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Breast cancer is cancer that forms in tissues of the breast, usually the ducts (tubes that carry milk to the nipple) and lobules (glands that make milk). It occurs in both men and women, although male breast cancer is rare. When breast cancer cells spread to other parts of the body, they are called metastases. There are different kinds of breast cancer. The kind of breast cancer depends on which cells in the breast turn into cancer. Breast cancer can begin in different parts of the breast, like the ducts or the lobes.
Liposuction to manage lymphedema? An interview with Professor John Boyages

Liposuction to manage lymphedema? An interview with Professor John Boyages

Lymphedema is persistent swelling of the arm and/or hand following biopsy or treatment of the axillary lymph nodes for patients with breast cancer. It is due to excess accumulation of protein‐rich fluid in body tissues. [More]
Young breast cancer patients see body changes more positively after mastectomy treatment

Young breast cancer patients see body changes more positively after mastectomy treatment

BODY image identity varies among women who have undergone treatment for breast cancer with many rejecting mainstream body shape ideals, research shows. [More]
First-ever ACR-led imaging boot camp training for breast radiologists to be held in Jeddah

First-ever ACR-led imaging boot camp training for breast radiologists to be held in Jeddah

The American College of Radiology is partnering with GE Healthcare and King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center to bring the first-ever ACR-led imaging boot camp training for breast radiologists to the Middle East. The three-day Breast Imaging Boot Camp to be held May 23-25 in Jeddah will provide up to 40 practicing radiologists in Saudi Arabia and the Middle East with intensive hands-on experience in mammography and breast ultrasonography. [More]
Combination of existing chemotherapy drugs can reduce breast cancer stem cells, improve survival

Combination of existing chemotherapy drugs can reduce breast cancer stem cells, improve survival

Two existing chemotherapy drugs appear to be a powerful pair in targeting errant stem cells that are making breast cancer and enabling its spread and recurrence, scientists report. [More]
MAAT may help prevent chemotherapy-induced memory problems in breast cancer survivors

MAAT may help prevent chemotherapy-induced memory problems in breast cancer survivors

A new analysis indicates that a type of psychotherapy delivered by videoconference may help prevent some of the long-term memory issues caused by chemotherapy. [More]
Key method to test compounds for anti-cancer activity in cells flawed, study reveals

Key method to test compounds for anti-cancer activity in cells flawed, study reveals

The primary method used to test compounds for anti-cancer activity in cells is flawed, Vanderbilt University researchers report May 2 in Nature Methods. The findings cast doubt on methods used by the entire scientific enterprise and pharmaceutical industry to discover new cancer drugs. [More]
Stereotactic body radiation therapy for NSCLC patients may raise non-cancer mortality risk

Stereotactic body radiation therapy for NSCLC patients may raise non-cancer mortality risk

Researchers have found that treating patients who have early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with a type of radiotherapy called stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is associated with a small but increased risk of death from causes other than cancer. [More]
DIEP flap breast reconstruction improves long-term quality of life for breast cancer patients

DIEP flap breast reconstruction improves long-term quality of life for breast cancer patients

For women who have undergone mastectomy for breast cancer, breast reconstruction using the abdominal "DIEP flap" provides good long-term quality of life (QOL)—similar to that of women without breast cancer, reports a study in the May issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). [More]
Exposure to fine particulate matter in air can increase risk of cancer-specific mortality

Exposure to fine particulate matter in air can increase risk of cancer-specific mortality

In 2015, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) published a series of monographs on the evaluation of various carcinogenic risks. In a monograph on air pollution, the organization pointed out the difficulty of assessing the effects of pollution on multiple types of cancers, given their different etiologies, risk factors and variability in the composition of air pollutants in space and time. However, the IARC identified certain key components of air pollution, including particulates. [More]
Exercise can minimize side effects of drugs used in cancer treatment

Exercise can minimize side effects of drugs used in cancer treatment

Good nutrition and regular exercise combined are an effective way to reduce the risk of cancer and to prevent its recurrence. "This has been proven over and over," said Carol DeNysschen, associate professor and chair of the Health, Nutrition, and Dietetics Department at Buffalo State. "If we could only motivate people to eat better and move more, we'd have so much less chronic disease." [More]
Predictive statistical approach opens door to development of more effective therapies for breast cancer

