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A virus is a microscopic infectious agent that can reproduce only inside a host cell. Viruses infect all types of organisms: from animals and plants, to bacteria and archaea. Since the initial discovery of tobacco mosaic virus by Martinus Beijerinck in 1898, more than 5,000 types of virus have been described in detail, although most types of virus remain undiscovered. Viruses are ubiquitous, as they are found in almost every ecosystem on Earth, and are the most abundant type of biological entity on the planet. The study of viruses is known as virology, and is a branch of microbiology.
Ebola Virus and Public Health: A special feature by Disaster Medicine and Public Health

Ebola Virus and Public Health: A special feature by Disaster Medicine and Public Health

Accurate knowledge regarding Ebola is critical and pertinent for practicing physicians and clinicians given the current risk of hazardous global outbreak and epidemic. [More]

Poll: Misconceptions, confusion surround public understanding of Ebola's spread

The survey, which was conducted by the Kaiser Family Foundation (KHN is an editorially independent program of the foundation), found that 70 percent of U.S. adults say they are following news reports closely about the deadly virus. [More]
Viewpoints: Examining the U.S. Ebola response, possible solutions, facts vs. fear, and the need for candor

Viewpoints: Examining the U.S. Ebola response, possible solutions, facts vs. fear, and the need for candor

The Ebola cases in the United States show that American hospitals and public health officials have much to learn about effective ways to protect health care workers and the public from possible infection. [More]
CDC, Obama under fire for Ebola containment policies

CDC, Obama under fire for Ebola containment policies

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Chief Thomas Frieden faced criticism Thursday on Capitol Hill over handling of the Dallas Ebola cases. [More]
Scientific insights into flu viruses must not give way to complacency, say researchers

Scientific insights into flu viruses must not give way to complacency, say researchers

As our ability to assess the pandemic risk from strains of influenza virus increases with the latest scientific developments, we must not allow ourselves to become complacent that the most substantial threats have been identified, argue an international consortium of scientists. [More]
TSRI scientists identify long-sought activating molecules for subset of immune system cells

TSRI scientists identify long-sought activating molecules for subset of immune system cells

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have identified the long-sought activating molecules for a rare but crucial subset of immune system cells that help rally other white blood cells to fight infection. [More]
Scientists develop promising vaccination strategy to counteract RSV infection

Scientists develop promising vaccination strategy to counteract RSV infection

Respiratory Syncytial Virus causes severe respiratory tract infections and worldwide claims the lives of 160,000 children each year. Scientists at VIB and Ghent University have succeeded in developing a promising vaccination strategy to counteract this common virus infection. [More]

Key experts to discuss Ebola response plan at one-day workshop

At the request of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), the Institute of Medicine and National Research Council will host a one-day workshop on Nov. 3 to examine the areas of biomedical and public health research that should be conducted to best prepare the United States to safeguard the public as a result of the emergence of Ebola Virus Disease. [More]
IU Bloomington biologists to receive funding from NSF’s Dimensions of Biodiversity Program

IU Bloomington biologists to receive funding from NSF’s Dimensions of Biodiversity Program

Indiana University Bloomington biologists who specialize in the ecology and evolution of microbes have been named one of 12 teams in the nation to receive funding from the National Science Foundation's Dimensions of Biodiversity Program. [More]
NIAID announces license agreement to develop dual-purpose candidate vaccines for rabies, Ebola

NIAID announces license agreement to develop dual-purpose candidate vaccines for rabies, Ebola

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, today announced a new license agreement aimed at advancing dual-purpose candidate vaccines to protect against rabies and Ebola viruses. [More]
Longer Looks: An Alabama Judge's Dismantling Of Roe V. Wade; The Mystery Of Enterovirus; Mutating Ebola

Longer Looks: An Alabama Judge's Dismantling Of Roe V. Wade; The Mystery Of Enterovirus; Mutating Ebola

In the nine years Parker has now served on the court, he has made the most of his opportunities. Child custody disputes, for instance, have made good occasions to expound on the role of religion in parental rights. [More]
Viewpoints: 'Blunders' on Ebola; McConnell's strange logic on Obamacare; temporary victory for Texas women

Viewpoints: 'Blunders' on Ebola; McConnell's strange logic on Obamacare; temporary victory for Texas women

The point of this is not to flog Presbyterian, though a few lashes might help snap [Daniel] Varga and other administrators back to reality. [More]
Ebola worries focus attention on public health leaders; administration bolsters its response

Ebola worries focus attention on public health leaders; administration bolsters its response

With questions emerging about the handling of Ebola patients, a House subcommittee is holding a hearing that will feature testimony from CDC Director Tom Frieden and Dr. Daniel Varga, chief clinical officer and senior executive vice president at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital. [More]

Intellimedix brings new approach to solve Ebola outbreak

Amidst the Ebola outbreak and subsequent research efforts, Atlanta-based Intellimedix is bringing a new approach to the table. Classical methods of drug development involve performing many experiments only to identify new molecules with a few desired effects. [More]
CHLA pediatric specialist discusses how parents can help children prevent Ebola outbreak

CHLA pediatric specialist discusses how parents can help children prevent Ebola outbreak

For many months, the world has witnessed the Ebola virus spread and claim more than 4,400 lives in West African countries. On Oct. 8, the first confirmed adult Ebola patient identified in the United States died. The constant news coverage has heightened concern among parents who fear their children will become infected. Jill Hoffman, MD, a pediatric Infectious diseases specialist at Children's Hospital Los Angeles, discusses the facts about Ebola, how parents can help their children prevent further outbreak by teaching them good hygiene, and how CHLA is prepared to identify and treat suspected Ebola patients. [More]
Myths, misconceptions about seasonal flu and flu vaccine

Myths, misconceptions about seasonal flu and flu vaccine

It's that time of year again. As days shorten, evenings become chilly and the trees start a showy display of color, it's time to roll up your sleeve and get your annual flu vaccine. [More]
Kalorama Information: Experimental vaccine distribution in the UK points to growing flu vaccine market

Kalorama Information: Experimental vaccine distribution in the UK points to growing flu vaccine market

Kalorama Information believes an experimental vaccine distribution in the United Kingdom and other similar developments point to a growing flu vaccine market, as well as a growing market for the production of these vaccines. [More]
Foreign-born residents with low vaccination rates face greater risk of exposure to diseases

Foreign-born residents with low vaccination rates face greater risk of exposure to diseases

Foreign-born residents with low vaccination rates and their relatives in the U.S. are at greater risk of exposure to several vaccine-preventable diseases, e.g. influenza; pneumococcal diseases; tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis; hepatitis A; hepatitis B; shingles; and HPV, the human papilloma virus, which can lead to some types of cancer. [More]

New study suggests that 21-day quarantine period not enough to completely prevent Ebola

As medical personnel and public health officials are responding to the first reported cases of Ebola Virus in the United States, many of the safety and treatment procedures for treating the virus and preventing its spread are being reexamined. One of the tenets for minimizing the risk of spreading the disease has been a 21-day quarantine period for individuals who might have been exposed to the virus. But a new study by Charles Haas, PhD, a professor in Drexel's College of Engineering, suggests that 21 days might not be enough to completely prevent spread of the virus. [More]
Statement on Ebola epidemic

Statement on Ebola epidemic

The Ebola virus is spreading rapidly and to an unexpected extent. The outbreak does not follow the patterns experienced in the past and the virus shows a new disease dynamic in regions, where it has never been recorded before. For this reason, the German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina, acatech – the German Academy of Science and Engineering, and the Union of the German Academies of Sciences and Humanities have presented a statement on the Ebola epidemic today. [More]