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OncoGenex terminates agreement with Teva, regains rights to custirsen

OncoGenex terminates agreement with Teva, regains rights to custirsen

OncoGenex Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced that its wholly owned subsidiary, OncoGenex Technologies Inc., executed a termination agreement with Teva Pharmaceuticals Ltd. under which OncoGenex will regain rights to custirsen, an investigational compound currently in Phase 3 clinical development as a treatment for prostate and lung cancers. [More]
ISSCR calls for moratorium on human germline genome editing attempts in clinical practice

ISSCR calls for moratorium on human germline genome editing attempts in clinical practice

In response to an article published by Chinese scientists describing research that used gene editing technologies in human embryos, the International Society for Stem Cell Research has again called for a moratorium on attempts at human clinical germline genome editing while extensive scientific analysis of the potential risks is conducted, along with broad public discussion of the societal and ethical implications. [More]
Vanderbilt biologists explore how electrochemical connections form at molecular and cellular level

Vanderbilt biologists explore how electrochemical connections form at molecular and cellular level

Every time you make a memory, somewhere in your brain a tiny filament reaches out from one neuron and forms an electrochemical connection to a neighboring neuron. [More]
Scientists discover new way to control inflammation during worm infections and allergies

Scientists discover new way to control inflammation during worm infections and allergies

Research from The University of Manchester is bringing scientists a step closer to developing new therapies for controlling the body's response to allergies and parasitic worm infections. [More]
Findings could help design tailor-made drugs to treat blood pressure

Findings could help design tailor-made drugs to treat blood pressure

One in three Americans has high blood pressure, a long-term constriction of arteries that can lead to coronary heart disease, heart failure and stroke. [More]
Researchers identify potential treatment target for fragile X carriers

Researchers identify potential treatment target for fragile X carriers

Fragile X syndrome, an inherited cause of autism and intellectual disability, can have consequences even for carriers of the disorder who don't have full-blown symptoms. [More]
Study explores innovative approach to identifying successful treatment for HER2+ breast cancer

Study explores innovative approach to identifying successful treatment for HER2+ breast cancer

Ahmad M. Khalil, PhD, knew the odds were against him -- as in thousands upon thousands to one. Yet he and his team never wavered from their quest to identify the parts of the body responsible for revving up one of the most aggressive forms of breast cancer, HER2+. This month in Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, Khalil and his colleagues at Case Western Reserve University proved the power of persistence; from a pool of more than 30,000 possibilities, they found 38 genes and molecules that most likely trigger HER2+ cancer cells to spread. [More]
New method could help scientists spot source of disease-causing mutations in enhancers

New method could help scientists spot source of disease-causing mutations in enhancers

A new technique that identifies how genes are controlled could help scientists spot errors in the genetic code which trigger disease, a study suggests. [More]
Lilly receives fourth FDA approval for CYRAMZA (ramucirumab)

Lilly receives fourth FDA approval for CYRAMZA (ramucirumab)

Eli Lilly and Company has received its fourth U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for CYRAMZA (ramucirumab). CYRAMZA (ramucirumab injection 10 mg/mL solution) is now also indicated in combination with FOLFIRI (irinotecan, folinic acid, and 5-fluorouracil) chemotherapy for the treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) with disease progression on or after prior therapy with bevacizumab, oxaliplatin, and a fluoropyrimidine. [More]
New research shows how fat controls energy levels in the brain

New research shows how fat controls energy levels in the brain

An enzyme secreted by the body's fat tissue controls energy levels in the brain, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The findings, in mice, underscore a role for the body's fat tissue in controlling the brain's response to food scarcity, and suggest there is an optimal amount of body fat for maximizing health and longevity. [More]
Fruit fly study shows that extra sleep helps the brain overcome neurological defects

Fruit fly study shows that extra sleep helps the brain overcome neurological defects

Many studies have linked more sleep to better memory, but new research in fruit flies demonstrates that extra sleep helps the brain overcome catastrophic neurological defects that otherwise would block memory formation, report scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]
Penn researchers find molecular bond between DNA damage, cellular senescence and premature aging

