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A virus is a microscopic infectious agent that can reproduce only inside a host cell. Viruses infect all types of organisms: from animals and plants, to bacteria and archaea. Since the initial discovery of tobacco mosaic virus by Martinus Beijerinck in 1898, more than 5,000 types of virus have been described in detail, although most types of virus remain undiscovered. Viruses are ubiquitous, as they are found in almost every ecosystem on Earth, and are the most abundant type of biological entity on the planet. The study of viruses is known as virology, and is a branch of microbiology.
Roche announces FDA clearance for cobas Cdiff Test to detect C. difficile in stool specimens

Roche announces FDA clearance for cobas Cdiff Test to detect C. difficile in stool specimens

Roche announced today that the US Food and Drug Administration has provided 510(k) clearance for the cobas Cdiff Test to detect Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) in stool specimens. [More]
Researchers create new vaccine development method for H5N1, H7N9 strains of avian influenza

Researchers create new vaccine development method for H5N1, H7N9 strains of avian influenza

A recent study with Kansas State University researchers details vaccine development for two new strains of avian influenza that can be transmitted from poultry to humans. The strains have led to the culling of millions of commercial chickens and turkeys as well as the death of hundreds of people. [More]
Risk prediction model can help target hepatitis C treatment to patients with most urgent need

Risk prediction model can help target hepatitis C treatment to patients with most urgent need

A team of researchers at the University of Michigan Health System has developed a risk prediction model that helps identify which hepatitis C patients have the most urgent need for new anti-viral drugs. [More]
Researchers develop way to potentially predict future infectious disease outbreaks in humans

Researchers develop way to potentially predict future infectious disease outbreaks in humans

Researchers at the University of Georgia Odum School of Ecology have developed a way to predict which species of rodents are likeliest to be sources of new disease outbreaks in humans. Their study, which includes maps showing potential future disease hot spots, appears in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. [More]
Monash University researcher helps identify right type of Ebola vaccine trial

Monash University researcher helps identify right type of Ebola vaccine trial

An Australian researcher has helped identify the kind of human trial that is most effective for testing Ebola vaccines. [More]
Changes in cell membrane play pivotal role in how HCV replicates

Changes in cell membrane play pivotal role in how HCV replicates

New research from the University of Southampton has identified how changes in the cell membrane play a pivotal role in how the Hepatitis C virus replicates. [More]
DNAtrix signs agreement to utilize Alcyone's MEMS platform for direct drug delivery into glioblastoma

DNAtrix signs agreement to utilize Alcyone's MEMS platform for direct drug delivery into glioblastoma

Alcyone Lifesciences, Inc., a leader in neural intervention systems for neurological conditions and targeted drug delivery, and DNAtrix Inc., a privately held biotechnology company and a leader in oncolytic virus therapy, have entered into an exclusive clinical collaboration. Under the agreement, DNAtrix will utilize Alcyone's MEMS Cannula (AMC) targeted delivery platform for the intratumoral delivery of DNX-2401, an oncolytic adenovirus and DNAtrix's lead product for the treatment of the most aggressive form of brain cancer, glioblastoma (GBM). [More]
UTHealth receives supplemental grant to establish Biosafety and Infectious Disease Training Initiative

UTHealth receives supplemental grant to establish Biosafety and Infectious Disease Training Initiative

Researchers from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Public Health have received a $100,000 supplemental grant from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences to establish a Biosafety and Infectious Disease Training Initiative. [More]
Machine learning can predict emerging infectious diseases

Machine learning can predict emerging infectious diseases

Machine learning can pinpoint rodent species that harbor diseases and geographic hotspots vulnerable to new parasites and pathogens. So reports a new study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences led by Barbara A. Han, a disease ecologist at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies. [More]
Monash University-led researchers call for HCV patients to gain improved access to effective drugs

Monash University-led researchers call for HCV patients to gain improved access to effective drugs

In a letter to the Medical Journal of Australia published today, a Monash University-led team is asking for hepatitis C virus patients to gain improved access to drugs to prevent liver related deaths. [More]
Investing in new hepatitis C therapies may have significant economic impact

Investing in new hepatitis C therapies may have significant economic impact

While a new generation of safer, more effective oral medications to treat hepatitis C patients may cost tens of thousands of dollars for a 12-week regiment, investing in these new therapies could generate savings estimated at more than $3.2 billion annually in the U.S. and five European countries, according to a new study (abstract 228) released today at Digestive Disease Week® (DDW) 2015. [More]
UCB sponsoring several presentations on Cimzia for Crohn's disease at DDW 2015

UCB sponsoring several presentations on Cimzia for Crohn's disease at DDW 2015

UCB, a global biopharmaceutical company focusing on immunology and neurology treatment and research, is sponsoring several data presentations on Cimzia (certolizumab pegol) at Digestive Disease Week 2015, taking place in Washington, DC from May 16-19. [More]
New genomics laboratory in Liberia enables scientists to monitor genetic changes in Ebola virus

New genomics laboratory in Liberia enables scientists to monitor genetic changes in Ebola virus

Army scientists working to support the Ebola virus outbreak response in West Africa have established the first genomic surveillance capability in Liberia, enabling them to monitor genetic changes in the virus within one week of sample collection. An article describing their work was recently published ahead of print in the online edition of Emerging Infectious Diseases. [More]
Researchers receive NSF RAPID response grants to develop computer model for Ebola spread

Researchers receive NSF RAPID response grants to develop computer model for Ebola spread

Identifying and tracking individuals affected by the Ebola virus in densely populated areas presents a unique and urgent set of challenges in public health surveillance. [More]
MD Anderson researchers find significant clinical variations among liver cancer patients

MD Anderson researchers find significant clinical variations among liver cancer patients

Significant clinical variations exist among patients with the most common type of liver cancer called hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), depending on the viral cause of the disease -hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV). These differences suggest that hepatitis status should be considered when developing treatment plans for newly diagnosed patients, according to researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. [More]
ART eligibility shorter for male HIV patients in rural South Africa

ART eligibility shorter for male HIV patients in rural South Africa

Male HIV patients in rural South Africa reach the low immunity levels required to become eligible for antiretroviral treatment in less than half the time it takes for immunity levels to drop to similar levels in women, according to new research from the University of Southampton. [More]
TSRI researchers find interferon beta protein as prime suspect in persistent viral infections

TSRI researchers find interferon beta protein as prime suspect in persistent viral infections

Interferon proteins are normally considered virus-fighters, but scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have found evidence that one of them, interferon beta (IFNβ), has an immune-suppressing effect that can help some viruses establish persistent infections. [More]
Bronchitis can cause pneumonia, says Loyola physician

Bronchitis can cause pneumonia, says Loyola physician

When a cold has lasted too long or a cough is especially bothersome, it's important to see a medical professional. [More]
Major breakthrough in understanding development of type 1 diabetes

Major breakthrough in understanding development of type 1 diabetes

Joslin researchers have uncovered the action of a gene that regulates the education of T cells, providing insight into how and why the immune system begins mistaking the body's own tissues for targets. The gene, Clec16a, is one of a suite of genes associated with multiple autoimmune disorders, suggesting it is fundamental to the development of autoimmunity. [More]
Simple blood test could help predict effectiveness of interferon-based therapy in HCV-infected patients

Simple blood test could help predict effectiveness of interferon-based therapy in HCV-infected patients

A simple blood test can be used to predict which chronic hepatitis C patients will respond to interferon-based therapy, according to a report in the May issue of Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the basic science journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]
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