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Breast cancer is cancer that forms in tissues of the breast, usually the ducts (tubes that carry milk to the nipple) and lobules (glands that make milk). It occurs in both men and women, although male breast cancer is rare. When breast cancer cells spread to other parts of the body, they are called metastases. There are different kinds of breast cancer. The kind of breast cancer depends on which cells in the breast turn into cancer. Breast cancer can begin in different parts of the breast, like the ducts or the lobes.
Meditation reduces anxiety, pain and fatigue in women undergoing breast cancer biopsies

Meditation reduces anxiety, pain and fatigue in women undergoing breast cancer biopsies

Meditation eases anxiety, fatigue and pain for women undergoing breast cancer biopsies, according to researchers at the Duke Cancer Institute. They also found that music is effective, but to a lesser extent. [More]
Missouri S&T researcher comes up with patented breast cancer screening device

Missouri S&T researcher comes up with patented breast cancer screening device

Cancer screening could soon be as simple as giving a urine sample using a patented device developed by a Missouri University of Science and Technology researcher. This week, Wyoming-based Cancer.im Inc., a Viratech Corp. company and social network for cancer patients, survivors and caretakers, announced an agreement with Missouri S&T to commercialize the device. [More]
Molecular imaging and radiochemistry: the importance of instrumentation. An interview with Professor Björn Wängler

Molecular imaging and radiochemistry: the importance of instrumentation. An interview with Professor Björn Wängler

I’m Björn Wängler, Professor for Molecular Imaging and Radiochemistry at the medical faculty Mannheim of Heidelberg University. I’m a radiopharmaceutical chemist by background and completed my PhD in 2004 at the University of Mainz. [More]
UC Davis researchers develop Hepatitis virus-like particles to target breast cancer

UC Davis researchers develop Hepatitis virus-like particles to target breast cancer

UC Davis researchers have developed a way to use the empty shell of a Hepatitis E virus to carry vaccines or drugs into the body. The technique has been tested in rodents as a way to target breast cancer, and is available for commercial licensing through UC Davis Office of Research. [More]
New research identifies key enzyme linked to age-related increases in cancer and inflammation

New research identifies key enzyme linked to age-related increases in cancer and inflammation

For the first time, researchers have shown that an enzyme key to regulating gene expression -- and also an oncogene when mutated -- is critical for the expression of numerous inflammatory compounds that have been implicated in age-related increases in cancer and tissue degeneration, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
NJHF awards 30 grants for NJ researchers working on health-related research

NJHF awards 30 grants for NJ researchers working on health-related research

New Jersey Health Foundation has awarded 30 grants totaling more than $1 million for researchers in New Jersey who are working on health-related research that demonstrates exciting potential. [More]
Height affects risk of major non-communicable diseases

Height affects risk of major non-communicable diseases

Height is largely genetically determined, but in recent decades the height of children and adults has steadily increased throughout the world: In adulthood the children are almost always significantly taller than their parents. [More]
New Brown School study examines health-related quality of life for breast cancer survivors

New Brown School study examines health-related quality of life for breast cancer survivors

Breast cancer takes a daunting toll on all women, but it hits younger women especially hard, finds a new study from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis. [More]
'Junk' DNA suppresses breast cancer

'Junk' DNA suppresses breast cancer

Supposed "junk" DNA, found in between genes, plays a role in suppressing cancer, according to new research by Universities of Bath and Cambridge. [More]
Study provides new insights into breast cancer metastasis

Study provides new insights into breast cancer metastasis

It has long been thought that cancer metastasizes, or spreads, when a single cancer cell escapes from the original tumor, travels through the bloodstream and sets up shop in distant organs. However, a growing body of evidence suggests that these bad actors don't travel alone; instead they migrate through the body in cellular clusters, like gangs. [More]
Women who eat more high-fiber foods during young adulthood may have lower breast cancer risk

Women who eat more high-fiber foods during young adulthood may have lower breast cancer risk

Women who eat more high-fiber foods during adolescence and young adulthood--especially lots of fruits and vegetables--may have significantly lower breast cancer risk than those who eat less dietary fiber when young, according to a new large-scale study led by researchers at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. [More]
Frequent consumption of nuts may reduce risk of breast, colon, pancreatic and lung cancer

Frequent consumption of nuts may reduce risk of breast, colon, pancreatic and lung cancer

Adding nuts to your diet is associated to a reduction in the risk of cancer. This is the main conclusion of multiple studies that have shown that eating 2 or 3 servings per week (57-84 g) of nuts is associated to a reduction in the risk of some types of cancer (breast, colon, pancreatic and lung cancer). [More]
Lipofilling safe for breast reconstruction

Lipofilling safe for breast reconstruction

For women undergoing breast cancer surgery, a technique called lipofilling—using the patient's own fat cells to optimize the results of breast reconstruction—does not increase the risk of recurrent breast cancer, reports a study in the February issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. [More]
Certain ethnicities diagnosed with colorectal cancer at younger ages

Certain ethnicities diagnosed with colorectal cancer at younger ages

Even though the possibilities of colorectal cancer increases with age, a new study found that certain ethnicities are starting to be diagnosed with the condition at younger ages than ever before. [More]
Increased breastfeeding could save over 800000 children’s lives annually

Increased breastfeeding could save over 800000 children’s lives annually

Just 1 in 5 children in high-income countries are breastfed to 12 months, whilst only 1 in 3 children in low and middle-income countries are exclusively breastfed for the first 6 months. [More]

Mistrust toward cancer treatment and health care system persists among African Americans

Mistrust toward breast cancer treatment and the health care system at large were expressed by African Americans who participated in Chicago focus groups, suggests new research led by an expert on the health of vulnerable populations at the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis. [More]
Eisai's Halaven receives FDA approval for treatment of patients with metastatic liposarcoma

Eisai's Halaven receives FDA approval for treatment of patients with metastatic liposarcoma

Eisai Inc. announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Halaven (eribulin mesylate) Injection (0.5 mg per mL) for the treatment of patients with unresectable or metastatic liposarcoma who have received a prior anthracycline-containing regimen. [More]

One-third of British adults not checking for signs of treatable health conditions

New research has revealed that motorists pay more attention to their bumpers than their bumps with a new study revealing that a third of British adults (33 per cent) are not checking themselves as much as medically recommended for signs of treatable health conditions including breast cancer and testicular cancer. [More]
Costs of lower cognitive ability linked with not breastfeeding amount to over $300 billion each year

Costs of lower cognitive ability linked with not breastfeeding amount to over $300 billion each year

When countries, rich or poor, support breastfeeding through meaningful investments and programs, it has an impact on their bottom line and the health of women and children. The Lancet Breastfeeding Series, released today, finds that globally, the costs of lower cognitive ability associated with not breastfeeding amount to more than $300 billion each year, a figure comparable to the entire global pharmaceutical market. [More]
Mutation or amplification of HER2 gene may lead to lung cancer

Mutation or amplification of HER2 gene may lead to lung cancer

A joint study by University of Colorado Cancer Center and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center published in the Journal of Thoracic Oncology shows two distinct causes of HER2 activation in lung cancer: mutation of the gene and amplification of the gene. [More]
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