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Cyclenium Pharma signs drug discovery and development agreement with Southern Research Institute

Cyclenium Pharma Inc., an emerging pharmaceutical company specializing in the research and development of novel drug candidates based on proprietary macrocyclic chemistry, today announced the signing of a discovery and co-development agreement with Southern Research Institute, a not-for-profit 501(c)(3) scientific research organization founded in 1941. [More]
Global hemophilia market to grow at 6.07% CAGR by 2018

Global hemophilia market to grow at 6.07% CAGR by 2018

Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Global Hemophilia Market 2014-2018" report to their offering. [More]
Drug used to treat TB may also act against various infections, says study

Drug used to treat TB may also act against various infections, says study

A drug under clinical trials to treat tuberculosis could be the basis for a class of broad-spectrum drugs that act against various bacteria, fungal infections and parasites, yet evade resistance, according to a study by University of Illinois chemists and collaborators. [More]

Engineering cell-based, biological devices may selectively kill cancer cells without disrupting healthy cells

​A Northwestern University synthetic biology team has created a new technology for modifying human cells to create programmable therapeutics that could travel the body and selectively target cancer and other sites of disease. [More]
B1/Cdk1 protein which plays key role in cell division also boosts power of mitochondrial activity

B1/Cdk1 protein which plays key role in cell division also boosts power of mitochondrial activity

​An international team led by researchers at UC Davis has shown that the cyclin B1/Cdk1 protein complex, which plays a key role in cell division, also boosts the mitochondrial activity to power that process. [More]
Princeton professor receives Agilent Thought Leader Award to research on cellular metabolism activity

Princeton professor receives Agilent Thought Leader Award to research on cellular metabolism activity

Agilent Technologies Inc. today announced that Joshua Rabinowitz, M.D., Ph.D., professor at Princeton University's Department of Chemistry and the Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics, has received an Agilent Thought Leader Award to support his work on quantitative analysis of cellular metabolism. [More]

Research provides fresh insight into structure of sodium channels

Sodium channels are implicated in many serious conditions such as heart disease, epilepsy and pain, making them an important potential target for drug therapies. Unfortunately, there is still much scientists do not know about the molecules. [More]

Findings could revive use of chloroquine drug in treating, preventing mosquito-bourne disease

An anti-malarial treatment that lost its status as the leading weapon against the deadly disease could be given a new lease of life, with new research indicating it simply needs to be administered differently. [More]

Nora Therapeutics closes $18M Series B financing to expand drug development

Nora Therapeutics, a biotechnology company focused on developing therapeutics to address unmet needs in reproductive medicine, today announced the closing of an $18 million Series B financing. [More]
Study provides better understanding of intestinal pathologies associated with inherited, infectious diseases

Study provides better understanding of intestinal pathologies associated with inherited, infectious diseases

The "brush border" - a densely packed array of finger-like projections called microvilli - covers the surfaces of the cells that line our intestines. [More]

Study reveals factors that contribute to eye mobility disorder

Imagine you cannot move your eyes up, and you cannot lift your upper eyelid. You walk through life with your head tilted upward so that your eyes look straight when they are rolled down in the eye socket. [More]
Scientists discover protein structure that helps common fungal pathogen to infect humans

Scientists discover protein structure that helps common fungal pathogen to infect humans

A team that includes scientists from the School of Medicine at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Johns Hopkins University and St. Mary's University reported the structure of a protein that helps a common fungus to infect the body. [More]
Findings offer new paths towards improved fertility treatments and development of new contraceptives

Findings offer new paths towards improved fertility treatments and development of new contraceptives

​Researchers at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute have discovered interacting proteins on the surface of the sperm and the egg essential to begin mammalian life. These proteins, which allow the sperm and egg to recognize one another, offer new paths towards improved fertility treatments and the development of new contraceptives. [More]
Study proposes new model for understanding how proteins bind together to facilitate cell movement

Study proposes new model for understanding how proteins bind together to facilitate cell movement

Cell movement plays an important role in a host of biological functions from embryonic development to repairing wounded tissue. It also enables cancer cells to break free from their sites of origin and migrate throughout the body. [More]
New mouse study indicates that mutant protein in muscle cells is responsible for SBMA

New mouse study indicates that mutant protein in muscle cells is responsible for SBMA

Sometimes known as Kennedy's disease, spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a rare inherited neuromuscular disorder characterized by slowly progressive muscle weakness and atrophy. [More]
Freiburg researchers discover molecule that smuggles toxins from intestinal pathogens into human cells

Freiburg researchers discover molecule that smuggles toxins from intestinal pathogens into human cells

Prof. Dr. Dr. Klaus Aktories and Dr. Panagiotis Papatheodorou from the Institute of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology of the University of Freiburg have discovered the receptor responsible for smuggling the toxin of the bacterium Clostridium perfringens into the cell. [More]
Iconic Therapeutics completes $20 million Series B-1 equity financing

Iconic Therapeutics completes $20 million Series B-1 equity financing

Iconic Therapeutics, Inc., a biotechnology company focused on developing therapeutics for serious eye disorders, announced today that it has successfully completed a $20 million Series B-1 equity financing from new investors MPM Capital, Lundbeckfond Ventures, and H.I.G. BioVentures. [More]
Understanding GPCRs and controlling inflammation: an interview with Dr. Richard Proia, NIDDK, NIH

Understanding GPCRs and controlling inflammation: an interview with Dr. Richard Proia, NIDDK, NIH

GPCRs are one of the largest families of cellular signalling proteins consisting of more than a thousand different types. They reside on the surface membranes of cells where they are poised to recognize molecules in the exterior environment and then transmit this information through the membrane allowing cells to respond accordingly. [More]
Study: Bacterium that causes whooping cough changes in Australia

Study: Bacterium that causes whooping cough changes in Australia

The bacterium that causes whooping cough, Bordetella pertussis, has changed in Australia - most likely in response to the vaccine used to prevent the disease - with a possible reduced effectiveness of the vaccine as a result, a new study shows. [More]

Research sheds new light onto possible causes of sudden infant death syndrome

Research at the University of Adelaide has shed new light onto the possible causes of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), which could help to prevent future loss of children's lives. [More]