Predictive statistical approach opens door to development of more effective therapies for breast cancer

Designing effective new drugs, especially drugs to fight cancer, demands that you know as much as you can about the molecular workings of cancer growth. Without that, it's like planning to fight a war against an enemy you've never seen. [More]
New research reveals sliding ability of cancer cells that helps in tumor spread

New research reveals sliding ability of cancer cells that helps in tumor spread

Metas­tasis. The very word evokes fear. Defined as the spread of cancer cells from one part of the body to another, metastasis is the cause of approximately 90 percent of deaths among cancer patients. How does metastasis come about? And can we stop it?
New research from a team led by Northeastern's Anand Asthagiri, associate professor of bioengineering and chemical engineering, helps to answer those questions. It provides an astonishing look at the biophysical properties that permit breast cancer cells to "slide" by obsta­les and travel out of their primary tumor toward a blood vessel that will carry them to a new site. [More]
New gene testing method can identify mutations, prioritize variants in breast and ovarian cancer genes

New gene testing method can identify mutations, prioritize variants in breast and ovarian cancer genes

A research team led by an award-winning genomicist at Western University has developed a new method for identifying mutations and prioritizing variants in breast and ovarian cancer genes, which will not only reduce the number of possible variants for doctors to investigate, but also increase the number of patients that are properly diagnosed. [More]
New class of cancer-driver gene may serve as unique therapeutic targets, biomarkers in TNBC

New class of cancer-driver gene may serve as unique therapeutic targets, biomarkers in TNBC

The discovery of long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) has dramatically changed the understanding of the biology of diseases such as cancer. The human genome contains about 20,000 protein-coding genes - less than 2 percent of the total - but 70 percent of the genome is made into non-gene-encoding RNA. [More]
Study reveals surprising results that may impair future therapeutic approaches in TGF-beta pathway

Study reveals surprising results that may impair future therapeutic approaches in TGF-beta pathway

Researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum München describe how breast cancer cells challenged with a small-molecule inhibitor targeting specific invasive properties switch to an alternative mode-of-action, rendering them even more aggressive. The results may impair future therapeutic approaches in the TGF-beta pathway and are published in the journal 'Oncotarget'. [More]
Derriford Appearance Scale 24 helps identify quality-of-life issues for breast cancer patients

Derriford Appearance Scale 24 helps identify quality-of-life issues for breast cancer patients

A new study produced by an interdisciplinary team led by Prof. Antonio Giordano, director of the Sbarro Institute for Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine at Temple University, tracks the development process and efficacy of the Italian translation of the Derriford Appearance Scale 24, an important clinical tool in identifying quality-of-life issues for breast cancer patients, especially concerns regarding body shame, depression, anxiety, overall appearance and appearance identity. [More]
Researchers unveil a secret to rich milk production in lactation

Researchers unveil a secret to rich milk production in lactation

One of the secrets to rich milk production in lactation has been uncovered by researchers at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute. Their studies have revealed that breast cells develop two nuclei as the breast switches on lactation to nurture the newborn. [More]
Modulation of estrobolome may help lower breast cancer risk

Modulation of estrobolome may help lower breast cancer risk

Investigating disparities in the composition of the estrobolome, the gut bacterial genes capable of metabolizing estrogens in both healthy individuals and in women diagnosed with estrogen-driven breast cancer may lead to the development of microbiome-based biomarkers that could help mitigate the risk of certain cancers, according to a review paper published April 22 in the JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute. [More]
Targeted therapy for triple-negative breast cancer may prove beneficial

Targeted therapy for triple-negative breast cancer may prove beneficial

A targeted therapy for triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), the most aggressive form of breast cancer, has shown potential promise in a recently published study. TNBC is the only type of breast cancer for which there are no currently approved targeted therapies. [More]
SI-2 molecule can inhibit tumor growth in breast cancer mouse model

SI-2 molecule can inhibit tumor growth in breast cancer mouse model

Cancer cells communicate with their environment through cell molecules that pass on signals to the inside of the cell. The signals help cancer cells multiply and migrate, spreading the disease. [More]
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