FibroGen's FG-3019 human monoclonal antibody against CTGF reverses progression of lung fibrosis

Published on May 18, 2010 at 12:41 AM · No Comments

FibroGen, Inc. today announced that administration of investigational therapy FG-3019, a human monoclonal antibody against connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), reversed the process of fibrosis in a preclinical model of radiation-induced lung fibrosis, a finding that has implications for treating multiple types of fibrotic disease. Administration of FG-3019 was also found to improve lung function and survival in this model. The data were presented at the International Conference of the American Thoracic Society in New Orleans (Abstract #A1054).

“These are encouraging data and support studying the ability of FG-3019 not only to slow, but to reverse, the progression of fibrotic lung disease.”

"This is the first time a therapeutic agent has demonstrated the ability to reverse the process of lung fibrosis in this model," said Professor Peter Huber, Head of the Radiation Oncology Division at the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany, where the study was conducted. "The finding that lung function and survival were improved even when administration of FG-3019 was delayed until after the development of significant pathology and initiation of the fibrotic process suggests that FG-3019 could be used therapeutically to reverse fibrotic damage to the lung."

"There is a serious unmet need for the development of effective therapies to treat fibrotic disease of the lungs and other vital organs," said Kevin Flaherty, MD, Associate Professor in the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Michigan Health System. "These are encouraging data and support studying the ability of FG-3019 not only to slow, but to reverse, the progression of fibrotic lung disease."

Source:

FibroGen, Inc.

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