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A virus is a microscopic infectious agent that can reproduce only inside a host cell. Viruses infect all types of organisms: from animals and plants, to bacteria and archaea. Since the initial discovery of tobacco mosaic virus by Martinus Beijerinck in 1898, more than 5,000 types of virus have been described in detail, although most types of virus remain undiscovered. Viruses are ubiquitous, as they are found in almost every ecosystem on Earth, and are the most abundant type of biological entity on the planet. The study of viruses is known as virology, and is a branch of microbiology.
CHEST issues new expert guidance while global health-care community cares for Ebola patients

CHEST issues new expert guidance while global health-care community cares for Ebola patients

The American College of Chest Physicians announces the immediate release of Care of the Critically Ill and Injured During Pandemics and Disasters: CHEST Consensus Statement today in the Online First section of the journal CHEST while the global health-care community cares for patients with the Ebola virus. [More]
Viewpoints: Threat to drug development; GOP's Obamacare criticism tempered; finding doctors for seniors

Viewpoints: Threat to drug development; GOP's Obamacare criticism tempered; finding doctors for seniors

An invasive species has been introduced into the U.S. health innovation ecosystem, with a growing danger of permanent damage to the development of specialty drugs. [More]
Some states angered about lack of authority over Medicare advantage plans

Some states angered about lack of authority over Medicare advantage plans

Elsewhere, Medicare officials consider offering HIV tests for all Medicare beneficiaries. Swanson turned to CMS because state regulators lack the legal authority to impose sanctions on Medicare Advantage carriers. [More]
Study: 15,000 pregnant women show decreased amount of prevalence of HSV type 2

Study: 15,000 pregnant women show decreased amount of prevalence of HSV type 2

In a study that included approximately 15,000 pregnant women, seroprevalence of herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 2 decreased substantially between 1989 and 2010 while there was no overall decrease for HSV type 1, but a slight increase among black women, according to a study in the August 20 issue of JAMA. [More]
New antibodies could pave way for more effective drugs to combat influenza infection

New antibodies could pave way for more effective drugs to combat influenza infection

Research toward developing new antibodies at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem's Faculty of Medicine could pave the way for more effective drugs to combat influenza infection. [More]
Viewpoints: Va. GOP's 'Medicaid charade'; Paul Ryan's health Rx for poverty; giving the sick unapproved drugs

Viewpoints: Va. GOP's 'Medicaid charade'; Paul Ryan's health Rx for poverty; giving the sick unapproved drugs

Virginia lawmakers will convene in a special session next month to address the question of expanding Medicaid and, more broadly, the fact that hundreds of thousands of poor and disabled people in the state have no health insurance coverage. Democrats and some moderate Republicans have advanced a variety of ideas to tackle that problem. Conservative Republicans, who control the legislature in Richmond, have rejected those solutions while proposing no alternative. Does the GOP intend for the special session to be anything more than a charade at taxpayers' expense? (8/15). [More]
Complete analysis of bioseparation technologies for global biopharmaceutical markets

Complete analysis of bioseparation technologies for global biopharmaceutical markets

Reportlinker.com announces that a new market research report is available in its catalogue: ​Bioseparation Systems for Global Biopharmaceutical Markets [More]
Another threat lies in the spread of Chikungunya virus, say experts

Another threat lies in the spread of Chikungunya virus, say experts

While media attention has been focused recently on coronavirus cases in the Arabian peninsula and the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, experts note that another threat lies in the spread of Chikungunya fever, an illness that is transmitted by mosquitoes and can cause fever, joint and muscle pain, headaches, and rashes. While it does not often cause death, the symptoms can be severe and disabling, with no treatment available. [More]
Targeting club cells may help shorten duration of flu symptoms

Targeting club cells may help shorten duration of flu symptoms

A specialized subset of lung cells can shake flu infection, yet they remain stamped with an inflammatory gene signature that wreaks havoc in the lung, according to a study published in The Journal of Experimental Medicine. [More]
Globavir plans to seek approval, launch novel drug for treatment of Ebola infection

Globavir plans to seek approval, launch novel drug for treatment of Ebola infection

Globavir Biosciences, Inc., a biotechnology company developing therapeutics to treat infectious diseases, has announced intentions to develop its lead drug candidate, GBV006, for the treatment of the current Ebola Virus outbreak in West Africa. Globavir will seek approval for the use of GBV006, a combination of Food and Drug Administration approved drugs, through an established compassionate use regulatory pathway. [More]
Aging Japanese population driving high CAP burden

Aging Japanese population driving high CAP burden

There is a high incidence of community-acquired pneumonia in Kochi City in western Japan, which is primarily explained by the large proportion of elderly inhabitants, researchers report. [More]
Assumptions on teen sexual activity result in low rates of HPV vaccination

Assumptions on teen sexual activity result in low rates of HPV vaccination

Probing deeper into the complex decisions that parents and providers face regarding the human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine, researchers found that though both parties appreciated importance of the HPV vaccine, their personal assumptions surrounding timing of administration relative to onset of sexual activity resulted in decreased vaccination rates. [More]
WHO calls for an end to continued attacks on health workers in conflicts, other humanitarian crises

WHO calls for an end to continued attacks on health workers in conflicts, other humanitarian crises

As major emergencies around the globe increase in scale, complexity and frequency, WHO is calling for an end to the targeting of health workers in conflicts and other humanitarian crises, which represent a breach of the fundamental right to health. [More]
First Edition: August 18, 2014

First Edition: August 18, 2014

Today's headlines stories about the pervasive nature of Medicare fraud and the difficulties involved in fighting it. [More]
ITS develops new T cell vaccine to protect humans from seasonal and pandemic influenza A

ITS develops new T cell vaccine to protect humans from seasonal and pandemic influenza A

Immune Targeting Systems, specializing in the development of novel T cell immune therapies, has been developing an exciting new T cell vaccine (FlunisynTM) designed to protect humans from all strains of seasonal and pandemic influenza A. [More]
CDC report blames researcher's haste for bird flu virus mishandling

CDC report blames researcher's haste for bird flu virus mishandling

An investigation into the mistaken shipment of deadly bird flu virus from a government laboratory earlier this year found that a scientist took shortcuts to speed up the work and accidentally contaminated the samples, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Friday. [More]
NIH challenges innovators to compete for prizes by developing new ways to track a single cell

NIH challenges innovators to compete for prizes by developing new ways to track a single cell

The National Institutes of Health is challenging science innovators to compete for prizes totaling up to $500,000, by developing new ways to track the health status of a single cell in complex tissue over time. [More]

Ebola virus outbreak: Equatorial Guinea temporarily suspends visas, regional flights

The government of Equatorial Guinea has temporarily suspended the issuance of visas from neighboring countries and cancelled regionals flights by its national air carrier, Ceiba International, as measures to protect the country against the spread of the Ebola virus. [More]
Cases of Ebola virus in West Africa continue to rise

Cases of Ebola virus in West Africa continue to rise

Since the Ebola virus outbreak was first reported in March there have been nearly 2,000 cases and over 1,000 deaths in Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria, and Sierra Leone. This makes it the most serious Ebola epidemic to date. [More]
Ebola virus disease poses new challenges for healthcare professionals

Ebola virus disease poses new challenges for healthcare professionals

The outbreak of Ebola virus disease that has claimed more than 1,000 lives in West Africa this year poses a serious, ongoing threat to that region: the spread to capital cities and Nigeria-Africa's most populous nation-presents new challenges for healthcare professionals. [More]