover mechanisms that control appetite during low glucose conditions in the brain

Researchers from Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST) in Korea have uncovered the mechanisms behind the enzyme that controls our appetite in response to low glucose availability in the brain. [More]
New Chromatrap ChIP-validated antibodies now available for mammalian epigenetic research

New Chromatrap ChIP-validated antibodies now available for mammalian epigenetic research

Chromatrap announces that seven further popular antibodies have been validated for use in chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays by their UK-based research team. [More]
Scientist develops way to detect BoNT in biological samples

Scientist develops way to detect BoNT in biological samples

Many know Botox as a trendy way to get rid of wrinkles, but the popular drug — made from botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) — can do more than just fill lines. [More]
Yale researchers compare efficacy of four PD-L1 assay tests

Yale researchers compare efficacy of four PD-L1 assay tests

In a recent study, a Yale Cancer Center team compared the performance of the four available PD-L1 assay tests. [More]
Skin phenotype of pediatric eczema opens door for personalized treatment of AD in infants

Skin phenotype of pediatric eczema opens door for personalized treatment of AD in infants

Researchers for the first time have identified the skin phenotype of pediatric eczema or atopic dermatitis (AD) in infants, opening the door for personalized treatment approaches for young children with eczema. [More]
DNA damage caused by smoking may last a lifetime

DNA damage caused by smoking may last a lifetime

Results of a study published this week show that the effects of smoking on DNA are wide-reaching and some persist long after a person has stopped smoking. The information gained may help improve our understanding of smoking-related diseases. [More]
Ludwig researchers shed more light on key requirement for function of regulatory T cells

Ludwig researchers shed more light on key requirement for function of regulatory T cells

A Ludwig Cancer Research study published online September 5th in Nature Immunology illuminates a key requirement for the function of regulatory T cells—immune cells that play a critical role in many biological processes, from suppressing inflammation and deadly autoimmunity to helping tumors evade immune attack. [More]
Scientists find way to reverse malfunctioning protein clumps involved in ALS

Scientists find way to reverse malfunctioning protein clumps involved in ALS

In the quest to understand the driving forces behind neurodegenerative diseases, researchers in recent years have zeroed in on clumps of malfunctioning proteins thought to kill neurons in the brain and spinal cord by jamming their cellular machinery. [More]
Scientists identify potential new way to prevent chronic urinary tract infections

Scientists identify potential new way to prevent chronic urinary tract infections

Researchers have identified a potential way to prevent chronic urinary tract infections (UTIs). Their research points to a key protein that bacteria use to latch onto the bladder and cause UTIs, according to scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]
Progesterone treatment protects female mice against consequences of influenza infection

Progesterone treatment protects female mice against consequences of influenza infection

Over 100 million women are on hormonal contraceptives. All of them contain some form of progesterone, either alone or in combination with estrogen. [More]
Bile acid transporter inhibitors can prevent NASH in mice, study shows

Bile acid transporter inhibitors can prevent NASH in mice, study shows

Drugs that interfere with bile acid recycling can prevent several aspects of NASH (nonalcoholic steatohepatitis) in mice fed a high-fat diet, scientists from Emory University School of Medicine and Children's Healthcare of Atlanta have shown. [More]
Immune and targeted therapies may be beneficial in patients with melanoma brain metastases

Immune and targeted therapies may be beneficial in patients with melanoma brain metastases

Brain metastases are one of the most common complications of advanced melanoma, requiring multidisciplinary management. [More]
TSRI scientists shed light on molecular workings of MS drug

TSRI scientists shed light on molecular workings of MS drug

A study by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute has helped to de-mystify the molecular workings of the multiple sclerosis (MS) drug Tecfidera. The drug is the most widely prescribed pill-based therapy for MS, but its biological mechanism remains mysterious. [More]
Scientists engineer smallest-reported synthetic virus that may help advance gene therapy

Scientists engineer smallest-reported synthetic virus that may help advance gene therapy

Gene therapy is a kind of experimental treatment that is designed to fix faulty genetic material and help a patient fight off or recover from a disease. [More]
KIT researchers use high-resolution microscopy to uncover how scavenger cells repair muscle fibers

KIT researchers use high-resolution microscopy to uncover how scavenger cells repair muscle fibers

Everybody knows the burning sensation in the legs when climbing down a steep slope for a long time. It is caused by microruptures in the cell membrane of our muscle fibers. [More]
Solid-state NMR in structural biology: an interview with Professor Tatyana Polenova

Solid-state NMR in structural biology: an interview with Professor Tatyana Polenova

My research lab studies several classes of systems. We are mostly interested in looking at large protein assemblies to understand their structure, dynamics and how their properties relate to their malfunction in disease. [More]

Researchers propose new way for early diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases

A preclinical test that may open new perspectives in the diagnosis of neurological disorders. This is the result accomplished by a group of researchers from the Center of Complexity and Biosystems of the University of Milan, who just published their work on 'Physical Review Applied'. [More]
Study suggests interactions between distant DNA regions may impact disease gene levels

Study suggests interactions between distant DNA regions may impact disease gene levels

A person's DNA sequence can provide a lot of information about how genes are turned on and off, but new research out of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine suggests the 3-D structure DNA forms as it crams into cells may provide an additional layer of gene control. [More]
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