Virus News and Research RSS Feed - Virus News and Research

A virus is a microscopic infectious agent that can reproduce only inside a host cell. Viruses infect all types of organisms: from animals and plants, to bacteria and archaea. Since the initial discovery of tobacco mosaic virus by Martinus Beijerinck in 1898, more than 5,000 types of virus have been described in detail, although most types of virus remain undiscovered. Viruses are ubiquitous, as they are found in almost every ecosystem on Earth, and are the most abundant type of biological entity on the planet. The study of viruses is known as virology, and is a branch of microbiology.
Researchers find different immunological profiles in HIV-infected individuals who produce bNAbs

Researchers find different immunological profiles in HIV-infected individuals who produce bNAbs

People living with HIV who naturally produce broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) that may help suppress the virus have different immunological profiles than people who do not, researchers report. [More]
Vaccination against single strain could confer protection against diverse Zika virus infections

Vaccination against single strain could confer protection against diverse Zika virus infections

Vaccination against a single strain of Zika virus should be sufficient to protect against genetically diverse strains of the virus, according to a study conducted by investigators from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health; Washington University in St. Louis; and Emory University in Atlanta. [More]
UW-Madison scientists working to screen mosquitoes for ability to carry, transmit Zika virus

UW-Madison scientists working to screen mosquitoes for ability to carry, transmit Zika virus

It's no accident that researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have taken a lead role addressing the Zika virus epidemic gripping the Americas. Many of them were already at work fighting viruses and mosquito-borne diseases in Central and South America. [More]
CD4/CD8 ratio biomarker could help identify HIV-infected individuals at risk for heart disease

CD4/CD8 ratio biomarker could help identify HIV-infected individuals at risk for heart disease

The ratio of CD4 to CD8 T cells in the blood-a marker of immune system health and associated with mortality risk in the general population-is an independent predictor of coronary heart disease in HIV-infected patients, according to a new study published in AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
New gene therapy shows promising results for treating neurodegenerative disorders

New gene therapy shows promising results for treating neurodegenerative disorders

A new gene therapy approach designed to replace the enzyme that is deficient in patients with the inherited neurodegenerative disorders Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff diseases successfully delivered the therapeutic gene to the brains of treated mice, restored enzyme function, and extended survival by about 2.5-fold. [More]
Dengue, chikungunya and Zika virus infections can be potential health threat to travelers

Dengue, chikungunya and Zika virus infections can be potential health threat to travelers

As the eyes of the world turn to Rio de Janiero for the 2016 Summer Olympics, the spread of the Zika virus in Brazil is a growing concern — but Zika is not the only disease that mosquitoes can spread to humans. [More]
NIAID begins early-stage trial of experimental vaccine for preventing yellow fever virus

NIAID begins early-stage trial of experimental vaccine for preventing yellow fever virus

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, has begun an early-stage clinical trial of an investigational vaccine designed to protect against yellow fever virus. [More]
New gene therapeutic approach could save people suffering from muscle wasting disease

New gene therapeutic approach could save people suffering from muscle wasting disease

A discovery by Washington State University scientist Dan Rodgers and collaborator Paul Gregorevic could save millions of people suffering from muscle wasting disease. [More]
Researchers identify new mechanisms capable of suppressing propagation of HCV

Researchers identify new mechanisms capable of suppressing propagation of HCV

Researchers at Osaka University, Japan uncovered the mechanisms that suppress the propagation of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) with the potential of improving pathological liver conditions. [More]
Study reveals long-term safety of AAV2-neurturin gene therapy in patients with Parkinson's disease

Study reveals long-term safety of AAV2-neurturin gene therapy in patients with Parkinson's disease

New safety data from a study of patients with advanced Parkinson's disease five years after gene transfer-mediated delivery of the neuroprotective factor neurturin directly to patients' brains reveal no serious adverse events related to the treatment. [More]
New screen-and-treat programme for hepatitis B may thwart deadly complications of disease

New screen-and-treat programme for hepatitis B may thwart deadly complications of disease

Research into Africa's first 'screen-and-treat' programme for hepatitis B suggests the initiative may reduce deadly complications of the virus. [More]
Researchers find easy way to ensure baby boomers get tested for hepatitis C

Researchers find easy way to ensure baby boomers get tested for hepatitis C

Baby boomers, adults born between 1945 and 1965, are five times more likely to have been exposed to the hepatitis C virus (HCV). [More]
Scientists discover modified human protein involved in Ebola virus replication

Scientists discover modified human protein involved in Ebola virus replication

A newly identified requirement of a modified human protein in ebolavirus (EBOV) replication, may unlock the door for new approaches to treating Ebola. [More]
Scientists unveil structure of Zika NS1 protein

Scientists unveil structure of Zika NS1 protein

Researchers have revealed the molecular structure of a protein produced by the Zika virus that is thought to be involved in the virus's reproduction and its interaction with a host's immune system. [More]
Researchers estimate total number of people who may become infected by Zika virus

Researchers estimate total number of people who may become infected by Zika virus

New research from the University of Notre Dame places a new upper limit on the total number of people who could become infected by the Zika virus in the first wave of the current epidemic. [More]
Scientists estimate 1.65 million childbearing women in the Americas could be at risk of Zika infections

Scientists estimate 1.65 million childbearing women in the Americas could be at risk of Zika infections

Research by scientists in the US and UK has estimated that up to 1.65 million childbearing women in Central and South America could become infected by the Zika virus by the end of the first wave of the epidemic. [More]
Recombinant antigens and antibodies for the Zika virus

Recombinant antigens and antibodies for the Zika virus

Anglo-American life science firm AMSBIO announces a new range of recombinant antigens and antibodies for Zika virus, which are suited for the development of rapid assays and to overcome the problem of cross-reactivity with related viruses. [More]
Scientists discover vaccine-induced antibodies that can counteract varied strains of influenza virus

Scientists discover vaccine-induced antibodies that can counteract varied strains of influenza virus

Scientists have identified three types of vaccine-induced antibodies that can neutralize diverse strains of influenza virus that infect humans. [More]
Better understanding of HIV latency could be key to eradicating virus, say researchers

Better understanding of HIV latency could be key to eradicating virus, say researchers

A better understanding of HIV latency is the key to eradicating the virus researchers at the University of North Carolina and partner institutions write in a perspective in the journal Science. [More]
Penn researchers construct model to examine how immune system may evolve to conquer HIV

Penn researchers construct model to examine how immune system may evolve to conquer HIV

It has remained frustratingly difficult to develop a vaccine for HIV/AIDS, in part because the virus, once in our bodies, rapidly reproduces and evolves to escape being killed by the immune system. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement