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Acupuncture is among the oldest healing practices in the world. As part of traditional Chinese medicineA whole medical system that originated in China. It is based on the concept that disease results from disruption in the flow of qi and imbalance in the forces of yin and yang. Practices such as herbs, meditation, massage, and acupuncture seek to aid healing by restoring the yin-yang balance and the flow of qi (TCM), acupunctureA family of procedures that originated in traditional Chinese medicine. Acupuncture is the stimulation of specific points on the body by a variety of techniques, including the insertion of thin metal needles though the skin. It is intended to remove blockages in the flow of qi and restore and maintain health. aims to restore and maintain health through the stimulation of specific points on the body. In the United States, where practitioners incorporate healing traditions from China, Japan, Korea, and other countries, acupuncture is considered part of complementary and alternative medicineA group of diverse medical and health care systems, practices, and products that are not presently considered to be part of conventional medicine. Complementary medicine is used together with conventional medicine, and alternative medicine is used in place of conventional medicine. (CAM).
Benefit and harm of vision screening in preschool-aged children still unclear

Benefit and harm of vision screening in preschool-aged children still unclear

It remains unclear whether a special ophthalmological examination of all children younger than 6 years (and potential follow-up treatments) would reduce the frequency and severity of visual impairment (amblyopia) in the population. An update search conducted for a benefit assessment of the German Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care from 2008 identified no new screening study. [More]
Two substantial gifts to support launch of integrative medicine program at Meridian Health

Two substantial gifts to support launch of integrative medicine program at Meridian Health

Riverview Medical Center Foundation is proud to announce two substantial gifts, totaling $10 million, which will significantly impact the way health care is delivered in our community. First, Joan and Robert Rechnitz, founders of the Two River Theater Company, donated $5 million to Riverview Medical Center Foundation to support the launch of an integrative medicine program. [More]
Non-invasive accupoint electrical stimulation to treat Crohn's disease

Non-invasive accupoint electrical stimulation to treat Crohn's disease

An oral abstract presented at the International Neuromodulation Society 12th World Congress today unveiled a new collaboration between U.S. and Chinese into non-invasive accupoint electrical stimulation in Crohn's disease. [More]
Acupuncture-like TENS may be effective for treating radiation-induced xerostomia

Acupuncture-like TENS may be effective for treating radiation-induced xerostomia

Phase III results of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0537 indicate that acupuncture-like, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (ALTENS) may be equally effective as pilocarpine, the current prescription medication in a pill, to treat radiation-induced xerostomia (dry mouth), according to a study published in the June 1, 2015 issue of the International Journal of Radiation Oncology * Biology * Physics (Red Journal), the official scientific journal of the American Society for Radiation Oncology. [More]
Study reveals how attitudes, beliefs of cancer patients drive complementary and alternative medicine use

Study reveals how attitudes, beliefs of cancer patients drive complementary and alternative medicine use

A new study has shed light on how cancer patients' attitudes and beliefs drive the use of complementary and alternative medicine. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings may help hospitals develop more effective and accessible integrative oncology services for patients. [More]
Acupuncture reduces pain, inflammation in pediatric patients with acute appendicitis

Acupuncture reduces pain, inflammation in pediatric patients with acute appendicitis

Acupuncture was shown to lessen pain and reduce the underlying inflammation in pediatric patients with a diagnosis of acute appendicitis, according to a study published in the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, a peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
New herbal tea to treat malaria in Africa

New herbal tea to treat malaria in Africa

Malaria is a critical health problem in West Africa, where traditional medicine is commonly used alongside modern healthcare practices. An herbal remedy derived from the roots of a weed, which was traditionally used to alleviate malarial symptoms, was combined with leaves and aerial portions from two other plants with antimalarial activity, formulated as a tea, and eventually licensed and sold as an antimalarial phytomedicine. [More]
Researchers test effects of light therapy on brain function

Researchers test effects of light therapy on brain function

Following up on promising results from pilot work, researchers at the VA Boston Healthcare System are testing the effects of light therapy on brain function in veterans with Gulf War Illness. [More]
Canada-US researchers to jointly study effectiveness of AIO treatment in patients with late stage cancer

