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Breast cancer is cancer that forms in tissues of the breast, usually the ducts (tubes that carry milk to the nipple) and lobules (glands that make milk). It occurs in both men and women, although male breast cancer is rare. When breast cancer cells spread to other parts of the body, they are called metastases. There are different kinds of breast cancer. The kind of breast cancer depends on which cells in the breast turn into cancer. Breast cancer can begin in different parts of the breast, like the ducts or the lobes.
Weight loss along with vitamin D supplementation reduces chronic inflammation

Weight loss along with vitamin D supplementation reduces chronic inflammation

For the first time, researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have found that weight loss, in combination with vitamin D supplementation, has a greater effect on reducing chronic inflammation than weight loss alone. [More]
STAR tumor ablation system reduces pain from spinal tumors, improves quality of life

STAR tumor ablation system reduces pain from spinal tumors, improves quality of life

Many patients with advanced cancers experience significant pain, and the pain caused by metastases (cancers that have spread to the spine) can be excruciating as tumor growth replaces bone. [More]
New device tracks chemical messages that regulate cell growth

New device tracks chemical messages that regulate cell growth

Biomedical engineers at the University of Toronto have invented a new device that more quickly and accurately "listens in" on the chemical messages that tell our cells how to multiply. [More]
Breast cancer treatment market estimated to increase to over $13.1 billion by 2020

Breast cancer treatment market estimated to increase to over $13.1 billion by 2020

Analysis from business intelligence provider GBI Research - Breast Cancer Therapeutics in Major Developed Markets to 2020 - forecasts the breast cancer treatment market to increase in value from $9.2 billion in 2013 to more than $13.1 billion by 2020, representing a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 5.1%. [More]
Steady rise in obesity, excess weight also signals upward swing in chronic health conditions

Steady rise in obesity, excess weight also signals upward swing in chronic health conditions

Obesity and excess weight, and their negative impact on health, have become a significant focus for physicians and other health-care experts in recent years. [More]
Selective use of biomarker testing for breast cancer patients can save millions of dollars in health care spending

Selective use of biomarker testing for breast cancer patients can save millions of dollars in health care spending

A review of medical records for almost 200 patients with breast cancer suggests that more selective use of biomarker testing for such patients has the potential to save millions of dollars in health care spending without compromising care, according to Johns Hopkins researchers. [More]
Vaxil's ImMucin receives FDA orphan drug designation for treatment of multiple myeloma

Vaxil's ImMucin receives FDA orphan drug designation for treatment of multiple myeloma

Vaxil Bio, a company specializing in the development of immunotherapy-based drugs, reports today that its lead product, ImMucin, has been granted an "orphan drug" designation by the US Food and Drug Administration, for the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM). [More]
Hormones used in breast cancer treatment could affect disease progression, outcomes in some patients

Hormones used in breast cancer treatment could affect disease progression, outcomes in some patients

Recently, researchers have discovered that the hormone progesterone, an ingredient in contraceptives and menopausal hormone replacement therapies, might stimulate the growth of breast cancer cells that are resistant to anti-estrogen therapy and chemotherapy. [More]
New Christian Doppler Laboratory for Clinical Molecular MR Imaging opens at MedUni Vienna

New Christian Doppler Laboratory for Clinical Molecular MR Imaging opens at MedUni Vienna

Today the new Christian Doppler Laboratory for Clinical Molecular MR Imaging (MOLIMA) was opened at the University Clinic of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine at MedUni Vienna. Its aim is to bring about a significant improvement in the prognosis or course of a disease. The research institute, which is funded by the Federal Ministry of Science, Research and Economy, develops high-resolution, quantitative imaging techniques to allow disease to be identified at an even earlier stage. [More]
Study opens new area of discovery for different aspects of cell biology, biomedical research

Study opens new area of discovery for different aspects of cell biology, biomedical research

