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Breast cancer is cancer that forms in tissues of the breast, usually the ducts (tubes that carry milk to the nipple) and lobules (glands that make milk). It occurs in both men and women, although male breast cancer is rare. When breast cancer cells spread to other parts of the body, they are called metastases. There are different kinds of breast cancer. The kind of breast cancer depends on which cells in the breast turn into cancer. Breast cancer can begin in different parts of the breast, like the ducts or the lobes.
New Horses and Hope campaign launched to raise $1 million for cancer screening mobile unit

New Horses and Hope campaign launched to raise $1 million for cancer screening mobile unit

Kentucky First Lady Jane Beshear today, along with representatives from the Kentucky Cancer Program, the University of Louisville's James Graham Brown Cancer Center and KentuckyOne Health, launched a new Horses and Hope campaign to raise $1 million for a mobile unit to provide free or significantly reduced cost cancer screenings to underserved populations across Kentucky. [More]
U-M researchers reveal key gene that may provide potential target for cancer treatment

U-M researchers reveal key gene that may provide potential target for cancer treatment

One of the mysteries in cancer biology is how one protein, TGF-beta, can both stop cancer from forming and encourage its aggressive growth. [More]
Brazilian researchers find that nutrition education may help prevent reoccurrence of breast cancer

Brazilian researchers find that nutrition education may help prevent reoccurrence of breast cancer

Breast cancer is the most frequent cause of death among women worldwide, and five-year survival rates are just 58.4% in Brazil, lower than in many other regions. In a new study, however, researchers from Federal University of Santa Catarina provided Brazilian breast cancer patients with nutrition education and found it could benefit patients and may help prevent reoccurrence of the cancer. [More]
Many breast cancer patients undergoing lumpectomy surgery benefit from new intra-operative technology

Many breast cancer patients undergoing lumpectomy surgery benefit from new intra-operative technology

Many patients undergoing lumpectomy surgery at NYU Langone Medical Center for the removal of an early detected breast tumor - the surgical option of choice for this diagnosis -- are benefitting from new intra-operative technology that detects microscopic amounts of cancer cells on removed tumor tissue not visible during or following surgical intervention. [More]
Holding breath during radiation therapy can reduce radiation exposure to the heart

Holding breath during radiation therapy can reduce radiation exposure to the heart

Women who have breast cancer on their left side present a particular challenge to radiation oncologists. Studies have shown that the risk of heart disease is higher in this group of women after radiation treatment because it can be difficult to ensure that a sufficient dose of radiation is delivered to the left breast while adequately shielding the heart from exposure. [More]

New imaging technology to detect cancer during surgery moves a step closer to market

New imaging technology that for the first time enables surgeons to detect cancer in real time during operations has moved a step closer to market thanks to a £2m ($3.1m) funding round by UK medical device company Lightpoint Medical. [More]
Adding Tomosynthesis to standard mammography improves breast cancer screening, reduces radiation level

Adding Tomosynthesis to standard mammography improves breast cancer screening, reduces radiation level

Dr. Lisa Weinstock, Director of Women's Digital Imaging in Ridgewood, said she has added Hologic Low-Dose 3-D Mammography (Breast Tomosynthesis) with C-View 2-D Imaging to enhance breast cancer screening of patients. [More]
Breast cancer risk for women with atypical hyperplasia greater than previously thought, study finds

Breast cancer risk for women with atypical hyperplasia greater than previously thought, study finds

Women with atypical hyperplasia of the breast have a higher risk of developing breast cancer than previously thought, a Mayo Clinic study has found. Results of the study appear in a special report on breast cancer in the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Researchers identify key events that prompt cancer cells to develop resistance to lethal therapies

Researchers identify key events that prompt cancer cells to develop resistance to lethal therapies

A team of researchers led by Duke Cancer Institute has identified key events that prompt certain cancer cells to develop resistance to otherwise lethal therapies. [More]
Whole-genome sequencing can identify patients' risk for hereditary cancer

