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'Good' cholesterol turns 'bad' by sugar-derived substance

'Good' cholesterol turns 'bad' by sugar-derived substance

Scientists at the University of Warwick have discovered that 'good' cholesterol is turned 'bad' by a sugar-derived substance. [More]
Scientists develop synthetic amino acid that can impact 3D structure of bioactive peptides

Scientists develop synthetic amino acid that can impact 3D structure of bioactive peptides

One of the greatest challenges in modern medicine is developing drugs that are highly effective against a target, but with minimal toxicity and side-effects to the patient. Such properties are directly related to the 3D structure of the drug molecule. [More]
Researchers identify how Ebola virus dodges the body's antiviral defenses

Researchers identify how Ebola virus dodges the body's antiviral defenses

Researchers at the Washington University School of Medicine have identified one way the Ebola virus dodges the body's antiviral defenses, providing important insight that could lead to new therapies, in research results published in the journal Cell Host & Microbe. [More]

Study investigates consumers' readiness to adopt insects as meat substitute

The most likely early adopters of insets as a meat substitute in Western societies are young men with weak attitudes toward meat, who are open to trying novel foods and interested in the environmental impact of their food choice. [More]
Comprehensive fitness and nutrition regimens may prevent bone and muscle deterioration

Comprehensive fitness and nutrition regimens may prevent bone and muscle deterioration

Being physically active may significantly improve musculoskeletal and overall health, and minimize or delay the effects of aging, according to a review of the latest research on senior athletes (ages 65 and up) appearing in the September issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (JAAOS). [More]
Internal production of hydrogen peroxide can lead cells to exit cell cycle and become senescent

Internal production of hydrogen peroxide can lead cells to exit cell cycle and become senescent

What happens inside cells when they detect the activation of a cancer-inducing gene? Sometimes, cells are able to signal internally to stop the cell cycle. Such cells are able to enter, at least for a time, a protective non-growth state. [More]
Scientists identify developmental on-off switch for Streptomyces

Scientists identify developmental on-off switch for Streptomyces

Scientists have identified the developmental on-off switch for Streptomyces, a group of soil microbes that produce more than two-thirds of the world's naturally derived antibiotic medicines. [More]
Study compares FK506 and rapamycin for Schwann cell migration, peripheral nerve regeneration

Study compares FK506 and rapamycin for Schwann cell migration, peripheral nerve regeneration

FK506 possesses a well-studied neuroregenerative effect, stimulating neurite extension in the presence of nerve growth factor in vitro, and enhancing nerve regeneration following nerve crush injury and isografting. [More]
Factor in cells of naked mole rats protects activity of proteasome

Factor in cells of naked mole rats protects activity of proteasome

Scientists at the Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies, part of the School of Medicine at the UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, have found another secret of longevity in the tissues of the longest-lived rodent, the naked mole rat. [More]
Gene therapy may offer significant advantages in prevention of botulism exposure

Gene therapy may offer significant advantages in prevention of botulism exposure

The current method to treat acute toxin poisoning is to inject antibodies, commonly produced in animals, to neutralize the toxin. But this method has challenges ranging from safety to difficulties in developing, producing and maintaining the anti-serums in large quantities. [More]
Pfenex reports total revenue of $3.3 million for second quarter 2014

Pfenex reports total revenue of $3.3 million for second quarter 2014

Pfenex Inc., a clinical-stage biotechnology company engaged in the development of high-value and difficult to manufacture proteins including biosimilar therapeutics, today provided a business update and reported financial results for the second quarter ended June 30, 2014. [More]
Researchers find method to expand blood stem cells used to treat cancer patients

Researchers find method to expand blood stem cells used to treat cancer patients

A team of scientists from the University of Colorado School of Medicine has reported the breakthrough discovery of a process to expand production of stem cells used to treat cancer patients. [More]
UT Southwestern faculty awarded CPRIT grants to combat cancer

UT Southwestern faculty awarded CPRIT grants to combat cancer

UT Southwestern Medical Center faculty have received 19 grants totaling more than $26 million from the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas to expand cancer screenings, investigate the effectiveness and viability for cancer therapies and radiation treatments, conduct research into cancer biology, and recruitment. [More]
Freiburg biochemists discover new mechanisms of brain disease

Freiburg biochemists discover new mechanisms of brain disease

The failing in the work of nerve cells: An international team of researchers led by Prof. Dr. Chris Meisinger from the Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of the University of Freiburg has discovered how Alzheimer's disease damages mitochondria, the powerhouses of the cell. [More]
Vasopressin more effective for cardiopulmonary resuscitation

Vasopressin more effective for cardiopulmonary resuscitation

Epinephrine has been shown to be a first-choice drug for cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Nevertheless, its β-adrenergic effect probably increases myocardial oxygen consumption and leads to severe cardiac and cerebral injuries; moreover, epinephrine does not elevate long-term survival rates. [More]
Specific foods and dietary patterns help prevent, control diabetes

Specific foods and dietary patterns help prevent, control diabetes

In a comprehensive review of recent randomized clinical trials and observational studies of diabetes and nutrition, Joslin Diabetes Center and Harvard School of Public Health investigators have identified specific foods and dietary patterns that are beneficial in preventing and controlling diabetes. [More]
CTC clusters cause metastasis

CTC clusters cause metastasis

Circulating tumor cell (CTC) clusters - clumps of from 2 to 50 tumor cells that break off a primary tumor and are carried through the bloodstream - appear to be much more likely to cause metastasis than are single CTCs, according to a study from investigators at the Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center. [More]
International consortium to accelerate collaborative multi-site trials of potential Ebola vaccine

International consortium to accelerate collaborative multi-site trials of potential Ebola vaccine

A candidate Ebola vaccine could be given to healthy volunteers in the UK, The Gambia and Mali as early as September, as part of an series of safety trials of potential vaccines aimed at preventing the disease that has killed more than 1,400 people in the current outbreak in West Africa. [More]
NIH to start initial human testing of investigational Ebola vaccine next week

NIH to start initial human testing of investigational Ebola vaccine next week

Initial human testing of an investigational vaccine to prevent Ebola virus disease will begin next week by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Changes in ADNP gene may provide further insight into causes of autism

Changes in ADNP gene may provide further insight into causes of autism

A new study from Bradley Hospital has identified a genetic change in a recently identified autism-associated gene, which may provide further insight into the causes of autism. The study, now published online in the Journal of Medical Genetics, presents findings that likely represent a definitive clinical marker for some patients' developmental disabilities. [More]