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Study reveals new way to improve stability of common protein drugs

Study reveals new way to improve stability of common protein drugs

Gaining access to important biopharmaceuticals needed to treat illnesses and autoimmune diseases is one of the biggest obstacles developing countries face. [More]
Genetic differences between brain cancer cells and normal tissues could offer clues to tumor behavior

Genetic differences between brain cancer cells and normal tissues could offer clues to tumor behavior

Two recently discovered genetic differences between brain cancer cells and normal tissue cells -- an altered gene and a snippet of noncoding genetic material -- could offer clues to tumor behavior and potential new targets for therapy, Johns Hopkins scientists report. [More]
Sperm tail enzymes inspire nanobiotechnology

Sperm tail enzymes inspire nanobiotechnology

Just like workers in a factory, enzymes can create a final product more efficiently if they are stuck together in one place and pass the raw material from enzyme to enzyme, assembly line-style. [More]
Combination of demineralized bone and gene therapy shows promise for treating pseudarthrosis

Combination of demineralized bone and gene therapy shows promise for treating pseudarthrosis

A team headed by Professor Albert Rizvanov, director of the Gene and Cell Technologies Open Lab, created a gene therapy drug that encodes growth factors for the stimulation of blood vessel and bone formation. [More]
Eindhoven researchers develop patient-friendly method to determine severity of heart failure

Eindhoven researchers develop patient-friendly method to determine severity of heart failure

Methods currently employed to determine the severity of a heart failure are very limited. Researchers at Eindhoven University of Technology and the Catharina Hospital in Eindhoven have therefore developed a method that is very quick, non-invasive, cost-effective and can be performed at the hospital bedside. [More]
Applying quantitative microscopy to live cells

Applying quantitative microscopy to live cells

Microscopy's got a long history. It was developed about 350 years ago for scientists to visualize things they could discern, but not describe. The two pioneers of microscopy were Antoine van Leeuwenhoek, who developed the first microscope and soon after the renowned scientist, Robert Hooke. [More]
Scientists devise new radiation-free probe for imaging molecules in the brain

Scientists devise new radiation-free probe for imaging molecules in the brain

Scientists hoping to get a glimpse of molecules that control brain activity have devised a new probe that allows them to image these molecules without using any chemical or radioactive labels. [More]
Four weeks of prehabilitation may help cancer patients to get in shape for surgery, study suggests

Four weeks of prehabilitation may help cancer patients to get in shape for surgery, study suggests

Just four weeks of prehabilitation may be enough to help some cancer patients get in shape for surgery. [More]
Reseachers identify cellular ‘off’ switch for inflammatory immune response in asthma attacks

Reseachers identify cellular ‘off’ switch for inflammatory immune response in asthma attacks

Working with human immune cells in the laboratory, Johns Hopkins researchers report they have identified a critical cellular "off" switch for the inflammatory immune response that contributes to lung-constricting asthma attacks. [More]
New UGA research finds pathogen's motility activates immune response

New UGA research finds pathogen's motility activates immune response

Until now, a pathogen's ability to move through the body has been overlooked as a possible trigger of immune response, but new research from the University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine found that motility will indeed alarm the host and activate an immune response. [More]
Scientists discover unique genomic changes integral to testicular cancer development

Scientists discover unique genomic changes integral to testicular cancer development

Researchers led by scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute say they have identified unique genomic changes that may be integral to testicular cancer development and explain why the great majority are highly curable with chemotherapy - unlike most solid tumors. [More]
New three-dimensional map of cystic fibrosis protein offers new insights to treating fatal disease

New three-dimensional map of cystic fibrosis protein offers new insights to treating fatal disease

Rockefeller scientists have created the first three-dimensional map of the protein responsible for cystic fibrosis, an inherited disease for which there is no cure. [More]
OHSU scientists identify potential target for preventing and treating Alzheimer's disease

OHSU scientists identify potential target for preventing and treating Alzheimer's disease

A new scientific discovery may provide a future avenue for treatment and prevention of Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Duke researchers modify popular drug-delivery technology to evade immune responses

Duke researchers modify popular drug-delivery technology to evade immune responses

Biomedical engineers at Duke University have reconfigured a popular drug-delivery technology to evade immune responses that have halted some clinical trials. [More]
Researchers develop efficient computational method to create new drugs

Researchers develop efficient computational method to create new drugs

Researchers of the University of Barcelona have developed a more efficient computational method to identify new drugs. [More]
TSRI scientists discover potential drug candidate to suppress pain and itch

TSRI scientists discover potential drug candidate to suppress pain and itch

In a new study, scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have identified a possible drug candidate that suppresses pain and itch in animal models. [More]
Study identifies conditions required to further develop liver and pancreas cells

Study identifies conditions required to further develop liver and pancreas cells

AMSBIO reports on the recent publication in Nature Protocols1 by Dr Meritxell Huch** and co-workers which describes development of culture conditions that allow the long-term expansion of adult primary tissues from the liver and pancreas into self-assembling 3D organoid cultures. [More]
Nature Methods publishes comparative study of leading Protein-Protein Interaction Networks

Nature Methods publishes comparative study of leading Protein-Protein Interaction Networks

Nature Methods published (online) a comparative study of leading Protein-Protein Interaction (PPI) Networks. [More]
Researchers uncover new prognostic marker and possible therapeutic target for Ewing's sarcoma

Researchers uncover new prognostic marker and possible therapeutic target for Ewing's sarcoma

Researchers of the Sarcoma research group of the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute, led by Dr. Òscar Martínez-Tirado, have first described the methylation profile of Ewing's sarcoma, a cancer of bone and soft tissues that mainly affects children and teenagers. [More]
biosurfit announces CE Marking for new HbA1c test

biosurfit announces CE Marking for new HbA1c test

Today, biosurfit SA, the in vitro point-of-care (PoC) diagnostics company, announces CE Marking (Conformité Européenne) for its HbA1c (Haemoglobin A1c) test, the third in a series of tests available on its spinit point-of-care instrument. [More]
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