Penn researchers find molecular bond between DNA damage, cellular senescence and premature aging

Like a beloved pair of jeans, human DNA accumulates damage over time, and older people's bodies can't repair it as well. Many scientists believe a build up of damage can cause cells to enter an irreversible dormant state known as senescence. Cellular senescence is believed to be responsible for some of the telltale signs of aging, such as weakened bones, less resilient skin and slow-downs in organ function. [More]
Scientists identify possible new genes that could change benign skin growths into fatal melanomas

Scientists identify possible new genes that could change benign skin growths into fatal melanomas

A Houston Methodist-led team of international scientists has identified hundreds of possible new genes in mice that could transform benign skin growths into deadly melanomas. [More]
EMD Millipore launches Magna ChIRP RNA Interactome Kits for analyzing chromatin-associated RNAs

EMD Millipore launches Magna ChIRP RNA Interactome Kits for analyzing chromatin-associated RNAs

EMD Millipore, the Life Science business of Merck KGaA of Darmstadt, Germany, today introduced Magna ChIRP™ RNA Interactome Kits, which allow researchers to more easily identify, recover and analyze regions of chromatin that interact with chromatin-associated RNAs such as long non-coding RNA (lncRNA). [More]
Exome sequencing helps identify link between environmental exposures and mutational patterns in HCC

Exome sequencing helps identify link between environmental exposures and mutational patterns in HCC

A new study presented today at The International Liver Congress 2015 shows that by using genomic analyses to understand how and when carcinogenic mutations occur in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), it is possible to identify specific molecular profiles. It is hoped that these molecular profiles will help identify which patients would benefit from specific anticancer treatments. [More]
Scientists reveal how breast milk prevents necrotizing enterocolitis in premature babies

Scientists reveal how breast milk prevents necrotizing enterocolitis in premature babies

The immune-boosting properties of breast milk have long been known. Now a team of scientists led by Johns Hopkins pediatric surgeon-in-chief David Hackam, M.D., Ph.D., says experiments in mice reveal how breast milk works to ward off the development of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), a devastating intestinal disorder that affects 12 percent of premature babies and claims the lives of one in four of those who have it. [More]
New study shows initial promise for treatment that may reduce dementia after TBI

New study shows initial promise for treatment that may reduce dementia after TBI

It was once thought that effects of a mild head injury -- dizziness, headaches, memory problems -- were only temporary, and the brain would heal over time. However, while the long-term consequences of head trauma are not fully known, growing evidence suggests that even a mild head injury can increase the risk for later-in-life development of dementias such as Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Adseverin protein plays key role in bone loss associated with osteoinflammatory disease

Adseverin protein plays key role in bone loss associated with osteoinflammatory disease

Adseverin, a protein found in the body, has been identified as the key driver behind the bone loss associated with the world's most common inflammatory disease: gum disease, or periodontitis. [More]
IMIM researchers identify new way of treating colorectal cancer

IMIM researchers identify new way of treating colorectal cancer

Researchers at the Institut Hospital del Mar d'Investigacions Mèdiques (IMIM) have identified a new way of treating colorectal cancer. In the study published in the journal Science Signaling, the team led by LLuís Espinosa, investigator of IMIM's research group into stem cells and cancer, have shown that inhibition of endosomal activity is a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancers with the BRAF mutated gene. [More]
Blocking Slit2 protein prevents blood vessel development that causes vasoproliferative ocular diseases

Blocking Slit2 protein prevents blood vessel development that causes vasoproliferative ocular diseases

Vasoproliferative ocular diseases are responsible for sight loss in millions of people in the industrialised countries. Many patients do not currently respond to the treatment offered, which targets a specific factor, VEGF. A team of Inserm researchers at the Vision Institute (Inserm/CNRS/Pierre and Marie Curie University), in association with a team from the Yale Cardiovascular Research Center, have demonstrated in an animal model that blocking another protein, Slit2, prevents the pathological blood vessel development that causes these diseases. [More]
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