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Breast cancer is cancer that forms in tissues of the breast, usually the ducts (tubes that carry milk to the nipple) and lobules (glands that make milk). It occurs in both men and women, although male breast cancer is rare. When breast cancer cells spread to other parts of the body, they are called metastases. There are different kinds of breast cancer. The kind of breast cancer depends on which cells in the breast turn into cancer. Breast cancer can begin in different parts of the breast, like the ducts or the lobes.
UCLA study questions value of BRCA genetic testing in general population

UCLA study questions value of BRCA genetic testing in general population

Women who are carriers of mutated BRCA genes are known to have a significantly higher risk for developing breast and ovarian cancers than those who don't have the mutations. [More]
Free e-book provides advice for lowering breast cancer risk at every stage of life

Free e-book provides advice for lowering breast cancer risk at every stage of life

Surprisingly, preventing breast cancer can begin as early as age 2. Eating right, being physically active and keeping weight in check - even at a young age - can substantially lower breast cancer risk. [More]
Acupuncture may be a viable treatment for women experiencing hot flashes

Acupuncture may be a viable treatment for women experiencing hot flashes

Acupuncture may be a viable treatment for women experiencing hot flashes as a result of estrogen-targeting therapies to treat breast cancer, according to a new study from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Hot flashes are particularly severe and frequent in breast cancer survivors, but current FDA-approved remedies for these unpleasant episodes, such as hormone replacement therapies are off-limits to breast cancer survivors because they include estrogen. [More]
Acupuncture: A viable treatment for breast cancer survivors experiencing hot flashes

Acupuncture: A viable treatment for breast cancer survivors experiencing hot flashes

Acupuncture may be a viable treatment for women experiencing hot flashes as a result of estrogen-targeting therapies to treat breast cancer, according to a new study from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Hot flashes are particularly severe and frequent in breast cancer survivors, but current FDA-approved remedies for these unpleasant episodes, such as hormone replacement therapies are off-limits to breast cancer survivors because they include estrogen. [More]
HUYA Bioscience International expands HBI-8000 clinical trials for breast cancer

HUYA Bioscience International expands HBI-8000 clinical trials for breast cancer

HUYA Bioscience International (HUYA) today announced expanding clinical trials with its lead cancer drug, HBI-8000, starting with a Phase 1 combination trial in support of a breast cancer program to be conducted in the United States. [More]
More men with breast cancer are opting for double mastectomy

More men with breast cancer are opting for double mastectomy

The number of men with invasive cancer in one breast who undergo surgery to remove both breasts is on the rise, according to a new report published in JAMA Surgery. [More]
Double mastectomies on the rise in men with breast cancer, new report finds

Double mastectomies on the rise in men with breast cancer, new report finds

The number of men with breast cancer who undergo surgery to remove the unaffected breast has risen sharply, according to a new report by American Cancer Society and Dana Farber Cancer Institute researchers. The report, appearing in JAMA Surgery, is the first to identify the trend, which mirrors a trend seen in U.S. women over the past two decades. [More]
Study reveals presence of new genetic mutation in melanoma cancer cells

Study reveals presence of new genetic mutation in melanoma cancer cells

There is strong evidence that the protein complex APC/C may function as a tumor suppressor in multiple cancers including lymphoma, colorectal and breast cancer, and now melanoma. A new study has revealed that a genetic mutation leading to repression of a specific protein, Cdh1, which interacts with APC/C, is present in melanoma cancer cells. [More]
New NIH grants support research that combines DNA sequence information and electronic medical records

New NIH grants support research that combines DNA sequence information and electronic medical records

A dozen awards from the National Institutes of Health will support research that incorporates DNA sequence information into electronic medical records. The goal of research conducted by the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) network is to better understand the genomic basis of disease and to tailor medical care to individual patients based on their genomic differences. [More]
Affinity tuning can make CAR T cells spare normal cells and attack cancer cells

Affinity tuning can make CAR T cells spare normal cells and attack cancer cells

A new development in engineering chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells, called affinity tuning, can make the CAR T cells spare normal cells and better recognize and attack cancer cells, which may help lower the toxicity associated with this type of immunotherapy when used against solid tumors, according to a preclinical study. [More]
UCSF-led team develops new technique to create tiny models of human tissues

UCSF-led team develops new technique to create tiny models of human tissues

A UCSF-led team has developed a technique to build tiny models of human tissues, called organoids, more precisely than ever before using a process that turns human cells into a biological equivalent of LEGO bricks. These mini-tissues in a dish can be used to study how particular structural features of tissue affect normal growth or go awry in cancer. They could be used for therapeutic drug screening and to help teach researchers how to grow whole human organs. [More]
MACC1 gene can help predict better treatment options for patients with Klatskin carcinoma

MACC1 gene can help predict better treatment options for patients with Klatskin carcinoma

Bile duct cancer is rare and is usually detected too late. Often only extensive liver surgery can help or, in rare cases, liver transplantation. But which patients will benefit from surgery and which will not, because their risk of cancer recurrence is too high? With the oncogene MACC1 as a biomarker, physicians for the first time have a tool to decide which treatment option is best for patients with Klatskin carcinoma, one type of bile duct cancer. [More]
Innovative research project explores impact of healthy weight and lifestyle in breast cancer survivors

Innovative research project explores impact of healthy weight and lifestyle in breast cancer survivors

An innovative, yearlong research project to determine whether a healthy weight and lifestyle can improve the quality of life for breast cancer survivors is underway at a Topeka, Kansas cancer center. [More]
Brain tumor is not always the death sentence

Brain tumor is not always the death sentence

Only half of brain cancers actually start in the brain. The rest - as in the case of former president Jimmy Carter - are metastatic tumors from cancer that originated elsewhere in the body. [More]
Synthetic tissue environment enables spatial definition of cancer cells and macrophages

Synthetic tissue environment enables spatial definition of cancer cells and macrophages

Tumors are notoriously difficult to study in their natural habitat - body tissues - but a new synthetic tissue environment may give cancer researchers the next-best look at tumor growth and behavior. [More]
Fetal microchimerism could be a subtle and dizzyingly complex puzzle

Fetal microchimerism could be a subtle and dizzyingly complex puzzle

Parents go to great lengths to ensure the health and well-being of their developing offspring. The favor, however, may not always be returned. [More]
OU and Mercy receive $2.5 million grant to develop new short-term breast cancer risk prediction models

OU and Mercy receive $2.5 million grant to develop new short-term breast cancer risk prediction models

The University of Oklahoma and Mercy Hospital Oklahoma City are developing new short-term breast cancer risk prediction models that aim to help increase cancer detection of breast magnetic resonance imaging screening. [More]
Genetic test that predicts recurrence of breast cancer may impact use of chemotherapy

Genetic test that predicts recurrence of breast cancer may impact use of chemotherapy

A genetic test that helps predict whether some women's breast cancer will recur might influence how chemotherapy is used, according to a study from Duke Medicine. [More]
New test predicts breast cancer relapse months in advance

New test predicts breast cancer relapse months in advance

UK-based researchers have developed a blood test that can predict whether patients with breast cancer will experience a relapse after receiving treatment, months before tumors are visible using hospital scans. [More]
Cornell study reveals how obesity changes consistency of breast tissue

Cornell study reveals how obesity changes consistency of breast tissue

Women who are obese have a higher risk and a worse prognosis for breast cancer, but the reasons why remain unclear. A Cornell study published this month in Science Translational Medicine explains how obesity changes the consistency of breast tissue in ways that are similar to tumors, thereby promoting disease. [More]
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