Using muscle tissue from tarantulas scientists discover how muscles relax

Published on August 24, 2005 at 7:43 PM · No Comments

Using muscle tissue from tarantulas, an HHMI international research scholar and his colleagues have figured out the detailed structure and arrangement of the miniature molecular motors that control movement. Their work, which takes advantage of a new technique for visualizing tissues in their natural state, provides new insights into the molecular basis of muscle relaxation, and perhaps its activation too.

"We have solved the structure of the array of miniature motors that form our muscles and found out how they are switched off," said Raúl Padrón, a HHMI international research scholar in the Department of Structural Biology at the Venezuelan Institute for Scientific Research (Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas or IVIC) in Caracas, Venezuela.

The findings are reported in the August 25, 2005, issue of the journal Nature.

Padrón and his colleagues focused their studies on striated muscle--the type of muscle that controls skeletal movement and contractions of the heart. Striated muscles are made of long cylindrical cells called muscle fibers. Within the fibers, millions of units known as sarcomeres give rise to movement of skeletal muscles. Sarcomeres are composed mainly of thick filaments of myosin, the most common protein in muscle cells, responsible for their elastic and contractile properties. The thick filaments are arranged in parallel with thin filaments of another muscle protein, actin. When the actin and myosin filaments slide along one another, the muscle contracts or relaxes.

Padrón's study focused on the long, rod-shaped myosin of the thick filaments. The heads of these myosin rods project outward from the thick filament to connect with and move actin filaments during contraction of a muscle.

The structural studies were done using tarantula striated muscle, which the team has been studying since the 1980s. Striated muscles from the large, hairy spiders contain filaments that are particularly well ordered, making them easier to study structurally than the more disorganized filaments found in vertebrate striated muscle, Padrón explained.

Padrón and Lorenzo Alamo at IVIC partnered with Roger Craig, John Woodhead and Fa-Qing Zhao at the University of Massachusetts Medical School to use cryo-electron microscopy to answer questions about the thick filament's structure, questions that could not be answered with existing electron microscopy techniques.

Standard electron microscopy requires dehydration and staining of a tissue sample, which modifies the structure of the specimen and distorts its shape. Cryo-electron microscopy avoids these problems by rapidly freezing the sample. Using the new technique, the researchers were able to visualize the muscle tissue in a form closer to its structure in the body than had previously been possible. It took several years to refine the techniques required to preserve the thick muscle filaments in their relaxed state. Even then, the researchers faced mathematical difficulties in calculating a three-dimensional map of the filaments. In 2004, using a new approach that Edward Egelman at the University of Virginia Health Sciences Center had developed to create the map, they soon had their structure. "The new reconstruction was very detailed; we were all amazed with the level of detail that it showed," Padrón said.

The structure provides crucial new details. A twisting, symmetrical arrangement of myosin heads spaced around the filament's circumference surrounds a backbone made up of 12 parallel strands or sub-filaments. "This is the first time that the structure of the backbone has been clearly seen in any thick filament reconstruction," the researchers wrote.

Read in | English | Español | Français | Deutsch | Português | Italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | 简体中文 | 繁體中文 | Dansk | Nederlands | हिन्दी | Bahasa | Русский | Svenska | Polski
Comments
The opinions expressed here are the views of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of News-Medical.Net.
Post a new comment
Post