Every cell in the body uses phosphorylation, the process of adding a chemical tag to control a protein's function and fate, such as when it moves from one part of a cell to another or binds to other proteins. [More]
Study demonstrates potential of new approach for sorting out BRCA1 gene variants

Study demonstrates potential of new approach for sorting out BRCA1 gene variants

Patients seeking certainty in genetic tests often receive a perplexing result. Many learn they carry a 'variant of unknown significance' of a disease-linked gene. Such variants might -- or equally might not -- increase disease risk. [More]
Researchers highlight important factors that impact early-stage breast cancer patients' access to BCT

Researchers highlight important factors that impact early-stage breast cancer patients' access to BCT

The first comprehensive national review of breast-conserving therapy (BCT) shows that over the last 13 years rates of this treatment modality for early-stage breast cancer have increased at a steady pace. However, the review also highlights important demographic factors that impact which patients have access to BCT. [More]
Early menstrual cycle could play role in development of ER-negative breast cancer among African-American women

Early menstrual cycle could play role in development of ER-negative breast cancer among African-American women

Early age at menarche, or first menstrual cycle, could play a role in the disproportionate incidence of estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancers diagnosed among African-American women, according to a study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. [More]
Simple test could help identify genetically inherited risk for prostate cancer

Simple test could help identify genetically inherited risk for prostate cancer

Men with an elevated, genetically inherited risk for prostate cancer could be routinely identified with a simple blood or urine test, scientists at UC San Francisco and Kaiser Permanente Northern California have concluded, potentially paving the way to better or earlier diagnosis. [More]
Heparin market in Europe estimated to reach USD 3,148.0 million by 2022

Heparin market in Europe estimated to reach USD 3,148.0 million by 2022

According to a new market report published by Transparency Market Research Heparin Market - Europe Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends and Forecast, 2014 - 2022" the Heparin Market Europe was valued at USD 2,004.5 million in 2013 and is estimated to reach USD 3,148.0 million by 2022 growing with a CAGR of 5.2% from 2014 to 2022. [More]
ALK1 protein determines the extent of breast tumour's spread in the body

ALK1 protein determines the extent of breast tumour's spread in the body

For breast cancer to be fatal, the tumour has to send out metastases to other parts of the body. The cancer cells are spread via the blood vessels, and a research team at Lund University in Sweden has now proven that the protein ALK1 determines the extent of the tumour's spread in the body. [More]
Nanoplatform technology that detects early stages of cancer receives U.S. patent

Nanoplatform technology that detects early stages of cancer receives U.S. patent

A U.S. patent has been awarded to a Kansas State University technology that quickly detects the early stages of cancer before physical symptoms ever appear. [More]
DAPK1 protein may be a promising new therapeutic target for most aggressive breast cancers

DAPK1 protein may be a promising new therapeutic target for most aggressive breast cancers

Although traditionally understood to induce death in cancer cells, researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have discovered that the DAPK1 protein is actually essential for growth in breast and other cancers with mutations in the TP53 gene. This discovery indicates DAPK1 may be a promising new therapeutic target for many of the most aggressive cancers. [More]
Study explores role of ALK1 protein in breast cancer metastasis

Study explores role of ALK1 protein in breast cancer metastasis

Pietras said that although prognosis for breast cancer is relatively good when detected in its early stages, metastatic disease is the cause of 90 percent of all cancer-related deaths. Therefore, learning more about the metastatic process and finding new cures to inhibit disease spread is at the center of clinical attention. [More]
Researchers identify gene variant that makes breast cancer cells more aggressive

Researchers identify gene variant that makes breast cancer cells more aggressive

A particular human gene variant makes breast cancer cells more aggressive. Not only are these more resistant to chemotherapy but also leave the primary tumour and establish themselves in other parts of the body in the form of metastases. An international group of researchers led by Lukas Kenner of MedUni Vienna has now identified a gene, AF1q, as being substantially responsible for this and recognized it as a possible starting point for more accurate diagnosis and potential targeted therapeutic approaches. [More]
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