Canada-US researchers to jointly study effectiveness of AIO treatment in patients with late stage cancer

Canadian and American health-care professionals will work together to study the effectiveness of advanced integrative oncology (AIO) treatment for patients with late stage cancer. AIO treatment includes elements of conventional and naturopathic medicine. [More]
RMANJ acquires IVF New Jersey

RMANJ acquires IVF New Jersey

Reproductive Medicine Associates of New Jersey, a world-renowned leader in the field of infertility, today announced the strategic acquisition of IVF New Jersey Fertility and Gynecology Center, one of the largest fertility centers in New Jersey. [More]
New research shows that psychological factors affect treatment for back-related disability

New research shows that psychological factors affect treatment for back-related disability

People with back pain who have low expectations of acupuncture before they start a course of treatment will gain less benefit than those people who believe it will work, according to new research from the University of Southampton. [More]
The Marcus Foundation awards $14 million grant to Thomas Jefferson University and Hospitals

The Marcus Foundation awards $14 million grant to Thomas Jefferson University and Hospitals

Thomas Jefferson University and Hospitals received a $14 million grant from The Marcus Foundation, Inc., which will establish Marcus Integrative Health at the Myrna Brind Center - Villanova. [More]
Experts recommend sublingual immunotherapy for treatment of allergic rhinitis

Experts recommend sublingual immunotherapy for treatment of allergic rhinitis

Sublingual immunotherapy is one of several state-of-the-science treatments for allergic rhinitis, or "hay fever," being recommended by a panel of experts in a new guideline published Feb. 2, 2015, by the American Academy of Otolaryngology--Head and Neck Surgery Foundation. [More]
Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine installs MILabs PET-SPECT-CT preclinical imaging system

Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine installs MILabs PET-SPECT-CT preclinical imaging system

Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, in Fuzhou, China has installed a MILabs VECTor/CT system to boost their neurological research with preclinical Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT). [More]
Controlling acute and chronic pain in women

Controlling acute and chronic pain in women

Despite the variety of effective treatments, and physicians who specialize in treating pain, women often suffer unnecessarily from conditions ranging from backaches to pain after cancer surgery, and also treat their pain with medications that may be ineffective and possibly harmful, according to a review of research related to women and pain by the American Society of Anesthesiologists. [More]
Doctors prescribe fewer opioids for pain as prescription drug abuse rises

Doctors prescribe fewer opioids for pain as prescription drug abuse rises

Nine in 10 primary care physicians say that prescription drug abuse is a moderate or big problem in their communities and nearly half say they are less likely to prescribe opioids to treat pain compared to a year ago, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests. [More]
World-first transitional pain program aims to stop chronic pain following surgery

World-first transitional pain program aims to stop chronic pain following surgery

A world-first transitional pain program that aims to stop pain from becoming chronic after surgery is being pioneered at Toronto General Hospital, University Health Network. [More]
Integrative medicine therapies can decrease pain, anxiety for hospitalized cancer patients

Integrative medicine therapies can decrease pain, anxiety for hospitalized cancer patients

Pain is a common symptom of cancer and side effect of cancer treatment, and treating cancer-related pain is often a challenge for health care providers. [More]
New studies offer hope for breast cancer survivors struggling with cancer-related pain, swelling

New studies offer hope for breast cancer survivors struggling with cancer-related pain, swelling

Two new studies from the Abramson Cancer Center and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania offer hope for breast cancer survivors struggling with cancer-related pain and swelling, and point to ways to enhance muscular strength and body image. [More]
Report: Wide variation in state exchange plans' covered benefits

Report: Wide variation in state exchange plans' covered benefits

University of Pennsylvania researchers find that the variations are significant. Other news about the online health marketplaces that open next month include Oregon's decision to ditch the old system for Medicaid enrollment, a review of navigators' roles in Georgia, and Maryland officials' assurances that their system will be ready. [More]
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