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Transcranial magnetic stimulation holds promise for tinnitus patients

Transcranial magnetic stimulation holds promise for tinnitus patients

In the largest U.S. clinical trial of its kind funded by the Veterans Affairs Rehabilitation Research and Development Service, researchers at the VA Portland Medical Center and Oregon Health & Science University found that transcranial magnetic stimulation significantly improved tinnitus symptoms for more than half of study participants. [More]
Changes in body temperature can cause sudden cardiac death, finds SFU research

Changes in body temperature can cause sudden cardiac death, finds SFU research

Scientists, including SFU professor Peter Ruben, have found that sudden death caused by cardiac arrhythmia can be triggered by changes in body temperature. The study is published in the Journal of Physiology. [More]
Big data project: CWRU wins federal grant to develop platform for collection, analysis of clinical data

Big data project: CWRU wins federal grant to develop platform for collection, analysis of clinical data

Case Western Reserve University is one of three institutions nationwide to win federal 'big data' grants focused on developing ways to ensure the integrity and comparability of the reams of information the U.S. health care system collects every day. If successful, the work could create enormous new opportunities to glean insights that help physicians cure or even prevent illness and disease. [More]
Family, cultural and geographical factors influence unsafe sleep position of infants

Family, cultural and geographical factors influence unsafe sleep position of infants

When it comes to newborn sleep, mother may not know best. According to Deborah Raines, associate professor in the University at Buffalo School of Nursing, family, cultural and geographical influences may lead some mothers to place their newborn children in unsafe sleeping positions. [More]
Researchers create clinical pathway to identify OSA in high-risk, hospitalized patients

Researchers create clinical pathway to identify OSA in high-risk, hospitalized patients

Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) remains under-recognized in hospitalized patients, despite being associated with cardiovascular complications and sudden death. A multi-disciplinary group of researchers and physicians at Thomas Jefferson University and Hospitals have created a clinical pathway, or screening process, to identify the disorder in higher-risk, hospitalized patients and recently published the results in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine. [More]
Updated guidelines released for treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

Updated guidelines released for treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

Updated guidelines on the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) have been released by an international group of leading respiratory societies, The new guidelines, issued by the American Thoracic Society, the European Respiratory Society, the Japanese Respiratory Society, and the Latin American Thoracic Association, were published in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. [More]
Lilly Diabetes releases Android version of Glucagon Mobile App to support diabetes caregivers

Lilly Diabetes releases Android version of Glucagon Mobile App to support diabetes caregivers

Lilly Diabetes has released an Android version of its mobile application designed for caregivers and healthcare providers who support people with diabetes. Through an injection tutorial and emergency instructions, the App can help people practice the injection steps ahead of time, which may help them feel better prepared to assist. [More]
Ferrer begins Lorediplon phase IIa trial in patients with insomnia disorder

Ferrer begins Lorediplon phase IIa trial in patients with insomnia disorder

Ferrer, a privately-held Spanish pharmaceutical company, today announces the first patient has been recruited into a phase IIa clinical trial to test the efficacy, safety and tolerability profile of Lorediplon in adult patients with insomnia disorder. The study is scheduled to be completed by Q4, 2016. [More]
Sleep loss makes memories less accessible during stressful situations

Sleep loss makes memories less accessible during stressful situations

It is known that sleep facilitates the formation of long-term memory in humans. In a new study, researchers from Uppsala University, Sweden, now show that sleep does not only help form long-term memory but also ensures access to it during times of cognitive stress. [More]
Alzheimer's disease may be 'at work' years ahead of actual symptoms, say IU researchers

Alzheimer's disease may be 'at work' years ahead of actual symptoms, say IU researchers

The best-known genetic variant linked to Alzheimer's disease may be "at work" promoting deposits of plaque in the brain long before any symptoms of the disease can be measured on tests, according to a national research study led by Indiana University School of Medicine investigators. [More]
ReWalk Robotics unveils latest edition of Personal powered exoskeleton system

ReWalk Robotics unveils latest edition of Personal powered exoskeleton system

ReWalk Robotics Ltd., the leading global exoskeleton manufacturer, unveiled today the latest edition of its Personal powered exoskeleton system—the ReWalk Personal 6.0—marking the company's sixth generation community use product. The ReWalk Personal 6.0 offers those in the spinal cord injured community the most functional exoskeleton system with the fastest walking speed and the most precise fit, among many other key benefits. [More]
Cognitive behavioral therapy effective for insomnia with psychiatric and medical conditions

Cognitive behavioral therapy effective for insomnia with psychiatric and medical conditions

Cognitive behavioral therapy is a widely used nonpharmacologic treatment for insomnia disorders and an analysis of the medical literature by sleep researchers at Rush University Medical Center suggests it also can work for patients whose insomnia is coupled with psychiatric and medical conditions, according to an article published online by JAMA Internal Medicine. [More]
Researchers examine limits of human hearing

Researchers examine limits of human hearing

Are wind farms harmful to humans? Some believe so, others refute this; this controversial topic makes emotions run high. To give the debate more objectivity, an international team of experts dealt with the fundamentals of hearing in the lower limit range of the audible frequency range (i.e. infrasound), but also in the upper limit range (i.e. ultrasound). [More]
Spotting the symptoms of advanced prostate cancer: an interview with Brian Tomlinson

Spotting the symptoms of advanced prostate cancer: an interview with Brian Tomlinson

The main symptoms of advanced prostate cancer can include (but are not limited to) difficulty walking or climbing steps, unexplained pain, troubled sleep and taking pain relievers daily. [More]
Abide Therapeutics begins Phase 1a study of ABX-1431 investigational endocannabinoid system modulator

Abide Therapeutics begins Phase 1a study of ABX-1431 investigational endocannabinoid system modulator

Abide Therapeutics, a developer of innovative pharmaceuticals, announced today initiation of enrollment and dosing of the first subject in a Phase 1a clinical study of ABX-1431, a first-in-class, investigational endocannabinoid system modulator. [More]
MIT researchers reveal key brainwave changes among patients receiving nitrous oxide

MIT researchers reveal key brainwave changes among patients receiving nitrous oxide

Nitrous oxide, commonly known as "laughing gas," has been used in anesthesiology practice since the 1800s, but the way it works to create altered states is not well understood. In a study published this week in Clinical Neurophysiology, MIT researchers reveal some key brainwave changes among patients receiving the drug. [More]

28th ECNP Congress of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology to take place in Amsterdam

Europe's largest meeting for the science and treatment of disorders of the brain, the 28th ECNP Congress of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology will take place at the Amsterdam RAI from 29 August to 1 September 2015. [More]
Increased sleepiness may necessitate cautious PD management

Increased sleepiness may necessitate cautious PD management

Many patients with early Parkinson’s disease develop excessive daytime sleepiness as their condition progresses, a study shows. [More]
UF researchers develop smart mouth guard to detect teeth grinding

UF researchers develop smart mouth guard to detect teeth grinding

Researchers at the University of Florida have developed a smart mouth guard equipped with sensors that allow it to detect if you're grinding your teeth, tell your dentist and even help you stop doing it. [More]

Poor sleep habits negatively affect self-control

Poor sleep habits can have a negative effect on self-control, which presents risks to individuals' personal and professional lives, according to Clemson University researchers. [More]
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