Whole-genome sequencing can identify patients' risk for hereditary cancer

UT Southwestern Medical Center cancer researchers have demonstrated that whole-genome sequencing can be used to identify patients' risk for hereditary cancer, which can potentially lead to improvements in cancer prevention, diagnosis, and care. [More]
Radiation/chemotherapy increases risk of leukemia in early-stage breast cancer patients

Radiation/chemotherapy increases risk of leukemia in early-stage breast cancer patients

The risk of developing leukemia after radiation therapy or chemotherapy for early stage breast cancer remains very small, but it is twice as high as previously reported, according to results of a new study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center. [More]
Study: Inactivating polymorphism may influence progression of ovarian and luminal breast cancer

Study: Inactivating polymorphism may influence progression of ovarian and luminal breast cancer

A common polymorphism - a variation in a person's DNA sequence that is found with regularity in the general population - can lead to a chain of events that dictates how a tumor will progress in certain types of cancer, including a form of breast cancer as well as ovarian cancer, according to new research from The Wistar Institute that was published online by the journal Cancer Cell. [More]
CDK activity predicts RCC recurrence

CDK activity predicts RCC recurrence

The specific activity of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 and CDK2 as well as a risk score based on the activity of these enzymes can predict recurrence in patients with renal cell carcinoma, study findings indicate. [More]
UTSA, UTHSCSA researchers to jointly develop next-generation breast cancer treatment drugs

UTSA, UTHSCSA researchers to jointly develop next-generation breast cancer treatment drugs

Stanton McHardy, associate professor of chemistry and director of the Center for Innovative Drug Discovery in The University of Texas at San Antonio College of Sciences, is partnering on a $1.9 million award to develop next-generation breast cancer treatment drugs. [More]
Two orphan receptor proteins exert fatal double whammy effect against glioblastoma cells

Two orphan receptor proteins exert fatal double whammy effect against glioblastoma cells

Two related proteins exert a lethal double whammy effect against glioblastoma cells when activated with a small molecule, say researchers at Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center. [More]
Survey highlights need for increased public education on benefits of lung cancer screening in France

Survey highlights need for increased public education on benefits of lung cancer screening in France

A prospective nationwide survey on perceptions of lung cancer in the general population of France highlights a need for increased public education on the benefits of lung cancer screening, the good survival rates of early-stage disease and the improved outcomes with new therapeutic strategies, including targeted-therapies. [More]
New study identifies how SNAIL gene helps cancer cells break free from primary tumor

New study identifies how SNAIL gene helps cancer cells break free from primary tumor

More than 90 percent of cancer-related deaths are caused by the spread of cancer cells from their primary tumor site to other areas of the body. A new study has identified how one important gene helps cancer cells break free from the primary tumor. [More]
Researchers find new 'sliding scale' model to rule out blood clots in lungs

Researchers find new 'sliding scale' model to rule out blood clots in lungs

Researchers from Intermountain Medical Center in Salt Lake City have identified a new "sliding scale" model used to rule out potentially deadly blood clots in the lungs, known as pulmonary embolisms, that is more accurate than current diagnostic methods. [More]
Investigational drug increases PFS in patients with advanced breast cancer

Investigational drug increases PFS in patients with advanced breast cancer

In a groundbreaking study that offers new hope for women with advanced breast cancer, researchers from UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center have published final clinical trial results that showed the amount of time patients were on treatment without their cancer worsening (called progression-free survival) was effectively doubled in women with advanced breast cancer who took the experimental drug palbociclib. [More]
UVA study finds that measurement of breast density better predicts woman's breast cancer risk

UVA study finds that measurement of breast density better predicts woman's breast cancer risk

A new study from UVA Cancer Center found that adding a measurement of breast density better predicts women's risk for breast cancer. Including breast density as part of risk models for breast cancer could support the development of a personalized risk model to recommend how often a woman should have a mammogram based on her unique risk factors. [More]