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Janssen announces submission of IMBRUVICA sNDA to FDA for WM treatment

Janssen announces submission of IMBRUVICA sNDA to FDA for WM treatment

Janssen Research & Development, LLC today announced the submission of a supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) for IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration by its strategic partner Pharmacyclics, Inc. [More]
Research: Ageing and depression are associated with epigenetic changes

Research: Ageing and depression are associated with epigenetic changes

Psychological stress and stress-related psychiatric disorders are associated with increased risk for aging-related diseases, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this relation are unknown. [More]
New findings could help develop antibiotics with lower risk of resistance

New findings could help develop antibiotics with lower risk of resistance

Scientists have used computer simulations to show how bacteria are able to destroy antibiotics – a breakthrough which will help develop drugs which can effectively tackle infections in the future. [More]
MMP-3 disrupts brain/spinal cord barrier, promotes hemorrhage

MMP-3 disrupts brain/spinal cord barrier, promotes hemorrhage

Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating condition with few treatment options. Studies show that damage to the barrier separating blood from the spinal cord can contribute to the neurologic deficits that arise secondary to the initial trauma. Through a series of sophisticated experiments, researchers reporting in The American Journal of Pathology suggest that matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) plays a pivotal role in disruption of the brain/spinal cord barrier (BSCB), cell death, and functional deficits after SCI. [More]
Scientists develop promising vaccination strategy to counteract RSV infection

Scientists develop promising vaccination strategy to counteract RSV infection

Respiratory Syncytial Virus causes severe respiratory tract infections and worldwide claims the lives of 160,000 children each year. Scientists at VIB and Ghent University have succeeded in developing a promising vaccination strategy to counteract this common virus infection. [More]
Scientists map DNA replication process at the most fundamental level

Scientists map DNA replication process at the most fundamental level

The proteins that drive DNA replication—the force behind cellular growth and reproduction—are some of the most complex machines on Earth. [More]
NIAID announces license agreement to develop dual-purpose candidate vaccines for rabies, Ebola

NIAID announces license agreement to develop dual-purpose candidate vaccines for rabies, Ebola

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, today announced a new license agreement aimed at advancing dual-purpose candidate vaccines to protect against rabies and Ebola viruses. [More]
Researchers identify novel method to develop personalized vaccines for ovarian cancer

Researchers identify novel method to develop personalized vaccines for ovarian cancer

Researchers at the University of Connecticut have found a new way to identify protein mutations in cancer cells. The novel method is being used to develop personalized vaccines to treat patients with ovarian cancer. [More]
Discovery offers insight on early stages of cancer

Discovery offers insight on early stages of cancer

The discovery of a cellular snooze button has allowed a team of Michigan State University scientists to potentially improve biofuel production and offer insight on the early stages of cancer. [More]
New oral biologic medication successfully treats precancerous intestinal inflammation

New oral biologic medication successfully treats precancerous intestinal inflammation

An oral biologic medication has successfully treated chronic, precancerous inflammation in the intestine, according to results of an animal study authored by an MD/PhD student in the University at Buffalo School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. [More]
Study: Tbx5 protein contributes to formation of epicardium, pericardium, coronary vessels

Study: Tbx5 protein contributes to formation of epicardium, pericardium, coronary vessels

Congenital heart defects are the most common birth defect, affecting 8 out of every 1,000 newborns according to the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. In the U.S., more than 35,000 babies are born annually with some sort of heart defect. [More]
Gold Crest Care Center offers key tips on proper nutrition for seniors

Gold Crest Care Center offers key tips on proper nutrition for seniors

Gold Crest Care Center, a trusted NYC nursing home, urges senior citizens and their families to learn the basics of proper nutrition for senior citizens. The nursing facility's staff has created a short list of key tips for families and seniors looking to improve their mental and physical health through dietary changes. [More]
Eating high-protein breakfast reduces food cravings, overeating later on

Eating high-protein breakfast reduces food cravings, overeating later on

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, many teens skip breakfast, which increases their likelihood of overeating and eventual weight gain. Statistics show that the number of adolescents struggling with obesity, which elevates the risk for chronic health problems, has quadrupled in the past three decades. [More]
Major scientific breakthrough in understanding retinal degenerative diseases that cause blindness

Major scientific breakthrough in understanding retinal degenerative diseases that cause blindness

An important scientific breakthrough by a team of IRCM researchers led by Michel Cayouette, PhD, is being published today by The Journal of Neuroscience. The Montréal scientists discovered that a protein found in the retina plays an essential role in the function and survival of light-sensing cells that are required for vision. [More]
Promising vaccination strategy to counteract RSV

Promising vaccination strategy to counteract RSV

Respiratory Syncytial Virus causes severe respiratory tract infections and worldwide claims the lives of 160,000 children each year. Scientists at VIB and Ghent University have succeeded in developing a promising vaccination strategy to counteract this common virus infection. [More]
Research on zebrafish helps identify cause of unknown genetic disorder

Research on zebrafish helps identify cause of unknown genetic disorder

Research in zebrafish has helped identify the cause of an unknown genetic disorder affecting a boy and two of his uncles, scientists report in an article published October 14 in the journal GENETICS. [More]
Research initiative focuses on microbial characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus

Research initiative focuses on microbial characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus

Staphylococcus aureus (Sa) and methicillin-resistant staph aureus (MRSA) continue to be among the most common pathogens that overwhelm the immune system, causing serious skin, soft tissue and life-threatening blood-borne infections. [More]
Sheffield researchers find vital new evidence on how to reverse effects of Parkinson's mutation

Sheffield researchers find vital new evidence on how to reverse effects of Parkinson's mutation

Researchers from the University of Sheffield have found vital new evidence on how to target and reverse the effects caused by one of the most common genetic causes of Parkinson's. [More]
Researchers define the process of Parkinson's disease using genetic mouse model

Researchers define the process of Parkinson's disease using genetic mouse model

Parkinson's Disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder. In Germany alone, almost half a million people are affected. The focus of the disease is the progressive degeneration of dopamine-producing nerve cells in a certain region of the midbrain, the substantia nigra. Misfolded proteins are the cause. Until recently, it was unclear why damage is confined to specific nerve cells. [More]
SIRT6 protein inhibits liver and colon cancers, but promotes skin cancer caused by ultraviolet light

SIRT6 protein inhibits liver and colon cancers, but promotes skin cancer caused by ultraviolet light

A new study published in Cancer Research shows SIRT6—a protein known to inhibit the growth of liver and colon cancers—can promote the development of skin cancers by turning on an enzyme that increases inflammation, proliferation and survival of sun-damaged skin cells. [More]