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Researchers identify traveling spike generator that produces brain waves

Researchers identify traveling spike generator that produces brain waves

Brain waves that spread through the hippocampus are initiated by a method not seen before--a possible step toward understanding and treating epilepsy, according to researchers at Case Western Reserve University. [More]
Many teenage mothers do not follow safe sleeping practices for preventing SIDS

Many teenage mothers do not follow safe sleeping practices for preventing SIDS

Sudden unexpected infant death (SUID), which includes sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), is the leading cause of death in infants 1 month to 1 year of age in the United States. Although the reason is unknown, maternal age less than 20 years is associated with an increased risk of SIDS. In a new study scheduled for publication in The Journal of Pediatrics, researchers found that although teenage mothers know the recommendations in regards to safe sleeping practices, many deliberately do not follow those recommendations. [More]
MAILES study finds link between fatty diets and sleep

MAILES study finds link between fatty diets and sleep

University of Adelaide researchers have found that men who consume diets high in fat are more likely to feel sleepy during the day, to report sleep problems at night, and are also more likely to suffer from sleep apnea. [More]
Study explores effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy in primary care for depressed teenagers

Study explores effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy in primary care for depressed teenagers

Depressed teenagers who received cognitive behavioral therapy in their primary care clinic recovered faster, and were also more likely to recover, than teens who did not receive the primary care-based counseling, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published today in the journal Pediatrics. [More]
Non-invasive optogenetic therapy can help treat chronic pain

Non-invasive optogenetic therapy can help treat chronic pain

The potential of light as a non-invasive, highly-focused alternative to pain medication was made more apparent thanks to research conducted by scientists at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital of McGill University and the McGill University Health Centre. [More]
Mother’s misperception of child's weight status linked to childhood obesity or malnutrition

Mother’s misperception of child's weight status linked to childhood obesity or malnutrition

A new study from the University of Houston Department of Health and Human Performance finds a child's risk for obesity or malnutrition may be tied to the mother's misperception of her child's weight status. A key to understanding this phenomenon may lie in how she regards her own weight status. Researchers say the situation shows that healthcare providers need to broaden their health care screenings. [More]
Drexel study provides new insight into future treatment of breathing disorders

Drexel study provides new insight into future treatment of breathing disorders

Bringing a steady supply of fresh air to the lungs can seem like a simple task, but breathing is a careful orchestration of brain and body. [More]

New study links specific psychological, social work factors with sleep problems

A new study found that specific psychological and social work factors were associated with sleep problems both concurrently and two years after exposure, indicating prolonged consequences. [More]
Researchers examine neuropsychological effect in ecstasy users

Researchers examine neuropsychological effect in ecstasy users

Researchers from the University of Liverpool have conducted a study examining the effect ecstasy has on different parts of the brain. [More]
New Lullaby Trust-funded study could prevent sudden, unexpected deaths of babies and children

New Lullaby Trust-funded study could prevent sudden, unexpected deaths of babies and children

An innovative new study funded by The Lullaby Trust is being launched, which could have profound implications for preventing the sudden and unexpected deaths of babies and children. [More]
Study shows noise impairs tactile abilities of premature babies

Study shows noise impairs tactile abilities of premature babies

Premature birth is a harsh change of environment for a baby. Until birth, the baby is confined to the mother's womb, surrounded by soft lighting and filtered noise. When infants are born, they are attacked by several visual, sound, and tactile stimulations. [More]
Scientists identify key pathway that regulates 'switch' between wakefulness and sleep

Scientists identify key pathway that regulates 'switch' between wakefulness and sleep

Falling asleep and waking up are key transitions in everyone's day. Millions of people have trouble with these transitions - they find it hard to fall asleep or stay asleep at night, and hard to stay awake during the day. Despite decades of research, how these transitions work - the neurobiological mechanics of our circadian rhythm - has remained largely a mystery to brain scientists. [More]
New study links high-volume lung transplant centers with lower costs, readmissions

New study links high-volume lung transplant centers with lower costs, readmissions

High-volume lung transplant centers have lower transplantation costs and their patients are less likely to be readmitted within 30 days of leaving the hospital following surgery, according to a new study of more than 3,000 Medicare patients who received lung transplants. [More]

Slow-wave sleep may promote consolidation of recent memories

Research strongly suggests that sleep, which constitutes about a third of our lives, is crucial for learning and forming long-term memories. But exactly how such memory is formed is not well understood and remains, despite considerable research, a central question of inquiry in neuroscience. [More]
Improving body clock could protect against metabolic syndrome

Improving body clock could protect against metabolic syndrome

Essential biological processes are managed by an internal timer or body clock. When the body clock gets out of whack, conditions such as metabolic syndrome can occur. [More]
Harvard University scientists develop paper-based electrical sensor to monitor a person's respiration rate

Harvard University scientists develop paper-based electrical sensor to monitor a person's respiration rate

A simple but effective sensor for monitoring the respiration rate of individuals has been created. Taking advantage of the hygroscopic character of ordinary paper, scientists at Harvard University have developed an electrical sensor to detect the periodic changes of humidity by breathing in and out. [More]
E-cigarette smoking has more deleterious short-term effects on pulmonary function in asthmatic smokers

E-cigarette smoking has more deleterious short-term effects on pulmonary function in asthmatic smokers

E-cigarette smoking is increasingly promoted as a safer alternative to cigarette smoking, but a growing body of evidence points to its potential dangers. Adding to the evidence, researchers will report at CHEST World Congress this month on a study of e-cigarettes and the immediate effects on pulmonary function in healthy and mild asthmatic young smokers. [More]
Low-level exposures to air pollution may affect normal lung function in children

Low-level exposures to air pollution may affect normal lung function in children

Dramatic improvements in air quality in U.S. cities since the 1990s may not be enough to ensure normal lung function in children, according to new research published in the April 15 American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care, a journal of the American Thoracic Society. [More]
New BioMinF toothpaste ingredient helps prevent decay and treat sensitivity

New BioMinF toothpaste ingredient helps prevent decay and treat sensitivity

A new toothpaste ingredient which puts back the lost minerals from tooth enamel and helps prevent decay and treat sensitivity while you sleep is available online and from specialist dental distributors now. It is expected to be available through high street stores by the end of the year. [More]
Bronchial thermoplasty improves quality of life for severe refractory asthmatics

Bronchial thermoplasty improves quality of life for severe refractory asthmatics

Among people with asthma, lower socioeconomic status, education level, and ethnic minority status clearly have undesirable effects on their care and outcomes. Patients with severe disease who attend county (public) hospitals in the United States tend to have less access to resources, which, in addition to environmental and compliance issues, may contribute to poorer disease control. [More]
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